Learning Development & Innovation (LDI)

Learning Development & Innovation (LDI) promotes and develops sound instructional design principles and practices for classroom and online instruction. We support faculty by helping them consider varied instructional strategies, integrate technology effectively within their courses, and support development of engaging course content. We explore and pilot emerging technologies and collect best practices for enhancing student learning. LDI also organizes training events and provides one-on-one consultation sessions for faculty.

To learn more about LDI events, contact Scott Kimball at Scott.Kimball@unh.edu

Fall 2022 LDI Events (click + to view details)

Fundamentals of Online Instruction – Asynchronous – Begins October 17

DESCRIPTION: (Asynchronous) A three-week online course for UNH faculty who will be developing and teaching an online course for the first time.

OCTOBER TERM: Starts Monday, October 17, 2022 (this course is offered each year in October, February, & July)

TIME COMMITMENT: 3-4 hours for 3 weeks

FACILITATOR(S): Mike McIntire, Learning Architect, LDI

   Teaching & Learning Technologies Registration

A three-week asynchronous online course for UNH faculty who will be developing and teaching an online course for the first time. The coursework leads to development of the course curriculum and the introductory module of your course. It also gives you the experience of taking an online course as a student. 3-4 hours per week for three weeks.

Fundamentals of Online Instruction is a three-week online course designed at UNH, for UNH faculty who will be developing an online course and teaching online for the first time. Delivered online and completely asynchronously, the course is offered three times each year (February, July, and October), with additional cohorts by demand. Fundamentals of Online Instruction helps prepare you for teaching online, gives you a jumpstart in creating a course plan for a course you will be teaching, and gives you the experience of taking an online course as a student. 

Fundamentals of Online Delivery – Asynchronous – Begins October 17

DESCRIPTION: (Asynchronous) A short, two-week online course designed for instructors who have been assigned to teach a course online for the first time.

OCTOBER TERM: Starts Monday, October 17, 2022 (this course is offered each year in October, February, & July)

TIME COMMITMENT: 2 weeks

FACILITATOR(S): Xuan Cai, Learning Architect, LDI

   Teaching & Learning Technologies Registration

A short, two-week online course designed for instructors who have been assigned to teach a course online for the first time. The course focuses on delivery and facilitation of online courses, rather than design. 2-3 hours per week for two weeks.

Fundamentals of Online Delivery is a short two week online course designed for instructors assigned to teach a course online for the first time. The course focuses on delivery and facilitation of online courses, rather than design. The course runs each February, July, and October. 

Fundamentals of Active Learning – Asynchronous / Hybrid – Begins October 17

DESCRIPTION: (Asynchronous/Hybrid) Two weeks of asynchronous online modules and an optional synchronous, hands-on component for TEAL technology training (required to use the TEAL classrooms). Get simple and adaptable active learning strategies that you can immediately incorporate into your current syllabus.

OCTOBER TERM: Starts Monday, October 17, 2022 (this course is offered each year in October, February, & July)

TIME COMMITMENT: 2 weeks

FACILITATOR(S): Scott Kimball, Manager, LDI

   Teaching & Learning Technologies Registration

Using Canvas Learning Analytics to Inform Course Design and Improve Teaching

ABSTRACT: Analytic data helps you examine the relationship between student engagement and learning outcomes. You can use this information to understand the learning process better and improve learning outcomes. 

New Analytics is a Canvas tool that collects and analyzes student usage patterns, such as log-in information, participation in course activities, and grades. Together with Canvas Quiz and Assignments tools, you can identify students who are struggling academically so you can take targeted interventions. Using Analytics data can be very helpful in large classes to monitor students’ performance. 

In this session, we will include the Canvas New Quiz tool analytics.

LOCATION: Webinar (via Zoom)

DATE: Wednesday, October 19, 2022

TIME: 10-11am

PRESENTER(S): Xuan Cai, Learning Architect, LDI; Louise Jones, Academic Technology; Megan Smith, Plymouth State University

   Teaching & Learning Technologies Registration

FOI: Innovation Lab – Microsoft OneDrive Integration

ABSTRACT: In this Hands-on Learning Laboratory workshop we will look at the new and tighter integration between the office 365 applications and Canvas. There are a number of tools that you can take advantage of that will help both you and your students improve their workflow and make the process of sharing documents and submitting work much more streamlined. Here are a few of the topics we will discuss: Cloud Assignments, Collaboration with Office 365, Class Notebooks

LOCATION: Webinar (via Zoom)

DATE: Thursday, October 27, 2022

TIME: 11am-12:30pm

PRESENTER(S): Fran Keefe, Learning Architect, LDI;  Karen Hoover

   Teaching & Learning Technologies Registration

The New Parker Media Lab: Meeting the Media Needs of Today's Students and Faculty

ABSTRACT: Student's experience with technology evolved exponentially over the past two years. With those changes in mind, it was only natural to reimagine how the Parker Media Lab can help them succeed. Come learn about the WhisperRoom, the One Button Studio, and the Lightboard technologies added to Dimond 237.

LOCATION: Dimond Library 237

DATE: Tuesday, November 29, 2022

TIME: 12:30-2pm

PRESENTER(S): Mike McIntire, Learning Architect, LDI; Doug Keene, Learning Design & Technology

   Teaching & Learning Technologies Registration

LDI Resources for Teaching & Learning

 Active Learning

Active learning is when students engage in activities such as a small group discussion, problem solving discussion, role playing, or hands-on activity to promote higher levels of cognitive learning. Research has shown that student-centered active learning produces significantly greater learning outcomes than traditional teacher-centered lectures. 

The Instructional Design and Development (IDD) team assists faculty with best practices and incorporating active learning strategies into teaching. Instructional Designers collaborate with instructors to learn about their course and learning outcomes, then recommend ways to implement active learning into any classroom style or online space. 

 "a method of learning in which students are actively or experientially involved in the learning process and where there are different levels of active learning, depending on student involvement." (Bonwell & Eison 1991)

Reach out to the IDD Team to schedule a consultation.  The IDD team has developed a glance at classroom types on campus and what strategies can be used in each classroom type. We have divided those classrooms into four categories. Each classroom type allows certain active learning strategies to be applied for best outcomes. The pyramid chart below shows various active learning activities that can be effective in classroom types from no technology, to low technology, to TEAL classroom.

Chart showing low to high technology enhanced classrooms

This image (above)  illustrates four UNH classroom types divided into categories :

  • Lecture
  • Suitable to Active learning
  • Active Learning
  • Technology-Enabled Learning (TEAL)

Each classroom type promotes active learning techniques that can be applied to teaching strategies. The pyramid chart shows varied active learning activities that can be effective in classroom types, from no technology --> to low technology --> to TEAL classroom.

UNH Active Learning Classroom Types

All the classrooms styles can be organized into five classroom types from basic lecture hall to technology enhanced classrooms.  Active learning can be implemented into any classroom setting with proper planning and preparation. Click each classroom type below for a full description, equipment list and images of each classroom.

Lecture 

In this type of classroom, furniture is not easily moveable, which restricts easy formation of groups and sharing of work. 

Suitable for Active Learning   

In this type of classroom, furniture mobility/design and room layout can accommodate working groups of 2-4 people with advanced planning and some effort, allowing all group participants to see each other and share work. Whiteboard space may be limited.

Active Learning 

In this type of classroom, furniture mobility can accommodate working groups of varied size with ease, allowing all group participants to easily interact with each other and have access to a shared workspace (digital or analog). 

Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL)  

In this type of classroom, student seating facilitates flexible group arrangements on the fly, and students have easy access to share work within and across groups with technology, and within groups with access to whiteboard space. 

Online / Hybrid

In this type of collaborative space, students have easy access to share work and interact with each other through technology.

Active Learning Strategies

Active Learning Strategies

Photo of a technology enhanced classroom

Active learning activities can be incorporated in various classrooms as well as in an online environment.  Presented in each section are activities, organized by active learning strategies and instructional approaches, which can be adapted into many classroom types:

  • Reflection Strategies
  • Polling Strategies
  • Group Strategies
  • Reasoning Strategies
  • Instructional Strategies

Each section lists active learning activities that are compatible with specific active learning classroom types.  Each activity listed states suggested classroom types based in the TASLO legend:

Expand each section below to view a typical approach of active learning activities that can be used in the classroom or online space. To further explore, customize or incorporate these activities into your teaching, contact the Instructional Design and Development to schedule a meeting with an Instructional Designer.

In these types of activities, lower levels of Blooms Taxonomy (level Remember to level Apply) are practiced.

In each activity, refer to the TASLO Legend (T: TEAL-- Technology Enabled Active LearningA: Active Learning , S: Suitable for Active Learning , L: Lecture, O: Online) to determine the suggested classroom type to use for that specific activity.

Minute Papers (TASLO)

Purpose

  • The Minute Paper activity encourages students to reflect on a core concept anytime before, after or during the class.
  • All students gain viewpoints of their peers, active  listening skills, awareness of theory and the ability to share verbally.

Approach

  • Pose a question, a problem set or  a misconception to the class.
  • Have students respond by writing or illustrating within a short period of time (e.g., 1-3 minutes).
  • Either break students into small groups or whole class response to share their comprehension of the specific concept. 
  • Offer class feedback and clear up any misconceptions of the concept.

The Minute Paper (6 minutes)

Think-Pair-Share (TASLO)

Purpose

  • The Think-Pair-Share activity encourages students to identify the topic, demonstrate their comprehension and share out to their peers. 
  • The Think-Pair-Share activity encourages students to listen, observe and understand their peer's knowledge of topic.
  • All students collaborate with their peers and gain varied viewpoints, active listening skills along with a better understanding of the concept.

Approach

  • Have students individually think about a particular question, scenario, or problem.
  • Pair students to discuss their ideas, comprehension or answers to the concept.  Collaboration amongst the pairs will expand the students knowledge of the scenario and promotes clarity.
  • Have the students discuss their findings with the whole class and provide feedback as necessary.

Think-Pair-Share (3 minutes)

Short Problems (TASLO)

White figure Choosing to Go in Different Directions

Purpose

  • The Short Problem activity encourages students to demonstrate their knowledge of solving problems and sharing with class and instructor.
  • All students gain a better understanding of the short problem, actively listen to their peer's findings and the ability to share-out to class.

Approach

  • Create time for students to work individually or in small group on problem sets in or out of class.Present the problem sets on screen, written on a white board or available online.   
  • Have students share with their peers, the findings and solutions with peer groups.
  • Gather students together to offer feedback and clear up any misconceptions.

In these types of activities, lower levels of Blooms Taxonomy (level Remember to level Apply) are practiced. 

In each activity, refer to the TASLO Legend (T: TEAL-- Technology Enabled Active LearningA: Active Learning , S: Suitable for Active Learning , L: Lecture, O: Online) to determine the suggested classroom type to use for that specific activity.

Interactive Learning (TASL)

Purpose

  • Instructors recognize what level of comprehension or misconceptions students have of the topic.
  • Instructors share feedback visually.
  • Students discuss their understanding with peers groups.
  • All students are able to actively engage independently or in study groups.

Approach

  • Ask students to access an interactive learning platform for anonymous polling or to participate in an interactive game. *Examples of interactive learning platforms for polling or gaming.
  • Pose a provoking or guiding question to students and have students answer independently or in groups.  
  • Have students discuss their understanding of the topic.
  • Repose question to students, share feedback and clear misconceptions.

*Kahoot an interactive tool that easily engages students to create, share and play learning games or trivia quizzes. 

*Polleverwhere an interactive polling tool that engages students to participate in realtime participation with instant feedback.

*Mentimeter an interactive tool that students can respond to questions, contribute to the content and receive visual feedback.

Teaching Tips (1 min 30 seconds)

iClicker Questions (TASL)

Image of iClickers

Purpose

  • iClicker questions posed at various points throughout a lecture prompt students to identify, relate or interpret instructional material.
  • The iClicker activity allows for instructors and students to recognize what level of comprehension or misconceptions they have of the topic.

Approach

  • All students use their iclicker to respond to questions before, during and/or at the end of the class.  
  • Instructor presents feedback on screen to clear up any misconceptions or to confirm understanding.
  • iClicker questions can be graded and imported into myCourses.

UNH supports iClicker, if you are interested in incorporating iClickers into the active learning classroom, visit How to get started with iClicker.

iClicker: The Power of Why (3 minutes 40 seconds)

In these types of activities, higher levels of Blooms Taxonomy (level Understand to level Create) are practiced. 

Fish Bowl (TAS)

Fishbowl Activity Image

Purpose

  • The Fishbowl discussion activity encourages students to explain and demonstrate their knowledge of a specific topic.  
  • The Fishbowl observers activity cultivates students active listening  and critiquing skills. 

Strategy

  • Break students into two groups, group 1 with a few students and group 2 with the remaining students. 
  • Group 1, the fishbowl discussers, are in the inner circle.  Have students discuss, debate or share expertise in the field for a specific timeframe.
  • Group 2, are the observers of group 1.  Have students listen, take notes, write a response or illustrate what they have observed. 
  • Once the fishbowl discussions is over, have the students in group 2 share their feedback and observations to group 1.
  • During the activity instructors observe and listen to both groups. Instructors provide  feedback to the class.

Fishbowl Discussion (3 minutes)

Purpose

  • The Poster and Gallery Walk activity encourages students to create a visual explanation and demonstration of a concept.
  • The Poster and Gallery Walk activity provides students to examine their peers understanding of the concept. 
  • All students gain viewpoints of their peers, improve the ability to collaborate and share with each other to produce tangible content.

Approach

  • Break students into small groups to work collaboratively to explain a concept, respond to course content  questions or debate a specific topic with one another.  The assignment can be done with using pieces of paper, post-it poster board, shared group computer and screens (e.g., TEAL classroom), web-based applications (e.g., Voicethread) online learning.
  • Once students have completed the poster assignment, have them display it, much like at a scientific poster session. One student in each group will stay with the poster and help to explain it as the class circulates to look at all of the posters. Students rotate so that everyone has a chance to visit all the posters.  
  • Gather class together to debrief, hear student's feedback and add additional clarification to the concept. 

Gallery Walk (2 minutes)

Buzz Groups (TASO)

Buzz Group Image

Purpose

  • Buzz Group activity generally takes place during a lecture timeframe to encourage student discussion. 
  • Buzz Group activity encourages students to listen, reflect and examine their peers understanding of the specific topic.
  • All students gain viewpoints of their peers, active  listening skills, awareness of theory and the ability to share verbally.

Approach

  • Break the class into small groups consisting of three to four students.
  • Each group discusses the topic or guided questions briefly to generate arguments, answers, or ideas. 
  • Each small group then shares one idea, answer, or argument with the class. 

 Jigsaw and Expert Groups (TA)

Purpose

  • TheJigsaw/Expert Group activity encourages students to work independently becoming experts in a specific chunk of content topic.  
  • The Jigsaw/Expert Group activity helps students to become the experts by synthesizing and constructing their comprehension of the content with their peers.
  • All students gain viewpoints of their peers, active listening skills and the ability to compile component ideas into a new idea or solution.
Bubble Chart for Home and Expert Groups

Approach

  • Put students into small groups (e.g., 4-6 students), this will become their "home group".  
  • Divide the content topic into chunks (e.g., 4-6) depending on how many students are in the home groups.  
  • Assign each student in the home group one chunk of the content topic.  
  • Independently, students gather information and research their content chunk while staying assembled in their home group.  
  • Once the allotted time is up, students in each home group find their perspective experts of their assigned content chunk and form  an "expert group". 
  • Each expert group shares with one another their findings and they work together to synthesize all the information gathered.
  • Instructor assesses and validates each expert group's content knowledge.
  • Within the expert group students prepare and create a report, analysis or presentation of materials learned to demonstrate their knowledge of the content chunk assigned.
  • Students move back to their original home groups to present to their home group on their assigned content.  
  • Assess the students understanding of the content topic or skill.

The Jigsaw Puzzle (6 minutes 20 seconds)

 

In these types of activities, lower levels of Blooms Taxonomy (level Understand to level Evaluate) are practiced. 

Four Corners (TASO)

Purpose

  • The Four Corners activity builds critical thinking skills.
  • The Four Corners activity encourages students to listen, think on their own and defend their understanding of the specific topic.
  • All students gain viewpoints of their peers, active listening skills, awareness of differences in thinking and the ability to share verbally.

Approach

  • Create four corners within the classroom having each corner display a Likert type responses (e.g., Agree, Strongly Agree, Disagree, Strongly Disagree). 
  • At the beginning, during or end of class share a statement and have students actively move to the corner of the room with the Likert response they most agree with.
  • Allow time for students to discuss and write down at least one reason why they choose that "corner". 
  • Have each corner share out to class those reasons.

Four Corners (2 minutes)

Post-It Parade (TAS)

Purpose

  • The Post-It Parade activity stimulates students creativity and the ability to generate ideas.  
  • The Post-It activity promotes active listening skills and collaboration amongst students.
Post-It Notes on Bulletin Board

Approach

  • Instructors provide students with a question or a prompt and gives students post-its to use in activity.
  • Create spaces around the room for topics related to the prompt.
  • Students generate ideas, solutions, or comprehension of the question or prompt and write down a summary on the post-it.
  • Students place their post-it in the topic area that pertains to their response and discusses with their peers.
  • Instructors gather students, talk over responses and provide feedback to clear up any misconceptions. 

Debate (TASLO)

Purpose

  • The Debate activity encourages each group to explore and defend their position on a specific topic.
  • The Debate activity encourages each group to listen and examine their position.
  • The Debate activity fosters audience group to critically assess debate groups and share findings.
  • All students gain a better understanding for the differences in each groups position, active  listening skills, and the ability to contribute verbally.

Approach

  • Break students into two groups, "Pro" group and "Con" group and have a few students as the "Audience". 
  • Give the Pro and Con group the topic allowing students to gather their position on the specified topic.  This can be done  before class so students have time to organize their thoughts. 
  • Provide a rubric for the "Audience" as they will be assessing the debate and sharing that assessment with both groups.
  • Taking turns, both groups bring forth their arguments, making rebuttals, and summarizing. 
  • Audience listens, takes notes and completes rubric to prepare for share-out.
  • Once the debate is over have the Audience provide assessment of debate and rubric score.
  • Instructors contribute additional feedback to all students.

STeP Structure of Debate (2 minutes)

In these types of activities, higher levels of Blooms Taxonomy (level Understand to level Evaluate) are practiced. 

Socratic Questioning (TASLO)

Purpose

  • The Socratic Questioning activity builds critical thinking skills by asking questions, drawing answers to enhance students thinking process.
  • The Socratic Questioning activity helps students gain perspectives and viewpoints of a content topic.

Approach

  • Instructor poses open-ended questions to students either in groups or as a class.
  • Six types of Socratic Questions:
    1. Getting students to clarify their thinking and explore the origin of their thinking
    2. Challenging students about assumptions
    3. Providing evidence as a basis for arguments
    4. Discovering alternative viewpoints and perspectives and conflicts between contentions
    5. Exploring implications and consequences
    6. Questioning the question
  • Instructor sets ground rules for active listening, collaborative space and overall respect among students.  
  • Students respond to the question posed and contribute to class discussion or group.  
  • Once students have contributed in the discussion the instructor offers clarification where needed and affirmation to students responses. 

What is SOCRATIC QUESTIONING? (4 minutes 30 seconds)

How to do the Socratic Method (3 minutes)

Social Annotation of Text (TASLO)

Purpose

  • The Social Annotation activity prepares students for pre-class readings (e.g., Flipped Classroom).
  • The Social Annotation activity supports collaborative learning.

Approach

  • Break students into small groups or work independently. 
  • Select a content topic for the students to annotate (e.g., ask questions, unknown or difficult words, note taking as independent study).
  • Select a social annotation platform, such as Hypothesis
  • Students share their annotation with the class.

Teaching Online

First Time Teaching Online

Before teaching in the UNH online programs, it is required that instructors complete the Fundamentals of Online Instruction (FOI), a three-module online course offered by the Instructional Design and Development team at UNH Academic Technology. The course is designed to introduce faculty to the best practices of designing and teaching online courses. FOI is strongly recommended for faculty who teaches other online courses at UNH.  Check the Professional Development Opportunities  to learn more about FOI course.

myCourses by Canvas is the Learning Management System (LMS) used at UNH. Get started with an introductory session or schedule some time with a myCourses trainer by calling 603-862-4242 or refer to the Academic Technology Training calendar to find a time works for you.

Course Design and Development

Developing an online course is time-consuming especially when you are new to the process.  We recommend that you work with your Instructional Designer to complete the Online Course Syllabus and Online Course Workbook.  The Online Course Workbook helps you outline the learning objectives, course materials, and assessments. The following Online Course Development Timeline helps you plan your course development so that your online course is ready for delivery on time.

Online Course Development Timeline

Week 1

  1. Make initial contact with an Instructional Designer.
  2. Confirm course shell in myCourses. 

Week 2-3

Schedule first meeting with your Instructional Designer to complete the following items:

  1. Online Course Syllabus.
  2. Learning Objectives for each module.
  3. Use the Online Course Workbook to design module content – plan the reading materials, videos, activities and assessments for each module before the actual course development. We also provided an example workbook for your reference.

Week 4-12

Course Development Phrase:

  1. Chunk content.
  2. Create Welcome video and Icebreaker forum.
  3. Create lesson content.
  4. Build weekly interactions.
  5. Create assignments.
  6. Develop assessments.
  7. Develop grading scheme and supporting rubrics.

Week 13

Work with your Instructional Designer to review your course. Finalize the content before course starts. Online courses are automatically published TWO weeks before the semester starts!

Important Notes

How many hours will it take to design and develop an online course? It depends. For example, the preparation and production time for a 15-minute video includes planning, rehearsing, recording and some editing so actual time needed for this 15-minute video will be anything from 1 hour to several hours. Transferring a face-to-face course into an online course is not simply uploading videos in your online course. Typically, lecture time is reduced in favor of other active learning strategies. Video lectures tend to be short, and focused on singular concepts. It takes hours or even days to chunk the content into modules, plan for assessment activities and rubrics before you start developing the course content. Working with an Instructional Designer will save time in the long run. 

 To ensure success, we encourage faculty to make an initial contact with IDD at least four months before the online course starts.

Quality Assurance Consultation and Course Reviews

Work with an Instructional Designer for help ensuring that your course aligns with best practices and accessibility standards. Instructional Designers can thoroughly review your course and consult with you on a revision plan. Our Instructional Designers are all certified online course reviewers.

Help Available for Online Course Development

In addition to the IDD team, there are other resources available at The University of New Hampshire to help you with online course development:

  • Academic Technology Training: schedule an one-on-one training with our LMS trainer or attend a training session that fits your schedule.
  • Media and Collaboration: to incorporate rich media or use synchronous web classroom tools in your online course, you can contact Media and Collaboration for help.
  • myCourses Support and Technical Help for Instructors: technical support is available three ways:
    • Online Support is available through the ‘Help’ link in the bottom left corner of myCourses. From this menu, instructors are provided with the following three options:
      • Search the Canvas Guides: This links you to the guides provided by Canvas which include step by step instructions and videos on how to use the system. These guides are very thorough and easy to search and it is always recommended you look here before contacting support.
      • Chat with Canvas Support: The chat function is also available 24/7 and allows for real-time assistance with myCourses questions or issues. This is the recommended method to request assistance within myCourses.
      • UNH IT Knowledge Base: This links to UNH help documentation specific to myCourses, as well as, support documentation from other academic departments.
    • Phone Support is available by calling the UNH IT Service Desk at 603-862-4242.  After hours calls can be routed to Canvas support staff.
    • In Person Support is available for instructors on the Durham campus at the ATSC on the main floor of Dimond Library.
  • UNH Libraries: UNH libraries provide journal articles, books and media that can be used in online courses.

Parker Media Lab (PML)

The Parker Media Lab (PML) has undergone exciting changes this summer. Located in Dimond 237 the space has been renovated to better support self-service recording. The addition of a WhisperRoom allows 1-3 people to do audio recording in a sound-isolated space, while the addition of a One Button Studio and Lightboard allow individuals and small groups to record presentations, interviews, lectures, and more.

Access to video cameras, tripods, microphones, etc is improved by moving the circulation point to Dimond 3rd floor through the IT service desk. 

Consultation on planning media projects as student assignments, classroom help sessions, and support is still available by requesting help via https://td.unh.edu/TDClient/60/Portal/Requests/ServiceDet?ID=160