Honors in Discovery

Honors students fulfill some of their UNH Discovery requirements with Honors Discovery courses.

 

Honors Discovery courses...

  • are open only to Honors students
  • are smaller and more discussion-based
  • provide students with opportunities to interact closely with faculty and get to know their peers in an engaged, intellectual community

 

The courses offered change every semester so keep a lookout for things that look interesting!

 

    Spring 2023 HONORS DISCOVERY COURSES

       Details, FAQs, and more

       What do honors students say about their discovery courses?

       

      Plan Your Honors in Discovery Path

      REQUIREMENTS: 16 credits of Honors Discovery Courses.

      In almost all cases, these classes can overlap with your general discovery requirements and generally do not add extra course requirements.

      Of those 16 credits, at least 8 must be from Honors Seminar courses and no more than 4 can be non-Honors courses that the student designates as Honors. 

      Discovery Requirements

       

       


       

      Click the menus below to learn more about the different options for Honors in Discovery.

      Seminars are small, highly-interactive, and research-oriented. Each semester the Honors Program offers a new group of seminars in which timely special topics cover a wide range of disciplines. When you see one that interests you—take it!  It may not come around again.

      Seminars are based on collaboration and intellectual community. Students in the Honors Program should aim to take at least one seminar their first year to build their own community of learners.

      Some current or recent Symposia include: 

      HIST 444J: Global Citizenship
      MUSI 444: Music and Social Change
      GEOG 405: There is No Planet B

      See our Seminar list here.

      See our list of current/upcoming Seminars here. 

      Students in the University Honors Program must take 8 credits of Honors Seminars. 

      Honors students have the option to elevate any course to an Honors level and count it towards their Honors Discovery requirements. 

      To do this, students make an agreement with their professor to complete Honors-level work within a general course. The goal of this is to enrich the class and foster a mentor-mentee relationship between the student and professor. 

      This "wildcard" option offers increased choice and flexibility for Honors Students. An “Honors-designated course” does not need to be part of the Discovery program. It may be any course that is offered in person on the normal semester schedule.

      Only one Honors-designated course may be used toward the Honors Discovery requirement. 

      Like all students at UNH, members of the  Honors Program need to complete the requirements of the Discovery Program, which is designed to ensure that students from all majors have fundamental knowledge about the most important areas of knowledge. If there is a course that does not carry a Discovery designation, but that fulfills the learning outcomes of a Discovery requirement, Honors students may propose to take that course instead. While using a different course to fulfill a Discovery requirement does not specifically count toward Honors Program requirements, the option provides more flexibility for Honors students to pursue their interests.

      cLICK hERE TO lEARN mORE

      Symposia are "supercourses" with linked sections from different departments that each address a common theme from a unique disciplinary perspective. The sections meet together regularly for large group academic experiences ("plenary sessions"). Each course section is capped at 20 students. Honors symposia have the course number 440 and Honors Symposia may count toward the Honors seminar requirement.

      Some current or recent Symposia include: 

      The Copernican Lens

      PHYS 440A: Searching for our Place in the Universe
      ENGL 440B: Seeing is Believing: How the Copernican Revolution Changed the Way We See Ourselves
      PHIL 440C: The Copernican Lens: Finding a Place for Humanity

      Engaging Addiction

      HIST 440E: Drugs and Addiction in World History
      CMN 440A: Communication, Identity and Addiction

      HUMA 440A: Hooked: Narratives of Addiction, Recovery, and Redemption

      These account for the majority of Honors Discovery courses. They include

      • Honors sections: These are Honors versions of classes that are also found in the general curriculum. Sometimes in a given semester these courses will only appear as an Honors course, and in other cases a standard and Honors version can appear the same semester (for example "First Year Writing.") They usually enroll 24-30 students.

      • Honors labs/lectures/recitations: Some science courses offer one or more parts of the course as Honors. For example, a biology student may attend a general lecture but have a lab section that is restricted to Honors students.

      Can I designate a course that isn't a Discovery course as one of my Honors Discoveries?

      Yes, you can designate any course that isn't required for your major as a Discovery course. We call them Honors Discovery courses so it's clear that they don't require extra classes.

      If I'm not an Honors student, can I take an Honors course?

      If you are interested in a particular Honors course, reach out to the Honors office!

       

      "I loved the discovery classes. The smaller classes helped me adjust to college and meet new people, as well as challenged me."

       

      "Most of my Honors Discovery classes were my favorite classes at UNH :) "

       

      "Very appreciative of my Honors Discovery courses for creating a discussion-based environment that opened my eyes to new perspectives."

       

      "My favorite parts of my UNH honors experience were my honors discovery courses and honors thesis. I feel like both presented me with unique opportunities to connect with driven and high achieving students and faculty."

       

      "These classes connected me with other honors students and gave me the opportunity to debate and discuss really interesting topics within a smaller classroom size."

       

      "These courses... were quite eye-opening and challenged me to think in new ways. I feel that these classes helped evolve my mindset regarding social norms and the human experience."