Empower Students for Academic Success: Teaching Students Study Skills Informed by the Science of Learning

 

 

 

 

 

 

This free Webinar is made possible by a grant from the Davis Educational Foundation (The Student Cognition Toolbox). The Foundation was established by Stanton and Elisabeth Davis after Mr. Davis's retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc. This Webinar and our work are also made possible by the support of the UNH Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Click here to Register for Empower Students for Academic Success:  Teaching Students Study Skills Informed by the Science of Learning

Date:

November 6, 2020

Time:

Webinar: 8:30am - 3:30pm

Location:
Zoom Webinar - you will receive a link prior to the Webinar.

 

Dear Colleague:

We are inviting you to attend a one-day Webinar (November 6, 2020) hosted by the University of New Hampshire on Empowering Students for Academic Success. This will be our fifth conference on a science of learning theme, each made possible by support from the Davis Educational Foundation. The conference will feature presentations on teaching college and university students study strategies informed by the science of learning and instructing and supporting them to use those strategies as they prepare for course assessments. There will also be a presentation on how technology-enhanced learning innovations be developed and applied in ways that improve outcomes for all learners. 

In addition to our presentation on the Student Cognition Toolbox, we have an excellent line-up of presenters, including Mark McDaniel (co-author of Make It Stick), Megan Sumeracki (co-author of Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide), and Norman Bier (Executive Director of the Carnegie Mellon University Simon Initiative).

Participation in the Webinar is free to registrants.

Webinar details are provided below.

Sincerely,    

Catherine Overson
Current Interim Director, CEITL, UNH

Affiliate Associate Professor of College Teaching, UNH

Victor Benassi

Professor Emeritus and Faculty Director, CEITL (2007-2018), UNH


 

SPEAKERS’ Biographies  and Presentation  Titles  with  Abstracts

Mark A. McDaniel

Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Washington University in St. Louis

Mark McDaniel is a Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, and the Director of the Center for Integrative Research in Cognition, Learning, and Education (CIRCLE).  He received his Ph.D. from University of Colorado in 1980. His research is in the general area of human learning and memory, with an emphasis on prospective memory, encoding and retrieval processes in episodic memory and applications to educational contexts. His educationally relevant research includes a series of studies on elaborative study techniques, learning of science categories, and enhancing learning through testing (repeated retrieval), with much of this latter work being conducted in college and middle school classrooms. His research has been sponsored by the Institute of Educational Sciences, the James S. McDonnell Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation.

McDaniel has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition and as president of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association and of Divisions 3 of the American Psychological Association. He has published over 290 journal articles, book chapters, and edited books on human learning and memory, and is the co-author with Peter Brown and Henry Roediger of Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning (Harvard University Press, 2014).

Presentation Title:

KBCP - The Knowledge, Belief, Commitment and Planning framework for Teaching Effective Learning Strategies:  A Concrete Example and Some Preliminary Results

Abstract:

The efforts to teaching learning strategies generally have failed to promote spontaneous transfer of the target strategies to new contexts and materials.  I will outline a theoretical framework that I am developing that delineates key components of a learning-strategy training regimen to support transfer and sustained use of the trained strategies.  I will illustrate these components from a recent course that incorporated these features, and provide initial results that inform the effectiveness of this approach.


Megan Sumeracki

Associate Professor

Rhode Island College

Megan Sumeracki (formerly Smith) is an Assistant Professor at Rhode Island College. She received her Master’s in Experimental Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis and her PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Purdue University. Megan studies human learning and memory, specifically applying the science of learning in educational contexts. Her research focuses on retrieval-based learning strategies, and the way retrieval can improve meaningful learning. Megan’s work has been published in journals such as Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition, and Applied Cognitive Psychology. Megan has given talks at regional and national conferences in the US, and abroad such as a lecture at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study and The McMaster Symposium on Education and Cognition in Hamilton Ontario. Megan is also passionate about bridging the gap between research and practice in education. In an effort to promote more conversations between researchers and practitioners, she co-founded The Learning Scientists (www.learningscientists.org ).

Presentation Title:

Six Cognitive Strategies for Effective Learning

Abstract:

Decades of cognitive research can inform classroom learning. However, the research is not always translated into practice. In particular, cognitive psychologists have identified six strategies with a lot of scientific evidence to suggest that they work well to promote durable long-term learning. These strategies include spacing, interleaving, elaboration, dual coding, concrete examples, and retrieval practice. During the talk, Dr. Sumeracki will provide a brief overview of each of these strategies and general tips for their use. Importantly, she will go over resources that are available on learningscientists.org to learn more about the strategies and their use in college courses.


Norman Bier

Executive Director of the Simon Initiative and the Director of the Open Learning Initiative

Carnegie Mellon University

Norman Bier has spent his career at the intersection of learning and technology, working to expand access to and improve the quality of education. He is the Executive Director of the Simon Initiative and the Director of the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon University.  The Simon Initiative leverages CMU’s unique research and educational technology ecosystem, applying learning science to improve outcomes for all.  OLI, a recognized leader in open education, combines leading research in the learning sciences with state-of-the-art technology to create scientifically-based courses that facilitate understanding for independent learners and support instructors to improve effectiveness in traditional classrooms. Prior to joining OLI, he was Director of Training and Development at iCarnegie Inc., a university subsidiary chartered delivering CMU-designed software development education through international partner institutions.  Norman has taught computer science as an adjunct faculty member at the Community College of Allegheny County, philosophy and computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, and he served as a founding member of the Robert E. Cook Honors College at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.  As a leader in Open Education and Educational Technology, in 2015 he was selected by the Center for Digital Education as one of their Top 30 Technologists, Transformers, and Trailblazers.

Presentation Title:

Open Education: Improving Learning in Higher Education

Abstract:

Higher education is more important than ever for economic mobility and lifetime earnings, but an increasingly diverse population of learners continues to struggle to achieve post-secondary success. How can technology-enhanced learning innovations be developed and applied in ways that improve outcomes for all learners? What are the opportunities and risks as the use of these innovations becomes more widespread? And how should these innovations engage with the growing Open Education (OE) community? One answer can be seen at Carnegie Mellon University’s Simon Initiative, where a learning engineering approach integrates research and practice in ways that simultaneously improve outcomes for students while advancing our understanding of how humans learn. In this talk, Bier will give an overview of the Simon Initiative and discuss the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) as an exemplar of learning engineering.  He will highlight the unique affordances of Open Educational Resources (OER) and emphasize productive overlap with other open approaches, including science, access, data and pedagogy. In this context, he will highlight the affordances of descriptive learning analytics for improving outcomes for diverse learners and provide an overview of OLI – its approach, supporting technologies, analytics and associated research. He will also provide an overview of emerging research on barriers to innovation in higher-education. He will argue that success in addressing educational technology’s opportunities and challenges while mediating risks requires this work to be centered in not-for-profit higher education and necessitates collaboration across educational institutions. To that end, he will highlight ways to leverage the work of the Simon Initiative and outline opportunities to collaborate with OLI and the larger OE community, including examples drawn from successful collaborations with UNH.


Victor Benassi

Co-Principal Investigator, Student Cognition Toolbox
Professor Emeritus and Faculty Director, CEITL (2007-2018)

University of New Hampshire

Victor Benassi is professor emeritus. He was Faculty Director of CEITL (2007 – 2018). He is an APA fellow and served as APA’s 2013 Division 2 President (Society for the Teaching of Psychology, STP). He has been a PI on four Davis Educational Foundation (DEF) grants that focus on the application of science of learning principles in college and university courses. With Catherine Overson and Chris Hakala, he is co-editor of Applying the Science of Learning in Education: Infusing Psychological Science into the Curriculum (STP, 2014). In 2003, he received the American Psychological Foundation’s Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology award.

 

Catherine Overson

Principal Investigator, Student Cognition Toolbox
Interim Director, CEITL

University of New Hampshire

Catherine Overson’s research focuses on the application of science of learning principles to teaching and learning in college and university courses. Catherine assists faculty and teaching graduate students in designing their courses in a manner that incorporates science of learning principles. She also conducts faculty development presentations and workshops at UNH and other universities and colleges on applying the science of learning. She is co-editor (with Victor Benassi and Christopher Hakala) of Applying the Science of Learning in Education: Infusing Psychological Science into the Curriculum (2014, STP).

Presentation Title:

The Student Cognition Toolbox: Empowering Students to Become Better Learners

Abstract:

Students enter college with a variety of past experiences and beliefs about how to prepare for assessments of their academic performance. Considerable research supports that most students prefer and use study strategies that are ineffective relative to strategies supported by applied research on cognition. In addition, this research shows that different study strategies are needed for different kinds of learning—one size does not fit all.

In response to this, we have developed and launched a comprehensive set of online instructional materials, the Student Cognition Toolbox, situated within Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU) Open Learning Initiative (OLI; http://oli.cmu.edu), that inform students about cognitively-supported effective and efficient study strategies. A distinctive feature of our Toolbox is that lessons include a practice component designed to assist students in mastery of that strategy. We will report on a number of assessments that examine whether and how students use their newly-acquired skills, as well as the impact of their use on their academic performance.


UNH Student Cognition Toolbox Team Member Moderators

 

Lauren Kordonowy

Science of Learning Project Coordinator, CEITL, UNH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Tappin

Elizabeth Tappin

Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Coordinator, CEITL, UNH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jenny Calawa

Graduate Assistant and Research Associate, PhD Candidate, CEITL, UNH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conference Schedule

Click to download a copy of the Webinar Schedule


Click Here to register for Empower Students for Academic Success:  Teaching Students Study Skills Informed by the Science of Learning

Acknowledgements

This conference is made possible by a grant from the Davis Educational Foundation (Applying the Science of Learning across the Biological Sciences Curriculum). The Foundation was established by Stanton and Elisabeth Davis after Mr. Davis's retirement as chairman of Shaw’s Supermarkets, Inc. This conference and our work is also made possible by the support of the UNH Office of the Provost and Vi;ce President for Academic Affairs.