Katibu J. Hatcher

Katibu J. Hatcher

Plymouth State College

Business/English


1997

Mentor: Dr. Paul Rogalus Associate Professor, English

Informing Black America: The Effects of Information Technology in African American Communities

Today while communication norms have changed globally, African American communities remain stagnant, relaying on and antiquated means of communication. The purpose of this project has been to examine the use of information technology within African American communities, specifically looking at the Internet as a method of providing the necessary services and information within the confines of the Information Age. Also preparing African Americans to use computer technology to educate the community to new technological cultures in schools, universities, and work places throughout the world.

Historically individuals who reside in lower-class African American communities, otherwise known as ghettos, have been excluded from the social, political, and economic mold of middle and upper-class America. The rise of the personal computing market in the early 1970's began a technological exclusion based on class. As we move towards the next millennium this class based stratification is becoming an issue of increasing importance. The fusion of the Internet, mass media, and communication technology is forming the next informational paradigm shift in American society. The Internet, information superhighway, World Wide Web, and the mere fundamentals of e-mail suggest to society that the old concept of communication has passed.

The information acquired in this study will be used as a platform for future on-line centers which promote and perpetuate African American existence in the technological field.

 

1996

Mentor: Drew Christie, Ph.D. - Associate Professor of Philosophy

The Effects of Information Technology in Urban, Lower-class, African-American Communities

Today while communication norms have changed globally, urban, lower-class, African-American communities remain stagnant, relying on an antiquated means of communication. The purpose of this study has been to examine the use of information technology within lower-class, African-American communities, specifically looking at the Internet as a method of providing the necessary services and information within the confines of the Information Age.

Historically individuals who reside in urban, lower-class, African-American communities, otherwise known as ghettos, have been excluded from the social, political, and economic mold of middle and upper-class America. The rise of the personal computing market in the early 1970's began a technological exclusion based on class. As we move towards the next millennium this class based stratification is becoming an issue of increasing importance. The fusion of the Internet, mass media, and communication technology is forming the next informational paradigm shift in American society. The Internet, information superhighway, World Wide Web, and the mere fundamentals of e-mail suggest to society that the old concept of communication has passed.

The information acquired in this study can be utilized by educators including school administrators and those involved with reconstructing our nation's schools.

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