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Graduate Course Catalog 2014-2015

Graduate School

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Education (EDUC)

» http://www.unh.edu/education/

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This program is offered in Durham and in Manchester through GSMC.

 

Degrees Offered: M.A., M.Ed., M.A.T., Ed.S., Ph.D.

 


Certificates Offered: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Curriculum and Instructional Leadership, Mentoring Teachers, Special Education Administration

 


Note:  The Department of Education has suspended admission, effective Spring 2012, to the Master of Education degree in Administration and Master of Education degree in Reading.

The Department of Education offers a variety of programs leading to the master's degree, the doctor of philosophy degree, and the education specialist degree.  The department also offers graduate certificate programs in autism spectrum disorder and mentoring teachers.

The master of arts in teaching is offered in secondary education. The master of education is offered in counseling, early childhood education (including an option in special needs), elementary education, secondary education, special education, and teacher leadership. Special education certification is also available to those who complete the M.Ed. programs in elementary or secondary education or who complete the M.A.T program in secondary education.

The education specialist degree is offered in educational administration and supervision. The doctor of philosophy is offered in education.

The master of science for teachers is offered through the departments of chemistry, English, and mathematics. (See those departments for information.) Most programs are available to part-time admitted graduate students.


Admission Requirements

In addition to the materials required by the Graduate School, each application must include recent (within five years) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores and a thoughtful, well-written statement of purpose for undertaking graduate study in a particular program.

Individual programs within the department may have additional admissions requirements. Applicants should refer to specific program descriptions. Consultation with a program faculty member is recommended. In all cases, the applicant's relevant experience, references, and professional goals will be considered in the admission process.

Action on applications to Department of Education programs varies by individual program. Applicants to this program must refer to the online Programs of Study listing for additional application instructions. This can be done by referring to the Graduate School's Admissions web page and then Application Requirements. The additional application instructions can be found under Requirements and Supplemental Documents.


Doctor of Philosophy

Program information: Please contact education department.

 

The program of Education offers a Ph.D. in education with specialization in fields related to the areas of (1) teacher education; (2) curriculum and instruction; (3) educational leadership and policy studies; (3) experiential/outdoor education; and (4) children and youth in communities. The doctoral program is designed to engender a broad understanding of the field of education by encouraging focused scholarly inquiry grounded in the reality of educational practice across varied formal and informal settings. Professors and students work to place educational issues in philosophical, socio-cultural, and policy-related contexts.  The program enrolls full- and part-time students.

An individual program of study is planned by the student and her or his guidance committee. Each student's program includes a set of common core courses, specialized study, a number of selected electives from across areas of inquiry, and required research preparation. Students must meet specific University, department, and program requirements. Within this framework, individual programs can vary widely from student to student depending upon the student's own interests and goals.

The Ph.D. in education provides students with preparation for research, teaching, and leadership in a variety of settings. Graduates hold positions at all levels of schooling, from colleges and universities to K-12 schools. Former students are also involved in work as policy makers, community agency directors, consultants, and research analysts.


Admission

Students admitted to the program must have completed a master's degree in education or a related field and will normally have worked full time as an educator at the elementary, secondary, or college level. Entering students are expected to have completed some graduate-level coursework in educational psychology, curriculum and instruction, educational structure and change, and the philosophical and social foundations of education. Exceptional candidates who do not meet all of these course prerequisites will be considered. To apply, candidates must submit a Graduate School application, transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework, and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores.

In addition to the personal statement required on the Graduate School application, candidates must submit an essay on an educational issue. This essay should discuss one issue in the field of education that is of interest to the candidate. It should explore the opportunities and challenges this issue poses and explain why the applicant finds it personally compelling (1,000 to 1,500 words in length).

Prior to completing and submitting the application, it is highly recommended that the candidate arrange for an on-campus interview with the director of doctoral studies or with an appropriate department faculty member. Applicants from distant locations may interview by phone. Contact the Department of Education by phone: (603) 862-2310 or e-mail: education.department@unh.edu.


Degree Requirements

Candidates for the degree must meet admission requirements, develop and complete an approved program of study in consultation with their guidance committee, complete required coursework, undergo an annual assessment review by the Doctoral Advisory Committee (for first- and second-year students), pass a qualifying examination to advance to candidacy, establish a dissertation committee, develop an approved dissertation proposal, write and present the dissertation, and pass the final oral examination.


Program of Studies

Upon acceptance to the program, students are assigned an adviser. During the first year of study, students identify, either in consultation with their adviser or with the director of doctoral studies, faculty members to serve as their guidance committee. Programs for the doctoral degree in education are planned individually by students and their guidance committees. The program of study consists of four major elements: common core courses, specialization specific to the student's scholarly interests, a number of selected electives from across areas of inquiry, and research preparation, including specific advanced research modules. At least five common core courses are required of all students: Proseminar in Doctoral Studies: Critical Inquiry in Education; Normative Inquiry in Education; Qualitative Inquiry in Education; Introduction to Statistics: Inquiry, Analysis, and Decision Making; Applied Regression Analysis for Educational Research; and Quantitative Inquiry: Methods and Techniques of Educational Research. Typically students complete 52 to 64 hours in graduate coursework following their matriculation. These hours do not include doctoral research (EDUC 999).


Qualifying Examination

To be advanced to Ph.D. candidacy, students must satisfactorily complete qualifying examinations as well as other program requirements. After completing at least two-thirds of their coursework, students may take the qualifying examination. The examination is a written exam to be developed, supervised, and evaluated by the student's guidance committee. The qualifying examination is used to evaluate the student's general knowledge in relevant areas of inquiry, and his or her fitness for engaging in research, particularly in the subject proposed for the dissertation.


Dissertation

To complete the degree, the student must present and defend a dissertation of original research and publishable quality.


Administration and Supervision

Program information: Todd DeMitchell, Virginia Garland

The Department of Education offers the degrees of master of education and education specialist in Educational Administration and Supervision.


Master of Education

Note:  The Department of Education has suspended admission, effective Spring 2012, to the Master of Education degree in Administration.

The program is designed for the experienced teacher who wishes to become qualified in the broad area of supervision and administration, grades K-12. Emphasis is on the elementary and secondary school principalship. This program leads to certification in New Hampshire as a principal.

Core requirements (28 credits): 953, Seminar in Curriculum Study; 961, Public School Administration; 962, Educational Finance and Business Management; 965, Educational Supervision; 967, School Law; 969, Practicum in Educational Administration; and 972, Educational Program Evaluation.

Electives (8 credits): Electives are elected in consultation with the program adviser. 

Concluding experience: A degree candidate must successfully complete one of the following: a comprehensive oral examination based on a set of theses statements prepared by the candidate, or a major research study related to school administration, curricula, or educational supervision.


Education Specialist (Ed.S.)

This program, formerly the C.A.G.S. degree program, is designed for those who possess a master's degree in school administration or a master's degree in a related educational field. This program offers advanced preparation for those educators who desire careers as school superintendents, assistant superintendents, state department of education personnel, vocational education coordinators, curriculum coordinators, or educational personnel in private organizations. This program leads to certification as a superintendent in New Hampshire. It is possible to also receive certification as a principal under special circumstances.

Core requirements (20 credits): Ed.S. students will take the following five core courses: 964, Human Resources in Education; 968, Collective Bargaining in Public Education; 971, School Facilities Management; 973, Policy, Politics, and planning in Education; and 977, Leadership: The District Level Administrator.

Electives (8 credits): Electives are selected in consultation with the program adviser. A student who does not hold a master's degree in administration may be required to take specific courses as electives.

Concluding experience (8 credits): A student must complete a field internship and a significant field project in an approved administrative setting.

 


Counseling Program

Program information: Loan Phan, Janet Thompson

The Graduate Program in Counseling prepares counselors to function in a variety of institutions, agencies, and schools dedicated to the educational, social, vocational, and psychological development of the person. Graduates are typically involved in team delivery of services and work in collaboration with other human services professionals. Students are encouraged to develop a fundamental psychotherapeutic approach that can be applied to diverse client populations. Students may also individualize their program of study to serve the needs of a particular clientele. This can be accomplished through selected readings and projects in required courses, internship experiences, elective courses, and independent study or research projects. The program meets educational requirements for certification in school counseling (M.Ed.). 


Master of Education (48 credit hours)

Core requirements (44 credits): 919, Counseling Practicum: Professional and Ethical Orientation; 920, Counseling Theory and Practice; 921, Psychology of Career and Personal Development; 922, Assessment in Counseling; 923, Group Counseling; 924, Psychological Disorders: Variations in Human Development; 925, Counseling Internship I; 926, Counseling Internship; 932, Society and Culture: Contemporary Issues in Counseling; 933, Developmental Models of Comprehensive School Guidance; 851c, Teaching Exceptional Learners: Related Services.

Electives (4 credits): Selected in consultation with the student's adviser, electives may be chosen from graduate-level courses on campus, or may be completed through an approved independent study.

Concluding experience: Degree candidates must complete a comprehensive essay examination.


Early Childhood Education

Program information: Eun Kyeong Cho

The Department of Education offers the master of education degree in early childhood education and an option in special needs. When completed in conjunction with a degree, certification is available as an early childhood teacher (PreK - 3rd).  Certification requirements are additional to the master's degree but may be completed as electives for the degree. This program is an advanced course of study designed for teachers, administrators, and other early childhood practitioners who wish to improve their professional competence and broaden their career opportunities. The program emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and competencies in child development (birth through eight years), learning environments, developmentally appropriate curriculum, developmental and cultural diversity, and professional leadership. The coursework culminates in extensive field-based experience.

Admission requirements: All admitted students are expected to have had at least one course in child development at the upper-division level and at least 200 hours of supervised classroom experience with children from birth through eight years of age, or the equivalent.

Core requirements (26 credits): 861, Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children; 941, Diversity and Child Development; 942, Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning; 948, Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education; one course selected from the special needs option courses offering (EDUC 856, 860, or 862); and two semesters (6 credits) of internship in EDUC 900B and 901B.

Electives (10 credits): Selected in consultation with the program adviser.

Concluding experience: Degree requirements 36 credits. All degree candidates must successfully complete two concluding experiences: (1) one of the following: comprehensive written and oral examination, or a research thesis, (2) and a graduation portfolio.


Special Needs Option

Program information: Eun Kyeong Cho

The Department of Education offers the master of education degree in early childhood education with an option in special needs. When completed in conjunction with a degree, certification is available as an early childhood special education teacher (birth through eight years). Certification requirements are additional to the master's degree but may be completed as electives for the degree.

This program is an advanced course of study designed for teachers, administrators, and other early childhood practitioners who wish to improve their professional competence and broaden their career opportunities. The program emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and competencies in child development (birth through eight years), learning environments, developmentally appropriate curriculum, developmental and cultural diversity, and professional leadership. The coursework culminates in extensive field-based experience.

Admission requirements: All admitted students are expected to have had at least one course in child development at the upper-division level and at least 200 hours of supervised classroom experience with children from birth through eight years of age, or the equivalent.

In addition to the early childhood core requirements described above, students choosing this option will concentrate on young children who are at risk for, or have, developmental difficulties and special needs. Coursework emphasizes an understanding of the role of the family, community, and social policy in early development and intervention. The program is non categorical in its approach to assessment and educational planning.

Core requirements (34 credits):  The core requirements of the early childhood program with the addition of three courses.

EC core requirements: 861, Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children; 941, Diversity and Child Development; 942, Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning; 948, Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education; and two semesters (6 credits) of internship in EDUC 900B and 901B.

Additional Special Needs core requirements: 860, Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs; 862, Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs: Evaluation and Program Design; and 856, Supporting Parents of Students with Special Needs.

Electives (8 credits): Selected in consultation with the program adviser.

Concluding experience: Degree requirements 42 credits. A degree candidate must successfully complete two concluding experiences: (1) one of the following: a comprehensive written and oral examination, or a research thesis,  (2) and a graduation portfolio.

 

 


Reading

Note:  The Department of Education has suspended admission, effective Spring 2012, to the Master of Education degree in Reading.

Program information: Paula Salvio, Ruth Wharton-McDonald

The graduate program in reading prepares literacy specialists and teachers to provide leadership and instruction in literacy in a variety of educational contexts. The instructional sequence integrates theory, research, and instructional practice, and incorporates field-based and clinical components. Particular emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of reading and writing. Graduates of the program provide direct instruction in literacy and offer leadership in organizing, managing, and evaluating literacy programs.

Core requirements (24 credits): 907, Foundations of Literacy Instruction; 908-909, Clinical Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties and Disabilities; 910, Reading and Writing Methods in the Middle/Secondary School; 913, Field Practicum in Reading; 914, Seminar in Reading Research.

Electives (12 credits): Selected in consultation with the program adviser; a student using the research thesis option as a concluding experience will use 8 credits for EDUC 899, Master's Thesis.

Concluding experience: A degree candidate will successfully complete either a written examination or a research thesis.


Special Education

Program information: Vincent Connelly, Georgia Kerns,  William Wansart

The special education program prepares highly qualified educators who possess the knowledge, disposition, and skills necessary to take the lead in establishing effective teaching and learning environments for a diverse population of learners, who are capable of collaborating with classroom teachers as team leaders or consultants, and who utilize these skills within their school communities, and within the profession itself. The program meets current certification requirements in the state of New Hampshire in General Special Education, Learning Disabilities, intellectual and developmental disabilities , and Special Education Administration.

Degree Requirements

Prerequisites for General Special Education Certification:

1. All candidates are required to complete a course in mathematics teaching methods and a course in reading teaching methods. At UNH, courses that meet the reading requirement are EDUC 806, Introduction to Reading Instruction and EDUC 907, Foundations of Reading Instruction. Courses that meet the mathematics requirement are MATH 701, Exploring Math for Teachers I and MATH 702, Exploring Math for Teachers II. Equivalent courses taken at another college or university may be substituted.

2. All students are required to complete EDUC 850, Introduction to Exceptionality and EDUC 851, Educating Exceptional Learners. Equivalent courses taken at another college or university may be substituted.

3. Credits for prerequisite courses will not count toward those needed for the M.Ed. degree.

Core Courses (32 credit hours)
Required courses for all students:

EDUC 756/856, Supporting Families of Individuals with Exceptionalities 4 cr.
EDUC 900C, Internship and Seminar in Special Education 6 cr.
EDUC 901C, Internship and Seminar in Special Education 6 cr.
EDUC 938, Advanced Seminar in Special Education 4 cr.
EDUC 939, Assessment of Children with Learning Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 940, Teaching Children with Learning Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 981, Methods and Techniques of Educational Research 4 cr. or an equivalent educational research course

Elective Courses (12 credit hours minimum)
EDUC 852, Contemporary Issues in Learning Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 853, Contemporary Issues in Behavior Disorders 4 cr.
EDUC 854, Contemporary Issues in Developmental Disabilities 4 cr.
EDUC 855, Fostering Social Relationships for Students Who Experience Severe Disabilities 2 cr.
EDUC 860, Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs 4 cr.
EDUC 876, Reading for Children with Special Needs 4 cr.
EDUC 908/909, Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 947, Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs: Evaluation and Program Design 4 cr.

EDUC 951, Laws and Regulations Affecting the Education of Individuals with Disabilities 4 cr.

EDUC 952, Inclusive Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction and Communication Supports 4 cr.

EDUC 956, Positive Behavioral Supports 4 cr. Students will select elective courses in consultation with their adviser. At most, 4 credit hours of EDUC 899, Thesis may count as elective work.

Other courses may be included on recommendation from the adviser.

Core Courses for certification in learning disabilities in addition to those necessary for certification in General Special Education:

EDUC 852, Contemporary Issues in Learning Disabilities 4 cr.
EDUC 908/909, Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities 4 cr./4 cr.
EDUC 910, Reading and Writing Methods in the Middle/Secondary School 4 cr.

Core Courses for certification in intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in addition to those necessary for certification in General Special Education:

EDUC 854, Contemporary Issues in Developmental Disabilities 4 cr.
EDUC 855, Fostering Social Relationships for Students who Experience Severe Disabilities 2 cr.
EDUC 876, Reading for Children with Special Needs 4 cr.
EDUC 952, Inclusive Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction and Communication Supports 4 cr.
.

EDUC 938, Advanced Seminar in Special Education 4 cr.
EDUC 956, Positive Behavioral Supports 4 cr.
COMM 914, Seminar in Alternative and Augmentative Communication 3 cr.

Core Courses for Special Education Administration in addition to those necessary for certification in General Special Education:

EDUC 951, Laws and Regulations in Special Education 4 cr.
EDUC 956, Learning to Listen: Positive Behavioral Supports 4 cr.
EDUC 961, Public School Administration 4 cr.
EDUC 962, Educational Finance and Business Management 4 cr.
EDUC 964, Human Resources in Education 4 cr.
EDUC 974, Administrative Internship 6 cr.

Concluding Experiences
All students will have the option of one of two concluding experiences:

1. Research project with a defense, or

2. A research thesis that meets the requirements of the Graduate School and the Education department (6-10 credits).

Requirements for the thesis are explained in the Graduate School publication entitled Thesis and Dissertation Manual. Which can be found at www.gradschool.unh.edu.   Requirements for the project may be obtained from the adviser or on the program website.

Grades and Credit Hours
The M.Ed. degree requires a minimum of 44 hours of graduate-level credits. The exact number of credit hours will depend on the student's background, competencies, and professional goals, and will be determined by the adviser.

 


Teacher Education Program

Program information: Tom Schram, Cindy Glidden

The Teacher Education Program prepares teachers who possess the knowledge, disposition, and skills necessary to take the lead in establishing effective teaching and learning environments within their own classrooms and school communities.

The Department of Education offers the master of arts in teaching degree in secondary education and the master of education degree in elementary and secondary education for those seeking initial teacher licensing. The master of education degree in teacher leadership is available for experienced teachers.

Applicants to teacher education programs are evaluated on the following criteria: undergraduate academic record, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores, personal statement, and letters of recommendation regarding academic ability, motivation, interpersonal skills, and potential for success as a teacher. Those seeking admission to programs leading to teacher licensing should also have a positive recommendation from EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching, or equivalent experience.

In the admissions process, we seek evidence that students have the following knowledge, abilities, and dispositions: motives to teach that include a strong social commitment to contribute to society through education; a disposition to care for their students; an ability to interact positively with children and adults; a capacity to win the respect of peers and be effective in group interaction, showing openness to the needs and views of others; well-developed communication skills, including speaking, writing, and listening skills, as well as an ability to engage others in both the giving and receiving of information and feelings; perceptiveness or the ability to identify and process the relevant details in their environment, especially in the context of a classroom; the ability to make reasonable judgments in a context of complex situations that change from moment to moment; the capacity for clear thinking and an ability to translate thoughts into simple and clear explanations; superior academic skills, extensive knowledge of at least one major discipline, intellectual curiosity, the ability to be open to the unknown, and the willingness to tolerate uncertainty in the face of enormous pressure to deny it; a disposition to take charge of their own learning, which includes the active pursuit of feedback and the willingness to take thoughtful risks.

Any course taken in the Department of Education that will be used to fulfill a teacher licensure requirement must be completed with a grade of B- or better.


Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Education Programs for Those Seeking Teacher Licensure

These programs are designed for two types of students: UNH undergraduates who anticipate completing the Five-Year Teacher Preparation Program at UNH, and students who completed an undergraduate degree either at UNH or elsewhere with little or no coursework in education. The programs lead to teaching licensure at the elementary and secondary levels. Admission to these programs is competitive.

Licensure requirements that must be met prior to or as part of the master's degree program include completion of 4 credits or an equivalent in each of the following: 500/935, Exploring Teaching; 800, Educational Structure and Change; 801, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology; 803, Alternative Teaching Models; 805, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education; 851A or B, Educating Exceptional Learners; 900A, 901A, Internship and Seminar/Teaching (6 credits each, must be taken as part of the program).

Elementary teacher licensure requirements include two additional courses: 806, Introduction to Reading Instruction in the Elementary Schools; and a mathematics course: EDUC 741/841, MATH 701, Exploring Mathematics I, or MATH 702, Exploring Mathematics II (4 credits each), or the equivalent.

Students pursuing teacher licensure in art, biology, chemistry, Earth sciences, general science, physics, or social studies must also complete EDUC 807, Teaching Reading through the Content Areas (2 credits).

Preparation for licensure in general special education is available to those who complete the M.A.T. or M.Ed. programs in either elementary or secondary education. This licensure allows recipients to serve as general special education teachers. In order to qualify for licensure in general special education, students must complete 22 credits (18 of which may be used toward the M.Ed. degree, or 6 toward the M.A.T. degree); a reading methods course; a mathematics methods course; 850, Introduction to Exceptionality; 851, Educating Exceptional Learners; 939-940, Assessment and Teaching of Children with Learning Difficulties; 900C, 901C, Internship and Seminar (3 credits each).

Dual licensure in early childhood education and elementary education is available to those who are enrolled in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education. This dual licensure allows recipients to serve as early childhood and/or elementary teachers. The early childhood/elementary education dual-certification program option is intended for students who have majored in family studies with an option in child studies or young child/P-3 program, or the equivalent. Dual licensure requires three graduate courses in early childhood education to be selected in consultation with an adviser from the early childhood program. The three early childhood courses will count as a graduate concentration in the M.Ed. elementary program. Students will complete a full-year internship at the K-3 level under the auspices of the teacher education program.


Master of Arts in Teaching (Secondary)

Students complete an Internship (12 credits) and an additional 20 credits. Of the 20 additional credits at the graduate level, three courses totaling 9 to 12 credits must be taken from a subject field outside education. The remaining 8-11 credits can be in education or in another department.

In consultation with his/her adviser, a graduate student in this program is strongly encouraged to develop a subject-area concentration consisting of at least 3 courses.

Concluding experience: A degree candidate must successfully complete a teacher education program portfolio and colloquium in conjunction with the internship.


Master of Education (Elementary and Secondary)

Students complete an Internship (12 credits) and an additional 20 credits. Of the 20 additional credits at the graduate level, 10 must be in education and 10 can be in either education or in another department.

Concluding experience: A degree candidate must successfully complete a teacher education program portfolio and colloquium in conjunction with the internship.


Master of Education in Educational Studies

The Master of Education in Educational Studies is a master’s degree program that can be completed fully or partially online. It is designed for educators who wish to expand their knowledge of education, improve their educational practice, and positively impact public and private schools. The M.Ed. is also intended to provide a foundation in educational studies for individuals broadly interested in education in a variety of settings, including business, educational and research centers, and national and state agencies. The program provides a context in which participants can develop tools of inquiry to investigate questions about teaching, mentoring, learning and school reform, and to inspire others to work toward educational change. This program does not lead to a teaching or administrative credential.

The 30 – 32 credit program is structured around a knowledge and application core (12 credits) that includes a course on contemporary issues in education, a course on the analysis of teaching, mentoring and learning, and a course on educational research methods. Program participants will also complete four electives (14 - 16 credits), designed to provide depth or breadth to their course of study. Finally, program participants will complete an inquiry project course in which they develop a literature review on an educational issue of their choice, conduct research, and present their findings in the context of the course (4 credits). The program includes flexible options for study, including a fully online option.

Applying:  Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the program.

Core required courses (12 credits): Issues in Education; Analysis of Teaching and Learning; Research Methods in Education and the Social Sciences.  

Elective courses (14-16 credits): Program participants choose a set of four elective courses in consultation with their advisor, reflecting their personal, professional, and academic interests, needs, and goals.  The electives are intended to provide breadth and depth to each participant’s course of study. At least two electives must be courses in the Education Department at UNH (8 credits). The other two elective courses may be taken in education, another department at UNH, or another approved institution with the appropriate permission and consistent with Graduate School transfer credit policies (6 – 8 credits, depending on school / department). Electives can be online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. 

Concluding experience course (4 credits):  Educators as Researchers


Graduate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorder

This program will serve the professional development needs of a wide variety of individuals, including: (1) parents of children with ASD; (2) special and general education teachers and administrators; speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, behavioral consultants, recreation therapists; and (3) graduate students in other University majors such as sociology or psychology.  For more information please visit the Autism Spectrum Disorder website.

 

Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

 

Certificate Requirements

The coursework for the graduate certificate consists of 19-23 credits from the following required and elective course offerings. Highly qualified individuals may petition for permission to waive a required course. Applicants are urged to schedule an appointment with the program coordinators to develop their individualized course of study.  Applications for graduate certificates are available through the Graduate School website.

Required Courses 

EDUC 857A, Contemporary Issues in ASD

COMM 916, Autism Spectrum Disorders

Elective Courses (two from among the following choices based on individual advising [other electives may be added in the future]

EDUC 853 Contemporary Issues in Behavior Disorders

EDUC 855, Social Relationships and Students with Disabilities

EDUC 857C, Contemporary Issues in ASD

EDUC 952, Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction, and Supports for Students with Disabilities

EDUC 956, Positive Behavior Supports

OT courses in Assistive Technology

COMM 914, Augmentative and Alternative Communication

 


Graduate Certificate in Curriculum and Instructional Leadership

This program provides the skills and knowledge for educators to understand curriculum and instruction and to lead educational programs at the school and district office level. It is comprised of curriculum, supervision, instruction, and data analysis components.

Applying

Applicants must have a minimum of five years of successful teaching experience or administrative experience. Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Required courses

A minimum of five courses (20 credits) is required for this Graduate Certificate; 16 credits must be completed after admission to the program. All students are required to complete EDUC 953 Seminar in Curriculum Study or an equivalent course.  In addition, students must complete one course from each of four strands:  curriculum, supervision, instruction, and data analysis.  With the approval of their advisor and the Division, students may make modifications to the Graduate Certificate’s course of study.

 

Strand courses:

1.     Curriculum: EDUC 907 Foundations of Literacy, EDUC 960 Curriculum Development, EDUC 991 Curriculum Theory I, EDUC 992 Curriculum Theory II

2.     Supervision of Instruction:  EDUC 965 Educational Supervision and Evaluation, EDUC 957 Collaborative Models of Supervision

3.     Instruction:  EDUC 958 Analysis of Teaching

4.     Data Analysis:  EDUC 881 Introduction to Statistics, EDUC 885 Educational Assessment, EDUC 972 Program Evaluation


Graduate Certificate in Mentoring Teachers

The Teacher Education Program works with approximately 150 “cooperating teachers” and more than 25 supervisors each year in its full-year internship program. Mentoring is a crucial element in the preparation of effective teachers, as well as in the transition from teacher preparation programs to the first years of teaching. The N.H. Department of Education has also recognized the need for mentoring early-career public school teachers in its “Induction Through Mentoring Projects.” The UNH Department of Education proposes to offer a graduate certificate program in mentoring teachers to help advance the preparation of professionals in the field.  For more information please visit the Mentoring Teachers website

This certificate is designed to serve:

 

Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements

The program of study required for the certificate consists of four required courses and a total of 16 credit hours. The program focuses on the development of mentoring skills that draw upon: (1) models of adult development; (2) approaches to effective teaching; (3) an understanding of teacher supervision and assessment; and (4) strategies for problem solving, conflict resolution, and communication.

EDUC 957, Collaborative Supervision (4 cr.) OR EDUC 965, Educational Supervision (4 cr.)
EDUC 958, Analysis of Teaching (4 cr.)
EDUC 990, Developmental Perspectives on Adulthood (4 cr.)
EDUC 897, Teacher as Researcher [note: course number will change in 05-06]
(Under special circumstances and with the approval of their adviser, students may substitute an elective for EDUC 897)

 


Graduate Certificate in Special Education Administration

The Graduate Certificate in Special Education Administration (SEA) is part of the department's strong academic offerings in special education, which include a master of education in special education and state certification in general special education, learning disabilities, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. This certificate is designed for experienced educators and prepares administrators who manage and lead special education programs.

Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Required courses

In order to receive the Graduate Certificate for Special Education Administrator, the matriculated student must pass a minimum of 12 credits, including transfer credits, from the courses below, or electives if appropriate, taken after admission to the Graduate Certificate program, and must complete all requirements for state certification as a special education administrator.

Special Education Courses:  EDUC 801 Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology, EDUC 850 Introduction to Exceptionality, EDUC 938 Assessment and Teaching of Children with Learning Difficulties, EDUC 856 Supporting Families of Individuals with Disabilities, EDUC 951 Laws and Regulations Affecting the Education of Students with Disabilities, EDUC 956 Positive Behavior Supports.

Administration Courses:  EDUC 961 Public School Administration, EDUC 962 Educational Finance and Business Management , EDUC 964 Human Resources in Education, EDUC 974 Administrative Internship.