Resources for ListProc Subscribers at UNH

There are over 600 special interest lists on the UNH ListProc mailing list system. Special interest lists are, by definition, opt-in lists. You should not have been added to a special interest mailing list unless you have requested to be added or provided your e-mail address as part of a registration or sign-up process. Many organizations and groups will automatically add members to mailing lists as part of being a member or interested party for that group. Subscribers to a special interest list always have the ability to remove themselves from the list either by sending a request to the ListProc mailing list robot, or to the list owner using the special e-mail address provided. Abuse of this policy should be reported to list system administrator at List.Admin@unh.edu e-mail address. The topics listed below apply to all UNH hosted special interest lists.


Table of Contents


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TOPIC: Signing Off, or Postponing, All Subscriptions

Here are the steps you can use to either remove yourself from all of the local lists you are currently subscribe to, or temporarily postpone receiving postings from these lists when you are away on vacation or extended leave.

PURGE -- Remove Me From All Local Lists

If you remember the password from any one of the lists you are currently subscribed to, you can use one command to unsubscribe yourself from all of the local UNH lists you belong to:

        To:listproc@lists.unh.edu
        Subj: I'm outta here!
            
purge any-one-of-your-list-passwords-goes-here
If you have more than one account, you should send this command from each since subscriptions, and their removal, are based upon your return address. Note that the command goes in the body of the message. The subject should be left blank or may contain a comment for your own notes.

But what if you don't remember any of your subscription passwords? First find out all of the lists you are currently subscribed to by using the WHICH command.

WHICH -- Which Lists Am I Subscribed To?

Use the WHICH command for a report of all the lists you are currently subscribed to.

        To:listproc@lists.unh.edu
        Subj: So many lists, so little time.
               
which
Like the PURGE command, you will want to do this from each of your accounts to be sure you have found all of your current subscriptions. Once you have a report of all the lists you are subscribed to, you can either UNSUBSCRIBE or POSTPONE your subscriptions to all of these lists.

UNSUBSCRIBE -- Remove Yourself From A List

You can UNSUBSCRIBE yourself from one or more lists with a single mail message. Note that unlike the PURGE command, you do not need to know your subscription password for each list.

        To: listproc@lists.unh.edu
        Subj: I'm outta here!
 
        unsubscribe parking.news
		 unsubscribe civic.wagon.forum
		 unsubscribe nh.seacoast.diving
    
The list management robot will confirm each unsubscription with a 'goodbye message'.

POSTPONE -- Temporarily Suspend Receiving Postings

You can POSTPONE your subscription to one or more lists with a single mail message. Note that unlike the PURGE command, you do not need to know your subscription password for each list. Use the WHICH command if you need to confirm what lists you are currently subscribed to.

        To:listproc@lists.unh.edu       
Subj: Tahiti here I come! set parking.news mail postpone set civic.wagon.forum mail postpone set nh.seacoast.diving mail postpone
While your subscription to a list is postponed, any postings that would have been sent to you are discarded. Except for the confirmation of your commands, no reminders will be sent to you by the system that you have postponed subscriptions.

To reactivate your subscription(s), send a message identical to the above, only substitute one of the following keywords for POSTPONE:

  • ACK - Send back a copy of your own postings. This is the initial default for new subscriptions.

  • NOACK - You do not want to see your own postings to the list.

  • DIGEST - You want to receive a digest of list postings rather than individual messages as they are received.


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TOPIC: ListProc Privacy Issues

Scope.

This privacy statement applies to the ListProc server at lists.unh.edu which is maintained and operated by UNH UNH Information Technology (IT) as a free service for the University community. This statement does not necessarily apply to any other electronic Mailing List Management (MLM) systems that may be operated at this university by other departments or organizations.

 

Saved E-Mail Messages.

In the course of ListProc's operation, electronic mail messages are stored in various temporary files and, of course, are distributed as e-mail to other computer systems as part of the list distribution mechanism. Each list has its own inbox for unprocessed messages. Once a message has been distributed, it is moved to a temporary file. These temporary files are trimmed periodically thus deleting any residual copy of the messages distributed. Copies of messages will also exist in our cycle of tape backups for a longer period. Statistics may be extracted from these temporary files before they are removed, but no actual information contained within these messages will be presented in any statistical reports.

While only a very small number of lists on our server have archiving enabled, be aware that any given list owner may keep their own archive of list traffic, or for that matter, any subscriber on a list may do the same. If retaining ownership and control of your posted text is important to you, you should include an explicit copyright notice as part of your own postings. (Note that a copyright does not protect "[i]deas, procedures, methods, systems, processes, concepts, principles, discoveries, or devices, as distinguished from a description, explanation, or illustration". [citation source, PDF] )

Availability of E-Mail Addresses

Each list on our server is sponsored by an individual, organization, or department associated with the University of New Hampshire. Thus the list's sponsor is considered the owner of all data associated with that list, including the list of subscriber names and e-mail addresses. Because of this, UNH IT, as a matter of policy, does not make available the names and addresses on any given list to third parties. But it is possible for the list's sponsor to configure their list so that such information is available directly from the server.

By default, each list is initially created such that only the owner of the list has access to the full list of subscribers. The owner of the list, however, has the ability to open up the list of subscribers so that it is visible to other subscribers, or even to the entire Internet. And, of course, the list owner can and may publish the list of addresses by other means other than via requests sent to the our server. If you have questions regarding the privacy of your e-mail address, you should contact the list owner of that list. This can be done by sending an e-mail message to the list address with the text

    -request

appended to the list name. For example, to contact the owner of the list:

    Alumni.Chat@lists.unh.edu

the list owner address would be:

    Alumni.Chat-request@lists.unh.edu

As part of normal system maintenance, UNH IT maintains copies of all lists on a regular cycle of backup tapes. Thus the data and contents associated with a list may exist for some time after the list has been removed from our server.

New List Applications

When a list sponsor applies for a new list, a great deal of personal information is collected. UNH IT uses this information only to determine the eligibility of the applicant (i.e. to confirm that the applicant is a member of the UNH community or may act on behalf of a University organization) and to insure that we will be able to contact the sponsor via means other than e-mail should there be a problem or question about the list. UNH IT takes all reasonable precautions to safe guard this information as well as to make sure that it is only used either in connection with electronic mailing lists on our server, or in regards to e-mail issues in general at UNH. Concerns about the data collected as part of the list application should be directed to the UNH mailing list system administrator at List.Admin@unh.edu


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TOPIC: E-Mail Attachment Recommendations

Many e-mail programs make it easy to send a computer file as an attachment when sending an e-mail message or to send a text message formatted using HTML. But sending non-plain text messages can be problematical, especially when an e-mail list of diverse subscribers is involved. For this reason, by default, messages sent to a UNH mailing list that are in MIME format are converted automatically (where possible) to plain text.

A better method for distributing large or complex documents is to publish them as a web page and send a reference to the page via the list. Since this alternative exists, we ask all list owners and subscribers to refrain from sending e-mail attachments via the mailing list system if at all possible. However it is recognized that for small specialized lists the ability to exchange files as attachments is key. In these cases the list owner may specifically request that MIME filtering be disabled. Note that this will not disable the automatic virus filtering which is performed on all messages sent through the UNH e-mail systems.

MIME Issues for Mailing Lists

Here are some of the reasoning behind offering this service:

  • To prevent the distribution of e-mail-borne viruses.

  • To prevent unusable e-mail messages from being sent to a significant number subscribers who do not have the specific commercial software that would be required to read it. Some lists have a wide diversity of subscribers representing a heterogeneous mix of computer systems and software. As a courtesy, only messages that can be easily read by all subscribers should be sent to the list.

  • To prevent denial of e-mail service to subscribers who have limited mailbox space quotas. Non-text attachments are often very large, requiring megabytes of storage, even for content that is the equivalent of just a few short paragraphs. One or two such attachments can fill a subscriber's mailbox, preventing that person from receiving any more e-mail until the offending messages have been deleted.

  • To prevent degradation of the University's network performance to the detriment of other computer users. Large attachments sent to lists with large numbers of subscribers can cause a significant strain on the local e-mail systems and networks that host the list management system.

  • To prevent the imposition of excessive time and/or cost on individual subscribers. Large attachments can cause lengthy downloads over slow modem connections which can result in significant additional time and expense for some subscribers.

  • To prevent the interruption of list services to other list clients on our server. Distribution of a large posting can potentially fill the local server's e-mail queue, preventing it from processing any other requests until delivery of the posting has been completed. Because of potential delivery problems caused by other systems refusing to accept the resulting large messages, this condition could tie up the list server system for several hours, or even days if it happens while the University is closed.

What is Filtered

All mail sent to the list's posting address, as well as the list's *-request address which is used for human-to-human contact with the list owner, is filtered using the open source demime mail filter program. The list's owner-* is not filtered since this address is used for reporting error messages, which are often sent in multi-part format.

Filtering is performed with one specific purpose in mind: to convert as needed all mail messages into plain text which can be viewed using any e-mail client. Filtering is automatically performed on messages sent in MIME format. This includes messages with non-text attachments (i.e. graphics, programs, scripts, etc.) as well as text sent in HTML or Microsoft's rich text format . (These formats allow the use different font sizes and styles, colored or patterned backgrounds, and embedded hyperlinks.) For messages that have alternative parts , demime will select the plain text version if provided. Failing that, it renders rich text and HTML alternatives to plain text. It also renders non-alternative parts when it knows how, and elides them when it does not.

Finally any recognized advertising boilerplate, which is often appended by free mail services such as Yahoo and Hotmail is removed. This is done to help reduce the size of the archives maintained for some lists.


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TOPIC: Virus Scanning Service

UNH Virus Filtering Service for Mailing Lists

Many e-mail programs make it easy to send a computer file as an attachment when composing an e-mail message. Unfortunately this also makes it easy to send malicious computer code (viruses, worms, Trojan horses) via e-mail as well. When combined with the power of a list management system like ListProc, it is possible for a list to inadvertently be used as a vector to propagate this harmful software to literally thousands of subscribers in matter of seconds. The methods used by these programs vary. Some viruses, for example, attach themselves silently to every mail message sent from an infected machine, while a worm may use the victim's own address book to automatically send itself to every e-mail address on file. Often this will include the address of any mailing lists the victim is subscribed to.

While there are many different types of malicious software with specific names used to precisely describe their particular behavior, we'll use the term virus generically in the rest of this document to mean all such software. See the Computer Virus Frequently Asked Questions for New Users page for more information about the various types of 'malware' and the basic principles on how they work.

On October 3, 2002, UNH Computing & Information Services installed a virus filtering system as part of our Mailing List Management (MLM) services. This filtering is performed on all e-mail that is sent to the computer system that hosts the UNH mailing list system. The goal of this service is to be as 'transparent' as possible. We hope that most subscribers and list owners will never see evidence that this automated system is place. However when a potential virus is detected, this service will alert the affected users involved with information about what was found and the corrective steps taken by the system.

While this system is effective against known viruses, there is always the danger that a new virus maybe reach our mail systems and spread before it has been identified for automatic removal. For this and other reasons, most lists on the UNH list management system also remove all non-text content from messages. This MIME filtering process greatly reduces the chance of any new virus slipping through our defenses. However be aware that individual list owners may opt-out of this additional service, whereas the virus filtering described here is mandatory.

How It Works

In a nutshell here is how the process works and what you, as a subscriber or a poster, will see when the system has been activated:

  • Every message sent to the mailing list host system will be analyzed. Since the mail system on this host is dedicated to handling mailing list traffic, this means all messages sent to a list, a list owner, or the list management system admin will be examined by the virus detection robot.

  • If no potential problems are detected, the message is passed on to the destination without modification or comment. If the destination is a list, the message will be handled and distributed in the usual fashion.

  • If the message contains one or more attachments, these attachments are examined by the scanner. If a virus is detected in an attachment, or if it is determined that the type of attachment is inappropriate, it is removed from the message and replaced with an alert message.

  • While subscribers to the list are alerted about changes to a posting by the replacement attachments, and the original poster will also receive a separate reply, the list owner will not receive any sort of special notice from the system. Thus the list owner may be unaware of any action taken by the system unless s/he is subscribed to the list or is contacted by the poster.

The figure below illustrates a message with two attachments being sent to a list. The first attachment is infected with a virus and is automatically replaced with an 'alert message'. The entire message is then passed on to the original destination. A separate notice is also sent back to the original poster alerting him/her to the actions taken by the message scanning system.

From
Poster
 Robot To
List
     
Message
Text
---------> Message
Scanner
Software
---------> Message
Text
Infected
Attachment
    Alert
Message
Safe
Attachment
    Safe
Attachment
       
Return
Notice
<---------    
 

Please note that the ability to scan an e-mail message depends upon that message being properly formatted according to the Internet RFCs for e-mail messages. The robot will remove those portions it could not analyze from the message before forwarding it along to the list for distribution.

How to Bypass the System

Because of safety considerations, the UNH Virus Filtering Service can be fairly restrictive in the type of attachments allowed. For example files with the extension ' .bat ' are not allowed because this file type would be interpreted as an executable script on a Microsoft Windows machine and thus could be potentially very destructive. Normally executable code should not be distributed to a typical e-mail list community. However there are special circumstances, such as a list devoted to software development, when distributing such files would be appropriate. In these rare cases, the most common work around is to save the file in pre-agreed upon file archive format (such as Unix tar) or file compression utility format (Stuffit, WinZip, gnuzip, etc.) and then send the resulting file as the attachment. However note that this method will not work for lists that have MIME filtering in effect. In this case all non-text attachments are removed regardless of type.


[ Return to Subscriber Topics ] [ Return to Main ListProc Page ]


TOPIC: Headers Mixing and Matching List Addresses with Non-List Addresses

For most people, most of the time, when you send a message to a mailing list, that is the only e-mail address involved. After all that one address actually represents tens, hundreds, or even thousands of subscriber addresses, so that one address does the work of many. But sometimes you may want to send a message to more than one list at a time, or you may even want to include people who are not subscribed to the list at all. When this is done it may not be clear who will see what in the message's header. This can make a difference if you are trying to protect the privacy of individuals or minimize the chance of there being confusion in the intended audience for that message.

This page looks at four different scenarios for sending messages using various combinations of the To: , Cc: (carbon copy), and Bcc: (blind carbon copy) fields. In each case explains how the message is processed and how the message will appear for both subscribers and non-subscribers. It looks at the reasons you may want to use that particular address combination.

Setting the Stage for the Examples

Before getting to the examples, some preliminaries are required.

Important Mailing List Principles

The mailing list mechanism can do more than just take a single input message and redistribute it to a list of subscribers. Some of these things include:

  • Control Who May Post to the List: A list can be configured to limit who is allowed to send out a message via the list. An 'announcement' list only let's the list owner post to the list; a 'moderated' list only allows the list owner and the moderators to post to the list, as well as any moderator approved messages; and a 'restricted' list only allows the list owner and subscribers to make postings.

  • Confirm Who is Posting: In addition to the above restrictions, a person making the posting can be required to include the list's password as the first line in the message. If the list management robot finds the correct password, it will remove the password from the message and post it, otherwise the message is rejected and an error is sent back to the poster and (if so configured) the list's owner. ( More information about the posting confirmation mechanism. )

    WARNING: Care must be taken when using lists that require confirmation. The list's password can be accidentally revealed to others if the message is simultaneously sent to any non-list addresses. Thus this danger applies to all of the methods shown in the examples below.

Because of the problems with unsolicited commercial e-mail (spam) and malware that propagates itself via e-mail (worms), most lists restrict posting in some way using either or both of the above mechanisms.

  • Edit the Message Headers: The default for UNH lists is to have the list management robot edit the To: header of the message. Only the list's descriptive name and e-mail address will appear in that field, any other addresses, including any other lists, will be removed. The robot will also optionally add or remove a Reply-To: address depending upon the list's configuration.

  • Suppress Duplicate Messages Sent to a Given List: The list management robot keeps track and catalogs messages sent to any given list. In particular it 'remembers' the body of all recent messages in order to detect duplicate messages. If a new posting arrives where the body of the message is identical to one seen in the recent past, the robot will not accept the posting and alert the list owner about the duplications. In addition the robot will not send out multiple messages if a given list's address is accidentally repeated as a delivery address.

The important point to keep in mind is that the list management robot can only perform these operations on messages that are sent via the robot. If you include any other delivery addresses in your message, the robot cannot change the message to that person in any way since the message will never reach the robot at all . The robot also does not cross check addresses across multiple lists. For example if a given subscriber is subscribed to two different lists, then posting a message to both lists will cause that person to get to separate copies of the message. It also follows that if a message is sent directly to a subscriber, as well as via a list, then duplicate messages will also be received.

Introducing the Actors in our Examples

In the examples below, we will use the following (fictitious) e-mail addresses:

  • J.J.Sender@unh.edu will be the person sending all of the postings.

  • The "Blue Bashers' Bulletin" ( blue.team@lists.unh.edu ) and "Crimson Pride News" ( red.team@lists.unh.edu ) are discussion lists for two local sports teams.

  • Pam.Public and Pete.Public are two non-subscribers who will also receive copies of the postings.

  • Sue.Secret and Sam.Secret are two more non-subscribers where an effort will be made to hide their e-mail address from any delivered message.

The stage is now set for our little four act drama.

 


EXAMPLE 1 -- Maybe not what you expected.

Message Sent As
To:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu 
Cc:   Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: No practice on Saturday

                        
Red Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Crimson Pride News <Red.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Cc:   Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: No practice on Saturday
                        
Others See
From:  J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:    Pam.Public@unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu 
Cc:    Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj:  No practice on Saturday
                        
 
Blue Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Blue Bashers' Bulletin <Blue.Team@lists.unh.edu>   
Cc:   Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: No practice on Saturday
                        
 

Description:

A message is sent to Pam and the Crimson Pride with a carbon copy to Pete.

Why You'd Do This:

The message is directed to the entire team as well as Pam; Pete gets a copy of the message since he is only tangentially involved. But...

Things to Watch Out For:

The team members will not see Pam's address at all, only Pete's, because a message distributed via a list will only preserve the list's own name and address in the To: field. However both Pete and Pam will see all three addresses.

 


EXAMPLE 2 -- Hiding Some Recipients

Message Sent As
To: blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu
Cc: Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Bcc: Sue.Secret@unh.edu, Sam.Secret@unh.edu
Subj: Banquet Invitation!
                
Red Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Crimson Pride News <Red.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Cc:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: Banquet Invitation!
                
Others See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu
Cc:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: Banquet Invitation!
                
 
Blue Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Blue Bashers' Bulletin <Blue.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Cc:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: Banquet Invitation!
                
 

Description:

A banquet invitation is sent to both teams; Pam and Pete are to receive a copy as well as private copy to Sue and Sam.

Why You'd Do This:

You want both teams to know that Pam and Pete are also invited, but you don't want anyone to know that Sue and Sam are also involved. They will be attending but it's suppose to be a surprise.

Things to Watch Out For:

Since Pam, Pete, Sue, and Sam all can see both list addresses, it will be easy for any of them to intentionally or unintentionally send a reply back to the list. But if the list does not recognize them as an authorized poster, that reply will never be seen by the subscribers. (See control and confirm topics above.) UNH lists, however, are configured by default so the list owner will at least be automatically notified about any failed posting attempts. This will allow the list owner to intervene if appropriate.

 

 


EXAMPLE 3 -- Letting List Subscribers See The 'Other' Lists

Message Sent As
To:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Cc:   blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu 
Bcc:  Sue.Secret@unh.edu, Sam.Secret@unh.edu
Subj: Joint practice Tuesday
                        
Red Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Crimson Pride News <Red.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Cc:   blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu
Subj: Joint practice Tuesday
                        
Others See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Sam.Public@unh.edu
Cc:   blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu
Subj: Joint practice Tuesday
                        
 
Blue Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Blue Bashers' Bulletin <Blue.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Cc:   blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu
Subj: Joint practice Tuesday
                        
 

Description:

Message is sent to Pam and Pete with a carbon copy to both team lists with a private copy to Sue and Sam.

Why You'd Do This:

Sending to two or more lists as a carbon copy is one way to let everyone on those lists know that the message was sent to multiple lists since those addresses can be seen by the subscribers. Notice, however, that the subscribers do not see Pam and Pete's address (for reasons described in Example 1 ) and nobody will see Sue and Sam's address at all.

Things to Watch Out For:

See reply issues discussed in Example 2 above.

 


EXAMPLE 4 -- Keeping Groups Separate

Message Sent As
To:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Bcc:  blue.team@lists.unh.edu, red.team@lists.unh.edu
Subj: Proposed rule changes!
                        
Red Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Crimson Pride News <Red.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Subj: Proposed rule changes!
                        
Others See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Pam.Public@unh.edu, Pete.Public@unh.edu
Subj: Proposed rule changes!
                        
 
Blue Team List Members See
From: J.J.Sender@unh.edu
To:   Blue Bashers' Bulletin <Blue.Team@lists.unh.edu>
Subj: Proposed rule changes!
                        
 

Description:

Message is sent to Pam and Pete with a blind carbon copy sent to both teams.

Why You'd Do This:

You want to send the same message to three distinct groups of people (red, blue, and other) with the idea that each group will hold their own separate discussions. If the two lists are configured as discussion lists, the subscribers within their own lists will be able to discuss the posting. Likewise, the non-subscribers will be able to share a discussion amongst themselves. But there shouldn't be any cross talk between any of these 3 separate groups. You might also use this approach to ensure that non-subscribers will not accidentally attempt a posting to a list.

Things to Watch Out For:

Accidentally revealing the list's password is still an issue if posting confirmation is required. (See the warning above.)

Final Notes

It should be clear that while it is possible to hide addresses from non-subscribers, even their own, list members always see the name and address of the list they are subscribed to. This is as it should be. By default UNH lists are configured so that subscribers cannot find out the e-mail address of other subscribers by asking the list management robot. It is possible for the list owner to change this setting but it generally is not recommended.

Obviously people who are not on a mailing list will not receive any postings from the list. This may seem obvious, but when including non-list addresses in a message, those individuals will see the initial posting that included them, but they will not see any resulting discussion on the list unless the replies explicitly includes the non-subscriber's address. Because of this don't expect a non-subscriber to stay 'in the loop' beyond having received the initial message that included them.

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