Visiting STEM Women Scholars Award Recipients

The UNH ADVANCE Visiting STEM Women Scholars Program provides a way to build exposure and networking with senior women faculty in STEM disciplines from other institutions.

This program allows UNH departments, programs, or individual UNH faculty to apply to UNH ADVANCE for support to bring senior women faculty from other universities to UNH to build research collaborations and expand professional networks.

Jump to | Spring 2016 | Fall 2015 | Fall 2014 | Spring 2014 |

Spring 2016 Award

 

Irene Beyerlein

Technical Staff Member
Center for Materials at Irradiation &
Mechanical Extremes
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Marko Knezevic

Marko Knezevic

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering
University of New Hampshire

 

Project Description

Dr. Irene Beyerlein of Los Alamos National Laboratory has received an ADVANCE Visiting STEM Women Scholars award for Spring 2016.  In collaboration with a team of UNH professors and graduate students lead by Dr. Marko Knezevic, Dr. Beyerlain will be conducting research projects involving plastic deformation and failure of low symmetry metals. Drs. Beyerlein and Knezevic anticipate several journal publications as the result of this work as well as the preliminary data for a Department of Energy funding proposal on phase transformations in hexagonal metals. In addition to her research aims while in residence at UNH, Dr. Beyerlein will take an active role in the development of successful careers of young female faculty members through seminars and more direct mentoring with her participation in a CEPS Cohort Career Advising Program meeting.

 

 

Fall 2015 Award

 

Kathryn Johnson

Associate Professor
Biology
Beloit College

Patricia Halpin

Patricia Halpin

Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences & Biotechnology
University of New Hampshire, Manchester

 

Project Description

Dr. Kathryn Johnson, Associate Professor of Biology at Beloit College has received an ADVANCE Visiting STEM Women Scholars award for Fall 2015 in collaboration with UNH professor Dr. Patricia Halpin. The objective of this collaboration is to enhance experimental learning at UNH, developing students’ abilities to connect their studies with past, current and future work, preparing them for future academic, career and personal endeavors. Beloit College has an established commitment to experimental learning: a success story with which Dr. Johnson has been closely involved. In consultation with Dr. Johnson and Dr. Annie Donahue, UNH associate professor and Director of Experimental learning, Dr. Halpin will develop and implement assessment strategies for experimental learning, specifically focusing on reflective activities. These strategies will culminate in the revision subsequent analysis of BSCI 701, a Biological Sciences senior seminar course. Apart from working with Dr. Halpin, while at UNH Dr. Johnson will also conduct an open workshop for faculty and staff interested in incorporating active and intentional reflection into their courses, special projects, or internships.

 

 

Fall 2014 Awards

 

Melinda Smith

Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Colorado State University

Heidi Asbjornsen

Associate Professor
Natural Resources and the Environment
University of New Hampshire

 

Project Description

Dr. Melinda Smith of Colorado State University has received an ADVANCE Visiting STEM Women Scholars award for Fall 2014.  In collaboration with UNH professor Dr. Heidi Asbjornsen, she will investigate the impact of extreme drought across diverse ecosystems.  Dr. Smith’s research concentrates on understanding the consequences on human-caused global changes with a recent focus on assessing the “impacts of increased frequency and severity of extreme climate events on plant community dynamics and ecosystem functioning”. Dr. Asbjornsen is currently working on reliably predicting changes in precipitation amounts and distribution and thus the impact on our ecosystem.  Together it is anticipated these two lines of research will produce state-of-the-art knowledge from drought experiments conducted at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in NH along with the publication of scholarly works.

 

 

Jacqueline Geoghegan

Professor
Economics
Clark University

Alix Contosta

Research Scientist
Earth Systems Research Center
University of New Hampshire

 

Project Description

Dr. Jacqueline Geoghegan of Clark University has received an ADVANCE Visiting STEM Women Scholars award for Fall 2014.  In collaboration with UNH research scientist Dr. Alix Contosta, she will work to integrate social science into research concerning land use, climate and global change.  The goal is to help address these problems from the human perspective creating an interface between science and society.  Dr. Geoghegan specializes in creating economic models of land use change using the combination of geographical information systems and economic models of human decision-making. This, in concert with Dr. Contosta’s research on how soils respond to both natural and human disturbances, will provide a more complete picture of land use and land use change and it’s impact.

 

Spring 2014 Award

 

Natacha Thomas

Associate Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Rhode Island

Jennifer Jacobs

Professor
Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of New Hampshire

 

Project Description

Dr. Natacha Thomas of the University of Rhode Island has received an ADVANCE Visiting STEM Women Scholars award for Spring 2014.  In collaboration with UNH professor Dr. Jennifer Jacobs, she will investigate the impact of climate change on various safety issues, including traffic safety and disaster management.  Dr. Thomas hopes to align her prior work with transportation safety, transportation terminal security, and disaster management under hurricane threat, with Dr. Jacobs work on climate change, infrastructure and emerging technologies. Their goal is to produce preliminary research in these combined areas leading to scholarly contributions to the field and ultimately tangible changes to the way we handle natural disasters.

 

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