Freshman Orientation

Freshman Orientation

Showing up to single-day orientation, in my usual 45-minute early fashion, my mom quickly kicked me out of the car and peeled out, leaving me in the dust. I stared blankly at Stoke Hall. Swarms of people moved towards the building and others were volunteers yelling in a sing-song-sorta tone about how we should be excited. I took a deep breath, entered the building, and was immediately out of my element. Not in the sort of way where you look out of place, like a prep at a metal fest, but just a completely new and exotic feeling as I was in a totally new situation. Volunteers filed us into groups and sat us down to tell us where to go and what to do. In no time, we were sent back out to figure out our schedules for the day, knowing no one but ourselves…

It took one shot to make my first friend. I swallowed my pride, as did everyone else, and got off my SnapChat and Facebook and turned around to introduce myself. It made orientation so much easier knowing I had just one ally. Even so, for the rest of orientation, we were strictly told that our phones were to be turned off. No phones meant no distractions during class time, which also meant no distractions for forced social interactions. We were stuck. It was oddly discomforting not having the ol’ reliable smart phone at my fingertips to submerge myself into, but I was also thrilled to be making friends and choosing classes. Freshman Orientation

Four or five hours of cell phone-sobriety later, and we all had our classes picked, had eaten lunch, taken our pictures, and created some good allies with other students. I was sweaty, exhausted from the brain-strain of picking classes, frazzled from schedule complications, and overall tired from a long night, but the experience of meeting some of my future classmates was so exciting that I left campus considering everything from my roommate-to-be to graduating. I ended up waking up the next morning bright and early, and left for Target to buy the start of my dorm supplies.