Health & Safety

  • Daily health screening for employees
  • On-campus testing provided for all students, staff and faculty prior to the start of classes as well as regularly throughout the semester, beginning with a phased return to research this summer
  • Comprehensive tracing in partnership with the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services and dedicated quarantine housing identified
  • Population density limited to enable physical (social) distancing in classrooms, dining halls, residence halls, offices and other public spaces
  • While at work, in class, and in public common areas, community members will wear a cloth face covering to help protect against the spread of the virus
  • Public health campaign launched to ensure students, faculty and staff follow all public health and safety guidelines
  • Health and safety supplies, sanitation stations, testing and physical distancing guidelines will be in place
  • Increased cleaning and disinfection of bathrooms and other high-touch surfaces

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus, or COVID-19, is a new respiratory virus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. It is responsible for the COVID-19 illness. Learn about COVID-19.

Updated March 30, 2020

What is a novel coronavirus?  

Human coronaviruses are common worldwide. Common human coronaviruses usually cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses, like the common cold. A novel coronavirus (CoV) is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified.  

Published March 17, 2020

What is the source of COVID-19? 

Public health officials and partners are working hard to identify the source of COVID-19. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others that circulate among animals, including camels, cats and bats. Analysis of the genetic tree of this virus is ongoing to know the specific source of the virus.

Published March 17, 2020

Is there a vaccine for COVID-19?

There is no vaccine or specific treatment for COVID-19.

Published March 17, 2020

What are the symptoms of COVID-19? 

Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. People with these symptoms or combinations of symptoms may have COVID-19:

  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Or at least two of these symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell
    Read more about COVID-19 Symptoms here. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, self-isolate and call your Primary Care Provider (PCP) or other health care clinician for guidance:
  • UNH Durham Campus, please call (603) 862-9355 to speak with a UNH Health & Wellness staff member.
  • UNH Manchester and School of Law: Please contact your Primary Care Physician or local Urgent Care Clinic.

Testing for COVID-19 infection will be an important component of reducing the spread of the virus. Current guidelines may allow for testing in individuals who have concerning symptoms; please discuss with your PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for testing status and recommendations.

Updated April 30, 2020

Should I be tested?

UNH Health & Wellness is following the updated New Hampshire Division of Public Health guidelines for COVID-19 testing which states that healthcare providers test any patient for COVID-19 who present with even mild symptoms, including any of the following:

  • Fever (subjective or documented fever )
  • Upper or lower respiratory tract symptoms including runny nose (unexplained), sore throat, cough, chest congestion, or shortness of breath
  • Flu-like symptoms including muscle pains/aches, chills, and new significant fatigue
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • Other symptoms or clinical syndromes at a provider's discretion

NH residents may now register to sign up and reserve a test for coronavirus at one of five fixed sites in Claremont, Lancaster, Plymouth, Rochester and Tamworth. Residents may self-attest they have one of the symptoms, such as chills, loss of smell or taste. Resident who are over 60 and with underlying conditions do not have t ohave symptoms to request and receive a test. Residents also no longer need their primary care provider or doctor to order a test, according to DHHS. You can find the registration form here.

Rite Aid has also opened or will open testing sites around the country, including two locations in New Hampshire. Find out more here.

If you believe you are a candidate for testing living outside of New Hampshire or are a New Hampshire resident and have questions please contact your PCP or Health & Wellness at (603) 862-9355 for further guidance. Individuals who have mild symptoms should self-isolate until at least 10 days have passed since the onset of symptoms, and at least 72 hours have passed since their recovery.

Updated May 12, 2020

I am feeling very anxious and worried given all of the unknowns about COVID-19’s impact and spread. Is this normal? What can I do to take care of myself?

Feeling anxious, stressed, scared, and/or worried are normal reactions to the unknowns about a new virus, what we see and hear around us, and things that feel outside of our control. These emotions can help motivate us to be informed and take actions to protect ourselves and others:

  • Get adequate sleep, eat well, move your body, do some things that help to relax your body and mind—these actions also strengthen our immune systems! 
  • Know the facts about the virus and getting accurate information from reliable sources.
  • Take breaks from media, including social media.
  • Acknowledge your feelings instead of suppressing them. It can be helpful to write down your feelings and list what is making you feel this way. Acknowledging feelings also includes acknowledging how others feel. Telling yourself or others not to worry, be stressed, or panic only tends to make ourselves and others feel worse.
  • Visit Harvard’s resource, “Managing Fears and Anxiety around the Coronavirus (COVID-19),” for more self-care ideas.
  • UNH Health & Wellness has virtual wellness programming and telehealth services (clinical and wellness education/counseling appointments) available to support students’ self-care.

If you find the emotions you are experiencing are impacting your daily life and functioning, reach out for help.  

  • Students at UNH-Durham can contact Psychological and Counseling Services (PACS) 603-862-2090.  
  • Students at UNH-M can contact The Mental Health Center of Greater Manchester (MHCGM) on campus (603) 641-4170 or directly (603) 668-4111. 
  • Students at UNH Franklin Pierce School of Law can contact Riverbend Community Mental Health 603-2281600 for an appointment or if crisis 1-844-743-5748. 
  • Employees can contact the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) 1-800-424-1749.
  • The Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available for those in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals: 1-800-273-8255.

Updated April 27, 2020

Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?

People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

If you have observed or experienced an incident of bias or hate, discrimination and/or harassment, please report the incident using the reportit!_form or contact the Affirmative Action and Equity Office at affirmaction.equity@unh.edu or (603) 862-2930 Voice / (603) 862-1527 TTY / 7-1-1 Relay NH.

Published March 17, 2020

Q: Who is susceptible to the novel coronavirus? 

A: People of all ages can be infected by COVID-19. Older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease) appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.

Everyone should take steps to protect themselves from the virus, for example by washing their hands often and covering coughs and sneezes.  

Published March 17, 2020

Q: How does the virus spread? 

A: This virus likely emerged from an animal source originally, but now is spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that, in person-to-person transmission, some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. This virus appears to be easily spread between people. The CDC considers this a very serious public health risk. Here is what we do know about the spread of newly emerged coronaviruses.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Should I be tested?

A: UNH Health & Wellness is following the New Hampshire Division of Public Health guidelines for COVID-19 testing:

Access to COVID-19 testing has improved, but testing still potentially exposes the public and healthcare system to contagious cases and consumes limited personal protective equipment (PPE) and testing supplies. People in the following groups should be tested for COVID-19 if symptomatic (fever > 100.4F or symptoms of respiratory illness), with new additions in bold:

  • Healthcare workers and first responders
  • Family members of healthcare workers and first responders (because it impacts the ability for these individuals to return to work)
  • Any person residing in, or who has worked or visited, a long-term care facility (LTCF) or healthcare setting
  • Patients hospitalized with fever, respiratory illness, or flu-like symptoms
  • Patients who may have had close contact with a large number of people
  • Residents or employees of jails or prisons
  • Essential workers who deliver, or directly support, home, community, or institutional care services
  • Patients 65 years of age and older
  • Patients with underlying chronic health conditions which puts them at increased risk of complications from COVID-19

If you believe you are a candidate for testing, please contact your PCP or Health & Wellness at (603) 862-9355 for further guidance.

If you have mild symptoms and are not in need of medical care, please self-isolate at home and monitor for symptom progression. If your symptoms worsen, please contact your PCP or Health & Wellness at 603.862.9355 for further guidance.

Individuals who have mild symptoms but are not tested should self-isolate until at least seven days have passed since the onset of symptoms, and at least 72 hours have passed since their recovery.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: What should I do if I have close contact with a person who is diagnosed with COVID-19 infection?

A: If you come into close contact with a person who is later diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommend:

  • The contact will be advised to begin a 14-day self-quarantine with monitoring for symptoms of illness. They are to practice physical distancing (>6ft). If a significant fever (temperature >100.4), cough or shortness of breath were to develop, they should call their PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for guidance. According to NH DHHS, “household members such as family members, including children, of quarantined individuals are not required to quarantine. As long as they remain asymptomatic, they can leave the home and can go to public places like school and work. If the person being quarantined develops illness, household members must then also stay home and self-isolate.”
  • Anyone who has contact with asymptomatic contacts are considered at low risk. No self-quarantine is recommended or required. Self-monitoring for symptoms is advised. If significant fever (temperature >100.4), cough or shortness of breath were to develop, they should call their PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for guidance.
  • Travelers returning from countries with CDC risk category Level 3 or higher are advised to maintain 14-day self-isolation with monitoring for symptoms of illness. They are to practice social distancing and should not come to campus. If significant fever (temperature >100.4), cough or shortness of breath were to develop, they should call their PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for guidance.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: How do I self-quarantine? 

A:  Self-quarantine means that you practice caution for 14 days after having contact with someone who is sick to see if you develop symptoms. For 14 days:

  • Stay at home with social restrictions. Do not go to work, classes, or other social activities. Avoid activities in public. 
  • If possible, use a separate bathroom from “household members."
  • If around, other people, practice social distancing (about 6 feet or 2 meters). 
  • Do not take public transportation, taxis or ride shares.  
  • Self-monitor for fever (>100.4F), cough, and/or shortness of breath. If you experience symptoms, call Health & Wellness at 603-862-9355, your primary care physician, or a local urgent care clinic for guidance. 
  • As long as you remain asymptomatic, other “household members” can leave the home and can go to public spaces like school and work. If the person in self-isolation develops symptoms, “household members” must then also stay home and self-isolate.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Should I be concerned about spread of the virus through food, food containers or handling packages? 

A: Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom. It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures. Learn what is known about the spread of COVID-19.”

Learn more about food safety and availability here.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Am I at greater risk of COVID-19 if I smoke or vape?

A: Medical researchers and health providers are recommending that those who smoke or vape work to reduc or quit their consumption of nicotine and/or marijuana to lower their risks and protect their lungs. Health & Wellnes is here to support anyone who is interested in reducing or quitting their use. Learn more about options and resources for quitting by visiting our nicotine webpage. Students may also scheduled free telehealth appointments for wellness education/counseling online and utilize our many virtual programs for additional support.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: What can I do to help stop the spread of colds, flu and/or the coronavirus? 

A: While the immediate risk of this new coronavirus to the American public is believed to be low at this time, everyone can do their part to help respond to this emerging public health emergency by following the CDC recommendations for everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses (colds, flu, Coronavirus), including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based (at least 60% alcohol) hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home and avoid public places (i.e. physical distancing) in accordance with your state directive.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoid being within 6 feet (close contact) of any person, but especially anyone who is sick.
  • Do not share drinks, smoking/vaping devices, or other utensils or objects that may transmit saliva
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces. Read the CDC's interim environmental cleaning and disinfection recommendations for community members and people isolated in home care.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Do I need to wear a mask? 

A: The CDC reommends wearing a mark or other nose/mouth covering in public. The reasoning is that COVID-19 may be spread from person to person whether someone is symptomatic or not. Therefore, anyone may be potentially contagious, including yourself. Mask use, combined with physical distancing (> 6 feet), may protect others from any unintentional spread of infection. To learn more about this recommendation and how to make your own mask visit the CDC's website.

Updated April 27, 2020 

Q: Should individuals with an underlying health condition isolate themselves or avoid classes to minimize their risk of being infected with the coronavirus?

A: If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.

Health & Wellness is prepared to partner with students’ medical providers to discuss specifics. If you are on the UNH Durham campus, Health & Wellness has Health Resource Nurses who serve as the contact point for concerned students, and students can contact them for information and guidance by calling (603) 862-9355. If you are on UNH Manchester or School of Law campuses, please contact your primary care physician or local Urgent Care Clinic. Employees with an underlying health condition should work with their healthcare provider for information and guidance. 

Published March 17, 2020 

Q: Should I be cleaning my house, residence hall, apartment, etc. with industrial-strength cleaning solutions? 

A: Perform routine environmental cleaning. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces (e.g., doorknobs, light switches, countertops). Read CDC's interim environmental cleaning and disinfection recommendations for community members and people isolated in home care. Use all cleaning products according to the directions on the label.

If you live on campus, in order to avoid the risk of a chemical reaction with disinfectants being used by UNH Facilities, Housing and Dining, please do not purchase or bring any cleaning agents for use on campus, particularly chlorine-based products, without prior approval from Environmental Health and Safety.

FYI - Staff in UNH Facilities, Housing and Dining have increased routine environmental cleaning including disinfecting frequently touched surfaces on campus like handrails, doorknobs and light switches, and will be placing disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer in all classrooms, residence and dining halls, and areas used by the general public to help decrease the spread of viruses.

Published March 17, 2020

Q: How do I clean my cell phone?

A: The CDC recommends the following for preventing the spread of infectious diseases: “Use disinfecting wipes on electronic items that are touched often, such as phones and computers. Pay close attention to the directions for using disinfecting wipes. It may be necessary to use more than one wipe to keep the surface wet for the stated length of contact time. Make sure that the electronics can withstand the use of liquids for cleaning and disinfecting.”

Published March 17, 2020

Q: What do I do if someone I'm living is sick?

A: If your roommate or someone you have frequent/close contact with is sick:

  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Don’t share household items like towels, eating utensils, dishes, cups, etc.
  • Clean common surfaces, such as doorknobs, handles, room surfaces, light switches etc. Use a standard household disinfectant. Wash your hands after cleaning the area.
  • Be helpful, but protect yourself. You can still care for your roommate. You can offer to pick up some Kleenex or get them a meal, but try to avoid close contact with your sick roommate.

Remind sick roommates to prevent others from getting sick.  The sick person should remember to cover coughs and sneezes and to wash hands frequently (especially after coughing, sneezing, or disposing of used tissue in the trash). The sick person should also wear a mask any time there is close contact (within six feet) of others or when using common areas, like a shared bathroom. If your sick roommate is not covering sneezes and coughs, you should consider wearing a mask when you are within close proximity (within six feet).

Following these precautions will decrease your risk of becoming ill, but if you are sharing space with someone who is sick, you should monitor yourself. If you develop fever (>100.4F, cough, shortness of breath) after contact with the sick person,

  • UNH Durham: Contact Health & Wellness, 603-862-9355 for information and care. 
  • UNH Manchester & School of Law: Contact your PCP or local Urgent Care Center.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Should I be concerned about pets/animals and COVID-19? 

A: As of April 22, 2020, two pet cats tested positive for COVID-19 in New York. Otherwise, there are very few reports of animals with confirmed cases of COVID-19 worldwide. The CDC does not recommend routine testing of animals: “There is no evidence that pets play a role in spreading the virus in the United States. Therefore, there is no justification in taking measures against companion animals that may compromise their welfare.”

For prevention recommendations and further information about caring for your pets while sick visit the CDC website.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: What are the current global travel advisories?

A: Travel advisories from the CDC include:

  • Level 3 Travel Warning: avoid all nonessential travel due to widespread community transmission of COVID-19 illness. 
  • For the most recent alerts check the U.S. State Department website and the CDC website.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Should I travel within the U.S. or change my travel plans?

A: The CDC does not generally issue advisories or restrictions for travel within the United States. However, cases of COVID19 have been reported in many states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease. Crowded travel settings, like airports, may increase your risk of exposure to COVID-19, if there are other travelers with COVID19. There are several things you should consider when deciding whether it is safe for you to travel. Read CDC’s travel considerations here.

Keep in mind that many states and cities are implementing stay-at-home orders. Check in with your local government to find out what the requirements are for your area.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: What if I recently traveled to a high-risk area?

A: If you spent time in a high-risk area during the past 14 days:

  • Stay home for 14 days from the time you return from travel, monitor your health and practice physical distancing. Physical distancing means staying out of crowded places, avoiding group gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.
  • If you get sick with fever (100.4°F/38°C or higher), cough, or have trouble breathing
    • Seek medical advice. Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room.
    • Tell your doctor about your recent travel and your symptoms.
    • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: What are the enhanced precautions recommended for travel?

A: Because older adults and those with chronic medical conditions may be at higher risk for severe disease, people in these groups should discuss travel with a healthcare provider and consider postponing nonessential travel.

If you must travel abroad, take the following steps:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Travelers should monitor their health during travel and after travel and limit interactions at large gatherings with other for 14 days after returning to the United States.

Published March 17, 2020

Q: How many cases of the coronavirus are there in the United States? 

A: With the evolving nature of the virus in the United States, check here for updated information regarding the coronavirus in the U.S.

Published March 17, 2020

Q: Are there cases of the virus in New Hampshire? 

A: The N.H. Division of Public Health Services provides the number of positive, possible and fatal cases in New Hampshire.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Will I know if there is a case of the coronavirus on campus?

A: COVID-19 illness has begun to affect our community, as well as our family and friends. As individual cases are identified, UNH will do its best to identify anyone who may be at elevated risk from contact and advise any necessary recommendations. Refer to the UNH COVID-19 Updates page for any updates regarding COVID-19 at UNH and information on how the campus is working to prevent the spread of the illness and what each member of the community can do to help prevent further spread of the virus.

Updated April 27, 2020

Q: Where can I get more information on the virus and what UNH is doing to protect the community? 

A: Refer to the UNH COVID-19 Updates page and/or the Health & Wellness Health Alerts page.

Updated April 27, 2020

COVID-19 Health & Wellness Resources

Updated March 17, 2020

Early/mild symptoms of COVID-19 illness caused by Coronavirus infection can include nasal congestion, sore throat, and achiness. Rarely, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea have been reported. More concerning symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included fever (>100.4F), cough, and/or shortness of breath. These symptoms typically appear 2 to 14 days after exposure.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, self-isolate and call your Primary Care Provider (PCP) or other health care clinician for guidance:

  • UNH Durham Campus, please call (603) 862-9355 to speak with a UNH Health & Wellness staff member.
  • UNH Manchester and School of Law: Please contact your Primary Care Physician or local Urgent Care Clinic.

Testing for COVID-19 infection will be an important component of reducing the spread of the virus. Current guidelines allow for testing in individuals who have concerning symptoms; please discuss with your PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for testing status and recommendations.

Use these links for UNH Health & Wellness hours and after-hours/emergency care.

Prevention

We encourage faculty, staff and students to continue to be vigilant in preventing the spread of illness. 

Everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat by following the CDC recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses (colds, flu, COVID-19), including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based (at least 60% alcohol) hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home and avoid public places when sick (i.e. social distancing).
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoid being within 6 feet (close contact) of a person who is sick.
  • Avoid sharing drinks, smoking/vaping devices, or other utensils or objects that may transmit saliva.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces. Read CDC's interim environmental cleaning and disinfection recommendations for community members and people isolated in home care. 
  • Get a flu vaccine.

Other Campus Resources:

If you find that you are experiencing heightened anxiety that is impacting your daily life and functioning, reach out for help. 

  • Students at UNH Durham can contact Psychological and Counseling Services (PACS) 603-862-2090. 
  • Students at UNH Manchester can contact The Mental Health Center of Greater Manchester (MHCGM) on campus (603) 641-4170 or directly (603) 668-4111.
  • Students at UNH Franklin Pierce School of Law can contact Riverbend Community Mental Health 603-228-1600 for an appointment or if crisis 1-844-743-5748.
  • Employees can contact the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) 1-800-424-1749.

If you have observed or experienced an incident of bias or hate, discrimination and/or harassment, please report the incident using the reportit!_form or contact the Affirmative Action and Equity Office at affirmaction.equity@unh.edu or (603) 862-2930 Voice / (603) 862-1527 TTY / 7-1-1 Relay NH.

Additional Resources:

Recommendations for Management of Close Contact with Person Diagnosed with COVID-19

Updated: March 30, 2020

If you come into close contact with a person who is later diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommend:

The contact will be advised to begin a 14-day self-quarantine with monitoring for symptoms of illness. They are to practice social distancing. If a significant fever (temperature >100.4), cough or shortness of breath were to develop, they should call their PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for guidance. According to NH DHHS, “household members such as family members, including children, of quarantined individuals are not required to quarantine. As long as they remain asymptomatic, they can leave the home and can go to public places like school and work. If the person being quarantined develops illness, household members must then also stay home and self-isolate.”

Anyone who has contact with asymptomatic contacts are considered at low risk. No self-quarantine is recommended or required. Self-monitoring for symptoms is advised. If significant fever (temperature >100.4), cough or shortness of breath were to develop, they should call their PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for guidance.

Travelers returning from countries with CDC risk category Level 3 or higher are advised to maintain 14-day self-quarantine with monitoring for symptoms of illness. They are to practice social distancing and should not come to campus. If significant fever (temperature >100.4), cough or shortness of breath were to develop, they should call their PCP or UNH Health & Wellness for guidance.

The CDC defines close contact as:

a) being within approximately 6 feet (2 meters) of a COVID-19 case for a prolonged period of time; close contact can occur while caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a healthcare waiting area or room with a COVID-19 case

– or

b) having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed on)

Guidelines for 14-day self-quarantine

Stay at home with social restrictions. Do not go to work, classes, or other social activities. Avoid activities in public.

If possible, use a separate bathroom from other household members.If around other people, practice social distancing (about 6 feet or 2 meters).

Do not take public transportation, taxis or ride shares.

Self-monitor for fever (>100.4F), cough, and/or shortness of breath. If you experience symptoms, call Health & Wellness at 603-862-9355, your primary care physician, or a local urgent care clinic for guidance.

As long as you remain asymptomatic, other household members can leave the home and can go to public spaces like school and work. If the person in self-isolation develops symptoms, household members must then also stay home and self-isolate. See the State of NH guidance on self-quarantine: https://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/cdcs/documents/self-quarantine-covid.pdf

  • PACS will remain open at critical staffing levels. We have the availability to consult with new and established students by phone. PACS hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday.
  • PACS is now offering telehealth counseling. We will be available to discuss continuity of care with new and established students. Feel free to call PACS at (603) 862-2090. For additional information, click here: https://www.unh.edu/pacs/telehealth-services
  • PACS is offering a free online platform that provides tools and resources to help deal with stress, anxiety and depression to any student, staff and faculty. Download the WellTrack app and register with your unh.edu email address for full access.
  • In the event of a mental health crisis, we continue to be available to you. We are able to offer crisis consultation for urgent and mental health emergencies during our business hours. If you are not on campus or it is after hours, please know that there are other resources available to you. You may access a trained counselor 24/7 through the Crisis Text Line by texting "HOME" to 741741. You can also speak with a trained crisis counselor by calling (800) 273-8255. If you are experiencing a life-threatening emergency, please call 911 or visit your local emergency room. For additional crisis resources, click here: https://www.unh.edu/pacs/crisis-emergency-services

Updated April 9, 2020