RIFC In The News

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UNH Peter T. Paul College Blog | September 3, 2019  
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Franchise Times | August 20, 2019
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Franchising.com | August  2019  
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Franchising.com | June 26, 2019  
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EFE.org | June 24, 2019  
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UNH Peter T. Paul College Blog | June 14, 2019  
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FranchisorPipeline.com | June 1, 2019
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UNH Peter T. Paul College Blog | May 15, 2019  
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UNH Peter T. Paul College Blog | March 20, 2019  
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IFA SmartBrief.com | March 18, 2019
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Franchise Times | March 1, 2019
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Fosters.com | February 22, 2019
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UNH Today| February 21, 2019
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UNH Peter T. Paul College Blog | January 24, 2019  
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Entrepreneur Magazine | January 2019
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UNH Peter T. Paul College Blog | December 13, 2018  
Forbes.com has invited RIFC director Dr. E. Hachemi "Hach" Aliouche to join their network of expert contributors by publishing a monthly business blog on franchising topics. This opportunity aligns with the RIFC outreach strategy to connect more directly with industry, and offers increased visibility for RIFC, Paul College, and UNH. Hach will be blogging on international franchising and social franchising topics. Read the full article here.
Franchise Times | November 9, 2018  
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1851Franchise.com | October 10, 2018  
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Franchising.com | October 9, 2018  
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Fosters.com | October 9, 2018  
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Business NH Magazine | October 9, 2018  
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UNH Today | October 3, 2018  
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Franchise Update Sales Report | September 10, 2018   Issue 16
The RIFC 50 Index of publicly held franchise companies fell 1.2% in Q2. 

Read the full RIFC 50 Index Q2 report here.

Franchising World Magazine | August 2018
Opening the right door can lead to successful international franchise expansion.

Read the full article here in the August 2018 issue of IFA's Franchising World Magazine.

UNH Today | June 22, 2018
E. Hachemi Aliouche, associate professor and director of UNH’s Rosenberg International Franchise Center (RIFC) has two research papers accepted for presentation at international, peer-reviewed annual conferences this summer.

RIFC explores and advances the understanding of franchising through academic research, education, and outreach. To further advance its mission, RIFC works with academic and industry partners in the United States and internationally.

Aliouche will present "The Franchise Model: How to Accelerate Circular Economy Implementation in the Recycling Sector" at the International Society of Franchising (ISoF) Conference in Quito, Ecuador, in June. Aliouche co-authored this research paper with Dominique Bonet-Fernandez of IPAG Business School of France.

In July, Aliouche will travel to Nice, France, for the International Research Meeting in Business and Management,where he will present "Letting Go of the Oil Addiction: Oil, Entrepreneurship and Franchising — the Case of Algeria. Aliouche co-authored this research paper with Bonet-Fernandez and Manel Guechtouli, University Aix-Marseille, France, and Widad Guechtouli, Ecole des Hautes Etudes Commerciales-Alger, Algeria.

“I was born and raised in Algeria, so when Widad reached out to me about collaborating on research regarding Algeria’s dependency on oil industry revenue, I was pleased to partner,” Aliouche explains.

IFA SmartBrief.com | April 30, 2018
The RIFC 50 Index, which tracks the franchise sector, outperformed the S&P 500 last year. "For the whole 2017 year, the RIFC 50 Index was up 28.6 percent while the S&P 500 gained 19.4 percent," noted E. Hachemi Aliouche, director of the University of New Hampshire's Rosenberg International Franchise Center.
FranchisorPipeline.com | April 25, 2018
The University of New Hampshire’s RIFC 50 Index™ and the franchise business sector it represents outperformed the overall market represented in the S&P 500 Index by 9.2 percent in 2017.

 

The RIFC 50 Index, initially published in 2002 by UNH’s Rosenberg International Franchise Center (RIFC), is the first stock index to track the financial market performance of the U.S. franchising sector. It is a stock portfolio comprised of 50 U.S. public franchising companies representative of the U.S. business format franchising sector. Index tracking begins with the year 2000 and is updated quarterly.

“For the whole 2017 year, the RIFC 50 Index was up 28.6 percent while the S&P 500 gained 19.4 percent,” said E. Hachemi Aliouche, director of the Rosenberg International Franchise Center at UNH’s Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics, and developer of the RIFC 50 stock index. “This is a significant change considering our index underperformed for six quarters in 2015 and 2016 in comparison to the S&P 500.”

Aliouche also noted that in 2017, four components of the RIFC 50 Index were acquired by private equity firms or other franchise firms: Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen, Panera Bread, Buffalo Wild Wings, and Ruby Tuesday, underscoring the increasing recognition of the value of franchise businesses.

Since its inception in 2000, the RIFC 50 Index is up 277.3 percent, while the S&P 500 is up 91.7 percent.

“Our RIFC 50 Index quarterly reports offer a succinct look at the best and worst performers from among the 50 franchise businesses in the portfolio, and the business reasons that may have contributed to their rise or fall in the quarterly ranking,” said Aliouche. The 2017 quarterly reports are available on the center’s website at unh.edu/rosenbergcenter/rcf-50-index.

UnionLeader.com | April 25, 2018
A University of New Hampshire index tracking the financial performance of U.S. franchises outperformed the S&P 500 last year.

UNH’s RIFC 50 Index and the franchise business sector it represents outperformed the S&P 500 Index by 9.2 percent in 2017.

The RIFC 50 Index, initially published in 2002 by UNH’s Rosenberg International Franchise Center, rose 28.6 percent last year while the S&P 500 gained 19.4 percent.

It’s comprised of 50 U.S. public franchising companies representative of the U.S. business format franchising sector.

Fosters.com | April 24, 2018
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1851Franchise.com | April 17, 2018
QSR is reporting a major benchmark for the franchise sector, which according to the University of New Hampshire’s RIFC 50 Index, outperformed the overall market (represented in the S&P 500 Index) in 2017.

The RIFC Index was first published by University of New Hampshire’s Rosenberg International Franchise Center in 2002. The index—a stock portfolio comprising 50 U.S. public franchising companies—was designed to track the financial performance of the U.S. franchise sector. The RIFC 50 Index was up 28.6 percent in 2017 while the S&P 500 was up just 19.4 percent.

“This is a significant change considering our index underperformed for 6 quarters in 2015 and 2016 in comparison to the S&P 500,” said RIFC 50 Index developer and director of the Rosenberg International Franchise Center at UNH’s Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics Dr. E. Hachemi Aliouche.

Read the full article at qsr.com.

The 8 | April 20, 2018
The 8 is a podcast from 1851 Magazine highlighting the top eight franchising stories of the week. The RIFC 50 Index 2017 performance reference is at approximately the 5 minute mark. View The 8 podcast here on 1851franchise.com.  
QSR Magazine | April 16, 2018
2017 was a banner year for the University of New Hampshire’s RIFC 50 Index and the franchise business sector it represents as it outperformed the overall market represented in the S&P 500 Index.

“For the whole 2017 year, the RIFC 50 Index was up 28.6 percent while the S&P 500 gained 19.4 percent. This is a significant change considering our index underperformed for 6 quarters in 2015 and 2016 in comparison to the S&P 500,” says Dr. E. Hachemi Aliouche, director of the Rosenberg International Franchise Center at UNH’s Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics, and developer of the RIFC 50 stock index.

“In 2017, four components of the RIFC 50 Index were acquired by private equity firms or other franchise firms: Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen, Panera Bread, Buffalo Wild Wings, and Ruby Tuesday, underscoring the increasing recognition of the value of franchise businesses.”

The RIFC 50 Index, initially published in 2002 by UNH’s Rosenberg International Franchise Center (RIFC), is the first stock index to track the financial market performance of the U.S. franchising sector. It is a stock portfolio comprised of 50 U.S. public franchising companies representative of the U.S. business format franchising sector. Index tracking begins with the year 2000 and is updated quarterly.

“Since its inception in 2000, the RIFC 50 Index is up 277.3 percent while the S&P 500 is up 91.7 percent,” Aliouche says.

”Our RIFC 50 Index quarterly reports offer a succinct look at the best and worst performers from among the 50 franchise businesses in the portfolio, and the business reasons that may have contributed to their rise or fall in the quarterly ranking,” says Aliouche. The 2017 quarterly reports are available on the center’s website at unh.edu/rosenbergcenter/rcf-50-index.

The UNH Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics offers a full complement of high-quality programs in business, economics, accounting, finance, information systems management, entrepreneurship, marketing, and hospitality management. Programs are offered at the undergraduate, graduate, and executive development levels. The college is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), the premier accrediting agency for business schools worldwide.

UNH Today | March 2, 2018
UNH seniors Rachel Vaz and Gina Occhipinti spent part of their winter break in Tanzania, Vaz working with a group that helps farmers improve agricultural practices and Occhipinti with a social enterprise that offers coding education to girls.

At the same time, Chelsea Evankow ’18 was in Uganda, graduate student Ana Alejandro was in Nicaragua and doctoral candidate Yusi Wang Turell was in India, all, like Vaz and Occhipinti, conducting research as part of their fellowships through UNH’s Social Sector Franchise Initiative (SSFI).

A program of the Center for Social Innovation and Enterprise, the initiative provides information on social sector franchising, which uses the business franchising format to reach large numbers of customers, to businesses and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) working in such areas as healthcare, clean water and sanitation, clean energy and education. Last fall, five social enterprises were chosen and matched with experts from the commercial franchising world for mentoring and support.

The groups also were paired with the student research fellows who, in addition to their field trips, continue to gather data, host conference calls and write blog posts.

“We are excited that we can engage students from across many different majors in this work that harnesses a successful commercial business model and uses it explicitly to advance economic development and bring life-changing goods to communities across the globe,” says Fiona Wilson, executive director for the Center for Social Innovation and Enterprise.

 

Ana Alejandro

Graduate student Ana Alejandro

Adds Bill Maddocks, program director for the Social Sector Franchise Initiative “Our fellows are working with five very different businesses that are each at different stages of growth. All have replicated their model at some level beyond a single unit. None of them are startups.”

In fact, Mercado Fresco, a micro franchise of Supply Hope has nearly 100 stores in Nicaragua. The enterprise, which aims to increase access to nutritious affordable food, offers women the opportunity to start their own businesses through in-home markets that serve the community.

“In doing so, they are able to learn and grow to ultimately provide a better life for their children while also providing healthier food options for the surrounding communities,” says Ana Alejandro, an immigrant from Uruguay who is working toward a master’s degree in social work.

Pollinate Energy brings low-cost solar and energy-efficient lighting to people living in India’s urban slums through a network of local entrepreneurs.

“It was incredible to see a business model that we typically associate with franchises like fast food restaurants and hotel chains being used as a powerful force for social and environmental good,” says Yusi Wang Turell, a doctoral candidate in natural resources and environmental studies. “As Pollinate explores different options for replicating for scale and incentivizing employees at different levels, we will follow along to see if concepts from the business format franchising methodology are applicable to its approaches to growth and structure.”

 

Yusi Turell with "pollinators" in India

Yusi Turell with “pollinators” in India 

 


A business-in-a-box concept is used by WSV (Wessex Social Ventures) with its local NGOs in Uganda, where Chelsea Evankow ’18 conducted her research. “Basically, they provide everything for the local NGOs and their entrepreneurs to be successful,” she says. 

WSV’s three social franchises are designed for communities where people live on less than $2 a day. Their “Million, Million, Million” plan seeks to provide 1 million school children with safe, hygienic toilets, 1 million girls with affordable, hygienic sanitary towels and 1 million people with access to safe, affordable lighting within five years. Evankow, a dual biology and women’s studies major with a minor in Africana and African studies, says, “WSV is empowering entrepreneurs to implement sustainable solutions that impact their economy, education and health.” 

 

Chelsea Evankow ’18

Chelsea Evankow ’18

“Our research fellows do a lot of work; we really expect a lot from them,” Maddocks says. “They end up being a kind of third informant in the process and help to identify ways the franchises could be more effective in meeting their expansion goals.”

Rachel Vaz ’18, who is majoring in business administration with a concentration in international business and economics and minoring in Spanish and Latin American studies, is working with Livelihood BASIX (LBI), a social franchise that promotes economic development for farmers and low-income households.

“The franchise approach of this business allows for close proximity to the villages and also for longer-term work in the communities, as opposed to shorter NGO projects,” Vaz says. “Since they started working with LBI, farmer groups have been more active, collaborative and entrepreneurial.”

Gina Occhipinti’s research in Tanzania with Apps and Girls, a franchise enterprise that provides code training for girls, gave her the chance to “get a real critical view of how the organization was working on the ground.”

Hear Rachel Vaz talk more about the work of the Center for Social Innovation and Enterprise in this UNH Podcats episode.

 

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“I had interviews with several girls involved in the program, some new, some experienced, running their own companies and employing people — and they're only 15 years old,” says Occhipinti, an economics major minoring in French. “I learned about how much Apps and Girls changed them for the better, gave them confidence, and gave them technology skills to the point they didn't doubt whether they could go to university or get a job or start their own venture.”

“Really what UNH is involved in is building a new field,” Maddocks says. “We don’t know of another university that’s doing this. The franchise model is something that works really well in a developed country. Transferring that model to a developing country can be challenging.”

Adds Wilson, “Consistent with our mission to engage and empower the next generation of changemakers, we are excited that we are able to leverage our work in the emerging field of social sector franchising to create meaningful, high-impact learning and research opportunities for students from across the UNH campus in partnership with community NGOs in the developing world.”

The Center for Social Innovation and Enterprise is a joint venture of the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics and the Carsey School of Public Policy. The center is collaborating on the initiative with the Rosenberg International Franchise Center at the Paul College.