Media Relations

UNH Experts Available to Discuss Demographic Trends and Political Implications of 2010 U.S. Census
December 15, 2010
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DURHAM, N.H. – Two experts from the University of New Hampshire are available to discuss the demographic trends and political implications of the 2010 U.S. Census, the first data counts of which are scheduled to be released Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. The 2010 Census data to be released include the resident population for the nation and the states as well as the congressional apportionment totals for each state.

Kenneth Johnson, professor of sociology and senior demographer at the UNH Carsey Institute, is available to discuss demographic trends, particularly those related to the demographic changes the nation experienced between 2000 and 2010.

“Population change is widespread in the United States, fueled both by natural increase and by migration. The recession has altered the pace and spatial distribution of these gains. In addition the United States is becoming more diverse from youngest to oldest and Hispanics are the driving force behind this growing diversity,” Johnson says.

Andrew Smith, associate professor of political science and director of the UNH Survey Center, is available to discuss the political implications of the 2010 U.S. Census.

“The census will reduce the power of the Northeast and increase the political power of the growing states in the South. Republicans will benefit as the seats lost are predominately held by Democrats and the states that gain seats are predominantly Republican,” Smith says.

“In addition, Republican gains in the 2010 midterm elections put them in control of how these new district boundaries will be drawn in states like Texas, Utah, Florida, Nevada, Arizona, Georgia and South Carolina. Also, GOP will control legislatures and governorships in many more states than Democrats meaning that they can redraw state legislative lines in their favor, helping them lock in majorities in the future,” he says.

The University of New Hampshire, founded in 1866, is a world-class public research university with the feel of a New England liberal arts college. A land, sea, and space-grant university, UNH is the state's flagship public institution, enrolling 12,200 undergraduate and 2,300 graduate students.

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Kenneth Johnson, professor of sociology and senior demographer at the UNH Carsey Institute.
http://www.unh.edu/news/img/ken_johnson.jpg

Andrew Smith, associate professor of political science and director of the UNH Survey Center.
http://www.unh.edu/news/img/Andy_Smith.jpg

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Media Contact: Lori Wright | 603-862-0574 | UNH Media Relations

Researcher Contact: Kenneth Johnson | 603-862-2205 | UNH Department of Sociology and Carsey Institute

Researcher Contact: Andrew E. Smith, Ph.D. | 603-862-2226 | UNH Survey Center