Summer Session

Featured Courses

online courses | on campus & hybrid courses

Online→

  • Germs 101 (BMS 408)

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    Instructor: Davida L. Margolin • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Expands on the increasing public awareness of the societal and technological impact of the invisible microbial world on our lives and on the planet. Students participate in weekly extra-class activities, acting as life scientists by using the scientific method of inquiry. One experience focuses on bacteria that use sunlight to make a living, another on using bacteria in genetic engineering. Students come to view germs Read more ↓

    in diverse lights: microbes as organisms, microbes as enemies, microbes as friends, and microbes in the press. Especially useful for people with microphobia. Not for BMS or Biology major credit. This is the online version of BMS 407 - Germs 101, and does not fulfill GenEd 3B requirements. BMS 408 - does NOT fulfill the GenEd 3B requirement (but DOES fulfill the DISC BS requirement). BMS 408.1BB - Online course, no campus visits required.

    Questions for Davida L. Margolin→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    During the regular semester I normally teach this class to 540 students and needless to say it’s impossible to get to know most students on a one-to-one basis. However, the summer online class will have less than 1/10 of the regular semester enrollment, meaning it will be more conducive in getting to know each individual student through interactive learning elements, such as weekly discussion boards, social media and video chats.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    Microbes touch every aspect of our lives. Often students are completely unaware of the depth and breadth of how these tiny invisible beings impact everything around them. Many individuals swayed by myopic marketing tactics end up being fearful of these creatures and spend copious amounts of time, energy and finances trying to avoid them. But, is that really advisable and what are the ramifications? This class is a perfect way for “germaphobes” to confront their fears while gaining a better understanding of the microbial world around them.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    I generally keep up with news, current events and pop culture, not only because that’s who I am innately, but because I find that being aware of what’s going on around me, helps me be a better instructor, and allows me to intertwine things that students might not initially suspect, within the world of microbiology. Yes, I have successfully used portions of the animated series, “South Park” to frame components of measles transmission and history. In doing so, students are able to relate what they are already interested in to topics they are learning about in class.

  • Global Environmental Change (ESCI 405)

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    Instructor: John Slater • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Human activity rivals nature as an agent of change in the global environment. Explores evidence of environmental degradation in Earth's crust, hydrosphere, and atmosphere; considers prospects for future sustainable human health, diversity, and economic development. Problem solving through critical analysis of environmental variables. Special fee. Lab. Read more ↓

    This course is an interdisciplinary study of the natural world and the impact of human activities on our global environment. The course examines key environmental issues by combining ideas from natural science disciplines such as biology, chemistry, physics, and geology, with ideas from social science disciplines such as economics, politics, and ethics. Important global environmental change topics such as climate change, human population dynamics, changes in biodiversity, and natural resource depletion will be covered. Important regional-scale environmental issues such as water quality and air quality will be discussed and explored through online laboratories. Throughout the course, the student will be exposed to state and federal environmental regulations, as well as international agreements that are designed to govern the environmental impact of humans.

    Questions for John Slater→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    Learning in an online environment can be very similar to a face-to-face course in that knowledge is constructed through interactions in public social settings (discussion forums), by completion of individual activities, and by receiving feedback from student peers and the instructor. Even though there is no real-time dialog between myself and the students, the asynchronous dialog in an online course can be just as invigorating as in a face-to-face course.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    Humans are now influencing planet Earth in every aspect. With a population of over 7 billion people, natural resource use is disrupting all of the Earth’s major cycles of biology, chemistry, and geology. It is important for all citizens to gain a fundamental understanding of how the planet works so that individuals can make sound decisions concerning how actions in their everyday life impact the natural world.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    I always approach teaching and learning by first exploring students’ current knowledge about important course topics. Then, I tailor course content to build upon certain concepts that are understood at some level, and I modify instruction to clear up common misconceptions. In this course, we spend a good deal of time on the fundamental principles of Earth System Science so that students can use this “toolbox” to help understand some of the more complex environmental challenges facing our planet.

  • Environmental & Resource Economics Perspectives (EREC 411) - Online or On Campus sections

    Instructor: John Halstead • Online or Oncampus sections availableView more course information and additional course section offered on campus.

    Course Description:
    Microeconomic theory and analysis in resource management and use decisions. Survey of significant resource problems from an economic perspective and the application of economic analysis. Cannot be taken for credit after ECON 402 or equivalent. Read more ↓

    Questions for John Halstead→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    There are limits to how much interaction I can have with students online. The reason I use the tegrity approach is that in viewing my own recorded lectures, they are always better when there are some live students in front of me. I make attempts to address the “folks at home” on camera by addressing questions they may have asked via email, talking into the camera from time to time to make “eye contact”, and other evolving strategies. Exams are problematic, so I have converted to an open book, timed format. In a way this is better than the traditional closed book format because with technological changes it is no longer the case that they memorize a list of facts and definitions (since they can look them up in seconds) but that they know how to apply them. I hope in the future to get in class and online students to interact via blackboard forums.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    A basic understanding of economics is essential to higher education and life in general, as it addresses the key concepts of scarcity and choice which everyone faces every day. It also makes students more literate in economic affairs of the country and hopefully helps them make more informed choices in elections and elsewhere. Finally, the course gives me a chance to dispel widely held incorrect notions about economics—such as “it’s all about money.” It is particularly useful in addressing environmental problems.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    Learning is a lifelong pursuit. Learning is a shared experience between student and teacher. I believe it is my job as a teacher to make the course material relevant to the student’s life so they at least appreciate the subject matter. Interaction between my students and me often teaches me things I didn’t know.

  • The Science of Happily Ever After (HDFS 697)

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    Instructor: Tyler Jamison • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    The Science of Happily Ever After will explore what scientists have discovered are the best bets and pitfalls of choosing a partner and maintaining a happy and healthy romantic partnership. Through personal reflection and application, the course will emphasize how students can use research-based information to form strong and lasting relationships. Read more ↓

    Questions for Tyler Jamison, Ph.D.

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    In online classes I like students to explore the topic outside of the digital classroom. I like to create assignments that send students onto the Internet or into their communities to learn something about the topic and the come back to the class to process and discuss it. This makes the class more student-directed, which I love because it capitalizes on all of the diversity of student backgrounds and experiences.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    Most of us will fall in love at least once in our lives, and many of us want to form a lifelong partnership with someone. Yet, no one teaches us how to do that. The assumption is that it should come naturally to us. This class assumes that forming great relationships is a skill that can be learned. The topic is relevant to anyone who wants to be deliberate about their love lives!

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    I believe that students learn best when they can apply material to their own lives. One of the things I like most about teaching in Human Development and Family Studies is that everyone has some frame of reference for what it means to be part of a family. Being able to relate to the material makes the scientific content easier to grasp and provides an opportunity for students to improve their lives through their academic learning.

  • Introduction to Russian Civilization & Culture (HIST 563)

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    Instructor: Cathy Frierson • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Interdisciplinary course on the development of Russian culture from its origins through the end of the 19th century. Historical documents, literary works, ethnographic materials, films, slides of Russian art, and music. Read more ↓

    Questions for Cathy Frierson

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    I am able to use more visual materials and give every student a way to explain what they see in the images and what the images convey about Russian culture. Through the journal and blog activities, I also learn every student's perceptions and understandings of the lectures and readings.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    Russia has been a world culture since the tenth century and a major world power consistently since the early eighteenth century. Russia is one of the two most important Eurasian powers and cultures in world history.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    I believe that the best learning is active learning. For that reason, my online course has multiple short response activities which students are required to submit. This keeps students on top of the readings and lectures and enables me to get to know them through the work they submit. I also believe there are many different learning styles. For that reason, my online course involves assignments designed for visual learners, students who understand a culture through literature as well as through laws, and students who like working with maps. The assignments are very diverse in content and method.

  • Activity, Injury and Disease (KIN 505)

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    Instructor: John Miller • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Sports and exercise are a part of American society and are used as entertainment, leisure activity as well as a means to better health. Unfortunately while we partake in these activities few individuals are aware of the risks they are exposing themselves to. In addition as more women engage in sports and exercise medical science is realizing that many conditions and injuries are gender specific. It is well known that women athletes deal with reproductive, Read more ↓

    orthopedic and nutritional issues that differ greatly from men. Also we know that individuals with varying diseases benefit greatly from exercise. This course will join. musculoskeletal anatomy, injuries, gender and special problems together to explain how an individual can enjoy activities safely. In addition this course addresses the interpretation of current medical literature and how to utilize new information.

    Questions for John Miller→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    Other than the time compression, this summer course is completely online with the benefit of learning at your own pace. In addition, I use various technology tools to bring the material to life in the online classroom

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    The course is about the human body, injuries and disease. We have all played sports or are familiar with sports and unfortunately getting hurt is common. This course will teach you the kind of injuries that can occur and how to recognize them. In addition, disease process such as asthma, diabetes and epilepsy among others, which effect performance, will be addressed. Ultimately you will learn more about yourself as well as learning how to assist others.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    I believe in active learning. The videos are designed to engage the students with exercises following each section. In addition I am available for meetings online to clarify any points and give the students the personal attention they may need.

  • Social Media Marketing in Sport (KIN 643)

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    Instructor: Kiernan Gordon • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Students examine the use of social media as a tool in the marketing of sport and sport-related products. THey are expected to effectively analyze and prescribe different ways in which social media can enhance the marketing profile of such products upon course completion. Student work should facilitate a deep understanding of social media in its constituent forms as they apply to sport and students should be able to examine such use critically. Read more ↓

    Questions for Kiernan Gordon→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    In my experience, online learning is not better or worse than traditional, face-to-face, educational settings. Online learning is simply different. Recognizing the unique attributes of online education requires, for example, that I provide my students with more guided instruction regarding their participation in the course than I would provide in face-to-face settings. This ensures that the course is progressing in a way that enables students to learn in different kinds of ways through interactions with their classmates, which I believe is still important and achievable in an online environment.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    Social media has become ubiquitous throughout popular culture, but its use as a professional tool in the world of sport business is still in its relative infancy. Consequently, this course is a means to better equip students with an understanding of social media to achieve their personal and professional objectives. To this end, this course offers opportunities for two different types of students. For students without a background in sport marketing, this course is a good introduction to the unique attributes of marketing sport and sport-related products. For students with a background in sport marketing, this course enables them to build upon their knowledge of the topic by focusing more deeply on the prospects and problems inherent to the use of social media as a marketing tool within sport. Perhaps most importantly, though, this course provides students of all sport-related backgrounds the opportunity to develop a personalized, social media strategy to market themselves effectively within the sport industry.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    I believe that effective learning is based largely on one’s desire to explore anything and everything that interests them as it relates to the subject matter. That’s the beauty of online learning and the benefit of this course. If you are a motivated student, you have the opportunity to both engage with your classmates and the instructor through a variety of communication platforms, while simultaneously having the opportunity to explore course content in a way that suits your individual needs and/or interests. I have created assignments in this course that allow for this type of personalized experience, while also providing a space for you to reach a depth of understanding about the material that you would not be able to do on your own.

  • International Marketing (MKTG 760)

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    Instructor: Nelson Barber • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Environmental factors affecting international trade: culture and business customs, political and legal factors and constraints, economic and technological development, and the international monetary system. Integration of these with the marketing management functions of market research and segmentation; product, promotion, distribution, and pricing decisions. Prereq: ADMN 585 or ADMN 651. Read more ↓

    Questions for Nelson Barber→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    It does not change it at all. My face-to-face courses are structured so students can move at a pace that suits their learning abilities, yet keeps them engaged with the other students. On-line works just as well if not more so. Challenging students and engaging them is not a matter of delivery method, but overall teaching method.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    The days of isolated or shielded markets where foreign suppliers or competitors cannot play are no more. All companies now operate in an international environment where customers can be scattered around the globe and new entrants can emerge from any economy with different business models and cost structures. This presents an exciting but daunting challenge for those with responsibility for marketing. This course will educate students about important global markets and related issues so that they can make informed decisions.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    As an educator, it is my obligation to insure students meet the needs of their future careers, as well as leave UNH as educated and articulate members of society by achieving a level of success through intellectual growth and critical thinking. In order to accomplish this, I have set for myself three specific objectives.
    The first objective involves nurturing academic achievement and mastery of fundamental course contentto prepare them for their careers. The acquisition of the knowledge and related skills is delivered through my assessments and in class engagement that instills confidence in students, thus fostering a solid sense of self-identity. The second objective is the development of student self-sufficiency and autonomy in thinking by enabling them to learn where and how to find answers to questions thereby succeeding independently of others. The third objective is to foster the development of a life-long interest in learning and perhaps even help cultivate the love of learning itself all three of these goals can be accomplished through the continued effort of mentoring, advising, and communication.

  • Country Music (MUSI 406)

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    Instructor: Daniel Beller-McKenna • E-Course 100% online, no campus visits View more course information.

    Course Description:
    This course surveys the rich musical, cultural, and economic history of country music in the United States. Since its inception, country music has embodied a tension between tradition and progress. Country music thereby reflects a basic feature of the American story, valorizing our history while valuing social and technological development. Throughout the course, we consider this tension as it affects the musical content and cultural meaning of country music. Read more ↓

    Questions for Daniel Beller-McKenna→

    How does teaching this class online change your approach?

    Taking a course on-line allows me to plan for events outside the classroom to which students can connect in real time or on their own schedule. I will be streaming a series of interviews and on location reports with individuals and institutions connected to country music in New England. Students will be required to text in questions to at least one of these during the course.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    Country music encapsulates many contested values in American culture. Most importantly, the constant struggle between tradition and progress that informs so much of what it means to be “American” has always driven the development of country music. From Jimmie Rogers’s train-whistle, to Johnny Paycheck’s “Jukebox Charlie,” and on to Dierks Bentley’s “Drunk on a Plane,” country songwriters have always evoked modern technology within a style that prides itself on its roots and traditional values.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    The best learning happens when one’s assumptions are challenged and familiar objects, old ideas, or accepted truths have to be considered from a new perspective. It is the instructor’s responsibility to present students with material they may not have thought about before, or with ways of seeing/hearing/understanding that material; it is the student’s responsibility to approach that material with an open mind in order to learn something new.



On-Campus & Hybrid→

  • Geology and the Environment (ESCI 409) - On Campus Course

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    Instructor: Ray Talkington • Durham Campus View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Did you ever wonder or ask yourself where the water comes from when you turn on the tap? How about has Durham, NH and the UNH campus always been located this far north of the equator? If yes, how did we get where we are today? Hmm, plate tectonics is integral to the formation of many of the different rock types, mineral deposits, and other resources that we rely upon every day. Is there a relationship? Environmental Geology will look at many of these topics and provide you with answers to these and many other questions about the Earth we live and rely on. The course is fast-paced, especially in the Summer, and you will have a lot of hands on activities in the classroom. Read more ↓

    Questions for Ray Talkington

    Is there a difference between summer session and traditionally scheduled classes?

    No, however, the summer session is taught on a shorter schedule and we cover more material over a shorter period of time.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?

    Geology is everwhere around us. Many items we touch and use everyday are from the earth and often times found by a geologist. What Environmental Geology examines are many fundamental geological principles and evaluates them in a holistic approach. For example, is the quality of all groundwater the same everywhere? The simple answer is no, but why is it no? This course will provide answers to this and many other questions in an informative, challenging, and exciting fashion.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?

    Yes, learning is not about memorization of numbers or facts, but understanding. If we understand how and where a rock is formed this will guide us in to understanding what minerals we can expect to find in the rock. This should be fun and exciting. To this day, I have spoken with friends I went to school with and we can talk about certain topics and it seems like yesterday that we learned them. This is what learning is about to me.

  • Environmental & Resource Economics Perspectives (EREC 411) - On Campus or Online sections

    Instructor: John Halstead • Durham Campus View more course information and additional course section offered online.

    Course Description:
    Microeconomic theory and analysis in resource management and use decisions. Survey of significant resource problems from an economic perspective and the application of economic analysis. Cannot be taken for credit after ECON 402 or equivalent. Read more ↓

    Questions for John Halstead→

    Is there a difference between summer session and traditionally scheduled classes?

    I have to change both the exam method and to some degree my teaching methods. The compressed nature of the course also changes grading metrics; for example, I do not require a term paper in summer session.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    A basic understanding of economics is essential to higher education and life in general, as it addresses the key concepts of scarcity and choice which everyone faces every day. It also makes students more literate in economic affairs of the country and hopefully helps them make more informed choices in elections and elsewhere. Finally, the course gives me a chance to dispel widely held incorrect notions about economics—such as “it’s all about money.” It is particularly useful in addressing environmental problems.

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    Learning is a lifelong pursuit. Learning is a shared experience between student and teacher. I believe it is my job as a teacher to make the course material relevant to the student’s life so they at least appreciate the subject matter. Interaction between my students and me often teaches me things I didn’t know.

  • The New Pirates of the Caribbean (EREC 444) - On Campus

    Instructor: Robert Robertson • Durham Campus View more course information.

    Course Description:
    Inquiry into many facets of tourism from the standpoint of tourists and tour destination. Economic and institutional factors affecting human well-being from the use of land and water resources; discussions of distributional aspects of benefits from tourism activities; environmental impacts; ownership patterns and uses; cultural attributes; and local economies in small Caribbean island nations. Cruise ships, time-shares, all-inclusive resorts, hurricanes, casinos, bars, rum, sex, and drugs are investigated through extensive readings and web surfing. Writing intensive.Read more ↓

    Questions for Robert Robertson→

    Is there a difference between summer session and traditionally scheduled classes?

    The summer is a great time to teach a course about life and living on an Island. With a smaller class size and longer class periods, we will able to engage in a wide variety of activities both in and out of the classroom. Students will actively engage and relate their travel and life experiences to explore the contrasts between life in New England and living in the Caribbean. This course will develop and use social media by preparing bi-weekly blogs for fellow students drawn from the Virgin Island Daily News, film, readings, real time and real world testimonies from people who call the Islands home.

    Why should students be interested in this subject matter?
    This course considers the distributional aspects of Island life on land ownership, the cost of food, energy, health care and the lack of fresh water resources. It will investigate many of the complicated and intriguing dimensions of the allocation of the social and environmental benefits and costs of Island life. The course will provide practical information to help students become informed, responsible and ethical travelers and world citizens. It considers travel and tourism as a social force that can provide a multitude benefits to even the most disadvantaged of a society by challenging the status quo via the transformative capabilities of diverse groups of people sharing life on an island. “All we can do is learn the art of being irrational in a reasonable way.” Aldous Huxley

    Do you have a philosophy about learning?
    Yes, I believe that the primary objective of a college education is to help us understand, value and accept our responsibility to become active citizens in their community, sensitive to cultural diversity, so that we may assume active leadership roles and help others do the same. These objectives will be achieved through the integration of service learning, community leadership, intercultural/international studies, travel study and student-centered pedagogy. But the key to such an objective is the integrative student centered pedagogy where students assume primary responsibility for their own learning. John Holt captured the soul of these goals when he said: “Let the learner, direct his or her own learning”.