UNH Land Acknowledgement

UNH Land Acknowledgement
aerial view of campus

As we all journey on the trail of life, we wish to acknowledge the spiritual and physical connection the Pennacook, Abenaki, and Wabanaki Peoples have maintained to N’dakinna (homeland) and the aki (land), nibi (water), lolakwikak (flora), and awaasak (fauna) which the University of New Hampshire community is honored to steward today. We also acknowledge the hardships they continue to endure after the loss of unceded homelands and champion the university’s responsibility to foster relationships and opportunities that strengthen the well-being of the Indigenous People who carry forward the traditions of their ancestors.


As a public land-, sea- and space-grant institution, UNH has been dedicated to the public good for over 150 years. Sustainability, the collective commitment to human dignity for all people and ecological integrity in all places, is fundamental to the public good and is a core UNH value.

Developed by a committee and approved by Tribal Elders, the committee built this acknowledgement with six guiding principles/critical elements:

  1. Include land, water, biota
  2. Capture Abenaki/Penacook historic stewardship status
  3. Recognize current challenges faced by local Indigenous peoples
  4. Recognize relationship of UNH with Indigenous people and place
  5. Include an Abenaki term to describe the local Durham place
  6. Include the spiritual connection to the land

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Committed to Diversity


UNH's Office of Community, Equity and Diversity serves as the central organizational structure to direct, monitor, advance, and support diversity efforts at the University. The office holds the responsibility for developing and sustaining programs, policies and initiatives that serve to create a welcoming environment for students, staff, faculty, and administrators of diverse backgrounds, cultures, and experiences.

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