2018 January-Term Courses on College Teaching

The Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching and Learning, in collaboration with the UNH Graduate School, is scheduled to offer two GRAD courses in college teaching during the 2018 January term (details below). These 2-credit courses will count toward meeting the requirements in the elective category for both the Cognate and Certificate in College Teaching. Registrants do not need to be enrolled in the Cognate or the Certificate to take the courses. Eligible students who currently have a UNH graduate assistantship may use the tuition waiver benefit to cover the cost of tuition.

We need your assistance to help determine if we will have sufficient enrollments to offer the courses. If you indend to register for one or both of the following 2018 J-Term courses on college teaching, please complete the following form to let us know by Friday, October 6th.

Please note, that completing this form is not a substitute for registering for the course. We will remind you before October 23rd , when registration officially opens for the 2018 J-Term, to register. Once registration opens, register as soon as possible. Once course caps are reached, registration will be closed.

Course Details:

GRAD 970 – Special Topics in College Teaching: Teaching and Learning with Multimedia 

Dates:  December 27, 2017 to January 19, 2018
Credits: 2
Course is online, in asynchronous format (no face-to-face meetings)
Course Instructor: Dr. Catherine Overson
Associate Director, Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching and Learning
Director, Teaching and Learning with Multimedia
Affiliate Associate Professor of College Teaching
University of New Hampshire, Durham

coverson@unh.edu

Course Information:

Designing multimedia presentations that are consistent with the cognitive principles of multimedia learning has been empirically demonstrated to benefit student learning. Through the lens of cognitive load theory, we will examine principles of multimedia learning (e.g., coherence, signaling, segmenting, modality) that can be used to design any face-to-face or online presentation of to-be-learned material. Additional readings will include empirical literature demonstrating the learning benefits of multimedia presentations using several multimedia principles. The final project will be to develop an annotated multimedia lesson presentation, applying cognitive principles of multimedia learning, for a specific course that you might teach.

Expected Student Outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students who successfully complete the course will be able to:

  • summarize and describe and cognitive load theory;
  • identify and describe Multimedia Principles of Learning within the context of cognitive load;
  • evaluate and integrate empirical research on the application of multimedia principles;
  • apply multimedia principles to a presentation for a specific course to be taught.

Required Text: Mayer, R. E. (2009). Multimedia learning (2nd ed). New York: Cambridge University Press. (A copy of this text may be purchased or accessed through UNH’s Dimond Library Reserve desk.)

Additional Readings:  We will provided through the course Canvas site.

Course Format

This course consists of group discussions on Canvas© and individually prepared and submitted assignments and one group assignment. Student will submit their assignments to the course instructor who will, in turn, provide feedback.

 


GRAD 970 – Special Topics in College Teaching: Course Design: Best Practices for Course Development and Implementation 

Dates:  December 27, 2017 to January 19, 2018
Credits: 2
Course is online, in asynchronous format (no face-to-face meetings)
Course Instructor: Dr. Victor Benassi
Faculty Director, Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching and Learning
Professor of Psychology

victor.benassi@unh.edu

Course Information:

Preparation for teaching in any college/university field or discipline. Examination of issues and models involving integrated course design—from developing course learning goals to creating instructional approaches to address those goals; Students will learn to develop authentic assessments to ensure that learning goals have been achieved. Specific topics include: overall course structure; writing course objectives and learning outcomes; creating authentic assignments and exam questions; grading course assignments and exams; developing a course grading scheme; reading about and discussing approaches that foster student engagement and learning. Products from the course will include a complete course syllabus on a subject related to the student’s field of study; sample assignments and exam questions; a complete teaching module for a unit in a course.

By the end of the course, students who successfully complete the course will be able to:

  • design and develop a comprehensive syllabus for a course in student’s field/discipline that includes a statement of learning outcomes, a testing and grading plan, a description of teaching/learning activities and assignments, and reading assignments. This protocol for a specific course will reflect evidence-based practices related to teaching and student learning.
  • read and write about contemporary theory, research, and practice pertaining to such topics as course design, test construction, grading practices, and representative teaching approaches.
  • design and develop a course-specific teaching module that describes the content to be covered in a specific section of a course.  The teaching module will include a statement of the learning outcomes for the unit, information on the resources that will be required to teach the unit, general and detailed outlines of the content included in the unit, presentation of all evaluation items and description of all assignments, and information on the materials to be used (e.g., handouts, PowerPoint outlines).

Course Readings:  All course materials will be provided through Canvas. No purchases required.

Course Format

This course consists of group discussions on Canvas© and individually prepared and submitted assignments. Each student will submit her/his individual assignments to the course instructor who will, in turn, provide feedback.