What COVID-19 Can Teach Us: Violence and Marginalization

Written By: Carolyn Stoller UNH '22 | SHARPP | Monday, March 29, 2021

The disproportionate impact of the pandemic on certain populations has highlighted numerous disparities and injustices in our society. On the surface, a disease does not discriminate. However, it's not hard to see that some groups may find it more difficult to take health precautions, are less likely to be tested, and will not receive the same quality of treatment if they do end up with COVID-19. A parallel can be drawn between the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic and the ways in which interpersonal violence (sexual violence, relationship abuse, and stalking) can affect marginalized communities.

Post Type: 
News
Date: 
Monday, March 29, 2021
Teaser: 

The disproportionate impact of the pandemic on certain populations has highlighted numerous disparities and injustices in our society. On the surface, a disease does not discriminate. However, it's not hard to see that some groups may find it more difficult to take health precautions, are less likely to be tested, and will not receive the same quality of treatment if they do end up with COVID-19. A parallel can be drawn between the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic and the ways in which interpersonal violence (sexual violence, relationship abuse, and stalking) can affect marginalized communities.