2017 RETE Participants

Piper Bartlett headshot
Piper Bartlett

Piper Bartlett

Bio-Sketch: I am a high school science teacher at St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Dover, NH where I teach Biology, Marine Biology, Forensics, and Anatomy. The area of research that I am most interested in is watershed ecology. More specifically, I want to look at the environmental factors that affect the health of the watershed and how human impact can change certain parameters.

Abstract: The Memorial Bridge in Portsmouth, NH runs over the Piscataqua River, which has a very strong receding current. A platform was deployed on the bridge to serve two purposes. One, is that there are environmental sensors on the platform that collect real-time data about water temperature, water speed, salinity, and a variety of other parameters. Secondly, the platform will serve as a place to attach a turbine for tidal power generation. My research focused on data collection and comparing the Memorial Bridge data with other sensors deployed in the Great Bay watershed. With the current being so strong in the Piscataqua, there has not been such a thorough collection of data at this site. Incorporating this data with the rest of the Great Bay sensors will give us a better idea of the overall health of the watershed. It will also show us how shipping traffic can affect certain parameters. This is a long-term monitoring project that will yield valuable information that can be used for management of the Great Bay watershed.

2017 RETE poster

THumbnail of Piper Bartlett RETE 2017 poster

 

 

K Ferraro headshot RETE 2017
Kacie Ferraro

Kacie Ferraro

Biosketch:
I am a 7th year teacher, teaching Math and Social Studies at Rye Junior High School. I graduated Summa Cum Laude from UNH with a Bachelor of Science degree in Middle School Math Education with Honors (2010) and a Master of Education degree in Secondary Education (2011). This is my second year completing the RETE program. Last year, I created a predictive equation modeling fatigue cracking in asphalt pavement mixtures.  I am interested in research involving mathematical applications in science and engineering fields.

 

Abstract:

This Life Cycle Assessment compares the Cumulative Energy Demand (CED), Global Warming Potential (GWP) and Cost and Benefit of Traditional and Solar Water Heating Systems. It compares a hybrid system composed of a flat plate, thermosyphon solar hot water system and natural gas supplement to a pure natural gas system when used for an average single family home in five different U.S. cities in order to assist consumers in choosing between solar and traditional hot water systems based on their geographic region. SimaPro and Excel were used to determine and calculate the impact per function unit: 1 gallon of water heated to 145.4°F. It considers impacts across the life cycle from cradle to grave including construction, operation, and end of life. The CED and GWP are highest in the Operation phase due to supplementation with natural gas. Boston has the lowest CED per gallon of hot water, Los Angeles has the lowest GWP per gallon of hot water, and Chicago has the highest CED and GWP per gallon of hot water. The only city in which the cost per gallon of hot water of the hybrid system is lower than the cost of the traditional system per gallon of hot water Phoenix. The costs of the two systems in all other cities are comparable.

2017 RETE poster

Kacie Ferraro poster 2017 RETE

 

Sean Colligan

Sean Colligan

Biosketch: Sean Colligan is a high school science teacher. He is going into his fourth year teaching at Goffstown High School, his alma mater, where he has taught physical science and will begin teaching physics and space science this fall. Sean also enjoys coaching cross country and track and field at the high school and middle school levels. When he is not at school, he can be found at the gym, traveling, or playing with his many canine friends.

 

Abstract: Aqueous energy storage devices may provide a safer, cheaper alternative to typical lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, and can be integrated into the energy grid. Nanomaterials with a layered structure can be used to compensate for these devices’ typically lower energy densities, because they allow for easier transportation of alkaline cations through the material. In this project, the electrochemical performance of electrode materials and electrolytes was tested to study their viability for future device development. Manganese oxide was used for the electrodes because it exhibits a strong, capacitor-like response in aqueous electrolytes. A procedure for successfully fabricated electrodes was developed.

Cyclic voltammetry showed lower than optimal energy storage, but further testing is needed to produce exfoliation of nanoparticle layering.

Advisor: Dr. Xiaowei Teng, Department of Chemical Engineering

 

2017 RETE poster

thumbnail of Sean Colligan's RETE 2017 poster

 

 

Amanda Hyde-Berger headshot RETE 2017
Amanda Hyde-Berger

Amanda Hyde-Berger

Biosketch:
I am starting my fourth year of teaching this coming school year (2017-2018).  I will be teaching physics, astronomy, physical science, and principles of technology at Mascenic Regional High School. I have a strong passion for learning, but I am particularly interested in oceanography, renewable energy, and climate change.  In my free time (what is that?) I love reading, hiking, kayaking, knitting, and riding my motorcycle.

Abstract:
TiO2 is a cheaper alternative for photocatalytic conversions allowing for the conversion of CO2 into CH4 and CO.  Doping TiO2 with nitrogen compounds, like urea, has been shown to enhance the absorption of TiO2 from the UV into the visible portion of the spectrum.  This study showed that N-TiO2 treated at 400 °C and 500 °C significantly produced CH4 and CO.

2017 RETE poster

Thumbnail of Amanda Hyde-Berger RETE poster 2017

 

Andrew Sturm headshot RETE 2017
Andrew Sturm

Andrew Sturm

My name is Andrew Sturm and I currently teach Physics and Space sciences at North Middlesex Regional High School. I graduated from the University of Maine with a B.A. in Physics and from Boston University with a MAT in Science Education. While at UNH I researched the strengths of welds formed using a magnetic pulse to collide materials together. My general research interests are ones that involve the interactions of systems and the way that forces and energy are transferred and distributed in those systems.

2017 RETE poster

Andrew Sturm RETE 2017 poster

 

 

Kaela Plante headshot 2017 RETE
Kaela Plante

Kaela Plante

Biosketch
I am a sixth and seventh grade science teacher at Noble Middle School in Berwick, Maine. My research interests involve standards based grading and how it affects the overall education of students.

Abstract
Eutrophication is a common problem in many bodies of water, but there is a lot that can be done to try to stop this problem. One simple solution is to stop nutrients found in urine from entering water bodies. This can be done by collecting urine separately from feces. This has many benefits besides cutting down on the amount of nutrients entering the environment. This process can also cut down on water usage, water costs, and it allows farmers to use urine as a fertilizer. However, the one obstacle that stands in the way of implementing this technology is user acceptability. The goal of this project was to create a web-based survey tailored with specific questions to gauge individuals interest and acceptability of urine diversion toilets and urine fertilizer.

2017 RETE poster

Kaela Plante poster 2017 RETE thumbnail

 

 

 

Jennifer Warren headshot 2017 RETE
Jennifer Warren

Jennifer Warren

Biosketch:
Jennifer Warren is the CAD teacher at Rochester Middle School in Rochester, NH.  She runs a Maker Club at her school and she enjoys teaching STE(A)M when possible.  She attended the University of Maine at Orono and studied abroad in Costa Rica and Chile.  She moved back to her home region and began teaching in 2007.  Jen enjoys researching virology and microbiology.  

Abstract:  
The molecular modeling of the Tat protein was precipitated by learning about virus capsids and their protein structures.  Once the complexity of the virions was understood, discussions led to research into replication of virions and how this key step in the replication of HIV-1 is not fully understood.  I undertook modeling the Tat protein to better understand what configurations it naturally takes. This could lead to learning what type of interaction it has with TAR-RNA to facilitate replication.  If the way in which the Tat protein binds with TAR-RNA is known, it would lead to the development of drugs targeted at stopping the process and hindering the replication of the HIV-1 virus. The simulation I created did not show any specific configuration.  

2017 RETE poster

Jennifer Warren RETE 2017 poster thumbnail

 

Heidi Orestis photo RETE 2017
Heidi Orestis

Heidi Orestis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kate Verfaillie headshot RETE 2017
Kathryn Verfaillie

Kathryn Verfaillie

I teach high school Chemistry and middle school Physical Science in Littleton NH. I attended Plymouth State University and graduated in 2017 with a degree in Chemistry Education. I always love learning new things and watching science documentaries and I hope to instill that same love of learning in my students. 

 

This summer I researched Microfluidics and what can be studied and what data gained from this science. My focus was using the science of microfluidics and microfluidic chips to analyze acids and bases in terms of observing pH change and mass transfer.  Secondarily I researched ways to make the science more accessible to a high school classroom in terms of cost and available supplies 

2017 RETE poster

Kate Verfaillie RETE poster thumbnail

 

 

Don Wason headshot RETE 2017
Don Wason

Don Wason

I currently teach Earth and Space Science at Dover High School in New Hampshire. My educational and early employment background is in mining and exploration geology, but I have enjoyed teaching in Dover for several decades. My research interests include the geology of Seacoast New Hampshire, trace element geochemistry applied to igneous and metamorphic rocks as well as the environment, and geoarchaeology.

The Effect of Electrical Current Magnitude on the Character of Electromagnetic Pulse Weld of Copper onto Brass

Abstract:
Three energy levels (40%, 50%, and 60% capacitor discharge) were used to electro-magnetically weld copper tubing onto a brass shaft. No welding occurred at 40%, but good welds with associated wavy character occurred at the 50% and 60% energy levels. Welds were able to withstand 11 to 18 kN of force, respectively, before push out failure.

2017 RETE poster

Don Wason RETE 2017 poster (thumbnail)