Anthropology  

ANTH 411 - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology
Credits: 4.00
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice

ANTH 411H - Honors/Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology
Credits: 4.00
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice. Writing intensive.

ANTH 411W - Global Perspectives on the Human Condition: An Introduction to Anthropology
Credits: 4.00
By providing a global perspective on the human experience, this course helps us think about the issues that confront students as citizens of the world. Gleaning lessons from cultures past and present this course examines what it means to be human. Whether humans are violent or peace-loving, egalitarian or hierarchical is linked to specific ways of life, rather than reflecting a fixed human nature. The course examines the economic, political, and social forces that shape human behavior and the global forces that people around the world currently confront. From an anthropological perspective it addresses pressing social issues such as sustainable development, hunger and poverty, population growth, religion and changing world views, racism, urbanization, co modification, and movements for social co modification, and movements for social justice. Writing intensive.

ANTH 412 - Broken Pots and Buried Cities: Adventures in Archaeology
Credits: 4.00
Traces the history of archaeology's most spectacular finds and how those moments of adventure and glory developed into a scientific discipline. Provides an introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to recover, analyze, and interpret data in their ongoing effort to understand humanity through the analysis of those small things left behind.

ANTH 415 - The Human Story: Evolution, Fossils and DNA
Credits: 4.00
This course uses an evolutionary approach to investigate human biological and bio-cultural variation in time and space. Through a study of the basics of population genetics, an evaluation of our closest living relatives, nonhuman primates, and an exploration of the biological and cultural pathways traversed by our ancestors to become modern Homo sapiens, students learn the depth and complexity of the human story. Laboratory exercises dealing with human genetics, hominin fossils, and evolution are integrated with lectures to give students hands-on learning experience. No credit earned if credit received for ANTH 413

ANTH 444 - The Lost Campus: The Archaeology of UNH
Credits: 4.00
In this course, students are active participants in the systematic documentation and examination of the University of New Hampshire's cultural heritage resources. Students are introduced to the practice and process of archaeology through lectures, readings, assignments and hands-on archival research and archaeological fieldwork. Students learn the foundational methods of archaeology including survey, mapping, documentation, excavation, artifact identification, artifact interpretation, and presenting results to the public.

ANTH 500 - Peoples and Cultures of the World
Credits: 4.00
A) North America; B) South America; C) Middle East and North Africa; D) Sub-Saharan Africa; E) South Asia; F) Southeast Asia; G) Oceania; I) Caribbean; Z) Other. Characteristic ecological, historical, and socio-cultural factors in the major ethnographic regions of the globe. Analysis of selected societies and institutions. Offered in the following sections as staff is available and student needs dictate. North America: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideas of North American Indians from pre-colonial times to the present. South America: A survey of the indigenous cultures and selected studies of the relationship between environment and culture. Changes in culture and social organizations since the 16th century will be considered where historical data permit. Middle East and North Africa: The role of ecological, social, cultural, and historical factors in shaping Middle Eastern and North African culture today. Special attention will be paid to family, values, and religion; to nomadic, village, and urban ways of life; and to issues of unity, diversity, colonialism, and culture change. Sub-Saharan Africa: Study of Sub-Saharan economy, society, and culture from pre-colonial times to the present. South Asia: Emphasis on India, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Traditional and changing South Asian cultures, including caste, family, economy, and religious traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Southeast Asia: Geographical, historical, ethnic, and socio-cultural factors characteristic of the region. Impact of Indian, Chinese, Islamic, and European civilizations. Analysis of selected indigenous social, political, economic, and religious institutions. Oceania: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideology of Pacific Island cultures from pre-colonial times to the present. Caribbean: The history and contemporary situation of diverse cultures of the Caribbean are examined using ethnography, music, and film. The mixture of cultural roots from Africa, Europe, and Asia are investigated and the dynamic and fluid nature of these cultures is stressed. Race as an experience of oppression and resistance is discussed.

ANTH 500W - Peoples and Cultures of the World
Credits: 4.00
A) North America; B) South America; C) Middle East and North Africa; D) Sub-Saharan Africa; E) South Asia; F) Southeast Asia; G) Oceania; I) Caribbean; Z) Other. Characteristic ecological, historical, and socio-cultural factors in the major ethnographic regions of the globe. Analysis of selected societies and institutions. Offered in the following sections as staff is available and student needs dictate. North America: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideas of North American Indians from pre-colonial times to the present. South America: A survey of the indigenous cultures and selected studies of the relationship between environment and culture. Changes in culture and social organizations since the 16th century will be considered where historical data permit. Middle East and North Africa: The role of ecological, social, cultural, and historical factors in shaping Middle Eastern and North African culture today. Special attention will be paid to family, values, and religion; to nomadic, village, and urban ways of life; and to issues of unity, diversity, colonialism, and culture change. Sub-Saharan Africa: Study of Sub-Saharan economy, society, and culture from pre-colonial times to the present. South Asia: Emphasis on India, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Traditional and changing South Asian cultures, including caste, family, economy, and religious traditions of Hinduism and Buddhism. Southeast Asia: Geographical, historical, ethnic, and socio-cultural factors characteristic of the region. Impact of Indian, Chinese, Islamic, and European civilizations. Analysis of selected indigenous social, political, economic, and religious institutions. Oceania: Study of the economy, society, religion, art, and ideology of Pacific Island cultures from pre-colonial times to the present. Caribbean: The history and contemporary situation of diverse cultures of the Caribbean are examined using ethnography, music, and film. The mixture of cultural roots from Africa, Europe, and Asia are investigated and the dynamic and fluid nature of these cultures is stressed. Race as an experience of oppression and resistance is discussed. Writing intensive.

ANTH 501 - World Archaelogical Cultures
Credits: 4.00
The development of prehistoric cultures worldwide offered in the following sections: A) North America; B) Mesoamerica; C) South America; D) Near East; E) Other. North America: from earliest settlement to European contact, includes Eastern Woodlands, The Plains, and the Southwest. Mesoamerica: from earliest cultures through Spanish conquest, includes the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec civilizations. South America: Cultural development from earliest migrations to the Inca Empire. Near East: from earliest agricultural villages to the world's first civilizations.

ANTH 508 - Anthropology of Internet
Credits: 4.00
While adopting an antrhopological lens in this coursewe explore how and in what ways digital environment, cyberspace in particular, affects an individual, community, and the state, and how, in turn individuals affect the digital landscape. Focusing on the dynamic interaction between digital environment and humans we will (1) tease out what is "new" about our contemporary moment, (2) clarify changes and continuity that characterize this digital age and its effects on our daily lives, (3) explore vitualityas part of our daily experiences, and (4) learn how in what ways cyberspace becomes a place of personal acheivement, dwelling of community-like formations, social control, and politics.

ANTH 511 - Core Concepts in Anthropology
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to the core concepts and paradigms of contemporary anthropology. Students will learn how anthropology approaches the study of family. kinship, community, gender, economic relationships, political systems, religion, social change and globalization. Ethnographic material from a variety of cultures will illustrate the concepts of social structure and the cultural construction of categories such as race and ethnicity. Foundation course required of anthropology majors in first year of declaring their major. Writing intensive.

ANTH 513 - Ethnographic Methods
Credits: 4.00
This class introduces students to a number of ethnographic methods both as technology of conducting ethnographic research and as theory of ethnographic practice. This is an experience-based course; the students are expected to rigorously engage in learning about ethnographic methods not only through reading and discussion, but mainly through their practice. All cultural anthropologists and some representatives of other disciplines participate in ethnographic research throughout their careers. The course provides students with information and experience that informs and guides their future knowledgeable and reflexive ethnographic research.

ANTH 514 - Method and Theory in Archaeology
Credits: 4.00
Basic method and theory; techniques in recovering and interpreting data; laboratory exercises in ceramic and lithic analysis. Critical evaluation of archaeological literature. Prereq: ANTH 412 or permission.

ANTH 515 - Anthropology and Contemporary Issues
Credits: 4.00
Anthropological approaches to current world issues such as racism, poverty, religious movements, revolution, and environmental stress. Selected topics examined in the context of both western and nonwestern societies.

ANTH #520 - Anthropology of Migration
Credits: 4.00
The question of immigration, an issue of great concern throughout the world, is addressed along with the movement of people as a historical, economic, and cultural process. Life experiences of people in motion are examined. Using case studies, past and present migrations are compared. The racial, ethnic, and national identities of migrants are explored. Distinctions between immigrants, refugees, sojourners, internal and international migration, and legal and undocumented migrants, as well as the history and current status of attacks on immigrants are critiqued. While most of the course material is drawn from the U.S. experience, the perspective on migration is global.

ANTH 597 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Occasional and experimental offerings on an entry level. May be repeated for different topics.

ANTH 601 - Topics in Popular Culture
Credits: 4.00
This course explores the anthropology of popular culture using film, novels, and other media as well as widely disseminated texts. The course focuses on myths about culture and human behavior which become part of the global cultural mainstream, and counterposes popular stereotypes with data from cultural anthropology and archaeology. A) Native Americans and Popular Culture B) Archaeology and Popular Culture C) Popular Culture and Physical Anthropology D) Poverty and Popular Culture E) Gender and Popular Culture F) Other. May be repeated but not in duplicate areas.

ANTH 610 - Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing
Credits: 4.00
How we as humans define sickness and health, our theories of who or what made us ill, our approach to biological processes from birth to death and our search for cures have varied through history and from culture to culture. This course provides and overview of illness and healing beliefs and practices in different cultures both around the world and in the United States. The course examines the practices and belief systems of healers, voodoo priestesses, midwives, Taoist priests, psychiatrists and medical doctors through the same analytical lens. Operates on a seminar format.

ANTH 610W - Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing
Credits: 4.00
How we as humans define sickness and health, our theories of who or what made us ill, our approach to biological processes from birth to death and our search for cures have varied through history and from culture to culture. This course provides and overview of illness and healing beliefs and practices in different cultures both around the world and in the United States. The course examines the practices and belief systems of healers, voodoo priestesses, midwives, Taoist priests, psychiatrists and medical doctors through the same analytical lens. Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

ANTH 611 - History of Anthropological Theory
Credits: 4.00
Provides a grounding in the history of social thought in cultural anthropology and sister disciplines from 19th century evolutionism to the present. Course reading is based on primary sources - original essays written by theorists central to the discipline. Assessment is partly based on students' ability to apply theoretical concepts to novel contexts, as well as the ability to evaluate and compare theories on the basis of logic and evidence.

ANTH 616 - Religion, Culture, and Society
Credits: 4.00
Major anthropological theories of religion; analysis of religious beliefs as symbolic systems and their interrelations with ritual and other social institutions. Detailed study of specific religions. Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

ANTH #618 - Political Anthropology
Credits: 4.00
Political processes and structures in nonindustrial societies. Major topics: centralization of power and authority, legal systems, and warfare. Prereq: ANTH 411 or permission.

ANTH 620 - Ritual and Religion of Ancient Mesoamerica
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the religious beliefs and ritual practices of ancient Mesoamerican cultures, such as the Olmec, Maya, and Aztecs. Students learn about the meaning of ritual practices (like human sacrifice and burial rites) and the myths that underlie this mysterious ritual behavior from an archaeological perspective. This class is writing intensive and involves primarily in-class discussion. Students are evaluated based on their participation, oral presentations, and a number of writing assignments. Writing intensive.

ANTH 625 - Sexuality in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the ideologies and practices associated with sexuality from a broad perspective that incorporates diverse case studies from the ethnographic record. Working from the argument that much of human sexual behavior is culturally constructed rather than biologically determined, the course invites students to expand their notion of the "normal" and to consider the human condition from a cross-cultural perspective. Topics discussed include cross-cultural varieties of trangendered experience, same-sex sexualities, and heteronormative identities.

ANTH 627 - Urbanization in Africa
Credits: 4.00
Explores the process of urbanization and describes the creation of urban culture in sub-Saharan Africa by investigating the effects of urbanization on socio-economic and cultural conditions. An attempt is made throughout the course to study urbanization and urban life within the context of broader societal, economic, cultural, and political relations in order to understand the dynamics inherent in these processes. Urbanization is discussed in the context of colonialism, post-colonialism, and other social relations of dependency that continue to shape urban life and urban-rural relations.

ANTH 640 - Anthropology of Islam: Muslims' everyday lives in comtemporary communities
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to different ways of being Muslim in contemporary world, focusing on Muslim communities residing in Central Asia (post-Soviet independent countries, China, and Afghanistan); the United States and some parts of Europe; and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

ANTH 670 - Language and Culture
Credits: 4.00
Investigates the relationship between language and culture and how their interpenetration produces meaning. Special attention to the issues of class, gender, and ethnicity and the ways in which inequality is maintained through culturally patterned speech styles and associated prejudices. Speech communities in the United States are emphasized.

ANTH 674 - Archaeological Survey and Mapping in Belize
Credits: 4.00
Involves hands-on training in field reconnaissance, survey and mapping of archaeological sites, and the use of ARCGIS mapping software. This field course takes place in Belize (Central America) and will be of interest to students studying anthropology, geography and geospatial technologies, among others. Special fee.

ANTH 675 - Archaeol Field School Belize
Credits: 8.00
The Archaeological Field School in Belize is an intensive, four-week summer program focused on the ancient Maya civilization in the eastern Belize River valley in Central America. Project participants will map and excavate archaeological sites and receive hands-on training in field and lab methods. Students will be graded on their participation, their submission of a field notebook, an exam based on readings and nightly lectures, and a final written report based on original field research. Special fee

ANTH 680 - Globalization, Development, and Poverty
Credits: 4.00
This course considers the phenomenon of globalization, a term that has come into use since the 1980s to describe the ever-intensifying networks of cross-border human interaction which increasingly tie the world together. Tracing the relationship between the increasing interconnectedness of the world, the processes of economic development and change, and world poverty, the course demonstrates that the consequences of globalization are neither the same nor positive in every country. Through the use of case studies of different development processes, students gain an understanding of why and how globalization is creating differential effects in different parts of the world. This course is the first course of a suggested two course sequence, ANTH 680 and ANTH 780. Writing intensive.

ANTH 685 - Gender, Sexuality and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa
Credits: 4.00
AIDS is spreading rapidly in sub-Saharan Africa. Course explores the factors that are behind this rapid transmission, including poverty, gender inequality, culture and sexuality. Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

ANTH 690 - Ethnographic Field Research
Credits: 4.00
Explores history, theory, and practice of ethnographic research. Students read and practice such techniques as mapping, taking life histories, compiling genealogies, and analyzing use of space, language, and rituals. Each student also carries out, writes up, and presents an independent research project. Prereq: ANTH 411 or SOC 400; one 500-level or higher anthropology or sociology course; or permission. No credit for students who have completed ANTH 630. Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

ANTH 695 - Globalization and Global Population Health
Credits: 4.00
This course considers the phenomenon of globalization and its impact on health of populations across cultures and nations. The term globalization has come into use since the late 1980's to describe the over-intensifying network of cross border human interaction that increasingly ties the world together. At most abstract level, glaobalization is characterized by vast constant movement of capital goods and jobs across borders usually under decisions made by multinational corporations and global financial lending institutions. Studies show that this process of social change tends to increase economic opportunities but without distributing them equally with deleterious consequences on people's health. Writing intensive.

ANTH 697 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Occasional or experimental offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Prereq: ANTH 411 or permission. Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

ANTH 698 - Folklore and Folklife
Credits: 4.00
Examines the materials and methods used to study folklore and folklife, emphasizing the historical context and development of folklore studies in North America and Europe, field research, performance theory, and other topics. (Also offered as ENGL 732.) Operates on a seminar format. Writing intensive.

ANTH 699 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 4.00 or 8.00
Independent work in the library or field; recommended for, but not confined to, majors intending to pursue graduate studies; required for honors candidates. Contact staff to obtain approval and arrange supervision prior to senior year. 4 or 8 credit 2 semesters, 8 credits required for honors; an IA grade (continuous course) given at end of first semester. Writing intensive.

ANTH 699H - Honors Senior Thesis
Credits: 4.00 or 8.00
Independent work in the library or field; recommended for, but not confined to, majors intending to pursue graduate studies; required for honors candidates. Contact staff to obtain approval and arrange supervision prior to senior year. 4 or 8 credit 2 semesters, 8 credits required for honors; an IA grade (continuous course) given at end of first semester. Writing intensive.

ANTH 700 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Provides student with supervised practical experience in anthropology in one of the following areas: A) professional or community support work within an academic or applied anthropology setting; B) teaching; C) museum work; D) archaeological laboratory or fieldwork; E) research on a faculty research project; F) editorial work on a journal or faculty book project. May be repeated up to 8 credits. Prereq: permission.

ANTH 705 - Topics in Mesoamerican Anthropology
Credits: 4.00
Examines the very origins of civilization in the New World by first focusing on the domestication of staple food crops and the development of inequality and carefully tracing the ever increasing socio-political complexity displayed by early Mesoamerican peoples. Includes the successive rises of the Olmec, the Zapotec, the Preclassic Maya and Teotihuacan in an effort to understand the mechanisms driving the development of agricultural intensification, economic specialization, long-distance trade networks, and the institution of divine kingship. Operates on a seminar format, open only to juniors and seniors.

ANTH 730 - Anthropological Thinking on Education
Credits: 4.00
Course introduces the students to key anthropological concepts that, taken together, underpin anthropological thinking on education. The concepts are Culture (Geertz, White), Evolution (Morgan Steward), Function (Malinowski, Radcliffe-Brown), Interpretation (Geertz, Turner), Feminism and Postmodernism (Leacock, Rosaldo) and Process (Bailey, Vincent). The course analyzes and synthesizes them into a conceptual framework by which to understand human behavior, activity, production and reproduction in formal education.

ANTH 740 - Teaching Race
Credits: 4.00
How do we teach about race? What are schools and universities communicating about the meanings of racial ascription, of color and whiteness? How can we best use the power of educational institutions to further the struggles for equality and racial justice?And how can we do this in ways that constructively educate all our students? This course brings together prospective teachers and other students interested in human relations to discuss ways of combining the insights of new scholarship on race with personal experiences and challenges in the classroom to address these questions.

ANTH 750 - Islam and Gender: Gendered Lives of Women and Men in Muslim Communities
Credits: 4.00
This seminar focuses on the lives of Muslim women and men as gendered subjects. The seminar introduces students to several practical and historical aspects of gender politics in different Muslim communities, and critically questioning and challenging established representation of Muslim men and women. Prereq: ENGL 401. Writing intensive.

ANTH 785 - The Anthropology of Dreams and Dreaming
Credits: 4.00
This course emphasizes the "dream theories" of indigenous societies and how beliefs and practices associated with dreaming are integrated into cultural, ontological, political, economic, and religious systems. Western theories are also examined from within a comparative perspective--from basic Freudian models to contemporary scientific debates about the neurological origin and significance of dreaming.

ANTH 795 - Reading and Research
Credits: 1.00 to 8.00
A) Cultural/Social Anthropology; B) Anthropological Linguistics; C) Archaeology; D) Physical Anthropology. Prereq: 12 credits of anthropology; permission.

ANTH 796 - Reading and Research
Credits: 1.00 to 8.00
A) Cultural/Social Anthropology; B) Anthropological Linguistics; C) Archaeology; D) Physical Anthropology. Prereq: 12 credits of anthropology; permission.

ANTH 797 - Advanced Topics
Credits: 4.00
Advanced or specialized courses presenting material not normally covered in regular course offerings. May be repeated, but not in duplicate areas. Course descriptions on file in the department office during registration. A) Social Organization; B) Economic Anthropology; C) Anthropology of Religion; D) Political Anthropology; E) Social Impact Analysis; F) Cultural Ecology; G) Prehistoric Archaeology; H) Historic Archaeology; I) Cultural Resources Conservation; J) Lithic Analysis; K) Ceramic Analysis; L) Faunal Analysis; M) Human Evolution; N) Human Variations; O) Anthropological Theory. Prereq: ANTH 411 or 412 (as appropriate)/ or permission. Operates on a seminar format, open only to juniors and seniors.