UNH Scientists Share Expertise at N.H. Farm and Forest Expo


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Tuesday, January 16, 2018
UNH tunnel berries

Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have succeeded in quadrupling the length of the Granite State’s strawberry growing season as part of a multi-year research project that aims to benefit both growers and consumers. Credit: Kaitlyn Orde/UNH

DURHAM, N.H. – What is New England’s role in the global battle against wheat stem rust? How have day neutral strawberries extended the state’s strawberry season? And how are unmanned aerial vehicles improving the accuracy of remote mapping of New Hampshire’s forestry resources? Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will present their latest NH Agricultural Experiment Station research on these topics and more at the 2018 New Hampshire Farm and Forest Expo Friday, Feb. 2, at 2 p.m. in the Frost/Hawthorne Rooms of Manchester’s Radisson Hotel.

“Education workshops are offered each year to bring together the state's subject matter experts to share the latest research as well as their expertise with our expo attendees,” said Tori Berube, expo manager. “The research UNH scientists will share during this workshop will undoubtedly help those working in the forestry and agriculture fields in New Hampshire make informed decisions about their own business.”

This year’s farm-oriented presentations include discussions of the favorable impacts on calves of niacin prepartum supplementation; New England’s role in the global battle against wheat stem rust; new findings on soil carbon balance; evaluating performance of greenhouse crops when grown in new wood chip and fiber media; advances in season extension with day neutral strawberries; an overview of specialty crop research; and ongoing experiments to recycle nutrients within paired fish and vegetable production (aquaponics).

For the forest industry, attendees will learn more about the ecological effects and control options for the invasive glossy buckthorn; current research on New England cottontails; the human impacts on bobcats; and how using unmanned aerial vehicles improves the accuracy of remote mapping of NH forestry resources.

Founded in 1887, the NH Agricultural Experiment Station at the UNH College of Life Sciences and Agriculture is UNH’s original research center and an elemental component of New Hampshire's land-grant university heritage and mission. 

The University of New Hampshire is a flagship research university that inspires innovation and transforms lives in our state, nation and world. More than 16,000 students from all 50 states and 71 countries engage with an award-winning faculty in top ranked programs in business, engineering, law, health and human services, liberal arts and the sciences across more than 200 programs of study. UNH’s research portfolio includes partnerships with NASA, NOAA, NSF and NIH, receiving more than $100 million in competitive external funding every year to further explore and define the frontiers of land, sea and space. 

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https://colsa.unh.edu/nhaes/sites/colsa.unh.edu.nhaes/files/media/images/unhtunnelberries.jpg
Researchers with the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of New Hampshire have succeeded in quadrupling the length of the Granite State’s strawberry growing season as part of a multi-year research project that aims to benefit both growers and consumers. Credit: Kaitlyn Orde/UNH

https://colsa.unh.edu/nhaes/sites/colsa.unh.edu.nhaes/files/media/images/invasives.jpeg
UNH has conducted extensive research on glossy buckthorn, including planting an orchard of the fast-growing shrub at UNH’s Kingman Farm to determine the life history characteristics of invasive glossy buckthorn under controlled conditions, free from competition with other plants, and free from variation in other environmental factors such as soil or micro-climate. Credit: Lori Wright/UNH