Talk about Teaching Fall 2020 Series

All sessions:

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Register for Talk about Teaching Fall 2020 Series



Two-part series (September 22 and December 1):

 

Cultivating Connection in Online Courses:  Perspectives from Large-Enrollment Classrooms

The current need to move many of our courses to a fully online learning environment has forced us to examine not only our teaching practices, but also the value of interpersonal connection.  How can we cultivate energy and enthusiasm when we teach remotely--particularly in large classes?  How might we create the personal connections we rely on in a remote learning environment? We believe the answer lies in a combination of openness to new pedagogical methods and a reimagining of how to connect with our students in this non-traditional setting. We will discuss the benefits and challenges of creating and sustaining a sense of community in online classes through this two-part TAT series. Participation in both sessions is recommended, though not required.  In the first session, we will share tips and best practices from personal experience and the literature, and we will set goals for implementation.  In the second session, presenters and participants will return to discuss the successes and challenges of utilizing new methods. While geared toward large-enrollment courses, if this is something you are grappling with as we pivot to partially (or fully) remote courses, these sessions are for you! 

Session I:  Cultivating Connection in Large-Enrollment (Online) Courses:  What does this mean, and why do it?

Date: Tuesday, September 22, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

What does it mean to build community and create connection?  How do I make this happen in a remote environment?  In this session, we will present the techniques and tools we have used to create and build a feeling of community in our online classes, as well as best-practices gleaned from other faculty and scholars. In addition, participants will be encouraged to identify 1-2 new strategies they will try to implement in their courses this semester.

Presenters:
Sara Withers, Senior Lecturer, Anthropology

Jennifer Purrenhage, Senior Lecturer, Natural Resources and the Environment

 

 

Date: Tuesday, December 1, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Session II:  Revisiting Strategies for Cultivating Connection in Large-Enrollment (Online) Courses:  What worked?  What wasn’t successful?

In this follow-up workshop, presenters and participants will share their experiences with new strategies or practices they have integrated into their online courses this year. Through this conversation, we will discuss best practices for sustaining meaningful connection and community in our classes.

Presenters:
Sara Withers, Senior Lecturer, Anthropology

Jennifer Purrenhage, Senior Lecturer, Natural Resources and the Environment

 

 

Date: Thursday, October 1, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Feedback Can Promote Learning: How to Deliver it with Effect

Feedback can be a powerful tool to facilitate student learning and achievement; however, some types and circumstances of feedback are more effective than others. This presentation will explore the notion of feedback as a psychological process. Beginning with the students’ perspective, we will consider student course learning goals, where the student is in relation to those goals, and where to expect the next step – that is, where the student will be heading. Moving forward, we will examine the role of feedback as students move from novice to mastery, immediate versus delayed feedback, and positive versus negative feedback, and the role of errors.

Presenter:

Catherine Overson, Associate and Current Interim Director, CEITL


Date: Thursday, October 8, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Performing Assessment and Grading Online

This session will look at some best practices for online assessment and strategies to mitigate cheating. We'll also look at tools for grading and feedback online, including rubrics, audio feedback, digital markup, and Canvas Speedgrader. 

Presenter:

Scott Kimball, Xuan Cai, Fran Keefe, Mike McIntire, Learning Development and Innovation 


Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Information Literacy: What Is It? Am I Already Teaching It?

Information Literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning.

Information literacy is increasingly important in the contemporary environment of rapid technological change and proliferating information resources. Because of the escalating complexity of this environment, individuals are faced with diverse, abundant information choices—in their academic studies, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. Information is available through libraries, community resources, special interest organizations, traditional media, and the Internet. Ever more often, information comes to individuals in unfiltered and unmediated formats, raising questions about its authenticity, validity, and reliability. In addition, information is available through multiple modes, including graphical, aural, and textual, and these pose new challenges for individuals in evaluating and understanding it. The sheer abundance of information will not in itself create a more informed citizenry without a complementary cluster of abilities necessary to use information effectively.

And you may already be teaching it!

This session will outline the history of information literacy, including its growth out of library bibliographic instruction into its own content field, structured around threshold concepts and able to address a variety of critical issues from fake news to social justice.

Presenter: 

Kathrine Aydelott, Associate Professor, Information Literacy Librarian, Dimond Library


Date: Wednesday, October 21, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Facilitating Collaborative Learning in a Face-to-Face and/or Remote Course

‘Collaborative Learning’ is term identifying a variety of intentional learning activities that involve at least 2 learners engaged in group work. Collaborative exercises, when incorporated into course design, are conceived to facilitate students’ progress toward achieving learning outcomes.  We will review techniques for implementing various components of collaborative learning, including the use of technology, and explore a variety of collaborative learning techniques that can be used across disciplines for face-to-face, online, and large enrollment courses.

Presenters:
Catherine Overson, Associate and Current Interim Director, CEITL

AT Staff


Date: Tuesday, October 27, 2020 
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Partnering with Center for Academic Resources to Promote Student Learning

The Center for Academic Resources (CFAR) is for all undergraduates who want to improve their academic performance whether they are low or high achieving students.  In this session, we will

  • describe the variety of services we provide
  • explore the active learning strategies CFAR employs with students related to their course content
  • discuss how you might partner with CFAR in an effort to promote student learning in your course
Presenters:
Dani Adler, CFAR Director

Christine Zaimes, Coordinator, TRIO Tutorial Services


Date: Wednesday, November 11
Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation 
CEITL Participation: 1 point

The Student Cognition Toolbox: Promote Student Success by Empowering Them to Become Self-Regulated Learners in Any Course Delivery Platform

College students tend to use study strategies that are ineffective relative to strategies supported by research found to promote learning. In our own work, we found that most students report using less-effective strategies such as rereading and highlighting. Moreover, it is the relatively less-skilled, low background knowledge students who are especially prone to using these comparatively ineffective strategies. We found that students instructed to use deep processing strategies tend to perform better on exams compared to students who do not use the deeper strategies.

In response, we have developed a set of open, online course materials, located with the Student Cognition Toolbox (SCT) that instruct students about effective study strategies. The SCT is situated within an internationally known online instructional platform. Distinctive features of the SCT include practice components that facilitate students’ mastery of each study strategy, and self-regulative components in which students identify and document learning strategies relative to course-related learning goals. The third edition of the SCT, based on performance measures and feedback from over 2,000 students, was released this fall and will be available in 2020 on the worldwide web as an open educational resource. The SCT includes modules on retrieval practice, self-explanation, elaborative interrogation, worked examples, spacing, and interleaving. For the Spring release, the SCT will include modules on making predictions and dual coding.

Learn how you can help your students succeed by providing them with the tools that have been empirically demonstrated to promote learning.  

Presenters:

SCT Team at CEITL: Catherine Overson; Victor Benassi

Moderators:

SCT Team Colleagues: Lauren Kordonowy; Elizabeth Tappin; Jennifer Calawa

 

 

Facilitating Collaborative Learning in a Face-to-Face and/or Remote Course (Multiple Dates):

Date: Monday, November 9, 2020 (Upon request, repeat offering of the October 21 session )
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Date: Tuesday, November 17, 2020 (new collaborative learning techniques)
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

Date: Monday, December 7, 2020 (new collaborative learning techniques)
Time: 12:40pm – 2:00pm 
Place: Zoom – you will receive an invitation the day prior to the session

CEITL Participation: 1 point

‘Collaborative Learning’ is term identifying a variety of intentional learning activities that involve at least 2 learners engaged in group work. Collaborative exercises, when incorporated into course design, are conceived to facilitate students’ progress toward achieving learning outcomes.  We will review techniques for implementing various components of collaborative learning, including the use of technology, and explore a variety of collaborative learning techniques that can be used across disciplines for face-to-face, online, and large enrollment courses. 

Presenters:

Catherine Overson, Associate and Current Interim Director, CEITL

Scott Kimball, Xuan Cai, Fran Keefe, Mike McIntire, Learning Development and Innovation, CEITL