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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2015-2016

Special University Programs


University-Wide Programs


Fellowships Office

The UNH Fellowships Office provides information, counseling, and editorial support to high-achieving students applying for national and international fellowships and scholarships. The office also assists faculty members who serve as mentors and recommenders, and arranges for members of the faculty to take part in interviews and screening committees.

In recruiting, advising, and supporting students with exceptionally strong records of academic excellence, the office collaborates campus-wide with other offices and departments of the University, including the Honors Program, the Center for International Education, and the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research, in support of the University’s Academic Plan.

The services of the Fellowships Office are available to undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni of the University. The Fellowships Office holds membership in the National Association of Fellowships Advisors. For more information, please contact Dr. Richard Parks, director, Fellowships Office, 207 Hood House, (603) 862-0733; e-mail: Richard.Parks@unh.edu.

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Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research

» http://www.unh.edu/undergrad-research/

In keeping with this research University’s mission to create and disseminate knowledge, UNH’s Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research offers undergraduates—working in collaboration with UNH faculty mentors—both funding and administrative support for individually designed academic projects ranging from laboratory research to humanist scholarship and fine and performing arts creations. Once projects are completed, student researchers may receive further support from the Hamel Center for presentations at national and international conferences and for online publication in UNH's undergraduate research journal, Inquiry.

Initially known as UROP (the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program), the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research currently offers year-round research opportunities both in the U.S. and abroad via competitive grant applications. Research Experience and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) grants offer honors students the opportunity to apprentice with a UNH faculty mentor for ten weeks of full-time research in the summer after their first year; Undergraduate Research Awards (URAs) are available each semester, including January term (research time commitment is flexible); Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURFs) for the U.S. offer support for ten weeks of full-time research in the summer following sophomore or junior year; and the SURF Abroad and International Research Opportunities Program (IROP) offers support for rising seniors to conduct nine weeks of full-time summer research  abroad. Also, by registering for INCO 590: Student Research Experience, or INCO 790: Advanced Research Experience, students at any level can work directly with faculty members while receiving academic credit and support for research expenses. 

Hamel Center research opportunities are available to students across all colleges and disciplines.

Grants from the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research open doors on real-world disciplinary practice, graduate school, post-baccalaureate fellowships, and professional careers; undergraduate research develops first-hand knowledge of the world and one’s place in it. For information about all awards, programs, and the Inquiry journal, contact the Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research, 209 Hood House, (603) 862-4323, or visit the website at www.unh.edu/undergrad-research.

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University Honors Program

» http://www.unh.edu/honors-program

The University Honors Program (UHP), established by the Academic Senate in 1983, recognizes the achievements and capabilities of outstanding students. The program enriches undergraduate education by offering a personal, intensive approach to learning through small classes of 25 or fewer students. UHP students take a minimum of four honors-designated courses in their freshman and sophomore years, one of which must be an honors 444 seminar. These courses count toward the Discovery Program requirements that all students must fulfill. Students also must complete their department's honors-in-major requirements in order to earn a "University Honors" designation upon graduation (see the "Honors in Major" description below).

Honors courses can be searched for in the online catalog by selecting the attribute "Honors Courses." Enrollment in these courses is generally restricted to members of the University Honors Program. Honors courses are open with special permission to non-honors students with a 3.4 or higher GPA on a space-available basis.

Honors in Major
Currently, there are more than 50 different departments from all five of the University's undergraduate schools and colleges offering honors-in-major programs. Academic work for honors in major requires a minimum of 16 credits, at least four of which will be devoted to a senior thesis project. Students should familiarize themselves with their departments' requirements and should meet with their departmental honors liaison (
http://www.unh.edu/honors-program/liaisons.html). After successful completion of the program, students will earn an honors designation on their transcripts and diplomas.

Admissions and Aid
Students gain admittance into the UHP in one of two ways:

  1. The Office of Admissions identifies a number of qualified incoming freshmen to be admitted to the honors program.
  2. Freshman who demonstrate academic excellence are also invited to join the program.

To satisfy University Honors Program requirements, UHP students must meet designated grade-point average requirements. Students admitted to the program prior to the fall semester of 2008 must have a final cumulative grade-point average of 3.2, while students admitted in the fall semester of 2008 or thereafter must have a final cumulative grade-point average of 3.4. All students must meet the grade-point average requirements of their honors-in-major program.

Full-tuition and partial-tuition merit-based scholarships are available to a select number of incoming freshmen. Several partial-tuition scholarships are also awarded to upper-class students. For more information, contact Kate Gaudet, University Honors Program, 211 Hood House, (603) 862-3928, or visit the UHP website at www.unh.edu/honors-program.

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Interdisciplinary Programs


Earth, Oceans, and Space

» http://www.eos.unh.edu/

Professor: Benjamin D. Chandran, Matthew Huber, Lynn M. Kistler, Martin A. Lee, Mark L. McConnell, Eberhard Möbius, Joachim Raeder, James M. Ryan, Harlan E. Spence, Roy B. Torbert
Research Professor: Charles J. Farrugia, Terry Forbes, Stephen E. Frolking, Antoinette B. Galvin, Christopher W. Glass, Philip A. Isenberg, Paul H. Kirshen, Changsheng Li, Charles W. Smith III, Bernard J. Vasquez
Affiliate Professor: John D. Aber
Associate Professor: Heidi Asbjornsen, James Connell, Marc R. Lessard, James M. Pringle, Nathan A. Schwadron, Ruth K. Varner
Research Associate Professor: Li-Jen Chen, Jack E. Dibb, Erik A. Hobbie, Harald A. Kucharek, Clifford Lopate, Alexander A. P. Pszenny, Douglas C. Vandemark, Cameron P. Wake
Assistant Professor: Kai Germaschewski, Linda Kalnejais, Wilfred M. Wollheim
Research Assistant Professor: Peter Forbes Bloser, Ulisse Bravar, Fatemeh Ebrahimi, Richard Lammers, Noé Lugaz, Mary E. Martin, Michael W. Palace, Joseph Salisbury, Jingfeng Xiao

The Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) is UNH’s largest research organization and its first University institute. It brings together, under common themes, many well-established research programs focused in EOS’s three centers: the Earth Systems Research Center, the Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, and the Space Science Center. EOS is also home to the newly formed School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering (SMSOE).

EOS and SMSOE scientists are exploring processes on the Sun, solar influences on Earth and its magnetosphere, the chemistry and dynamics of the atmosphere, changing climate, and large-scale terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Much of this research emphasizes complex impacts on and by human activities. 

Research takes EOS investigators from the most distant energetic phenomena in the universe and Earth’s environment in space to tropical, temperate, and boreal forests; from the coast of New Hampshire and the Gulf of Maine to the world's great oceans; from the grasslands and agricultural fields of China to those of the American Midwest; from the great ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica to the summit of Mount McKinley. EOS scientists and students use satellites, aircraft, ships, and increasingly complex computing systems to explore and investigate the most important processes in the universe and on our planet.

EOS and SMSOE's advanced research contributes substantively to the training and development of graduate students. This research is funded by major national and international organizations including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. EOS faculty also teach and mentor undergraduate students, and there are numerous opportunities for undergraduates to participate in the research activities of the Institute. Undergraduates interested in EOS activities should contact either EOS faculty in their academic departments, or e-mail the EOS director’s office, eos.director@unh.edu.

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Intercollege Courses (INCO)

» Click to view course offerings

 


International Affairs (dual major) (IA)

» Click to view course offerings

Lecturer: Mary Wallace

The Center for International Education (CIE) offers undergraduate students the opportunity to pursue a dual major in international affairs (IA). The dual major requires completion of the interdisciplinary international affairs program and any other major. The purpose of the program is to expand students’ global horizons, enhance their disciplinary major, and expand their career opportunities into the international arena. The courses in the dual major program are multidisciplinary, taught by faculty from many different departments in the University. They are designed to help students appreciate the complex interrelationships and interdependencies among nations and peoples and to equip students with the analytical skills and broad perspectives necessary for both public and private sector international careers.

Students who wish to declare international affairs dual major must earn a C or better in IA 401, have declared (or be prepared to declare) a disciplinary major, and have a 2.5 cumulative grade-point average. After declaration, students are expected to maintain at least a 2.5 grade-point average, which is also the minimum required for study abroad at UNH.

IA Dual Major Requirements
Students who matriculated into UNH prior to fall semester 2010 should refer to the undergraduate catalog of their year of matriculation to see the IA dual-major requirements that apply to them. For those who matriculated into UNH fall 2010 or later, please see below:

Required Core Courses (4 total)
IA 401, International Perspectives: Science, Geography, and Politics
IA 501, Global Issues in International Affairs
IA 701, Seminar in International Affairs
ECON 401A, Principles of Economics (Macro), or  ECON 402A, Principles of Economics (Micro), or EREC 411

Please note:  IA 401, a prerequisite for IA 501, should be taken no later than spring of the sophomore year. IA 501 should be taken prior to foreign experience, and after ENGL 401 has been taken.

Electives (3 total)
Choose one elective course from each category below:

Foreign Area (to be taken prior to foreign experience)
ANTH 500, Peoples & Cultures of the World (area specific)*
ANTH 501, World Archaeological Cultures
ANTH 627, Urbanization in Africa
ANTH 685, Gender, Sex, & HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa
ANTH 697, Islam and Gender
ANTH 750, Islam and Gender
ARTS 585, History of Islamic Art
ARTS 674, Greek Art
ARTS 678, Romanesque and Gothic Art
ARTS 679, Northern Renaissance Art I
ARTS 680, Northern Renaissance Art II
ARTS 681, Early Renaissance Art in Italy
ARTS 684, Baroque Art in Northern Europe
ARTS 687, Paris:  Art and Modernity
ARTS 688, Gauguin to Hitler
ARTS 697, Art of the Far East
CHIN 425, Introduction to Chinese Culture and Civilization
CHIN 521, Chinese Literature in translation
CLAS 405, Introduction to Greek Civilization
CLAS 421, Major Greek Authors in English
CLAS 510, Building Rome
FREN 522, French Drama in Translation
FREN 525, Introduction to French Civilization
FREN 526, Introduction to Francophone Civilization
FREN 625, Cuisine and French Culture
FREN 651/652, Readings in French Literature
FREN 675, Topics in French Civilization
FREN 676, Topics in Francophone Civilization
FREN 677, France in the European Union
FREN 762, 17th Century French Literature
GEOG 401/402, Regional Geography of Western and Non-Western World
GEOG 520, Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
GEOG 540, Geography of the Middle East
GEOG 541, Geography of Japan
GEOG 550, Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa
GEOG 796, Conflict in Africa
GERM 521, Major German Authors in English
GERM 524, Love & Nation in German Film
GERM 525, Introduction to German Culture & Civilization
GERM 601, Introduction to German Literature
GERM 721, German Culture & Civilization: Austria
GERM 798, Post-Wall German Literature
GERM 798, Austrian Literature and Culture
HIST 425, Foreign Cultures (area specific)*
HIST 444D, Slavery & Society Africa
HIST 503, Soviet Dreamers, Despots, & Dissidents
HIST 531, The Americas: Introduction to Latin America & the Caribbean
HIST 532, Modern Latin America
HIST 538, Modern European War and Society
HIST 560, History of Great Britain
HIST 563, Introduction to Russian Culture & Civilization
HIST 564, WWII in Russia and Soviet Union
HIST 565, Women in Modern Europe
HIST 579, History of China in Modern Times
HIST 580, History of Japan in Modern Times
HIST 585, Venture of Islam: 6th to 15th Century
HIST 586, Islam in the Modern Age, 15th Century to present
HIST 587/588, History of Africa South of the Sahara
HIST 589, Islam in Africa
HIST 595, Russia’s Intel Outlaws
HIST 595, Military and Politics of Ancient Greece - Modern
HIST 596, Carnal Pleasures
HIST 600, Topics vary*
HIST 602, Holocaust/War on Europe’s Jews
HIST 632, Latin American History: Topics vary*
HIST 641, Europe after the Black Death
HIST 642, Religious Conflict Early Europe
HIST 648, Modern France
HIST 652, Topics in European Intellectual History*
HIST 656, 20th Century Europe
HIST 662, England in Tudor and Stuart Period
HIST 664, Russia: Modernization through Soviet Empire
HIST 669, Germany from 1918 to the Present
HIST 675, Early History of Ancient Greece
HIST 676, Class & Hellenistic Greek Worlds
HIST 678, Roman Empire
HIST 681, Modern China Topics
HIST 684, History of Southern Africa since 1652
HIST 688, African Religions   
IA 599, Special Topics*
IA 699, Topics in International Affairs*
ITAL 425, Introduction to Italian Studies
ITAL 521, Italian Literature Translation 13-16 C
ITAL 522, Italian Literature Translation 18-20 C
ITAL 525, Italian Cinema/Introduction to Italian Civilization & Culture
ITAL 651, Introduction to Italian Civilization & Culture
ITAL 652, Introduction to Italian Civilization and Culture II
JPN  425, Introduction to Japanese Culture and Civilization
LLC 444A, Love and Nation in German Film
LLC 444B, France and the European Union in a Global World
LLC 444C, World of Salvador Dali
LLC 444D, Love in Disguise
LLC 444E, Italians Come to America
PHIL 520, Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
POLT 552, Contemporary European Politics
POLT 555, Politics in Russia
POLT 556, Politics in China
POLT 558, Politics and Government of Canada
POLT 569, Rise of China
POLT 740, States and Societies in the Middle East
POLT 798E, Politics of the Middle East
RUSS 425, Contemporary Russian Society and Culture
RUSS 521W, Devils, Deities, Mad Russ Lit 
RUSS 522, Morality, Sex, and Revolution in Russian Lit
RUSS 525, Russia: Mythology and Propaganda
RUSS 691, Readings in Russian Literature
SPAN 525, Spanish Culture and Civilization
SPAN 526, Latin American Culture and Civilization
SPAN 647, Hispanic Cultural Studies
SPAN 651, 652, Introduction to Spanish Literature and Thought
SPAN 653, 654, Introduction to Latin American Literature and Thought

*Check with CIE


Science, Technology, and the Private Sector                                   
ACFI 703, International Financial Management
ANTH 610, Medical Anthropology: Illness and Healing
BIOL 420, Parasites and Pestilence
BIOL 520, Our Changing Planet
CHE 410/H, Energy and the Environment
CMN 515, Analysis of News
ECON 645, International Economics
ECON 698, Micro Finance
ECON 707, Economic Growth and Environmental Quality
ECON 746, International Finance
ENE 520, Environmental Pollution/Protection-Global Context
EOS/ESCI 405, Global Environmental Change
EOS/ESCI 715, Global Atmospheric Chemistry
EREC 633, Economics of Travel and Tourism
GEOG 560, Geography of Natural Hazards & Disasters       
GEOG 673, Environmental Geography
GEOG 796, Crowdsource Mapping
HIST 522, Science in the Modern World
HIST 600, Topics vary*
HIST 652, Topics vary*
HIST 654, Topics vary*
HIST 789, Topics vary*
HMGT 771, Beverage Management (for HMGT majors only)
IA 599, Special Topics*
IA 699, Topics in International Affairs*
MGT 755, International Management
MGT  798, Topics in International Management*
MKTG 756, International Franchising
MKTG 760, International Marketing
NR 415, Global Biological Change
NR 435, Contemporary Conservation Issues
NR 502, Forest Ecosystems & Environmental Change
NR 720, International Environmental Politics & Policies of the 21st Century
PHIL 424, Science, Technology, and Society
POLT 444, Science, Technology, & Politics
POLT 563, Global Information Grid
POLT 567, Politics of Global Resources
POLT 592B, Global Information Grid
POLT 751, Comparative Environmental Politics & Policy
POLT 780, International Environmental Politics
SOC 565, Environment & Society
TOUR 510, Tourism & Global Understanding

*Check with CIE


Policy and Theory in International Affairs
ADMN 444, Business for People, Planet & Profits   
AMST 444A, The Portable, Exportable Nation
ANTH 411, Global Perspectives
ANTH 515, Anthropology and Contemporary Issues
ANTH 520, Anthropology of Migration
ANTH 614, Economy, Culture and Society
ANTH 616, Religion, Culture and Society
ANTH 618, Political Anthropology
ANTH 627, Urbanization in Africa
ANTH 680, Globalization, Development and Poverty
ANTH 695, Globalization and Global Population Health
ANTH 697, Islam and Gender
ANTH 720, Roots and Routes: Migration and Globalization
ANTH 750, Islam and Gender
ARTS 695-1, The Art of Revolution
ARTS 695-2, Modern and Contemporary Sculpture
ECON 645, International Economics
ECON 668, Economic Development
ECON 669, Women and Economic Development
ECON 698, Micro Finance
ECON 706, Economics of Climate Change
ECON 707, Economic Growth and Environmental Quality
ECON 745, International Trade
ECON 746, International Finance
ECON 747, Multinational Enterprises
ECON 768, Seminar in Economic Development
EDUC 620, Education, Poverty & Development
EREC 409, Catastrophe & Terrorism
EREC 633, Economics of Travel and Tourism       
ESCI 444, Water:  How Much is Enough?
FS 772, International Approaches to Child Advocacy
FS 773, International Perspectives on Children and Families
GEOG 514, Geography of Canada and the United States
GEOG 581, Human Geography
GEOG 582, Economic Geography
GEOG 583, Urban Geography
GEOG 584, Political Geography
GEOG 588, Geography of Food
GEOG 685, Geography of Population and Development
GEOG 796, Conflict in Africa
GEOG 796, Geography of Narcotics
HIST 421, World History to the 16th Century
HIST 422, World History in the Modern Era
HIST 435/6, Western Civilization
HIST 444C, World War Propaganda in Britain and the United States
HIST 444D, Slavery & Society Africa
HIST 483/RS 483, History of World Religions
HIST 537, Espionage and History
HIST 538, Modern European War and Society
HIST 585, Venture of Islam: 6th to 15th Century
HIST 586, Islam in the Modern Age
HIST 595, Comparative Revolutions
HIST 600, Topics vary*
HIST 619/20, Foreign Relations of the United States
HIST 631/2, Latin American History *
HIST 642, Religious Conflict Early Europe
HMGT 570, International Food & Culture (for HMGT majors only)
HMP 444A, Global Public Health Issues
HUMA 514, The Twentieth Century 1900-1945
HUMA 515, The Twentieth Century 1945-1999
IA 444H, Philosophy and Politics of Nonviolent Action
IA 599, Special Topics *
IA 699, Topics in International Affairs *
LLC 440, Cultural Approaches to Film and Fascism
LLC 444, Walls: Mortar & Metaphor
MGT 798, Social Entrepreneurship
MKTG 598, Topics in Global Marketing
NR 720, International Environmental Politics & Policies of the 21st Century
NURS 794, Beyond our Borders: Global Health Issues
PHIL 520, Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
PHIL 620, 20th Century European Philosophy
POLT 403, United States in World Affairs
POLT 522, Dissent and the Political Community
POLT 544, Pathways to Democracy
POLT 545, People and Politics in Asia
POLT 546, Wealth and Politics in Asia
POLT 550, Comparative Government and Society
POLT 551, Global Urban Politics           
POLT 552, Contemporary European Politics
POLT 553, Politics in the Developing World
POLT 554, Latin American Politics
POLT 555, Politics in Russia
POLT 556, Politics in China
POLT 557, Politics in Italy
POLT 558, Politics and Government of Canada
POLT 559, Comparative Politics of the Middle East
POLT 560, World Politics
POLT 561, Introduction to International Political Economy
POLT 562, Strategy and National Security Policy
POLT 565, U.S.-Latin American Relations
POLT 566, Foreign Policies of Asia and the Pacific
POLT 567, Politics of Global Resources
POLT 568, Introduction to Intelligence
POLT 569, Chinese Foreign Policy
POLT 569, Rise of China        
POLT 588, Managing Ethnic Diversity
POLT 592, Politics of Immigration
POLT 592B, Global Information Grid
POLT 740, States and Societies in the Middle East
POLT 743, Comparative Political Economy
POLT 751, Comparative Environmental Politics & Policy
POLT 760, Theories of International Relations
POLT 762, International Political Economy
POLT 778, International Organization
POLT 780, International Environmental Politics
POLT 797/798, Nationalism & Ethnicity
SOC 444A, Society in the Arctic
SOC 565, Environment & Society
SOC 597, Peace, Conflict and War
SOC 656, Terrorism
SOC 697, Global Social Change
SPAN 647, Hispanic Cultural Studies
TOUR 510, Tourism & Global Understanding
TOUR 560, New Pirates of the Caribbean
WS 595, Global Feminist Perspectives

*Check with CIE

Courses used to satisfy international affairs elective requirements must be from outside the student's disciplinary major(s). Students pursuing two disciplinary majors in addition to international affairs may count one of the courses in either disciplinary major as an international affairs elective. For any major with 14 or more required courses (or 56 or more required credit hours), the IA program permits counting a maximum of three courses or 12 credits from the major program as international affairs electives.

Competency in a Foreign Language
Functional reading, writing, and speaking ability equivalent to a third-year, second-semester college level (632).

Foreign Experience
Minimum of eight weeks. The international affairs foreign experience is ordinarily conducted in a country consistent with the student’s language study but may also be conducted in a select list of countries where English is an official language or where UNH does not offer language training. Students who desire to study in such a country must petition the Center for International Education. Plans of study must include rigorous local language training while in-country.

The foreign experience (usually completed during the junior year) and the foreign language requirement are completed before taking IA 701 in the senior year. To acquire the knowledge, skills, and experience that come from residence in a foreign culture, students may spend an academic year, semester, or summer in an academic institution, in an internship with a private or public organization, or in purposeful travel/research. All foreign experiences must be pre-approved by the IA major adviser or the University Committee on International Studies.

The completion of the dual major requires no additional credits for graduation beyond the 128 required of all UNH students. All coursework required for international affairs must be completed with a grade of C or better. For information, contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, www.unh.edu/cie.

*The Department of Civil Engineering has worked with the UNH Center for International Education to develop a dual-major program in civil engineering and international affairs. Civil engineering students participating in this program spend at least one semester studying abroad in a foreign experience. Students can complete the international affairs dual major in five years or less and do not need to have pre-existing skills in a foreign language before coming to UNH. For more information, contact Ray Cook at (603) 862-1411 or by e-mail to ray.cook@unh.edu.

IA Minor Requirements
The international affairs minor adds a recognized distinction and global context to any academic major. It was developed for those students who, due to the demands of their primary majors, are unable to complete the more rigorous requirements of the IA dual major. Students take IA 401, the core course that provides a broad overview of international affairs from a geographic, scientific, and political perspective. Micro or macroeconomics is required. Undergraduates work toward intermediate proficiency in a foreign language, participate in a foreign experience of at least three weeks (or 4 credits), and take two globally relevant electives.

Required Core Courses (2 total)
IA 401, International Perspectives: Science, Geography, and Politics
ECON 401A, Principles of Economics (Macro), or  ECON 402A, Principles of Economics (Micro), or EREC 411

Electives (2 total)
Choose one elective course from each category below:
Foreign Area (to be taken prior to foreign experience)
Science, Technology, and the Private Sector, or Policy and Theory in International Affairs  (See list above for IA dual major requirements.)

Courses used to satisfy international affairs elective requirements must be from outside the student's disciplinary major(s).

Foreign Language
Functional reading, writing, and speaking ability equivalent to a second-year, second-semester college level (504).

Foreign Experience
Minimum of three weeks (4 credits). The international affairs foreign experience is ordinarily conducted in a country consistent with the student’s language study but may also be conducted in a select list of countries where English is an official language or where UNH does not offer language training. Students who desire to study in such a country must petition the Center for International Education. Plans of study must include rigorous local language training while in-country.

All coursework required for international affairs must be completed with a grade of C or better.

A maximum of two courses can be taken away from UNH.  Students are expected to maintain at least a 2.5 grade-point average, which is also the minimum required for study abroad at UNH.

» Click to view course offerings

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Marine Science and Ocean Engineering

Professor: Kenneth C. Baldwin, David L. Berlinsky, Barbaros Celikkol, Wayne R. Fagerberg, Larry G. Harris, W. Huntting Howell, Nancy E. Kinner, Marianne Klauser Litvaitis, Aaron B. Margolin, Arthur C. Mathieson, Larry A. Mayer, Subhash C. Minocha, Christopher D. Neefus, Stacia A. Sower, M. Robinson Swift, Paul C. Tsang, Igor I. Tsukrov, Charles W. Walker, Colin Ware, Winsor H. Watson III
Research Professor: Janet W. Campbell, Jim Gardner, Christopher W. Glass, Raymond E. Grizzle, James Irish, Paul H. Kirshen, Michael P. Lesser, Yuri Rzhanov, Frederick T. Short
Affiliate Professor: Andrew Armstrong, Richard Langan, Christopher E. Parrish
Associate Professor: Jessica A. Bolker, Allen D. Drake, Diane L. Foster, Joel E. Johnson, Anita S. Klein, Thomas C. Lippmann, Jonathan R. Pennock, James M. Pringle, Robert A. Robertson, Thomas G. Safford, May-Win L. Thein, Cheryl A. Whistler
Research Associate Professor: Lee Alexander, David M. Burdick, Brian R. Calder, Stephen H. Jones, Douglas C. Vandemark, Cameron P. Wake, Larry G. Ward
Assistant Professor: Margaret S. Boettcher, Rosemarie E. Came, Vaughn S. Cooper, Kelly L. Cullen, Joel E. Johnson, Linda Kalnejais, Thomas Weber, Martin M. Wosnik
Research Assistant Professor: Elizabeth A. Fairchild, Adrienne I. Kovach, Gregg E. Moore, Joseph Salisbury, Alison W. Watts
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Jennifer Dijkstra, John Kelley
Clinical Assistant Professor: Elise R. Sullivan
Extension Professor: Julia M. Peterson
Affiliate Research Associate Professor: Shachak Pe'eri

Undergraduate programs in marine science and ocean engineering at the University of New Hampshire reflect the diversity of the ocean itself and are enriched by easy access to a variety of natural laboratories, including tidal rivers, estuaries, coastal areas, and the open ocean. Studies in marine science and ocean engineering are offered through various colleges and departments of the University and are supported by the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering and a number of marine research programs and institutes. 

Curricula in Marine Science and Ocean Engineering
Students interested in marine science and ocean engineering generally identify specific degree programs in those areas or degree programs in core disciplines ranging from, for example, zoology to earth sciences to mechanical engineering, with marine specializations or minors related to that area of study. There are currently two undergraduate majors and four minors in the marine science and ocean engineering. The College of Life Sciences and Agriculture offers a B.S. in marine, estuarine, and freshwater biology through the Department of Biological Sciences, while the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences offers a B.S. in Ocean Engineering through the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an oceanography concentration as part of its B.S. in Earth sciences through the Department of Earth Sciences. In addition to these offerings, students can declare a major in any established discipline and augment it with a minor in marine biology, ocean engineering, oceanography, or wetland ecology. Students are encouraged to declare their intention to follow these programs as soon as possible.

B.S. in Earth Sciences, Oceanography Concentration
See College of Engineering and Physical Sciences: Earth Sciences

B.S. in Marine, Estuarine, and Freshwater Biology (MEFB)
See College of Life Sciences and Agriculture: Marine, Estuarine, and Freshwater Biology (MEFB)

B.S. in Ocean Engineering
See College of Engineering and Physical Sciences: Ocean Engineering

Marine Biology Minor
See College of Life Sciences and Agriculture Interdisciplinary Programs: Marine Biology.

Ocean Engineering Minor
The ocean engineering minor allows undergraduate engineering students to acquire a nucleus of knowledge about engineering pertaining to the ocean and the coastal zone.

To meet the University minor requirement, students must satisfactorily complete a minimum of five courses from the following list: ESCI 501, Introduction to Oceanography; OE 690, Introduction to Ocean Engineering; ESCI 752, Chemical Oceanography; ESCI 758, Introductory Physical Oceanography; ESCI 759, Geological Oceanography; OE 710, Ocean Measurements Lab; OE 744, Corrosion; OE 754, Ocean Waves and Tides; OE 756, Principles of Naval Architecture and Model Testing; OE 757, Coastal Engineering and Processes; OE 765, Underwater Acoustics; OE 771, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping; OE 795, Special Topics in Ocean Engineering; ENE 747, Introduction to Marine Pollution and Control; and TECH 797, Undergraduate Ocean Research Program. Ordinarily, students typically take ESCI 501, TECH 797, and OE 690 plus two additional engineering courses from the above list to complete the minor.

Students wishing to take the ocean engineering minor should indicate their interest to the ocean engineering minor adviser, Kenneth C. Baldwin, (603) 862-1898 or Kenneth.Baldwin@unh.edu no later than the beginning of the junior year. During the final semester, students must apply to the dean to have the minor shown on their transcript. 

Oceanography Minor
The minor in oceanography is available to all students in the University interested in obtaining a broad background in oceanography and is offered through the Department of Earth Sciences. The minor consists of a minimum of five courses with grades of C (2.0) or better and no pass/fail courses. No more than eight major requirement credits may be used. All courses in the program are selected in consultation with the oceanography minor adviser, James Pringle, (jpringle@unh.edu). Students should contact him to complete an Intent to Minor form no later than their junior year. Forms can be picked up in the Earth Sciences departmental office, 214 James Hall.

Required courses include 1) ESCI 501, Introduction to Oceanography; 2) two of the following courses: ESCI 750, Biological Oceanography; ESCI 752, Chemical Oceanography; ESCI 758, Introductory Physical Oceanography; or ESCI 759, Geological Oceanography; 3) any two of the following courses, or a suitable substitute approved by the minor adviser (at least one of these courses should be in the biological sciences): PBIO 625, 722; CIE 757; ENE 747, 753; ESCI 653, 658, 754, 756, 760, 770, 771; MICR 707; OE 690, 710, 753, 754, 757, 785; EREC 611; TECH 797; ZOOL 503, 560, 674, 720, 725, 730, 751, 753, 772, 775; or ZOOL/ESCI/750. During the final semester, students should apply to the dean to have the minor shown on their transcript.

Wetland Ecology Minor
See College of Life Sciences and Agriculture Interdisciplinary Programs: Wetland Ecology

School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering
The School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering (SMSOE) provides a campus-wide umbrella for marine activities and maintains specialized facilities to support efforts of faculty in individual departments and organized research units. The SMSOE is administratively housed within UNH’s Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space (EOS).

The SMSOE directly supports academic graduate programs focused broadly on ocean engineering, oceanography, and marine biology, and supports experiential learning and research opportunities for undergraduates beyond the formal classroom.  The on-campus Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory houses both educational and research activities including large acoustic and wave research tanks. Estuarine research is pursued at the Jackson Estuarine Laboratory on Great Bay, which is designated as a National Estuarine Research Reserve. The Gregg Marine Science Complex, including the Coastal Marine Laboratory, a flow-through seawater laboratory, and a research pier is located in nearby Newcastle, N.H.  Research on salmonids and other freshwater animals is conducted at the Anadromous Fish and Aquatic Invertebrate Research Laboratory, located near the Durham reservoir. Off-shore and coastal studies are carried out aboard the University’s 50-foot research vessel, Gulf Challenger, and a number of smaller boats. 

Each of the SMSOE facilities features modern, specialized equipment and opportunities for undergraduate students to work and carry out independent research. There are many opportunities for undergraduates to participate in marine research under the supervision of SMSOE faculty.

The University has a Sea Grant College Program that supports research, teaching, and service projects through numerous partnerships with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Marine research projects are also supported through the National Science Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Office of Naval Research, and other state and federal agencies, foundations, and private donors.

Extensive research, interdisciplinary academic programs, and the extraordinary variety of marine environments and facilities allow students to observe and learn about the frontiers of science and technology being explored in the ocean. For further information about marine opportunities, contact the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering at marine.information@unh.edu or through the website at marine.unh.edu.

Shoals Marine Laboratory
 

The Shoals Marine Laboratory (SML) is a summer field station located on Appledore Island, Maine, the largest island in the Isles of Shoals archipelago in the southwestern Gulf of Maine. SML is operated by UNH and Cornell University with a focused emphasis on the undergraduate student experience.

Just six miles offshore from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, students and faculty from UNH, Cornell, and the world live together in a small, closely knit academic community away from mainland distractions. Facilities include vessels (research vessels 47 ft. John M. Kingsbury and 36 ft. John B. Heiser), waterfront and diving facilities, dry and wet laboratories, classrooms, dining, and residence halls. SML offers introductory and advanced courses in marine biology for undergraduates (generally 2-4 credits each); opportunities for student research; college courses for high school students; and public education programs. Appledore Island also provides a superb setting for investigations in sustainable engineering through courses and the summer Sustainable Engineering Internships. The fee includes all costs: full tuition, room, board, field trips, and transportation to and from the island.

SML is proud of its ability to make several forms of financial aid available to applicants on the basis of both merit and need. In addition, many short-term work positions are available to students enrolled in SML courses. SML courses can help a student decide whether marine science is the right major or career while fulfilling university major and minor requirements and providing a hands-on, field-based academic experience.

Join our island community!

For more information visit: marine.unh.edu/SML; e-mail: shoals.lab@unh.edu

Diving Program
UNH has maintained an active research diving program for nearly 40 years to provide assistance for faculty, staff, and students with both instruction and support for research diving, allowing many certified student divers to participate in University-sponsored underwater research projects. Today, the UNH Diving Program consists of two areas: the academic portion where students, faculty, and staff may enroll in courses for academic credit (through the Department of Kinesiology), and the research portion, which supports faculty and student divers in University-sponsored underwater projects.

For further information about the UNH Diving Program as well as the offered workshops in rescue diving and diving accident management, contact Liz Kintzing (elizabeth.kintzing@unh.edu), diving program officer, through the Diving Program Office at (603) 862-3896.

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Race and Ethnic Studies (RES)

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Race and Ethnic Studies Minor Description 
The race and ethnic studies (RES) minor examines how racial and ethnic categories are created and maintained—politically, socially, and culturally. RES uses critical, interdisciplinary, and comparative approaches to study race relations as they intersect with factors including gender and sexuality, class, religion, and immigration status. The minor prepares students for life and work in a world increasingly characterized by difference derived from racial and ethnic identities.  

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Facilitate understanding of how the social constructions of race affect the social fabric of our historical and contemporary world;
  2. Enhance students' abilities to appreciate differences and to actively and critically engage in civic responsibilities, especially with respect to social justice;
  3. Prepare students to negotiate an increasingly interconnected world and apply their education in a wide range of occupations;
  4. Gain exposure to the theories and methods of ethnic studies;
  5. Compare representations of borderlands, hybridity, migration, and diaspora from different cultures to comprehend how national boundaries, as well as local, national, and transnational cultures and politics, affect the constitution of racial and ethnic categories.

Classes for the RES minor are housed in a variety of departments in the College of Liberal Arts, offering students a truly interdisciplinary experience.

Requirements
The race and ethnic studies minor consists of five courses or 20 credits. To complete a minor, students are required to:

Additional Information

Classes are approved by the coordinator and announced each semester on the program's website, www.cola.unh.edu/res.

After completing the 20-credit sequence, the student submits the Certification of Completion of Minor form, available online or from the RES coordinator. Once this certification is approved by the RES coordinator and major adviser, the form goes to the college dean and the registrar to be recorded on the transcript. The certification form must be completed by the beginning of the student's final semester at the University.

For further information, please contact Jessica Fish, Huddleston Hall room 322, (603) 862-0939, jessica.fish@unh.edu. Or visit www.cola.unh.edu/res  for course listings and program details.

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Student-Designed Majors

Under special circumstances, students may design their own majors. This option is offered for highly motivated and self-disciplined students who seek a course of study that is not available through existing programs at the University. It allows students, with the close supervision of faculty members, to cross department and college lines and to create educational experiences on and off campus as part of individual programs of study.

Student-designed majors are administered by a committee of elected faculty that operates through the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Students who want to design their own majors are required  to give the committee evidence of careful thought and planning in a proposal. 

Fall submissions are due by October 15 of the student’s junior year. Proposals are only reviewed once a semester. Spring submissions are due by February 25. The committee will convene soon after the deadline to review the proposals. Under no circumstances will the committee consider a senior year proposal.

Proposal guidelines are available in the Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs and on the Academic Affairs website, www.unh.edu/academic-affairs/student-designed-major-sdm. Click on "Academic Enrichment."

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War and Peace Studies

War is the scourge of humankind. Tribes, cities, and nations have gone to war against each other for as long as we have records; only here and there, among some small “precivilized” groups, has war been absent or strictly controlled. For as long as we have records, too, we find thoughtful people crying out against war and pleading for peace, arguing for principles to govern war’s conduct and laboring to mitigate war’s effects, imagining a world where war is abolished, and taking steps to bring that world about. As the scale of war has grown to a size now great enough to devastate the entire globe in a single conflict, more and more people have devoted themselves to preventing war and finding acceptable substitutes. In the nuclear era, age-old moral and religious discussion has joined with historical study and practical, even technical, research to produce a set of related disciplines sometimes called “war and peace studies.”

To meet the requirements for the war and peace studies minor, students must complete two core courses (8 credits) and 12 credits of elective courses with a grade of C- or better. Ordinarily, no two electives (or no more than 4 credits) may be taken from the same academic department. No elective may count for both a student’s major and the war and peace minor. A relevant internship may be substituted for one of the electives. As they are announced, other relevant courses may be added to the list of acceptable electives. Students may request others not so listed. Courses carrying fewer than 4 credits will be counted as partial satisfaction of an elective requirement. If a good case can be made for it, a departure from any of these rules may be approved by the adviser for the minor and the coordinator.

All students will be assigned an adviser from the membership of the Committee on War and Peace Studies, ordinarily one not in the student’s major department. The adviser will assist students in constructing a coherent program that suits their particular interests.

The core courses are INCO 401, War, and INCO 402, Peace. Occasionally, a new core course may be included.

Departmental elective courses will include courses such as these:
AERO 681, National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society (3 cr.)
CMN 456, Propaganda and Persuasion
HIST 617, Vietnam War
HIST 537, Espionage and History
NR 435, Contemporary Conservation Issues and Environmental Awareness
POLT 562, Strategy and National Security Policy
POLT 778, International Organization
SOC 780, Social Conflict

Special offerings that may serve as electives:
ANTH 797, Advanced Topics in Anthropology (e.g., War and Complex Society)
ECON 698, Topics in Economics (e.g., Economics of War and Peace)
ENGL 595, Literary Topics; ENGL 693, 694, Special Topics in Literature; ENGL 797, 798, Special Studies in Literature (e.g., Literature of World War I, Literature of the Vietnam War)
HIST 600, Advanced Explorations (e.g., Comparative Revolutions)
HUMA 730, Special Studies (e.g., Nonviolence, Thinking about War and Peace)
INCO 404P, Honors: Introductory Seminar (e.g., Understanding War)
POLT 660, Special Topics in International Politics (e.g., Arms Control and Disarmament)

For more information, contact Michael Ferber, Department of English, (603) 862-3973.

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Preprofessional Programs


Prelaw

Many graduates of UNH attend law school. The faculty and staff advisers of the Prelaw Advising Committee work closely with students and alumni to identify interests and explore opportunities within legal education. The committee helps students undertake the best possible preparation for legal education while also bringing the excitement of law to UNH students. The committee achieves this goal through careful consideration of the American Bar Association’s (ABA) statement on preparation for legal education (found on the web at http://www.abanet.org/legaled/prelaw/prep.html).

In that statement, the ABA explains why no single major or course is required or recommended for students wishing to explore or prepare for legal study. The ABA does, however, describe certain skills and values that are essential to success in law school and to life as a lawyer. These include analytic and problem solving skills, critical reading abilities, writing skills, oral communication and listening abilities, general research skills, task organization and management skills, and the values of serving others and promoting justice.

Prelaw Advising implements the ABA statement by working with student interests and strengths to select UNH courses, internships, and experiences that will develop those skills and values. Programmatically, the committee provides a prelaw resource library, visits to local law schools, and sponsors discussions with law school students, admission and financial aid representatives, and with members of the legal community. The committee also provides support for LSAT preparation, law school search, writing personal statements, and the application and selection processes.

Interested students should register with the committee by contacting the Prelaw Advising Office, 106 Hood House, at (603) 862-2064. Additional information is available at www.unh.edu/prelaw-advising/.
 

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Premedical/Prehealth Care Professional Study

The Preprofessional Health Programs Advising Office in Hood House provides advising for all students preparing for postgraduate careers in medicine, dentistry, optometry, chiropractic, podiatry, physical therapy, pharmacy, and physician assistant programs. There is no premedical or predental major at UNH. A student’s major is not considered in the application process and students from majors in all five UNH colleges have been admitted to postgraduate health professional programs. Though premedical/predental is not a major, interested students are expected to register with the Preprofessional Health Programs Advising Office in Hood House as soon as possible so as to be kept informed of important events, opportunities, and deadlines regarding preparation for application.

A premedical/predental program at UNH consists of the following:
1. Taking the prerequisite courses for admission to a health professional program. Medical and dental schools generally require biology, physics, general chemistry, and organic chemistry—all two semesters each with laboratory. A semester of biochemistry is also required. A year of English is required, as is one year of math including one semester each of calculus and statistics. Prerequisite courses can be taken as part of a student’s major curriculum, as part of the Discovery Program requirements, or as electives.

2. Gaining volunteer/health care experience. Applicants to health professional programs will be expected to demonstrate a sustained involvement in volunteer and community service. A significant portion of this experience must take place in a health professional setting and include direct patient contact. Most students gain this experience by volunteering at a hospital, though volunteer opportunities are available in a wide range of settings, including nursing homes and community clinics.

3. Preparing for the requisite entrance exam. Students applying to medical school are required to take the MCAT exam. Students applying to dental programs are required to take the DAT, and applicants to optometry programs take the OAT. The MCAT, DAT, and OAT are standardized, comprehensive exams that test students’ knowledge of biological and physical sciences as well as verbal reasoning and writing skills. Exams are usually taken by students no earlier than the spring of their junior year and should be taken only if the student has completed or is within a month of completing prerequisite coursework. Students applying for physician assistant and physical therapy programs may be required to take the GRE, a more general exam similar to the SAT in structure and content.

Application Process
The Preprofessional Health Programs Advising Office works with the Premedical/Predental Advisory Committee—a body of 10-12 UNH faculty members with interest and/or experience in medical/dental education—to provide students with comprehensive, confidential evaluation services at the time of application. An orientation meeting is held each fall to outline the application process and establish timetables/deadlines. Students should note that the medical and dental school application process begins a full two years before matriculation; e.g., in the fall of a student’s junior year if they wish acceptance following graduation. However, a delay of a year or more between graduation and admission is neither unusual nor detrimental, and in many cases, students can use this time to improve their credentials by taking additional courses and/or gaining exposure to the profession.

It is important that students understand that in order to gain admission to a health professional program they must not only satisfy the prerequisite requirements, they must satisfy these requirements at a high level of achievement. The Preprofessional Health Programs Advising Office can provide students with information on competitive grade-point average and entrance exam scores for each of the postgraduate health professional programs.

The Preprofessional Health Programs Advising Office is located in Hood House and can be contacted by phone at (603) 862-2064 or by e-mail at Premed.Advising@unh.edu. The office also has a website at www.unh.edu/premed-advising.

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Off-Campus Programs


Consortium (NHCUC) Student Exchange Program

Under the Student Exchange Program of the New Hampshire College and University Council (NHCUC), UNH students may be eligible to enroll for one course per semester, one semester of courses, or a full year of coursework at a member school on a space-available basis. The NHCUC exchange allows matriculated undergraduates to use educational resources that are not available at the home campus and are considered appropriate for their degree programs. This exchange will be used only when academic reasons or other special circumstances warrant it. Approval of the UNH academic adviser and college dean is required, and students must meet all UNH Study Away eligibility standards. Schools in the NHCUC consortium include Colby-Sawyer College, Franklin Pierce University, New England College, Southern New Hampshire University, Rivier College, Saint Anselm College, UNH Durham, UNH Manchester, Keene State College, and Plymouth State University. Students will remain as degree candidates and continue to pay normal UNH tuition and fees, but must make their own room and board arrangements if they plan to spend a full semester at another consortium school. For more information and application forms, students should contact the National Student Exchange Office, Hood House, (603) 862-2064.

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Exchange Programs Within the U.S.

The University offers many opportunities for exchange study with other institutions within the U.S. The National Student Exchange program provides an educational experience in a different environment, within North America. It is hoped that students will develop new ways of viewing the country and expand their knowledge of our complex society.

Through the National Student Exchange (NSE), UNH students can study at one of more than 170 colleges and universities throughout the United States, U.S. territories (Guam, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands), and Canada. Several historically black colleges and universities are exchange members, and several are members of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. In addition, a one-semester or full-year exchange program is available with the University of California, Santa Cruz.

To qualify for exchange study, students must be full-time undergraduate degree candidates in good standing, with at least a 2.5 grade-point average, have earned at least 32 credits (16 of which must be from UNH at the baccalaureate level), have declared a major, receive permission from their college dean and academic adviser, and receive permission from the UNH NSE coordinator.

Students in exchange programs are expected to return to UNH to complete their studies. Participation in an exchange program does not disrupt the continuity of a student’s educational process. Exchange program participants continue to maintain their status as UNH students, even while temporarily located at another university. Students do not have to withdraw from UNH and later be readmitted. Maintaining UNH student status also facilitates reentry into classes, on-campus housing, and many other dimensions of University life.

Interested students should contact the National Student Exchange office in Hood House, (603) 862-2064, or visit www.unh.edu/nse.
 

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New England Land-Grant Exchange Program

In order to provide students at the New England land-grant universities with expanded access to unique programs and faculty expertise, the institutions have agreed to encourage student exchanges of one, but not more than two, semesters. To qualify, students must identify a course or combination of courses related to their area of academic interest and not available on their home campus, be degree candidates in good standing with at least a 2.5 grade-point average, be at least first-semester sophomores, and receive permission from the appropriate university exchange authorities at both the home and host institutions. Interested students should contact the National Student Exchange Office, Hood House, (603) 862-2064.
 

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UNH/UNHM Cross Registration

Matriculated students at the University of New Hampshire and the University of New Hampshire at Manchester may take UNH courses at either campus. Students must have permission from their academic adviser to cross register for the fall and spring semesters. Students may register at either registration office for the courses on a space-available basis during cross registration periods. Course restrictions may apply. For more information, students should contact Donna Reed, Associate Registrar, Stoke Hall, Durham or Doreen Palmer, Associate Registrar, UNH Manchester, 88 Commercial Street.


 

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Study Abroad Programs


Study Abroad Programs

» http://www.unh.edu/cie/

The University offers opportunities for full-time degree candidates meeting eligibility criteria to study abroad in many foreign institutions. UNH-managed and exchange programs are described in this section. Students may study abroad in other locations through UNH-approved programs by using the intercollegiate option (INCO). All students who study abroad pay a study abroad or exchange fee and an international travel insurance fee. For information on study abroad programs, students should contact the Center for International Education or the department identified in the UNH-managed program descriptions.

Study Abroad Eligibility
Students enrolled in UNH baccalaureate degree programs may participate in approved study abroad programs provided they meet the following eligibility criteria at the time of application:

  1. must be in good standing with the student conduct system at the time of application and throughout the study abroad program;
  2. must have earned at least 32 credit hours, at least 12 of which must have been earned at the University of New Hampshire at the baccalaureate level;
  3. must have a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application to and at the time of departure for the study abroad program. Study abroad programs provided by UNH or other approved institutions may have higher minimum GPA requirements;
  4. must have a declared major. 

Transfer students, including transfer students from the Thompson School of Applied Science (TSAS), are not eligible to study abroad during the first semester of their baccalaureate program at UNH.

Students enrolled in the degree programs of the Thompson School of Applied Science may participate in approved study abroad programs appropriate for two-year degree candidates. TSAS students must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  1. must have earned 32 credits, at least 12 of which must have been earned at the University of New Hampshire at the associate degree level;
  2. must have a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application to and at the time of departure for the study abroad program. Study abroad programs provided by UNH or other approved institutions may have higher minimum GPA requirements.

Belize
The UNH Archaeological Field School in Belize
Offered in the summer, the UNH Archaeological Field School in Belize is a four-week program where students excavate ancient Maya sites and are trained in archaeological field and lab techniques. Students register for ANTH 675 and earn 8 credit hours. Assisted by program staff, each student chooses a topic of original field research to focus on (e.g., analyses of a particular artifact class, architecture, excavation, or survey results from the project). The program is directed by Eleanor Harrison-Buck, assistant professor of anthropology, who has worked on archaeological projects in Belize and Guatemala since 1992. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/belize-field.

Archaeological Survey and Mapping in Belize
A January-term course, Archaeological Survey and Mapping in Belize (ANTH 674), offers students hands-on training in survey and mapping techniques, as well as digital cartography using ArcGIS mapping software. This program is also administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad and directed by Eleanor Harrison-Buck. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu//belize-mapping.

New Hampshire Teacher Program
EDUC 880/780, Belize: Education, Culture, and Nature, is open to graduate students in education, upper-level education majors, and professional teachers earning continuing education credits. The 4-graduate credit class is offered in the spring semester. Participants will attend pretrip workshops (November – February) to learn about the educational, geographical, historical, and cultural background of Belize and design a project to integrate their personal interests and objectives with in-country activities. During February vacation, participants will spend 8–11 days in Belize. Contact Sheila Adams at sadamsrjh@gmail.com, or visit cola.unh.edu/belize-teacher.

Brazil
University of São Paulo Ribeirao Exchange Program
Focused studies in all aspects of music with immersion in Portuguese language and Brazilian culture. This exchange with University of São Paulo Ribeirão Preto grew out of collaborations between UNH’s and USP-RP’s Departments of Music, and offers small group interaction with professors and Brazilian students, and participation in extra-curricular activities, including Filarmônica, Jazz Band, Grupuri (percussion group), and several choirs. This is an ideal exchange for independent students wanting to travel abroad and continue work on their music major. Ribeirão Preto is a city in the northeastern region of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, nicknamed Brazilian California because of its wealth, agribusiness and high-tech economy, and year-round sunny weather. Ribeirão Preto is a city of immigrants (in large part Italian) known for its coffee and sugar cane farms, basketball, outstanding theater venues, and, of course, its university. The University of São Paulo Ribeirão Preto (USP-RP) is a modern campus of 10,000 students located two miles from the city center. Contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, email international.exchange@unh.edu or visit www.unh.edu/cie.

Canada
National Student Exchange
Students may spend one or two semesters at one of ten campuses in Canada, through the National Student Exchange (NSE) program. While having the opportunity to learn in a Canadian environment, participants maintain their status as UNH students, pay UNH tuition, and will be able to graduate from UNH on schedule. The exchange is open to students from all UNH majors. Participants must provide proof of proficiency in French for Francophile campuses in Quebec. Interested students should contact Paula DiNardo, National Student Exchange Office, 106 Hood House, (603) 862-3485, or visit www.unh.edu/nse.

China
Chengdu Spring Program
Semester study of Chinese language and culture at Chengdu University. Upper-level students in the Chinese language program as well students in other colleges will spend a full semester in China learning Chinese language and culture first-hand. Chengdu has a population of 14 million! It is one of the most advanced metropolises in China's southwest. Students immersed in such a city for a semester will not only improve their language skills but will also gain insights beyond what they could learn in classrooms in the U.S. They will have a chance to see the challenges and opportunities facing Chengdu and to compare and contrast China policies and practices with those in U.S. The program is administered through the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Yige Wang. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/china.

Chengdu Summer Program
This summer short-study program (just under three weeks long) includes travel and intensive Chinese language study at both the beginner and advanced levels at Chengdu University in China. The city of Chengdu is the economic hub for China’s southwest. It is also the hometown for the giant Pandas. Forbes Magazine recently ranked the city of Chengdu as the No.1 city with the greatest potential. Students also visit the cities of Beijing and Xian. The program typically runs in late May and early June. It is open to all students; however, space is limited. The program is administered through the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Yige Wang. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/china-summer.

Chengdu University Exchange Program 
Chengdu University in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China, is UNH’s partner in the Confucius Institute, a non-profit educational institution housed in the College of Liberal Arts that offers a full curriculum in Chinese language and culture. Out of this partnership grew an undergraduate exchange program in which UNH students have the opportunity to study Chinese language and culture in an immersive setting by directly enrolling at Chengdu University. Located in the Shiling Historical and Cultural Scenic Area, the large, gated campus is beautifully landscaped with gardens, ponds, and tree-lined passages with easy access to downtown Chengdu. For more information, contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, e-mail international.exchange@unh.edu, or visit www.unh.edu/cie.

Costa Rica
Costa Rica Summer Program (San Joaquin de Flores)
This six-week summer immersion program offers a variety of courses in language and culture taught by professors from the University of Costa Rica and the National University. The program combines two Spanish courses, cultural field trips, and weekend trips. Classes meet daily Monday through Friday. Students live with Costa Rican families. Upon the completion of the program, students earn the equivalent of up to 8 credit hours. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Lina Lee. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/costa-rica.

Agriculture and Development in the Neotropics (SAFS 510)
This course is designed as a three-week immersion into tropical agriculture and Costa Rican ecology and culture. Agriculture plays a pivotal role in Costa Rica's history and in shaping current events. Production of horticultural and agronomic crops occurs on a variety of scales ranging from large export-based systems, to mid-sized operations for domestic sales, and sustenance-based home gardens. Examples of all systems will be visited and discussions will focus on their overall sustainability. Sustainability is a broad concept and requires consideration of socio-cultural, environmental, and economic factors. Agriculture and agricultural products infuse the culture as seen by large participation in farmers markets and appreciation for a wide variety of fruits and vegetables prepared in myriad ways. An appreciation for nature also infuses the culture and is embodied by the country's extensive system of national parks and protected reserves along with the national philosophy of "Pura Vida." At the same time, there exists a delicate balance between agricultural development and preservation of biodiversity. Through visits to Costa Rica's major bioregions, the course explores their major agricultural activities and how those activities interface with local ecological systems, cultures, and economies.

Dominican Republic
Perspectives on the Business Environment in the Dominican Republic (MKTG 598/MKTG 798)
Offered in January term, MKTG 598/MKTG 798, Perspectives on the Business Environment in the Dominican Republic, is a 4-credit course open to all UNH students. Students will participate in a 13-day visit to Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic, one of the commercial hubs of the Caribbean. The course will include two pretrip classes held in the fall, in which the students will learn about the business culture of the country, as well as a brief introduction to its history and current demographics. The group will travel to Santo Domingo where four hours of each weekday (32 contact hours) will be devoted to meeting with business owners and managers from a variety of industries who will discuss business practices. Upon return to Durham, a final three-hour class will be held in the spring semester to wrap up, assess the learning outcomes, and conclude the experience. Contact Audrey Ashton-Savage, the instructor for this course, at aeu65@unh.edu.

Social Action in the Dominican Republic: Exploring Culture, Poverty, Human Rights, and Social Justice in a Developing Caribbean Nation (SW 697/897)
This course examines issues of culture, poverty, social development, and social justice in the Dominican Republic through direct service learning work and preparatory and reflective class sessions and discussions. Students will have the opportunity to examine development issues that have plagued the island nation for years and current efforts to address these concerns. During spring break, students and a UNH faculty member embark on a service learning adventure to work in the bateys of the Dominican Republic. Past projects have included the building of schools, clinics, community centers, and residential houses. Additionally, students will be working in local schools, orphanages, and child welfare centers. Afternoons and evenings will be spent learning about social services in the DR from community leaders and activists, participating in cross-cultural activities with community members, learning about Dominican life and history, and reflecting upon the days’ activities. Students will visit other local Haitian immigrant communities (bateyes), spend an evening in Santo Domingo, spend a night with a local family, and much more.

England
Cambridge Program
For six weeks each summer, students from across the United States have the opportunity to participate in the UNH Cambridge Summer Program held at Cambridge University in England. Program participants choose from courses in literature, writing, history, and humanities, taught by faculty from Cambridge University and UNH. Students live and study at Gonville and Caius College, one of the oldest colleges at Cambridge University, and travel on excursions throughout the UK. The program is open to students who have successfully completed at least one year of college. Participation fulfills UNH’s Discovery Program requirement in World Cultures. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Dennis Britton. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/cambridge.

Lancaster University Exchange Program
Lancaster University is a comprehensive university similar to UNH in size, setting, and program offerings. The program allows students to spend a semester or a year in Lancaster while still making normal progress toward their UNH degree. Lancaster enjoys a diverse campus and is centrally located for travel to Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and London. Contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, e-mail international.exchange@unh.edu, or visit www.unh.edu/cie.

London Program
The London Program offers students the chance to spend either the fall or spring semester at Regent’s University in the heart of London, choosing from courses in British studies, the arts, humanities, social sciences, business, and a wide range of other basic subjects. Taught by British and American faculty members, many of the courses are specifically concerned with British studies or have a special British emphasis. The program allows students to spend a semester or year in London while still making normal progress toward their U.S. degrees. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Doug Lanier. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/london.

The London Experience
This course provides a wonderful opportunity to learn about one of the greatest cities in the world. Travel to the United Kingdom for nine nights/ten days during the January term. See the many amazing historical and cultural sights and take in some of the best theatre in the English-speaking world. A side trip to either Stratford upon Avon or Bath is also part of the itinerary. The course offers insight into the politics, society and culture of London and the United Kingdom as students walk, tube, and double-decker bus their way through 2000 years of history. The course can be taken for either 2 or 4 credits. The 4-credit option fulfills the Fine and Performing Arts Discovery requirement. This program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is David Kaye. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/london-experience

London Travel Writing
Travel writing is for the adventurous. In three weeks, students will learn to navigate London, one of the world’s greatest cities, and craft compelling, vivid essays about what they’ve discovered. Through curiosity, research, and writing they will transcend from tourist to traveler, gaining a confidence in their ability to master the unfamiliar as well as pen publishable stories about place. Prerequisite of ENGL 501 or permission of instructor. This program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Susan Hertz. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/london-writing.

Europe
Study Abroad: Comparative Social Welfare Systems,  SW 775/885
Students studying abroad on SW 775/885, Study Abroad: Comparative Social Welfare Systems, examine the historical development of social welfare in another country, including an analysis of the underlying values and attitudes that direct practice and policy decisions. This 4-credit class includes agency site visits, lectures, themed readings, and visits to important cultural sites. Prerequisites are SW 424 and SW 525. Previous programs have visited Ireland, England, Scotland, and Latvia.

France
Dijon Program
The Dijon Program offers students the chance to spend their junior year or a  spring semester in Dijon, France. Students enroll directly in the Université de Bourgogne (University of Burgundy), where they will take courses alongside French students, or at the CIEF (Centre International d'Etudes Françaises), which hosts students from around the world. Students generally live with French families in the heart of this historic city. Credit for all work completed successfully will be automatically transferred to UNH up to 16 credits. The program is open to those French majors who have completed FREN 631-632 and FREN 651-652 or equivalent, and to French minors who have completed FREN 631-632 and FREN 651 or 652 or equivalent. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Claire Malarte-Feldman. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/dijon.

Dijon Summer Program
The Dijon Summer Program provides the opportunity to spend four or eight weeks in Dijon, France, taking the equivalent of one or two of the following courses at the Centre International d'Etudes Françaises (CIEF): FREN 503, 504, 631 or 632. An eight-week summer option is also available in the form of FREN 691 to French double majors who cannot spend a semester abroad for documented reasons. The pre-requisites for FREN 691 are FREN 631,632, 651 and 652. This course is worth 8 credits and consists of eight weeks of intensive French literature, culture, and civilization courses at the CIEF at the Université de Bourgogne in Dijon, France. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Claire Malarte-Feldman. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/dijon.

EcoGastronomy International Experience, Spring Semester in Dijon, France
All students who declare the dual major in EcoGastronomy spend a full semester abroad, most likely during their junior year. The table is set spring semester in Dijon, where students will study the links between food cultures, sustainably-focused agriculture, and the policies and issues impacting the food system. Courses include: French Art of Living, Wine Product and Tasting, Food and Wine Tourism, Entrepreneurship, and French as a Foreign Language. EcoGastronomy study abroad programs are open to all UNH students.

German-Speaking Countries
Students may study for a semester or a full year through any approved American study abroad program or, in special cases, by applying directly to universities in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland. Many programs require a minimum grade-point average of 3.0 and a B average in the major. Programs vary greatly in academic focus, size, language of instruction, living arrangements, services, and extra-curricular programming provided, and cost. Study abroad goals and requirements should be discussed with a German adviser as early as freshman year. Program and application materials may be obtained through the Center for International Education in Hood House. For credit in the German major or minor, the program must be conducted in German. After consultation with the major adviser and the study abroad adviser to establish possible UNH course equivalents and fulfillment of major and/or Discovery Program requirements, students submit a planning form indicating the planned course of study abroad. To ensure proper credit transfer, especially if seeking to transfer credits directly from a university abroad without benefit of an American program, students should keep syllabi, course descriptions, and all written work. Students planning study at a university in Germany, Austria, or Switzerland should note major differences in academic calendar (winter semester October-February, summer session April-July), which may be shortened by the American sponsor university to accommodate U.S. academic calendars.

Berlin Program
The Berlin Summer Program offers students the chance to spend five weeks in Berlin, Germany. Students earn 4 or 8 credits through German 586, designed to give students an immersion experience in the German language and culture. Students will receive eighty hours of intensive language instruction at the appropriate level (elementary, intermediate, or advanced) at the BSI Private Language School in central Berlin. No prior German language study is required. On designated weekday afternoons, students will gather for cultural excursions and discussions with the on-site UNH faculty member. Students enrolling for 4 credits can receive the UNH German Program language course equivalent of one semester of language study. Students enrolling for 8 credits will receive the UNH German Program language course equivalent of one semester of language study as well as engage in additional UNH faculty-guided cultural study, fulfilling German 525 (Discovery World Cultures) or other pre-approved courses. Students may fulfill the bachelor of arts language requirement by taking the equivalent of Intermediate German at the BSI Language School or by taking the equivalent of the first semester of Elementary German with the program and then independently continuing language instruction at the BSI for one month beyond the program study period, for a total of 8 weeks. Required pretravel meetings at UNH will prepare students for the Berlin experience. In line with UNH’s goals to educate students to become global citizens, this immersion experience will give students insight into what it means to experience a different culture and language. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Mary Rhiel. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/berlin.

Intensive Language Courses through the Goethe Institut
Students needing to advance rapidly in proficiency beginning at any level and at any time of year may enroll at a Goethe Institut center in Germany for courses ranging from eight to 16 weeks and receive UNH equivalent credit depending on level of exam passed upon completion of course. UNH's faculty contact is Mary Rhiel, (603) 862-0063, or the Center for International Education, (603) 862-2398, or study.abroad@unh.edu.

German Internship
Students who have completed GERM 504 or equivalent may apply for a 4-8 credit internship placement in a German-speaking firm or organization. The internship does not alone fulfill the study abroad requirement for the major, but may count toward the minor and may be coupled with academic course work through UNH or any study abroad program to fulfill the major study abroad requirement. The faculty contact person is Mary Rhiel, (603) 862-0063.

Ghana
Ghana Program

The Ghana Program is a spring semester program at the University of Ghana, one of West Africa’s most prestigious universities. With more than 30,000 students at its campus in Legon, a suburb of Accra, Ghana’s capital city, the University of Ghana offers students a broad range of exciting educational and cultural opportunities. Politically stable, safe, and with English as its official language, Ghana provides an excellent vantage point for experiencing sub-Saharan Africa and for a rich and deep study-abroad experience. All courses are taught by University of Ghana faculty in English, and courses are available in a very wide range of fields.  The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Burt Feintuch. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/ghana.

Global Health in Ghana (N794)
Offered during January term, N794, Special Topics: Global Health in Ghana,  is a 2-credit course that provides for an immersive, active learning experience in the Ghanaian health care system focusing on the challenges of rural care in the context of a rapidly developing country. This short-term study abroad course aims to immerse students in the culture and health care system of Ghana, offering an experiential learning opportunity to meet the course objectives. Contact Gene Harkless, chair of Nursing, at gene.harkless@unh.edu.

Global E3 Engineering Exchange Program
Global E3 allows engineering students to enjoy a fulfilling study abroad experience at one of 31 international member institutions. Through participation in the program, Global E3 graduates gain the necessary foreign language ability, cross-cultural skills, and professional experience to excel in the multinational/multicultural business environment of the 21st century. Global E3 students pay tuition at their home institution, and enjoy the benefits of attending an overseas one. Students can study abroad for the fall semester, spring semester, or the entire school year. At some member universities, Global E3 students are able to take on a supplemental internship after their study abroad experience. Member institutions include some of the best universities in Argentina, Australia, Austria, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, The Netherlands, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom. For more information, contact Caitlin Baldwin, Academic Counselor, caitlin.baldwin@unh.edu, Phone: 603-862-1783.

Grenada
Tropical Coastal Plant Ecology in Grenada, West Indies (MEFB 616) 
Offered during January term, this 4-credit course is for students with an interest and background in botany, coastal ecology and restoration, and conservation. Prerequisites include BIO411/412. This field-based course taught in Grenada, West Indies, will provide an introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological processes that form and sustain tropical coastal plant communities with an emphasis on mangroves and seagrasses. Plant adaptations to various environmental stresses will be examined over a range of habitats. As a dynamic ecosystem affected by both natural and anthropogenic disturbances from hurricanes to large-scale development, major environmental impacts and pressures will be examined first hand, and conservation and management actions will be discussed. A variety of on-going, community-based coastal habitat restoration and ecological monitoring sites will be visited throughout the island. Student participation in management actions will be encouraged through interaction with local students, volunteers, and representatives from governmental environmental agencies and several non-governmental organizations. Contact Gregg Moore in the Department of Biological Sciences at gregg.moore@unh.edu for more information.

Hungary
Justice Studies Budapest Program
The Justice Studies Budapest Program, offered in the fall, is designed to introduce students to a broader appreciation of the cross-cultural perspective in justice studies. Each fall, twelve UNH students spend the semester in residence at the Corvinus University of Budapest in Hungary. Hungary offers students an opportunity to witness first-hand the evolution of a criminal justice system within a context of significant cultural, political, economic, and social change with a member of the justice studies faculty. Situated along the Danube in one of central Europe’s oldest cities, Corvinus offers a unique educational experience to students interested in the study of criminology, law, and society, and the administration of justice. Under the supervision of a UNH faculty member also in residence, students carry a four-course load, two of which are taught by the UNH faculty member. All courses are taught in English.

Eligible students must hold sophomore standing, have completed either SOC 515 or POLT 507, and one other course in the justice studies curriculum. Participating students will meet several times during the spring semester prior to the study abroad semester to prepare for the program. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Charles Putnam. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/budapest-justice.

Humanities Spring Budapest Program
The Humanities Budapest Program, offered in the spring, is available to any undergraduate at UNH interested in living and studying in the historically rich city of Budapest. The program is designed to provide undergraduates with an intensive study abroad experience focusing on the humanities, and modern Hungarian and Central European history and culture. Students will earn 16 credits in courses taught by Hungarian and University of New Hampshire faculty, and through field trips to cultural sites in and around Budapest as well as other Central European cities. Courses fulfill various Discovery Program requirements. Students will be introduced to Hungary’s rich history and culture and to some of the most significant developments of the 20th and early 21st centuries, including the rise and fall of Soviet domination of Central Europe, revolution and democratizing in Hungary, and the significance of Hungary’s membership in the European Union. All courses are taught in English. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Stephen Trzaskoma. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/budapest-humanities.

PAUL in Budapest
The Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics (PAUL) has partnered with the Corvinus University of Budapest to offer students a unique opportunity to live and study in Budapest. This partnership allows PAUL students to take courses at Corvinus in the fall semester that directly transfer into the core of the Business Administration or Economics degrees and into most business options. This ensures that students can study abroad and graduate on time. Moreover, Budapest is developing into a commercial and financial center for many U.S. companies; its importance for the U.S. economy is growing rapidly.

Students travel to Budapest in the third week of August. A PAUL faculty member meets students in Budapest and sets them up in apartments in the city that are close to the University. The school works to make the transition to life in a foreign culture as simple and easy as possible. Additionally, the program offers three major excursions to differing parts of Hungary and to Krakow, Poland, and the Auschwitz concentration camps. For more information about this program, please contact Professor Bruce Elmslie at bruce.elmslie@unh.edu. 

Ireland
Integration of Culture and Agriculture in Ireland: Past, Present, and Future (ANSC 510)
What was the worst natural disaster in 19th century Europe? What characterizes Ireland's agriculture in the 21st century? In this interdisciplinary course, students examine the cultural, historical, political, economic, and religious influences on Ireland's agriculture. The crowning experience of the course, a 10-day study abroad  in late May, provides students with a window to the world as they experience the culture, agriculture, and topography of Ireland. Students will immerse themselves in local Irish history and culture as they tour working agricultural farms and significant landmarks. For more information, contact Patty Bedker at patty.bedker@unh.edu.

Study Abroad in Athletic Training
This UNH study abroad program is open to athletic training majors who are interested in expanding and enhancing their athletic training education while also gaining an appreciation of a different culture. Students will be taking courses in the bachelor of science (honours) in sports rehabilitation and athletic therapy program at the Institute of Technology at Carlow. The increased emphasis on manual therapy application and skill by therapists in Ireland will provide the visiting UNH student with a unique opportunity to develop abilities far-beyond what they may learn in the U.S. Students may earn up to 16 credits applicable to their UNH graduation requirements. Students pay their normal UNH tuition (in-state or out-of-state as appropriate) as the tuition to study in Ireland.

The Institute of Technology at Carlow has a student body of approximately 4,000 and an academic staff of 200. The mission of the Institute is to combine a stress-free location with top-level instructors and facilities that are a leading edge in a number of key disciplines both nationally and internationally. The Institute is just five-minutes walk from the center of town. Located on the banks of the River Barrow, Carlow town is a bustling market center serving a large rural area. Multiple trains and buses travel between Carlow and Dublin daily.

 Interested students should contact Daniel Sedory, Dan.Sedory@unh.edu, (603) 862-1831.

Italy
UNH-in-Italy Program
Students may participate in the UNH-in-Italy Program in the medieval city of Ascoli Piceno, for a semester, a year, or a summer session (see ITAL 685-686).

Academic Year Program. Students live in apartments in the heart of the city and take UNH courses, taught in English, by UNH faculty. Students with advanced language skills may take courses taught in Italian. Internships are possible. There is no language prerequisite. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Stephen Brunet. For further information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/unhinitaly.

Summer Program. UNH-in-Italy offers five different summer options. Painting in Italy (4 credits), Music and Language in Italy (7 credits), Intensive Italian (8 credits), Explorations in Nutrition and Culture (8 credits), and EcoGastronomy (9 credits—students participate in the Explorations in Nutrition and Culture Program then spend an extra week earning 1 extra credit in EcoGastronomy). Students live in apartments in the historic center of the city. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Stephen Brunet. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/llc/program/italy-ascoli.

EcoGastronomy International Experience, Fall Semester in Ascoli Piceno, Italy
All students who declare the dual major in EcoGastronomy spend a full semester abroad, most likely during their junior year. The table is set fall semester in Ascoli Piceno, Italy, where students will study the links between food cultures, sustainably-focused agriculture, and the policies and issues impacting the food system. Courses include: Food Aesthetics in Italy, Food Technology Processes in Italy, Italian Language, Italian Cinema, The Making of Modern Italy, and Modern and Contemporary Italy. EcoGastronomy study abroad programs are open to all UNH students.

Rome J-Term Program
The Rome Program provides the opportunity to take a January term course in Rome, Italy. Students earn 4 credits through Classics 510, Building Rome. Experience the history, architecture, and art history of the ancient Romans the way they did—in Rome itself! Six days of study in the eternal city followed by two days in Pompeii and other sites will give students a sense of the majesty and miracle that was the ancient Roman Empire. A five-day online component prepares students for the on-site portion so that they will be ready to soak in the monuments of the past. This course fulfills the Discovery category for Fine and Performing Arts. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Scott Smith. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/rome.

The UNH Manchester Florence Summer Program
The UNH Manchester Florence Summer Program enables UNH students to earn  8 credits while living for six weeks in Florence, Italy, the birthplace of the Renaissance. The program is located in the beautiful and historic Rucellai Palace in central Florence, and is offered in collaboration with the Institute at Palazzo Rucellai. Students are housed in fully-furnished, centrally-located apartments, close to all of Florence’s most famous landmarks, such as the Duomo, the Ponte Vecchio, the Uffizi Gallery, and Piazza della Signoria. Students take two courses, one of which is the UNH course, POLT 557: Politics in Italy. Students choose their second course from the offerings of the Institute at Palazzo Rucellai's distinguished faculty. All courses except Italian language and literature are taught in English. Contact Melinda Negron-Gonzales for more information at melinda.negron@unh.edu, (603) 862-4364.

Japan
Saitama University Exchange Program
Accelerated Japanese language learning on Saitama University’s park-like campus, just outside Tokyo. With its moderate size (9,000 students), generous scholarship opportunities, dynamic student life and recreation facilities, Saitama is an ideal fit for UNH students interested in Japanese language and culture. The university also has a wide variety of courses taught in English, which draws students from around the world. Saitama is known as  the "Oasis of Tokyo"—a historic city whose forests were planted centuries ago by peace-loving Samurais who nurtured the land instead of living by the sword. Saitama is the famous backdrop for Japanese animated films. Located in the Okubo neighborhood of Saitama City, the university’s tree-lined campus is an enjoyable place to study. From campus, you can view the skyscrapers of Saitama’s city center, the majestic peak of Mt. Fuji and the Chichubu Mountains, and you can easily take the train to Tokyo to enjoy the amazing cultural offerings of this world-class city, less than an hour away. Contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, email international.exchange@unh.edu or visit www.unh.edu/cie.

Nepal
Special Topics: Global Health in Nepal (N794)
Independent Study: Global Health in Nepal (N894)
This 2-credit course provides for an immersive, active learning experience in the Nepali health care system. The course will examine the health status of individuals, families, and communities through the lens of culture and the social determinants of health, in addition to the Western medical model. The course objectives include: understanding the major causes of morbidity and mortality in Nepal; critically examining the health care system in Nepal for its strengths and weaknesses in addressing the major causes of morbidity and mortality; analyzing the influence that culture and the social determinants of health have on the health status of individuals, families, and communities in Nepal; interacting with health care workers in Nepal to understand their clinical challenges and successes. This short-term study away course aims to immerse students in the culture and health care system of Nepal, offering an experiential learning opportunity to meet the course objectives.

The Netherlands
Utrecht University Exchange Program
The Center for International Education administers an exchange program with Utrecht University, open to undergraduate and graduate students in all fields. Utrecht University is one of the top research universities in Europe, with the largest undergraduate population and the largest research budget in the Netherlands. The size, status, and international population of the university ensure that courses in all areas of study are offered in English; these include the humanities, social and behavioral studies, law, economics, governance, and geosciences. Contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, e-mail international.exchange@unh.edu, or visit www.unh.edu/cie.

University College Utrecht Exchange Program
An honors exchange is available at the University College Utrecht (UCU), which is an international Liberal Arts and Sciences Honors College of Utrecht University. UCU's mission is to offer ambitious students an academic environment aimed at transforming their broad academic and social interests and their international orientation into academic excellence, intellectual independence, and world citizenship. Students have access to all academic, social, and recreational facilities that Utrecht University has to offer.

UCU specializes in undergraduate education. Students choose from courses in humanities, science, and social sciences, and they are educated in the spirit of liberal arts. Among the special characteristics are the college's small classes and individual attention.

Located in an especially lovely section of central Holland, Utrecht is the fourth largest city in the Netherlands. It has a classically old-Dutch city center with 17th century buildings, a medieval church, several high-quality museums, and terraced canals that encircle the old city. A university town since the medieval period, Utrecht has long enjoyed a vibrant student culture. Utrecht is easily navigable by foot, bicycle, and bus; the center of the Dutch rail system, it enjoys easy access to other cities in the Netherlands and Europe (Amsterdam is 35 minutes away; Paris three hours; London a day trip by plane). Interested students should contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, or international.exchange@unh.edu.

New Zealand
UNH-EcoQuest, New Zealand
In partnership with the UNH Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, the EcoQuest Education Foundation offers an intensive program of applied field studies in ecology, resource management, and environmental policy. New Zealand offers an ideal context for multidisciplinary, field-oriented studies, with its rich cultural traditions, diverse ecosystems, expansive natural areas, and history of innovative approaches to resource management. EcoQuest students engage hands-on in New Zealand’s restoration ecology and sustainable resource management initiatives. Semester participants have the opportunity to carry out directed research projects while working closely with a faculty mentor and in association with New Zealand research partners. The rural seaside campus is located about an hour’s drive southeast of Auckland. Students travel throughout New Zealand’s North and South Islands to learn more about the unique ecosystems and local culture.

Students may choose either a four-course, 15-week fall or spring term for 16 credit hours, or a two-course, five-week summer session for eight credit hours. The UNH-EcoQuest Academic Program Coordinator is Kimberly Babbitt. Contact Donna Dowal, EcoQuest Director of Admissions, at (603) 862-2036 or ecoquest@unh.edu for more information.

Portugal
Classical Dressage Experience in Portugal  (ANSC 520)
A faculty-led short-term program, students take ANSC 520: Classical Dressage Experience in Portugal, a 2-credit class with a weekly seminar preparing students for one week in Portugal where they receive classical dressage training at L'Escola de Equitação de Alcainça during spring break or at the end of spring semester after exams. For more information go to http://www.equine.unh.edu/ANSC520.

Russia
Russia Program
This is a four-week summer program in Russian language, culture, mythology, and propaganda in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and on the Trans-Siberian Railway. Studying in the current and former capitals of Russia and the largest city in Europe gives students a profound image of the country, its language and culture, as well as an overview of recent and ancient history. It is an opportunity for an intensive dose of authentic Russian culture. Prior to departure, students will work on Blackboard with readings and films. In Moscow and St. Petersburg, there will be field trip classes and special lectures. Upon return, students will complete their work on Blackboard and on a project. Students will earn 8 credits through Russian 425 (Discovery World Cultures) and Russian 525 (Discovery Historical Perspectives). The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Arna Bronstein. For more information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/russia.

Scotland
Heriot-Watt University Exchange Program
College of Engineering and Physical Sciences students are eligible to participate in a spring semester exchange with Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland. Heriot-Watt was named as Scottish University of the year 2011/12 by The Sunday Times. The current program is designed for civil and environmental engineering majors. For more information, contact Ray Cook at (603) 862-1411, or e-mail ray.cook@unh.edu.

Spain
Granada Program
The Granada Program is a spring semester program in Granada, Spain. The program is designed for those who have completed SPAN 631 or its equivalent and have a B average in Spanish, but may be open to intermediate-level students by petition. Many of the courses taught by professors from the University of Granada fulfill requirements for the Spanish major and minor and UNH Discovery Program requirements. Students generally live with host families and take courses at the Centro de Lenguas Modernas at the Universidad de Granada. The program is administered by the COLA Center for Study Abroad, and the faculty director is Lina Lee. For further information, contact cola.studyabroad@unh.edu, (603) 862-3962, 116 Murkland Hall, or visit cola.unh.edu/granada.

U.S. Territories (Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam)
Students may spend one or two semesters at one of 12 campuses in the U.S. Territories of Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, and Guam through the National Student Exchange (NSE) program. Participants maintain their status as UNH students, pay UNH tuition, and will be able to graduate from UNH on schedule. The exchange is open to students from all UNH majors. Participants must provide proof of proficiency in Spanish for all campuses in Puerto Rico. For more information contact, Paula DiNardo, National Student Exchange Office, 106 Hood House, (603) 862-3485, or visit www.unh.edu/nse.

Cruise Ship Management  (HMGT 698)
Offered in January term, this 4-credit course explores through text and on-board experience key areas of cruise ship management: food and beverage, HR, finance, yield management, front office, housekeeping, safety, security, sanitation, and interporting. Students will participate in a 12-day cruise that sails round trip from New York City, after brief class time in Durham during the fall semester. HMGT 698 counts as an elective for majors and minors in hospitality management. For more information, contact Carl E. Lindblade, affiliate professor, Department of Hospitality Management at Carl.Lindblade@unh.edu.

Wales
Cardiff University Exchange Program
Study abroad at one of the UK's "Ivy League" universities while paying UNH tuition. Founded in 1883, Cardiff University is recognized as one of the leading research and teaching universities in the United Kingdom and a member of the Russell Group, the UK’s “Ivy League” of world-class universities. Spend a semester or academic year studying at Cardiff and benefit from learning with professors who are pioneers in their fields. Over 27,000 students have been drawn to Cardiff University, coming from Wales, the rest of the UK and more than 100 countries. UNH students can enroll in a wide range of courses and are guaranteed housing in student halls of residence, living among British and other international students. The University boasts over one hundred clubs, sporting teams, and societies. Cardiff University is located in the center of the capital of Wales, an exciting and diverse city and the heart of Welsh history, culture, street life, and politics. There is something for everyone in the Welsh capital, with the excitement of the small city campus located just minutes from the beautiful coastlines, hills, walking trails, and green countryside for which Wales is famous. Interested students should contact the Center for International Education, Hood House, (603) 862-2398, or international.exchange@unh.edu.

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Other Programs


Aerospace Studies (AERO)

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Please refer to Reserve Officer Training Corps Programs for more information.

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Military Science (MILT)

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Please refer to Reserve Officer Training Corps Programs for more information.

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Reserve Officer Training Corps Programs (ROTC)

Students attending the University of New Hampshire may enroll in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) or in the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (AROTC) at the University.

The Army ROTC and Air Force ROTC offer programs leading to a commission as a second lieutenant in their respective services. Students in either ROTC program may pursue any University curriculum that leads to a baccalaureate or higher degree.

Two- and four-year programs are available. The four-year program is open to freshmen, sophomores, and transfer students. The two-year program is open to students who have at least two academic years remaining in their college/university degree program. In addition to on-campus course requirements, students must attend an officer-preparatory training session for a part of one summer.

ROTC scholarships are offered on a competitive basis by both the Army ROTC and Air Force ROTC. Entering freshmen may compete for four-year scholarships during their last year of high school. Additionally, incoming students may compete for scholarships while already in college if they meet specific ROTC requirements. Scholarships may pay up to full tuition, mandatory fees, and required textbooks for college courses. Incoming students with either a four-year or three-year ROTC scholarship may receive a full or partial room and board grant for the entire time they are on an ROTC scholarship. In addition, all scholarship recipients receive a tax-free monthly subsistence allowance. Non-scholarship students in the last two years of the ROTC program also receive the tax-free monthly subsistence allowance.

Both ROTC programs have administrative and medical requirements, which must be met to qualify for a scholarship and a commission.

More specific information about ROTC programs may be obtained by contacting Army ROTC at (603) 862-1078 or Air Force ROTC at (603) 862-1480.
 

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