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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2014-2015

College of Health and Human Services

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/


Athletic Training

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/kin_at/index

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Professor: Erik E. Swartz
Associate Professor: John P. Miller
Clinical Associate Professor: Daniel R. Sedory

An athletic trainer collaborates with physicians to optimize the activity and participation of patients and clients. Athletic training encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, first aid, and rehabilitation of emergency, acute, and chronic medical conditions. The athletic training major has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) since 1991 and prepares professionals qualified to attend to the athlete, the fitness-conscious jogger, the skilled professional athlete, or anyone engaged in physical activity.

Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all KIN-required courses and BMS 507-508.

Students gain clinical experience in University Athletics and Campus Recreation and at off-campus clinical sites. Successful completion of the entire program, including supervised clinical experience, qualifies students to take the Board of Certification (BOC) certification exam. Students who wish to pursue both BOC certification and public school teacher certification should also see the Department of Kinesiology Physical Education Option. This double course of study will require between five and six years.

Students are admitted to the University in Athletic Training with conditional status. Specific competitive criteria must be met during the student’s first year before he or she may apply for full-time status in the major, which is awarded only to students demonstrating exemplary performance in classes and directed observation. Detailed criteria may be found at www.chhs.unh.edu/kin_at/admission_at.html. Additionally, Major Technical Standards establish the qualities considered necessary for students to achieve the knowledge, skills, and competencies associated with the program. Candidates for full-time status will be required to verify they understand and meet these technical standards or that, with reasonable accommodation, they can meet them. Interested students should consult with program coordinator, Dan Sedory, regarding entry criteria and the technical standards.

Students in Athletic Training complete KIN 718, Career Preparation in Athletic Training, as the capstone course for the major.  This course is designed to provide students with a means to integrate and augment concepts, skills, and knowledge gained in all previously-completed major course requirements. Prerequisites include KIN 665, sections A-D.

Courses


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
KIN   506   Concepts of Athletic Training   4  
KIN   507   Concepts of Athletic Training Lab   1  
KIN   585   Emergency First Responder   4  
KIN   620   Physiology of Exercise   4  
KIN   652   Clinical Kinesiology   4  
KIN   653A   Musculoskeletal Assessment   2  
KIN   658   Evaluation & Care of Athletic Training Injury I   4  
KIN   658L   Evaluation/Care of Athletic Training Injury I Lab   1  
KIN   659   Evaluation & Care of Athletic Training Injury II   4  
KIN   659L   Evaluation/Care of Athletic Training Injury II Lab   1  
KIN   660   Therapeutic Exercise in Athletic Training   4  
KIN   661   Therapeutic Exercise Lab   1  
KIN   662   Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training   4  
KIN   663   Therapeutic Modalities Lab   1  
KIN   665   Laboratory Practicum in Athletic Training    
  665A   Level I   2  
  665B   Level II   2  
  665C   Level III   2  
  665D   Level IV   2  
  665E   Level V   2  
KIN   667   Pharmacology in Athletic Training   2  
KIN   668   Ergogenic Aids in Sports   2  
KIN   670   General Medical Conditions in Athletics   4  
KIN   710   Organization/Admin of Athletic Training Programs   4  
KIN   715   Seminar in Athletic Training   4  
KIN   718   Career Preparation of Athletic Training   4  
KIN   780   Psychological Factors in Sport   4  


University Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NUTR   400   Nutrition in Health and Well Being   4  
PSYC   401   Introduction to Psychology   4  
Statistics Course       4  
BMS   507-508   Human Anatomy and Physiology   8  


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Communication Sciences and Disorders (COMM)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/csd/index

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Chairperson: Penelope E. Webster
Professor: Stephen N. Calculator
Associate Professor: Steven P. Bornstein, Penelope E. Webster
Assistant Professor: Dana Moser, Bryan M. Ness
Clinical Associate Professor: Jeanne H. O'Sullivan, Ruth E. Peaper, Amy S. Plante, Rae M. Sonnenmeier
Clinical Assistant Professor: Sheryl Gottwald, Mary Jane Sullivan
Lecturer: Kevin J. Fleese, Kelly Fleese, Donna Schefer, Michael Wallace

Communication sciences and disorders is the profession devoted to helping people overcome disabilities of speech, language, and hearing. The study of communication sciences and disorders may begin in the freshman or sophomore year. Students learn about speech, language, and hearing disorders in the classroom and are involved in clinical observation in the on-campus Speech-Language-Hearing Center. Students are encouraged to take elective courses in linguistics, human development, learning theory, early childhood, health administration, special education, and various aspects of rehabilitation.

Students are advised to continue their professional education at colleges or universities offering graduate programs leading to a master’s degree and to subsequent certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Certified clinicians find employment opportunities in hospitals, schools, community speech and hearing clinics, and private practice. Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of communication sciences and disorders.

The required courses in communication sciences and disorders that all students in the program must complete with a grade of C- or better are COMM 520, Survey of Communication Disorders; COMM 521, Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism; COMM 522, The Acquisition of Language; COMM 524, Clinical Phonetics; COMM 630, Organic Pathologies; COMM 631, Articulation and Language Disorders in Children; COMM 635, Professional Issues in Speech-Language Pathology; COMM 704, Basic Audiology; COMM 705, Introduction to Auditory Perception and Aural Rehabilitation; and COMM 777, Speech and Hearing Science. Students also must complete KIN 706, FS 525, or equivalent in human development, and a course in statistics.  Other elective courses are available. All students must also complete 15 hours of clinical observation.

In addition, students must complete one of the following courses to meet ASHA certification requirements: CHEM 403, CHEM 409, PHYS 401, PHYS 409. 

A 3.5 grade-point average is required to transfer into the major. Students interested in this program should consult with the chairperson, Penelope E. Webster, Ed.D.

Minor in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Studies
The minor in deaf and hard of hearing studies is intended to provide students with courses leading to specialized knowledge related to the fields of deafness and hearing loss. It is of interest to students who intend to engage in teaching, counseling, rehabilitation, social work, and other professions in which contact with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing may be expected. There may be some interest as well on the part of students majoring in TESOL and linguistics due to the bilingual aspect of the field. Finally, it may be an option for those students who wish to move on to graduate study in the fields of deaf education, rehabilitation counseling, speech-language pathology, and audiology. Minor coordinator: Mary Jane Sullivan.

Communication sciences and disorders majors may not use a course required of their major to fulfill both major and minor requirements.

Students in the deaf and heard of hearing studies minor must earn a grade of C- or better in each course in order to receive credit for the course in the minor.

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Health and Human Services (HHS)

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Health Management and Policy (HMP)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/hmp/index

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Professor: Barbara Arrington, Charles Drum, Leslie N.H. MacLeod, John W. Seavey, Lee F. Seidel, Robert S. Woodward
Associate Professor: Rosemary M. Caron, Marc D. Hiller, James B. Lewis, Robert J. McGrath
Research Associate Professor: Monica McClain
Assistant Professor: Semra A. Aytur
Research Assistant Professor: David J. Laflamme, Amanda Reichard
Clinical Professor: Edgar J. Helms Jr.
Clinical Assistant Professor: Susan Fox
Instructor: Ann-Marie Matteucci

Undergraduates majoring in the health management and policy program are prepared to embark upon management careers in a wide range of health care delivery and financing organizations, public health, and health policy. Graduates work in many settings, including health care delivery systems, hospitals, nursing homes, health maintenance and other managed care organizations, public health departments, community-based and home-health agencies, mental health facilities, regulatory bodies, consulting companies, and insurance companies.

The academic program is interdisciplinary, with undergraduates taking courses in many academic units of the University. Students gain a broad view of health and health care while developing analytical skills in health care management and policy. The department uses a computer laboratory that is integrated throughout the curriculum.

The department’s undergraduate program maintains full certification by the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA). Students have the opportunity to become student members in the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), the Health Care Financial Management Association (HFMA) and the American Public Health Association all of which are represented by student chapters at the University. There also is an organization for students interested in public health issues. The department curriculum is approved under the New England Regional Student Program.

 

Academic Program

Competencies are achieved through three components of the curriculum: University Discovery program requirements, HMP collateral courses, and HMP courses, which include a field practicum and a capstone course. Students work closely with their assigned faculty advisers to develop a plan of study to achieve completion of each of these components. Upper-division HMP courses are sequenced in a two-year progression as described in departmental handouts to all majors. Students are expected to follow this sequence; any exceptions are made by petition. Late transfers may have to plan for an extra year. All HMP students are required to take a core of introductory courses generally completed before their junior year in the major. 


HMP Introductory Core Courses - Required of All Majors

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits Fall Spring
HMP   401   U.S. Health Care Systems   4   X   X  
HMP   501   Epidemiology and Community Medicine   4   X   X  
HMP   403   Introduction to Public Health   4   X   X  
MATH   420   Finite Math   4   X   X  
Statistics     Any UNH statistics course satisfies the requirement   4   X   X  

 

For HMP majors only: HMP 401 will not meet the social sciences requirement.



seq

Course Number Credits Fall Spring


HMP Program Option:

Students in the health management and policy major may choose to pursue an option in public health. The option is outlined in the following tables. Students should complete the introductory core courses prior to their junior year in the major. All students are required to meet with their departmental academic adviser to ensure appropriate scheduling of classes within the major


Health Management and Policy:

Students not opting to pursue a focus in public health will complete the health management and policy management curriculum, which conveys tools to obtain entry-level analytical or management positions in the health care industry.  Health care management presents numerous opportunities to integrate skills such as finance, marketing, and management into organizations whose mission is to improve the lives of others. Students in this option will complete a capstone course, HMP 742, Strategic Management for Health Care Organizations.


Required Courses - Health Management and Policy

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits Fall Spring Summer
             
HMP   621   Pre-Practicum   2   X      
HMP   622   Field Practicum-summer session between junior/senior year   3       X  
HMP   624   Post Practicum   2   X      
HMP   631   Health Issues Seminar II   2     X    
HMP   642   Health Economics   4     X    
HMP   711   Health Systems Research I   4   X      
HMP   712   Health Systems Research II   4     X    
HMP   721   Managing Health Care Organizations I   4   X      
HMP   722   Managing Health Care Organizations II   4     X    
HMP   723   Health Planning   4     X    
HMP   735   Social Marketing   4   X      
HMP   740   Health Care Financial Management I   4   X      
HMP   511   Introduction to Health Information Systems   4     X    
HMP   742   Strategic Management for Health Care Organizations   4     X    
HMP   744   Health Care Ethics & Law   4   X      
HMP   746   Health Policy   4   X      


Public Health Option:

This option provides students with the knowledge and skills for entry-level positions within the public health workforce. The public health field is emerging as a key area for the protection of population health. This option provides students with an introduction to many of the foundation areas of public health and gives basic exposure to key concepts and skills in the five core disciplines of public health as articulated by the Council on Education for Public Health. Students in this option will complete a capstone course.


Required Courses - Public Health Option

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits Fall Spring Summer
HMP   403   Introduction to Public Health   4   X   X    
HMP   569   Human Behavior & Public Health   4     X    
HMP   621   Pre-Practicum   2   X      
HMP   622   Field Practicum summer session between jr/sr year   3       X  
HMP   624   Post Practicum   2   X      
HMP   631   Health Issues Seminar II   2     X    
HMP   642   Health Economics   4     X    
HMP   711   Health Services Research I   4   X      
HMP   712   Health Services Research II   4     X    
HMP   715   Environmental Health   4     X    
HMP   721   Managing Health Care Organizations I   4   X      
HMP   723   Health Planning   4     X    
HMP   735   Social Marketing   4   X      
HMP   740   Health Care Financial Management I   4   X      
HMP   742   Strategic Management for Health Care Organizations   4     X    
HMP   744   Health Care Ethics & Law   4   X      
HMP   746   Health Policy   4   X      


Field Practicum:

A full-time practicum (or administrative internship) that integrates class work with a supervised field experience constitutes an essential part of the academic program and is required of all majors. It allows students to explore an area of special interest in depth. Courses comprising this component of the major include HMP 621, Pre Practicum Seminar; HMP 622A, HMP 622B, HMP 622C, Field Practicum; and HMP 624, Post Practicum Seminar. The field experience is divided into three concurrent components: HMP 622A, Field Practicum Organizational Analysis; HMP 622B, Field Practicum Management Skills Development; and HMP 622C, Field Practicum Project Analysis. Field practicum sites are selected by faculty with student involvement and are concentrated in central and Northern New England. Given sufficient timing of student requests, efforts will be made to arrange practica at distant sites based on special needs.

HMP field practica occur during the summer between the junior and senior year within the curriculum. They begin in late May and end in late August and require a full-time commitment of a minimum of 400 hours.
 


Academic Requirements:

HMP majors must obtain a minimum of a C- in all HMP core courses and must pass all HMP-required collateral courses. Majors must have an overall grade-point average of 2.75 by the end of the semester preceding their practicum. Students not maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.75 are reevaluated by the faculty and may be counseled into another major at the University.

The faculty reviews student performances during the semester before the practicum to determine each student’s readiness. Students who do not successfully complete prerequisite courses may not be permitted to advance through subsequent courses in the major.
 


Applications for Major:

Students interested in additional information or in applying for admission to the health management and policy major should contact the department’s director of undergraduate studies. Efforts should be made to complete this process during the freshman year or early in the sophomore year to ensure sufficient time to complete all of the required collateral courses as well as those in the major in a timely manner. Admitted UNH students can apply to the major at any time, and admission decisions are made at the end of the semester in which the student applies. In general, admitted students have a cumulative GPA of over 2.75.
 


Honors in Major:

The department offers an honors-in-major program. To qualify, students must meet the department’s requirement of having an overall 3.4 grade-point average at UNH and a 3.4 grade-point average for required HMP courses taken by the end of the junior year. Honors-in-major students take honors courses during the last half of junior year and senior year and complete an honors project. Students work with a faculty member in the department in the development of the honors project. Students should contact the department’s honors-in-major adviser for further information.


Academic Minors:

HMP offers two academic minors: a minor in health management and one in public health.  Health management and policy majors are not eligible for minors in HMP.
 


Academic Minor in Health Management:

The department offers an integrated minor in health management designed for students in any major. Students seeking to minor in health management must meet with the department’s director of undergraduate studies before commencing the minor. The health management minor includes the following courses:


Academic Minor in Health Management

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits Fall Spring Summer
HMP   401   U.S. Health Care Systems   4   X   X    
HMP   501   Epidemiology and Community Medicine   4   X   X    
HMP   735   Social Marketing   4   X      
HMP   721   Managing Health Care Organizations I   4   X      
HMP   740   Financial Management of Health Care Organizations I   4   X      

Student may take HMP 740 Financial Management of Health Care Organizations I - fall semester or HMP 710 Financial Management For Clinicians - spring semester.



Academic Minor in Public Health:

The department offers a minor in public health. Public health deals with the health of populations and focuses on health promotion and disease prevention as well as access to the medical system. The minor introduces students to many of the foundation areas of public health and provides a basic exposure to key concepts and skills in the five core disciplines of public health, as articulated by the Council on Education for Public Health. The minor is open to any baccalaureate student at UNH. The public health minor includes the following courses:


Academic Minor in Public Health

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits Fall Spring Summer
HMP   403   Introduction to Public Health   4   X   X    
HMP   501   Epidemiology and Community Medicine   4   X   X    
HMP   569   Human Behavior and the Public Health   4     X    
HMP   505   History of Public Health   4   X   X    
HMP   715   Environmental Health   4     X    

Students may take HMP 735 Social Marketing or HMP 715 Environmental Health.



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Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/fs/index

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Chairperson: Kerry Kazura
Associate Professor: Barbara R. Frankel, Michael F. Kalinowski, Kerry Kazura, Corinna Jenkins Tucker
Assistant Professor: Lisa Porter Kuh, Erin Hiley Sharp
Clinical Associate Professor: Mark Moses
Extension Professor: Charlotte W. Cross

The department’s mission is to support the well-being of individuals and families through research, teaching, and service. Programs emphasize both theoretical and practical knowledge about life span development, the social and economic roles of families, child advocacy, teacher and parent education, and intervention programs that support families. The department is committed to acknowledging and supporting diversity, to providing an educational environment that stresses excellence and innovation, and to developing exemplary programs to serve both students and the larger community.

Students learn about families through integration of developmental, theoretical, and empirical information. The department offers a B.S. degree in Human Development and Family Studies. Each student selects from one of four specializations, each of which offers unique opportunities. Students prepare for positions in family service organizations, educational settings and programs, corporations, and government agencies. Each specialization has entry-level criteria and specific course requirements. All require close consultation with a faculty adviser. Any changes or updates are posted on our website.

The preschool/third grade teaching certification (P-3) and the Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE) programs are highly structured and may have limited enrollment. Acceptance to these programs and to internships and practica is restricted to students demonstrating exceptional potential for working with children and families.

Child Advocacy & Family Policy Specialization

This specialization focuses on analyzing and solving problems related to children and their families, with a primary emphasis on unmet needs. The goal is for students to complete their degree with a detailed understanding of human development, family relations, educational and government initiatives and regulations, cultural differences, statistics, politics, and effective communication strategies. The child advocacy and family policy specialization is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions as advocates or policy generalists, or to pursue a graduate degree.

Discovery Program/General Education
Please see the human development and family studies website for guidelines regarding Discovery/General Education courses.

Internships
Internships are chosen under the guidance of the specialization coordinator, and placement will be made with a state advocacy-related office. Some organizations may require a criminal background check before intern placement is finalized. Arrangements for criminal background checks are the responsibility of the student and the requesting organization, not the Department of Human Development and Family Studies.

Capstone Courses
The FS 712/714 internship serves as the senior capstone experience for the child advocacy and family policy specialization.
 


Departmental Requirements

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   525   Human Development  
HDFS   545   Family Relations  
HDFS   760   Family Programs and Policies  
HDFS   772   International Approaches to Child Advocacy  
HDFS   773   International Perspectives on Families and Young Children  
HDFS   712/714   Internship*  

*Spring or summer semester; 712 is 4-8 credits, 714 is 2 credits.



One Course from Each of the Following Groups:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
1.   HDFS 553   Personal and Family Finance for Family Life Educators - OR -  
  HDFS 653   Family Economics  
2.   HDFS 623   Developmental Perspectives on Infancy and Early Childhood - OR -  
  HDFS 624   Developmental Perspectives on Adolescence and Early Adulthood  
3.   HDFS 641   Parenting Across the Lifespan - OR -  
  HDFS 746   Human Sexuality - OR -  
  HDFS 757   Race, Class, Gender, and Families  
4.   HDFS 776   Children, Adolescents, and the Law* - OR -  
  HDFS 794   Families and the Law  

* Not offered every year



Major Requirement - One Course in Statistics

Abbreviation Course Number Title
PSYC   402   Statistics in Psychology - OR -  
SOC   502   Statistics - OR -  
HHS   540   Statistics for Health and Human Service Professionals  


Supporting Courses - Choose ONE from Each Group:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
1.   ENGL 502   Professional and Technical Writing - OR -  
  ENGL 503   Persuasive Writing - OR -  
  CMN 456   Propaganda and Persuasion  
2.   CSL 401   Introduction to Community Service and Leadership - OR -  
  CSL 402   Introduction to Nonprofit Organizations - OR -  
  CSL 404   Managing Change and Conflict in Communities - OR -  
  CSL 508   Essentials of Fundraising for Community-Based Organizations - AND -  
  CSL 509   Essentials of Grant Writing for Community-Based Organizations  
3.   SW 705   Child and Adolescent Risks and Resiliency: Program, Policy & Practice - OR -  
  PSYC 581   Child Development  
4.   HDFS 635   Teaching and Learning in Early Childhood Settings - OR -  
  EDUC 500   Exploring Teaching - OR -  
  EDUC 507   Mentoring Adolescents  
  AND   Electives as approved by student's adviser  


Family Support/Provisional CFLE Specialization

This specialization is intended for students interested in working with children, adolescents, and adults, either as individuals or as families. Students in the family support specialization develop knowledge and skills to prepare them to provide family support, direct services, and family life education. 

Certified Family Life Educator
Students in the family support specialization are encouraged to participate in the provisional Certified Family Life Educator (CFLE) component.  The National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) has approved the Department of Human Development and Family Studies’ undergraduate program as meeting the standards and criteria required for the provisional CFLE designation. Certified Family Life Educators work in a variety of settings including social services, health services, child care, family support, youth programs, parent education, junior and senior high schools, and universities and colleges. The CFLE designation recognizes expertise in a broad range of issues that constitute family life education and increases credibility by validating the individual’s education and experience. Students may apply to NCFR for provisional CFLE designation upon completion of required coursework.

Discovery Program/General Education
Please see the human development and family studies website for guidelines regarding Discovery/General Education courses.

Internship
Students accepted into the CFLE program are required to complete the Family Internship, including the Family Internship courses.  Students who are not in the CFLE program may also choose to complete the Family Internship.

In the Family Internship (FS 782), students will apply knowledge gained from their academic studies in a supervised environment. The optional internship involves a commitment of sixteen hours per week for two semesters, plus a three-hour seminar (FS 792) every other week.  In addition, some organizations may require a criminal background check before placement is finalized. Arrangements for criminal background checks are the responsibility of the student and the requesting organization, not the Department of Human Development and Family Studies. 

If you are planning to study abroad as well as complete the Family Internship, you must speak with Corinna Tucker or Tyler Jamison prior to making plans to go abroad.

Students apply for the internship during the spring semester of their junior year. Internship applicants must have completed 20 credits of departmental coursework prior to their senior year with a minimum overall grade-point average of 3.0 and a departmental grade-point average of 3.2 or higher.  Internship courses (782/792) count toward the 20 credits required in supporting courses.

Capstone Courses


Departmental Requirements

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   525   Human Development*  
HDFS   545   Family Relations*  
HDFS   641   Parenting Across the Lifespan*  
HDFS   746   Human Sexuality*  
HDFS   757   Race, Class, Gender, and Families*  
HDFS   760   Family Programs and Policies*  

* Required for provisional CFLE designation.



One Course from Each Group. Total of Three Courses.

Abbreviation Course Number Title
1.   HDFS 623   Developmental Perspectives on Infancy and Early Childhood  
  HDFS 624   Developmental Perspectives on Adolescence and Early Adulthood  
  HDFS 625   Adult Development and Aging  
2.   HDFS 586   Families at Risk  
  HDFS 553   Personal and Family Finance for Family Life Professionals  
  HDFS 797   Special Topics (as approved by adviser)  
3.   HDFS 794   Families and the Law  
  HDFS 776   Children, Adolescents and the Law  

* Required for provisional CFLE designation.



Major Requirement - One Course in Statistics

Abbreviation Course Number Title
PSYC   402   Statistics in Psychology - OR -  
SOC   502   Statistics - OR -  
HHS   540   Statistics for Health and Human Service Professionals  


Supporting Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   776   Children, Adolescents, and the Law (not offered every year)  
HDFS   782   Family Internship*  
HDFS   792   Seminar for Family Interns*  
    Gerontology Minor  
    Research Methods (such as PSYC 502)  
CMN   730   Family Communication (OR PSYC 762)  
NURS   535   Death and Dying  
PSYC   552   Social Psychology  
PSYC   582   Adult Development and Aging  
PSYC   762   Counseling (OR CMN 730)  
SOC   525   Juvenile Crime and Delinquency  
SOC   540   Private Troubles, Public Issues: Contemporary Social Problems  
SOC   675   Sociology of AIDS  
SW   525   Social Welfare Policy: History of Social and Economic Justice  
SW   697A, B, or C   Special Topics in Social Welfare  

* Required for provisional CFLE designation.



Lifespan Development Specialization

This specialization is intended for students with a broad interest in working with families. The lifespan development specialization provides knowledge about specific life stages of individuals within the context of family systems with a focus on system dynamics, diverse family systems, gender, and cultural differences. This plan of study is designed particularly for those expecting to attend graduate school and those who desire a general background in life span development and family dynamics.

Senior Capstone Course
FS 757, Race, Class, Gender, and Families


Departmental Requirements

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   525   Human Development  
HDFS   545   Family Relations  
HDFS   623   Developmental Perspectives on Infancy and Early Childhood  
HDFS   624   Developmental Perspectives on Adolescence and Early Adulthood  
HDFS   625   Adult Development and Aging  
HDFS   641   Parenting Across the Lifespan  
HDFS   746   Human Sexuality  
HDFS   757   Race, Class, Gender, and Families  
HDFS   794   Families and the Law  


Major Requirement - One Course in Statistics

Abbreviation Course Number Title
PSYC   402   Statistics in Psychology - OR -  
SOC   502   Statistics - OR -  
HHS   540   Statistics for Health and Human Service Professionals  


Supporting Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   760   Family Programs and Policies  
HDFS   776   Children, Adolescents, and the Law (not offered every year)  
HDFS   782   Family Internship  
HDFS   792   Family Internship Seminar  
    Research Methods (such as PSYC 502)  
NURS   535   Death and Dying  
PSYC   552   Social Psychology  
PSYC   581   Child Development  
PSYC   582   Adult Development and Aging  
SOC   540   Private Troubles, Public Issues: Contemporary Social Problems  
    One Foreign Language  
    Work with the Institute on Disability  


Child Development Specialization

This specialization is intended for students who have a broad interest in working with children ranging in age from birth to age eight. The child development specialization has four major foci: child development, teaching methodology and curriculum development, developmentally appropriate learning environments for young children, and home-school-community relations.

Senior Capstone Course
The senior capstone course for child development students who do not enter the P-3 program is
FS 743, Families, Schools, and Community.


Departmental Requirements

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   525   Human Development  
HDFS   545   Family Relations  
HDFS   623   Developmental Perspectives on Infancy and Early Childhood  
HDFS   635   Teaching and Learning in Early Childhood Settings  
HDFS   709   Advanced Child Development Internship  
HDFS   733   Supervising Programs for Young Children  
HDFS   734   Curriculum for Young Children  
HDFS   743   Families, Schools, and Community  
HDFS   771   Observation and Assessment of Young Children  


Major Requirement - One Course in Statistics

Abbreviation Course Number Title
PSYC   402   Statistics in Psychology - OR -  
SOC   502   Statistics - OR -  
HHS   540   Statistics for Health and Human Service Professionals  


Supporting Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   757   Race, Class, Gender, and Families  
HDFS   760   Family Programs and Policies  
HDFS   772   International Approaches to Child Advocacy  
HDFS   773   International Perspectives on Families and Young Children  
HDFS   794   Families and the Law  
HDFS   797   Families in Poverty  
EDUC   500*   Exploring Teaching  
EDUC   703F   Alternative Teaching Models - Elementary School Science  
EDUC   703M   Alternative Teaching Models - Elementary School Social Studies  
EDUC   706   Introduction to Reading in the Elementary School  
EDUC   733   Introduction to the Teaching of Writing  
EDUC   734   Children's Literature  
EDUC   741   Exploring Mathematics with Young Children (OR MATH 601)  
EDUC   750   Introduction to Exceptionality  
EDUC   751A   Educating Exceptional Learners: Elementary  
EDUC   760   Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs  
MATH   601   Exploring Mathematics for Teachers (OR EDUC 741)  
PSYC   581   Child Development  
PSYC   780   Prenatal Development and Infancy  
PSYC   783   Cognitive Development  
PSYC   785   Social Development  
SOC   520   Family  
SOC   525   Juvenile Crime and Delinquency  
SOC   540   Private Troubles, Public Issues: Contemporary Social Problems  
SW   705   Child and Adolescent Risks and Resiliency: Program, Policy and Practice  
THDA   583   Introduction to Puppetry  
THDA   622   Storytelling, Story Theatre, and Involvement Dramatics  

* May substitute FS 708 or FS 709 if student is not planning to apply to the P-3 program.



Child Development: Preschool - Third Grade Teacher Preparation Program

The Early Childhood Education Teacher Preparation (P-3) program prepares students for a career in teaching young children. Coursework for this program is designed to maximize in-classroom mentorship and to provide a broad range of exposure across the preschool to third-grade levels. However, student teaching will be in preschool and kindergarten settings. This competitive program within the Child Development Specialization in the Human Development and Family Studies Department is approved by the New Hampshire State Board of Education. Reciprocity of the P-3 certification with other states varies. Students interested in teaching in other states should contact each state directly.

This program requires 76 credits of pre-approved departmental and supporting coursework. Requirements and instructions for the application process for this program are detailed below. Students who wish to be considered for the P-3 Teacher Certification Program must indicate their interest at the time of application to the major so that an appropriate plan of study can be arranged.

Application Requirements
Juniors in the Child Development Specialization who have maintained a minimum overall GPA of 2.8 and a departmental GPA of 3.0 are eligible to apply. Please note that this is a competitive program with limited enrollment. Those accepted into the program must maintain this level of achievement throughout the program. Students must be prepared to have their own transportation for off-campus placements as needed. 

Applications are available through the human development and family studies departmental website and are due by February 15 of each year. Completed applications will be reviewed by the child development faculty. Admission decisions will be made by mid-March. Provisional admission may be given to those who have not yet taken and passed the Praxis I tests at the time of application in mid-February. Final admission will be given pending the submission of passing Praxis I test scores by the last day of final exams at the end of the junior year. (See additional certification information below.)

Senior Capstone Course
FS 788, Student Teaching of Young Children

A Note about Obtaining State Teacher Certification
Provisionally admitted P-3 teacher candidates are expected to submit passing Praxis I test scores by the last day of the UNH spring final exams of their junior year. All P-3 program teacher candidates are expected to take the Praxis II for ECE CONTENT prior to graduation. PLEASE NOTE that without the required set of passing Praxis I and II test scores, although students may graduate from UNH with a bachelor’s degree in family studies and have completed the P-3 coursework along with all student teaching requirements, they will not be eligible to apply for the New Hampshire State P-3 Teaching Certificate. This is a state of New Hampshire requirement, not a condition for graduation from UNH. Information on the Praxis tests is available at www.ets.org/praxis.

In order to fulfill a teaching contract with a public school district, a prospective teacher must be certified by the state in which he/she is to be employed. Certification by the state is not an automatic event upon graduation and must be initiated by the teacher candidate. If certification by the state of New Hampshire is desired, P-3 teacher candidates must complete and mail in the necessary forms, which will be given to them at the end of the successful student teaching experience by the UNH Certification Officer. Issuance of a teaching certificate in many states is based upon the specific certificate received in the home state. If application is not made in a timely manner upon graduation, the teacher candidate is subject to any new requirements in place at the time of application.

P-3 Internship Course Descriptions
FS 785 is a fall semester seminar-based course intended to prepare students, as teacher candidates, for the student teaching experience in the spring semester. This course emphasizes students’ continued development as learners, researchers, and collaborators. Discussions and projects focus on the ways in which these three roles are developed within the classroom and school community. Students meet as a cohort in weekly/bi-weekly seminars on campus. Students should expect to spend a minimum of three hours per week in their assigned classroom (42+ hours) and become first aid/CPR certified. Other expectations for this course include, but are not limited to, preparing a résumé, observing at other sites, attending professional conferences, starting a professional portfolio to document the achievement of professional teaching standards, and completing additional assignments and readings.

FS 786 and 788 provide the capstone student teaching experience in the spring semester of the senior year. Students should expect to spend a minimum of 24 hours per week (a minimum of 300 hours total) in their assigned classrooms, gradually assuming increasing teaching responsibilities, culminating in the assumption of two to three lead-teaching weeks. Additional hours outside of actual classroom/program operation hours are expected for meeting and planning with cooperating teachers, preparing for teaching, and attending parent conferences and other school functions, as well as attending professional conferences. Seminars provide continued opportunity for reflection on students’ development as teacher candidates, reflecting on classroom practices, identifying teaching strengths and weaknesses, and planning for their first professional appointment as teachers of young learners. Students should be prepared to meet weekly or bi-weekly on campus after school hours and to complete and present a professional portfolio to faculty and related professionals in the field.
 


P-3 Program Requirements (48 FS and 20 Supporting Credits)

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   525   Human Development  
HDFS   545   Family Relations  
HDFS   623   Developmental Perspectives on Infancy and Early Childhood  
HDFS   635   Teaching and Learning in Early Childhood Settings (56 classroom hours)  
HDFS   708/709   Child Development Internship at CSDC (140 classroom hours)  
HDFS   734   Curriculum for Young Children  
HDFS   743   Families, Schools, and Community  
HDFS   771   Observation and Assessment of Young Children  


Major Requirement - One Course in Statistics

Abbreviation Course Number Title
PSYC   402   Statistics in Psychology - OR -  
SOC   502   Statistics - OR -  
HHS   540   Statistics for Health and Human Service Professionals  


Required P-3 Senior Year Internship (12 Credits)

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   785   Seminar for Student Teachers - Fall Semester  
HDFS   786   Seminar for Student Teachers - Spring Semester  
HDFS   788   Student Teaching of Young Children - Spring Semester  


Other Required Courses for P-3 Certification*

Abbreviation Course Number Title
EDUC   500   Exploring Teaching (with placement in 1st, 2nd, or 3rd grade)  
EDUC   741   Exploring Mathematics with Young Children (OR MATH 601)  
MATH   601   Exploring Math for Teachers (OR EDUC 741)  
EDUC   706   Introduction to Reading in the Elementary School (with practicum in 1st, 2nd, or 3rd grade)  
EDUC   760   Introduction to Children with Special Needs  
EDUC   703M   Teaching Elementary School Social Studies (with focus on 1st, 2nd, or 3rd grade)  
EDUC   703F   Teaching Elementary School Science (with focus on 1st, 2nd, or 3rd grade)  

* These courses are subject to change to meet state certification requirements in subsequent years.



Family Internship

The family internship is available to students in the family support and lifespan development specializations.

Internship students apply knowledge gained from their academic studies in a supervised environment. The family internship involves a commitment of 15 hours per week for two semesters, plus a three-hour seminar every other week. A current listing of internship sites is available in the departmental office.

Students apply for the internship during the spring semester of their junior year. Internship applicants must have completed 20 credits of departmental coursework prior to their senior year with a minimum overall grade-point average of 3.0 and a departmental grade-point average of 3.2 or higher. Internship requirements vary depending on specialization. Internship courses are counted toward the 20 credits required in supporting courses.


Minor - Child Life

The interdisciplinary child life minor is offered by the Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the therapeutic recreation option of the Department of Recreation Management and Policy. Upon completion of course requirements for the minor, students are able to sit for the Child Life Specialist exam. 
 


HDFS Majors Minoring in Child Life - Required Courses:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   525   Human Development  
HDFS   623   Introduction to Child Life*  
RMP   502   Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation  

* Offered every other spring.



HDFS Majors Minoring in Child Life - Choose Two Electives:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
RMP   501   Leisure Services for Individuals with Disabilities  
RMP   503   Therapeutic Recreation: Rehabilitation and Interventions  
RMP   504   Therapeutic Recation: Mental Health  
RMP   603   Assessment and Treatment Planning in TP with RMP 602 Clinical Treatment Lab 1  
RMP   604   Therapeutic Communication and Facilitation Techniques in TR with RMP 605 Clinical Treatment Lab II  


Internship

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   710D   Internship under the Supervision of a Certified Child Life Specialist  


Minor - Adolescence

The interdisciplinary minor in adolescent and youth development is offered by the Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the Department of Recreation Management and Policy. The minor is designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills regarding adolescence and youth development. 

Required courses offer a foundation in theory, research, and practice for all minors. Students select three additional courses from a wide array of more specialized offerings from collaborating departments. To assist students in developing a cohesive plan of study for their minor, a simple application process is required. Only students who have submitted an application, been accepted into the minor, and completed the required coursework will be identified as having achieved a minor in adolescent and youth development. 


Required Courses:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
HDFS   624   Developmental Perspectives on Adolescence and Early Adulthood  
RMP   668   Youth Culture and Programs  


Select THREE of the Following Courses:*

Abbreviation Course Number Title
EDUC   507   Mentoring Adolescents  
EDUC   710C   Youth Organizations  
EDUC   797   Seminar in Early Adolescent Development  
EDUC   717   Growing Up Male in America  
EDUC   735   Young Adult Literature  
HDFS   797   Special Topics in Family Studies - Approved Sections Only  
JUST   701   Special Topics - Approved Sections Only  
KIN   565   Principles of Coaching  
PSYC   791   Adolescent Psychology  
RMP   558   Program Supervision and Leadership  
RMP   560   Recreational Sport Management  
RMP   730   Camp Administration and Leadership  
RMP   760   Community Sports Organizations: Administration & Development  
SOC   525   Juvenile Crime and Delinquency  
SOC   773   Sociology of Childhood  
SW   705   Adolescent Risk and Resiliency  
RMP   563   Practicum**  
RMP   707   Practicum**  

* Some courses may require prerequisites or permission.

** Only one practicum may be applied toward the minor.



Minor - Human Development and Family Studies

The department offers a minor in human development and family studies to interested students in related majors. Minor requirements include FS 525, Human Development; FS 545, Family Relations; and three additional courses chosen in consultation with a departmental adviser. 

Individual course grades must be C or above, and the overall grade-point average for the 20 human development and family studies credits must be at least 2.0. Students who wish to minor in human development and family studies are advised to consult with the department’s administrative manager as early as possible in their undergraduate studies.


Major Requirements

Core courses required of each human development and family studies major are: 

  1. FS 525, Human Development
  2. FS 545, Family Relations
  3. A minimum of nine human development and family studies courses, at least two of which must be at the 700 level
  4. A senior capstone experience; each human development and family studies specialization has a capstone experience incorporated into the program. 
  5. Twenty credits of supporting coursework, selected in consultation with the adviser. Supporting courses must be 500 level or above, and supporting coursework must include at least 12 credits in courses outside the department.
  6. An undergraduate statistics course

Each specialization has required or recommended supporting courses. Some departmental specializations may specify Discovery/General Education courses because they enhance the plan of study. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery or General Education Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of their human development and family studies specialization.


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International Affairs (dual major)

For program description, see Special University Programs.

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Kinesiology (KIN)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/kin/index

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Chairperson: Ronald V. Croce
Professor: Ronald V. Croce, Michael A. Gass, Stephen H. Hardy, Erik E. Swartz, Steven C. Wright
Associate Professor: Heather Barber, Brent J. Bell, Karen E. Collins, Michelle A. Grenier, Dain LaRoche, John P. Miller, Timothy J. Quinn, Neil B. Vroman
Assistant Professor: Summer Cook, Jayson O. Seaman
Clinical Associate Professor: Daniel R. Sedory
Clinical Assistant Professor: Tara Flippo, Laurie Gullion, Pam McPhee, Melissa Rodgers
Instructor: Karen N. Henny
Senior Lecturer: Thomas W. Ashwell
Lecturer: Nathan Fitch

The mission of the Department of Kinesiology is to generate, transmit, and apply knowledge about the role of physical activity (including exercise, movement, outdoor adventure experiences, and sport) in the advancement of health in society. The department has several teaching, research, and service functions that support this mission, including the preparation of professionals in the one major and four options described below. While programs vary in emphasis, each curriculum offers students fundamental knowledge in the following areas: the biological, psychological, and sociocultural foundations and consequences of physical activity; the pedagogical and rehabilitative aspects of physical activity; and the management and marketing of delivery systems in the field. Each program makes extensive use of field experiences and internships that blend theory with practice.

The department offers five areas of study for majors: athletic training, exercise science, outdoor education, sport studies, and physical education. Candidates for degree requirements in any of the department majors or options must satisfy all University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying specific program requirements.

 

Athletic Training Major

For further information, please see Athletic Training.


Exercise Science Option

This curriculum prepares individuals for career opportunities in health and fitness promotion and education programs in hospitals, sports medicine centers, wellness clinics, universities, and rehabilitation facilities. Students are also prepared for advanced degree programs in the health professions, basic biology fields, medicine, or other health-related fields. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in every required course. Successful completion of early and prerequisite courses is required before advancing to sequenced and higher-level coursework. All required courses must be completed before enrolling in KIN 650A, Internship in Exercise Science. Interested students should consult with the option coordinator, Timothy J. Quinn.

Students in exercise science complete the series of KIN 736, Fitness and Graded Exercise Testing; KIN 737, Exercise Prescription & Leadership in Healthy & Special Populations; and KIN 650A, Internship in Exercise Science; as capstone courses for the major. These courses give students practical experience in evaluating health and fitness and prescribing exercise to a wide range of clients.  Specifically, students assess a number of disease risk factors, including blood pressure, blood chemistry, and body composition measures, and perform maximal graded exercise tests complete with electrocardiogram monitoring, as well as measure strength and flexibility. Students ultimately develop individualized exercise prescriptions for their clients and work with them one-on-one to improve their health and fitness.  The internship experience is an off-campus, 10-week, 40 hours per week, full-time experience and can only be taken after ALL University and departmental courses are completed.  Typically, this is taken during the summer after the student’s senior spring academic term.


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
KIN   585   Emergency First Responder   4  
KIN   620   Physiology of Exercise   4  
KIN   621   Exercise Laboratory Techniques   4  
KIN   650A   Exercise Science Internship   8  
KIN   652   Clinical Kinesiology   4  
KIN   653A   Musculoskeletal Assessment   2  
KIN   704   Electrocardiography   4  
KIN   705   Topics in Applied Physiology   4  
KIN   720   Science & Practice of Strength Training   4  
KIN   724   Exerc Metab: Acute/Chronic Adapt   4  
KIN   736   Fitness and Graded Exercise Testing   4  
KIN   737   Ex Rx/L'ship Health & Spec Pop   4  
KIN   794   Cardiopulmonary Pathologies   4  
KIN   795   Practicum in Cardiac Rehabilitation   2  


University Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NUTR   400   Nutrition in Health and Well Being   4  
PSYC   401   Introduction to Psychology   4  
BMS   507-508   Human Anatomy and Physiology   8  
One course chosen from   SOC 502, PSYC 402, or HHS 540     4  
CHEM   403-404   General Chemistry   8  


Outdoor Education Option

The outdoor education option is an accredited, award-winning, internationally recognized program preparing individuals for careers in outdoor education, adventure programming, wilderness therapy, and other educational/organizational settings. In addition to providing rich course content, this interdisciplinary program gives ample opportunity for practical application and field experience in the New Hampshire seacoast and White Mountains areas. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in every major course. In addition, they must complete 100 days of documented leadership experience prior to beginning a required internship. Interested students should contact the undergraduate coordinator, Laurie Gullion, by e-mail at lgullion@unh.edu.

Students in outdoor education complete KIN 650B, Internship in Outdoor Education, as the capstone course for the option. This course integrates the knowledge and skills learned in all previous option courses and experiences into practical applications students will use as they prepare to enter the profession. Students complete their internships at regional and national organizations upon completion of all other courses and prerequisites.
 


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
KIN   540   Top Rope Rock Climbing   4  
KIN   541   Management of Challenge Courses   4  
KIN   543   Winter Adventure Programming   2  
or        
KIN   548   Winter Expedition Programming   4  
KIN   550   Outdoor Education Philosophy and Methods   4  
KIN   551   Adventure Programming: Backcountry-Based Experiences   3  
KIN   552   Adventure Programming: Water-Based Experiences   3  
KIN   682   Outdoor Leadership   4  
KIN   686   Wilderness Emergency Medical Care   4  
KIN   687   Leadership Practicum   4  
KIN   786   Organization/Administration of Outdoor Education   4  
KIN   787   Theory of Adventure Education   4  
KIN   650B   Internship*   (2-4) Cr/F  

*Note: Proof of 100 days of leadership experience is required prior to taking this course.



University Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
ENGL   501, 502, or 503   Intro to Prose, Technical, or Persuasive Writing   4  

Other: Core of courses (16 credits) emphasizing the particular area or population in outdoor education of interest to student, e.g., business, education, psychology, social work—selected with assistance of an adviser.
 



Elective Courses (must successfully complete at least one)

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
KIN   542   Sea Kayaking   2  
KIN   545   High Angle Rescue   2  
KIN   546   Whitewater Canoeing   3  
KIN   547   Lead Rock Climbing   3  
KIN   549   Wilderness Navigation   4  
KIN   693C   Teaching Assistantship   2  
KIN   782   Therapeutic Applications of Adventure Programming   4  
KIN   798   Special Topics   Var.  


Physical Education Option

The physical education option provides the foundation for public school teacher certification through either the department’s four-year certification program, or, if a student chooses to pursue a master's degree with certification, the Department of Education’s Fifth-Year Program. Bachelor candidates become certified to teach K-12 through classroom and practicum experiences that fulfill New Hampshire state requirements. Master candidates have the option of completing certification in both health and physical education, as well as obtaining a certificate in adapted physical education.

This option integrates best practices with the theoretical and process knowledge necessary for teaching elementary and secondary physical education. Extensive practicum experiences prepare students to teach preschool children, school-aged youth, and young adults, including students with disabilities.

All fifth-year candidates must meet the requirements for admission to graduate school (e.g., grade-point average of at least 3.0 and "minimum" scores on the Graduate Record Examination). Internal transfer candidates must have a minimum GPA of 2.67 and pass the Praxis I state licensure exam before admission to the option. All physical education option students must receive a C grade (2.0) or better in all KIN required courses, including KIN 655, Middle School and Secondary PE Pedagogy; KIN 666, Middle School and Secondary PE Practicum; and KIN 610, Elementary PE Pedagogy.  Education equivalent courses taken for a teacher licensure requirement must be completed with a grade of B- or better including KIN 781, Inclusion in PE; KIN 570, Elementary PE Practicum, and KIN 675, Motor Development and Learning.  Freshmen physical education majors are admitted with conditional status. In order to obtain full-time status in the option, majors must pass the Praxis I state licensure exam before classes begin in the fall of their sophomore year and maintain at least a 2.67 overall GPA at the start of their junior year. For questions about this program, contact the option coordinator, Michelle Grenier, at (603) 862-1835, or e-mail Michelle.Grenier@unh.edu.

KIN 694, Supervised Teaching in Physical Education (student teaching), is the culminating capstone experience before a student can be certified to teach physical education (K-12). Students will be required to spend eight weeks in an elementary school setting and eight weeks in a middle and/or secondary school setting observing, assisting, and teaching various physical activities and grade levels. Students will also be required to attend seminars and complete a portfolio for this credit/fail course.


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
KIN   500   Historical/Contemporary Issues Physical Education   4  
KIN   501   First Aid: Responding to Emergencies   2  
KIN   570   Elementary Physical Education Practicum   4  
KIN   600   Movement and Gymnastics Exploration   4  
KIN   601   Lifetime Sports   3  
KIN   603   Team Sports   3  
KIN   610   Elementary Physical Education Pedagogy   4  
KIN   620   Physiology of Exercise   4  
KIN   648   Current Issues in Health   4  
KIN   652   Clinical Kinesiology   4  
KIN   653B   Biomechanical Analysis of Movement   2  
KIN   655   Middle School/Secondary Physical Education   4  
KIN   666   Middle/Secondary Physical Education Practicum   4  
KIN   675   Motor Development and Learning   4  
KIN   676   Adventure Activities   3  
KIN   780   Psychological Factors in Sport   4  
KIN   781   Inclusion in Physical Education   4  


Required Education Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
EDUC   700/800   Educational Structure and Change   4  
EDUC   705/805   Alternative Perspectives/Nature of Education   4  
KIN/EDUC   694   Supervised Student Teaching   8  
or        
EDUC   900/901   Internship and Seminar in Teaching   12  


Sport Studies Option

Sport studies is an interdisciplinary option in the Department of Kinesiology that provides a foundation for a variety of career paths in school and college athletics, including coaching, administration, marketing, and sports information. The major also prepares students for further graduate study in areas such as sport psychology. Some sport studies courses are appropriate for students with career interests in other industry segments (e.g., pro-sports, broadcasting), but those students must choose other majors (e.g., business or journalism). Majors take a core of foundation courses (e.g., The Sport Industry) as well as electives in applied areas such as sport marketing, athletic administration, and sport psychology. Majors must earn a grade of B- (2.67) or better in KIN 565 and KIN 580, and a grade of C (2.0) or better in each required University and KIN course. All majors must complete 20 credits of prior-approved coursework in supporting areas such as business, psychology, or education. In addition, an internship experience or independent study is required. An internship experience is strongly recommended since it is often critical to career development. Interested students should consult with the option coordinator, Karen Collins.
 


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
KIN   560   Sport Psychology   4  
KIN   562   Sports Media Relations   4  
KIN   565   Principles of Coaching   4  
KIN   580   The Sport Industry   4  
KIN   741   Social Issues in Contemporary Sports   4  
KIN   761   Senior Seminar in Sport Studies*   4  

*Majors must complete a minimum of 150 hours of industry experience before they can take KIN 761. Students must be enrolled as a sport studies major for one full semester before taking KIN 761, Senior Seminar. See adviser for details.

Electives. Sixteen credits of approved KIN electives to include KIN 650 or KIN 696.

Internal transfers to sport studies must have a 2.5 GPA as well as a minimum grade of C (2.0) in PSYC 401, CS 401, Statistics (PSYC, SOC, DS) and a minimum grade of B- (2.67) in both KIN 565 and KIN 580.



University Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CS   401   Computer Applications   4  
PSYC   401   Introduction to Psychology   4  
One approved statistics course       4  

Cognate Requirement (outside of Department of Kinesiology). Students must complete a minimum of 20 credits of coursework in other departments.  Each course must be approved in advance by the faculty adviser.



Minors in Kinesiology

Kinesiology Minor
The Department of Kinesiology offers an interdisciplinary curriculum for nonmajors, which is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge of movement and sport sciences. The minor consists of courses offered by several options within the department. A list of minor requirements and available classes is available at the Kinesiology Department Office, Room 107, New Hampshire Hall.

Coaching Minor
The Department of Kinesiology: sport studies option offers a coaching minor. The coaching minor is an interdisciplinary curriculum designed to provide students interested in coaching at the youth, high school, or college levels with basic knowledge and skills necessary for competence in coaching. The minor consists of courses offered by several options within the Department of Kinesiology and recreation management and policy. The coursework lays a theoretical and practical framework for students interested in coaching.

Description of Curriculum and Requirements of Coaching Minor
Admission to the minor is based on successful completion of KIN 565, Principles of Coaching (grade of C or better), and a minimum GPA of 2.0.


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
KIN   565   Principles of Coaching  
KIN   505   Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries  
KIN   521, 522, 523, 525, 528, 529   Sport-Specific Coaching Theory Course (minimum of two) (each course is 2 credits)  
KIN   650D   Internship in Coaching (one 4-credit internship or two 2-credit internships)  


Select at Least One of the Following:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
KIN   527   Scientific Foundations of Health and Fitness  
KIN   560   Sport Psychology  
RMP   560   Recreational Sport Management  
KIN   562   Sport Media Relations  
KIN   675   Motor Development and Learning  
KIN   740   Athletic Administration  
KIN   765   Advanced Topics In Coaching  
KIN   780   Psychological Factors in Sport and Exercise  
RMP   760   Community Sport Organizations: Administration and Development  

Students will not be permitted to enroll in KIN 650D, Internship until they have completed KIN 565, Principles of Coaching; KIN 505 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries, and at least one Theory of Coaching class.

To graduate with a coaching minor, individuals must earn a grade of C- or better in all courses associated with the minor (not including KIN 565, which will require a C or better).

Individuals will not be permitted to count coaching minor classes toward their major regardless of the major/degree program.



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Nursing (NURS)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/nursing

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Chairperson: Gene E. Harkless
Professor: Susan J. Fetzer
Associate Professor: Pamela P. DiNapoli, Gene E. Harkless, Joanne G. Samuels, Carol L. Williams-Barnard
Assistant Professor: Joyce Dolphin Cappiello, Ralph Klotzbaugh, Carolyn L. Tobin
Clinical Associate Professor: Donna Marie Pelletier
Clinical Assistant Professor: Elizabeth J. Evans, Kimberly Gibbons, Pamela Kallmerten, Patricia Puccilli, Megan E. Seawards, Deborah L. Simonton, Nancy A. Wells
Lecturer: Karen Crowley, Karen S. Niland

The nursing programs are nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036-1120. The nursing department reflects the mission and goals of the University and focuses on the uniqueness of each individual. The mission of the Department of Nursing is to enhance the health of individuals, families, groups, and communities. The philosophy expresses the beliefs of the faculty regarding person, environment, health, nursing, and education. The curricular goal is to guide nursing students in developing knowledge and skills essential to the present and future practice of nursing. Graduates are prepared to provide care to individuals and groups, help people identify and meet their health care needs, be effective colleagues on the health care team and shape the future of health care.

The curricula are divided into biological, social sciences, and humanities as a foundation for courses in the major, and nursing courses, which emphasize relationship-based care, reflective thinking, clinical decision making, and the application of evidence-based guidelines to develop quality and safe clinical skills. Clinical experiences are offered in area health facilities, community health agencies, and a state-of the-art simulation laboratory. The senior year culminates in a capstone practicum, NURS 721C, Integrating Professional Nursing Practice Clinical, in which students apply curricular concepts in a precepted clinical experience. Candidates for the nursing degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying major requirements.

The nursing program faculty believe learning is a creative process wherein students are active participants in their education, growth, and development as professional nurses. Faculty members are facilitators and mentors to students within a supportive, scholarly environment.

Honors-in-major courses are offered to interested nursing students who have achieved a minimum grade-point average of 3.75 in NURS courses and cumulative GPA of 3.4 at the end of the sophomore year in nursing.  In addition to NURS 641H, Translating Research for Practice (4 cr.), students must successfully complete 8 additional credits of honors coursework drawn from the following courses: NURS 612H, Care of the Adult with Acute Illness 2 (4 cr.); NURS 627WH, Clinical Judgment in Nursing (4 cr.); and NURS 705, Contemporary Leadership within Health Care Systems (4 cr.), for a total of 12 credits of honors coursework.

Honors-in-major students must successfully complete NURS 794, Special Topics: Honors Seminar (1 cr.), spring semester junior year; NURS 797, Honors Thesis (1 cr.), fall semester senior year; and NURS 797, Honors Thesis (4 cr.), spring semester senior year. These self-directed learning experiences, related to the student's interests, are designed to help students acquire advanced knowledge and skills to undertake inquiry or scholarly projects. Students must submit a project description to a faculty adviser at the beginning of the senior year. Students present the results of this study at the Nursing Inquiry Day.

A grade of C or better in high school chemistry is required as well as biology or physics. The following prerequisite courses must be completed successfully prior to enrollment in NURS 500: ENGL 401, BMS 507-508, and PSYC 401. BMS 501 must be taken prior to or concurrent with NURS 500. A course in statistics must be completed prior to, or taken concurrent with, NURS 641.

Prerequisite courses require grades of C or better and only one prerequisite course may be repeated one time in order to progress. Most of the prerequisite courses also meet Discovery requirements. Major courses require a minimum grade of C. Nursing courses may not be repeated. A cumulative grade-point average of 2.50 must be maintained throughout the program.

Students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical agencies, uniforms, professional equipment, health insurance coverage, yearly criminal background drug and alcohol screening, fingerprinting, yearly health assessment, and select immunizations and titers. Students must maintain certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation at the Healthcare Provider or Professional Rescuer level.  All clinical documents must be received by July 1st before the sophomore year, except flu vaccine that is due by October 15th, and remain up to date until graduation. Clinical documents cannot expire during the academic year; documents that must be submitted yearly must be dated between May 1 and June 30. Students will be assessed a late fee if clinical documents are not received by the due date. Students will be dropped from nursing courses if documentation is not received by the first day of class. Additional costs associated with the program include, but are not limited to, simulation laboratory fees, fees associated with program requirements and attendance at professional meetings.

 

 



Freshman Year - Fall Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
BMS   507   Human Anatomy & Physiology   4  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing   4  
    Discovery/Inquiry   8  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   16  

1.  BMS 507 satisfies Discovery Biological Science category (BS) and Discovery Lab (DLAB).
2.  ENGL 401 satisfies Discovery Writing Skills category (WS).
3.  One of the Discovery courses should be Inquiry by end of first year.



Freshman Year - Spring Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
BMS   508   Human Anatomy & Physiology   4  
PSYC   401   Introduction to Psychology   4  
    Discovery/Inquiry   8  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   16  

1.  PSYC 401 satisfies Discovery Social Science category (SS).
2.  Two additional WI courses required beyond ENGL 401 and NURS 627W (see spring junior year).



Sophomore Year - Fall Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
BMS   501   Microbes in Human Disease   4  
NURS   500   Introduction to Professional Nursing   2  
NURS   504   Diseases and Drugs 1   4  
NURS   516   Health Assessment and Nursing Fundamentals   4  
NURS   516C   Health Assessment and Nursing Fundamentals Clinical   2  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   16  

NURS 516 requires Simulation Lab.



Sophomore Year - Spring Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
*     Statistics   4  
NURS   505   Diseases and Drugs 2   4  
NURS   506   Human Development, Interaction and Learning Across the Lifespan   4  
NURS   517C   Clinical Integration   2  
NURS   601   Function and Well-being of Older Adults   2  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   16  

* HHS 540, PSYC 402, SOC 502, MATH 439 - satisfies Discovery Quantitative Reasoning category (QR).

NURS 517C requires Simulation Lab.



Junior Year - Fall Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   611   Care of the Adult with Acute Illness 1   4  
NURS   611C   Care of the Adult with Acute Illness 1 Clinical   2  
NURS   616   Living with Mental Illness, or NURS 621/621C Maternal and Newborn Nursing   2  
NURS   616C   Living with Mental Illness Clinical   2  
NURS   641   Translating Research for Practice   4  
    Discovery/Elective   4  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   18  

NURS 611 requires Simulation Lab.
 



Junior Year - Spring Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   612   Care of the Adult with Acute Illness 2   4  
NURS   612C   Care of the Adult with Acute Illness 2 Clinical   2  
NURS   621   Maternal and Newborn Nursing or NURS 616/616C Living with Mental Illness   2  
NURS   621C   Maternal and Newborn Nursing Clinical   2  
NURS   627W   Clinical Judgment in Nursing   4  
    Discovery/Elective   4  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   18  

1.  NURS 612 requires Simulation Lab.
2.  NURS 621 requires Simulation Lab.
3.  NURS 627W satisfies Writing Intensive (WI) in major/WI at 600-level or above.


 



Senior Year - Fall Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   702   Child Health Nursing   2  
NURS   702C   Child Health in the Community Clinical   2  
NURS   704   Public Health Nursing   4  
NURS   704P   Public Health Nursing Project   2  
NURS   711   Clinical Judgment in Complex Illness   2  
    Discovery/Elective   4  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   16  

NURS 711 requires Simulation Lab.



Senior Year - Spring Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   705   Contemporary Leadership within Health Care Systems   4  
NURS   721   Integrating Professional Nursing Practice   2  
NURS   721C   Integrating Professional Nursing Practice Clinical   6  
    Total Credit Hours for Semester   12  


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Occupational Therapy (OT)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/ot/index

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Chairperson: Kerryellen Vroman
Associate Professor: Sajay Arthanat, Lou Ann Griswold, Shelley E. Mulligan, Barbara Prudhomme White
Clinical Associate Professor: Therese Willkomm
Clinical Assistant Professor: Susan C. Merrill, Elizabeth A. Stewart, Kate Stimmell, Alexa Trolley-Hanson, John Wilcox

Occupational therapy enables people to participate in daily life activities including leisure, work, self-care, and home management. Occupational therapists work with people of all ages to gain or regain skills and abilities or adapt tasks within their natural environment. Occupational therapy education includes studies in liberal arts; biological, behavioral, and health sciences; and occupational science and occupational therapy.

The occupational therapy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE).  The Council may be contacted c/o Accreditation Department, American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), 4720 Montgomery Lane, Bethesda, MD 20824-3449, (301) 652-2682, website: www.acoteonline.org. Graduates from an accredited program are eligible to sit for the certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a registered occupational therapist (OTR). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT certification examination.

Combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Science Program
Graduates of professional programs must complete a professional master’s degree in occupational therapy in order to enter the field. The University of New Hampshire Department of Occupational Therapy offers a combined bachelor’s degree/master’s degree program. Students may enter as first-year students or transfer within UNH into the B.S./M.S. program at the end of the sophomore year, space permitting in the program. Students interested in transferring into this program should contact the Department of Occupational Therapy for information about transfer requirements and application deadlines.

Preprofessional Curriculum
Students begin the B.S./M.S. curriculum with three years of preprofessional courses, which include courses in biological and social sciences as well as occupational therapy. In addition to University Discovery Program requirements, students take the following core courses during their first three years:

ENGL 401, First-Year Writing
PSYC 401, Introduction to Psychology
BMS 507 and 508, Human Anatomy and Physiology
OT 500, The Behavior and Development of Children
OT 501, Development Tasks of Adulthood
OT 510, Exploring Occupational Therapy and Occupation
OT 610, Occupation, Identity, and Disability
OT 685, Psychosocial Disorders and Everyday Life
KIN 706 and 707, Neurology and Neurology Lab
Statistics

Additional requirements (Details on satisfying these requirements are provided by the student's academic adviser and are outlined in the OT Department Policy and Procedure Manual.)

An experiential learning/occupation-based learning course for 3-4 credits (This is a course that requires cognitive learning that is translated into a motor skill. Many courses can meet this requirement);
A health or social policy course (This is a course that address social and health policy, such as HMP 401 or SWS 525);
A minor or self-designed concentration area for a total of 20 credits;
Minimum 4-hour OT shadow/observation experiences in three different practice settings;
Volunteer or work experience in a health and human service organization is recommended, although not required.

Professional Curriculum
Students in the B.S./M.S. curriculum begin the professional program in the senior year and complete the following courses:

OT 741, Human Occupation 
OT 710, Occupational Therapy Practice and Professional Roles
OT 751, Mind Body Systems Neurologically-Based Function and Dysfunction
OT 752, Human Movement and Environmental Effects on Everyday Occupations (with co-requisite lab, OT 752L) 
OT 792, Level I Fieldwork  (January-term)
OT 760, Psychosocial Evaluation and Intervention (with co-requisite lab, OT 760L)
OT 785, Research Methods and Application to Practice
OT 745, Administration and Management for OT Practice

One of the following two courses:   

OT 771, Enabling Participation in Community Groups (with co-requisite lab, OT 771L)   or
OT 730, Assistive Technology for Enhancing Occupational Performance (with co-requisite lab, OT 730L)

The Discovery Program Capstone requirement is satisfied through the completion of coursework for OT 741, Human Occupation. 

At the end of the senior year, students are awarded a bachelor of science degree in occupational science. Students then apply to the Graduate School as advanced-standing students in the professional master’s program. An overall minimum grade point of 3.0 is required for admission to the master’s degree program, and students must attain a minimum grade of B- in all OT classes, and meet professional behavior expectations. Students must have no more than 8 credits of B- coursework in OT senior-level courses. Please refer to the Graduate Catalog for additional information about the master’s program and the final 1.5 years (three semesters) of the professional occupational therapy curriculum including fieldwork requirements.

Students entering as first-year undergraduate students have 5.5 academic years (11 semesters) to complete the professional curriculum, including level II fieldwork. They then will be eligible to sit for the certification examination administered by the National Board of Certification of Occupational Therapists (NBCOT). Consistent with NBCOT, students must sit for the certification examination within two years of completion of coursework and fieldwork. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination and/or obtain state licensure.

Students are responsible for transportation to off-campus practicum and fieldwork locations.

Curriculum review and revision is undertaken annually. The department works closely with students during academic advising sessions and shares information about any policy and requirement changes during registration periods as well as throughout the academic year. Students also are expected to take an active role in verifying expectations and should check with their department advisers each September for updated policies and requirements. Program requirements and policies for retention in the major are in the OT Department Policy and Procedure Manual, which is available on Blackboard. 

 

 

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Recreation Management and Policy (RMP)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/rmp/index

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Chairperson: Janet R. Sable
Professor: Janet R. Sable
Associate Professor: Robert James Barcelona, Ann L. Morgan
Assistant Professor: Patricia J. Craig, Charles Boyd Hegarty, Nate Trauntvein, Allison Wilder
Affiliate Assistant Professor: James Hilton, Cari A. Moorhead
Clinical Assistant Professor: Jennifer Frye, Jill Gravink
Clinical Instructor: Matthew Frye, Crystal Skahan, Cathy Thompson
Lecturer: Sean McLaughlin

 

As the fabric of life in contemporary society grows in complexity, people are increasingly turning to leisure and recreation services to find meaning, renewal, and enrichment. Recreation services can improve public health and wellness, promote sustainable environments, develop a sense of community, and enhance the quality of life of all citizens. Recreation professionals work in diverse settings, including human services, health care, natural recreation resource areas such as parks, and commercial recreation businesses. Population and economic projections suggest that recreation service industries will continue to expand and thereby continue to provide numerous professional career opportunities. 

The Department of Recreation Management and Policy is nationally accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions (COAPRT). The department’s curriculum supports a broad-based education and an opportunity to acquire specialized professional knowledge and skills. Graduates are employed in a broad range of settings, such as community recreation agencies, resorts, conference centers, youth services agencies, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and long-term care facilities.

Curriculum Structure
Students entering the major may choose either an option in program administration, which includes the professional core and required courses related to program administration, or the therapeutic recreation option, which includes the professional core and required courses in therapeutic recreation. Candidates for a degree in recreation management and policy must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major option.

Study Abroad Opportunities
The University of New Hampshire Approved Study Abroad Program list is available on the Center for International Education website: http://www.unh.edu/cie/studyabroad/programs_approved.html. This site includes a wide variety of destinations, coursework, and activities to meet the diverse needs of UNH students. Students who wish to attend a program not included in the approved list must complete a UNH One-time Study Abroad Approval Petition. Interested students in the major should consult with their recreation management and policy academic adviser about sites, timing, and coursework that may be most compatible with degree requirements.


Core Requirements

All majors must complete a core curriculum of seven courses.


Core Curriculum

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
RMP   490*   Recreation and Leisure in Society   4  
RMP   501   Recreation Services for Individuals with Disabilities   4  
RMP   557   Recreation Services Program Design and Planning   4  
RMP   563   Recreation Management and Policy Practicum   2  
RMP   654   Professional Development and Ethics   2  
RMP   664   Professional Internship   14-16  
RMP   724   Grantsmanship, Evaluation, and Research   4  

*RMP majors cannot count RMP 490 toward the University social sciences requirement.



Professional Internship

A supervised internship (RMP 664) is required of all majors and serves as their major capstone requirement. The internship is designed to create a bridge between theory and practical application. Students, working with their advisers and the internship coordinator, select an appropriate setting based on their professional and career interests. They must register for a 14-16 credit  full-time internship that ranges from 14-16 weeks and is under the supervision of a qualified professional. Specific requirements are identified in the Internship Manual available from the Department of Recreation Management and Policy.


Program Administration Option

This option prepares students for managerial positions in commercial, public, and nonprofit organizations that provide recreation and leisure services. Curriculum design emphasizes the effective and efficient planning, delivery, and evaluation of leisure-based programs, services, and enterprises. Applied experience is a component of most courses, in addition to a required practicum and the 14-16–week full-time internship under professional supervision. Depending upon the RMP electives and the career support emphasis or minor chosen, students may expect to find employment in a broad range of settings. Recent graduates have found employment in the areas of conference and event planning, municipal park and recreation services, recreational sports, commercial and entrepreneurial recreation businesses, youth serving agencies, resorts, camps, and natural resource management positions in state and federal agencies.

In addition to the required core courses, students who pursue the program administration option must complete the following departmental requirements:


Program Administration Course Requirements

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
RMP   558   Program Supervision and Leadership   4  
RMP   663   Management and Policy in Leisure Services   4  
RMP   559   Applied Marketing and Communication in Recreation Services   4  
RMP   770   Managment and Design of Recreation and Park Facilities   4  
RMP   772   Law and Public Policy in Recreation Services   4  
CS   401   Computer Applications or an approved equivalent   4  
SOC   502   Statistics or other descriptive statistics   4  
PSYC   401   Introduction to Psychology   4  

Three RMP course electives selected from a rotating list of specialized RMP course offerings are required.  Examples of elective course topics include:  recreational sport management, youth culture and programs, festival and event management, camp administration and leadership, recreation resource management, and youth development.  RMP courses taken to fulfill the elective course requirement may not also be used to fulfill the emphasis area requirement unless prior approval from the student's academic adviser is obtained in unique circumstances.

Program administration students must complete a minor or emphasis area of 18–20 credits to support their specific career goals. 



Therapeutic Recreation Option

Therapeutic recreation utilizes recreation to assist people with disabilities or illnesses to develop and use their leisure in ways that enhance health, independence, and well-being. Therapeutic recreation recognizes the importance of quality of life and uses activities to remediate or rehabilitate functional abilities. Therapeutic recreation services are provided in a variety of settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, residential treatment facilities, schools, home health care, community recreation, correctional facilities, rehabilitation centers, camp and outdoor education centers, and adult day programs. Observation and applied experience is a component of several courses. Students complete a 14-16-week full-time clinical internship under the supervision of a certified therapeutic recreation specialist (CTRS).  The Bureau of Labor Statistics occupational outlook reports the "employment of recreational therapists is expected to increase 15 percent from 2008 to 2018, faster than the average for all occupations" (Bureau of Labor Statistics). A 2011 CNN Money report identifies recreation therapy among the top ten "best jobs for saving the world." In particular, they note the profession's high benefit to society and high personal job satisfaction (CNN Money Magazine).

Upon successful completion of this option, students are prepared to meet sitting requirements for the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification Examination. Students/graduates who pass the NCTRC exam and attain the CTRS® and are eligible to seek licensure to practice in the state of New Hampshire.

In addition to required core courses, students who choose this option must meet the following departmental requirements:


Therapeutic Recreation Course Requirements

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
RMP   502   Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation   4  
RMP   503   Therapeutic Recreation Rehabilitation Principles and Interventions   4  
RMP   504   Therapeutic Recreation Mental Health Principles and Interventions   4  
RMP   612   Therapeutic Communication and Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation   4  
RMP   613   Interventions and Documentation in Therapeutic Recreation   3  
RMP   614   Assessment and Treatment Planning in Therapeutic Recreation   4  
RMP   615   Clinical Lab in Therapeutic Recreation   2  
RMP   705   Management and Policy in Therapeutic Recreation   4  


Required Support Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CS   401   Computer Applications or an approved equivalent   4  
PSYC   402   Statistics or equivalent   4  
PSYC   401   Introduction to Psychology   4  
PSYC   561   Abnormal Behavior   4  
FS   525   Human Development   4  
BMS   507-508   Human Anatomy and Physiology   8  
KIN   652   Clinical Kinesiology   4  
KIN   653A   Musculoskeletal Assessment   2  


Criteria for Admission and Retention

Internal transfer students interested in applying to the major must submit an application online (application is on the RMP website). After the application is submitted and reviewed, students must meet with the RMP TR or PA option coordinator to complete the application process. Transfer applications are accepted throughout the academic year. 

Students within the major are required to maintain a minimum 2.5 grade-point average every semester to retain good academic standing within the major. In addition, student majors must obtain a grade of C (2.0) or better in RMP courses and a grade of C- (1.67) or better in all other courses specifically required by the department.


Child Life Minor

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS) and the Department of Recreation Management and Policy (RMP) offer an interdisciplinary minor in child life for students majoring in HDFS and RMP only. Students admitted to the minor in child life are required to take three core courses, which include RMP 502, HDFS 525, and HDFS/RMP 565. In addition, RMP majors must select two courses from an elective list, including HDFS 623, HDFS 635, HDFS 641, HDFS 734, HDFS 772, and RMP 593. In addition, HDFS majors must select two courses from an elective list including RMP 501, RMP 503, RMP 504, RMP 612 (4-credit course) with RMP 613 (3-credit course/lab), and RMP 614 (4-credit course) with RMP 615 (2-credit lab). Lastly, students from RMP and HDFS must participate in a 480-hour internship under the supervision of a CCLS (RMP majors take RMP 593F and HDFS majors take HDFS 707A). RMP students interested in the child life minor should contact Professor Patti Craig, pjcraig@unh.edu and HDFS students interested in the child life minor should contact Professor Michael Kalinowski, mk2@unh.edu.


Adolescent and Youth Development Minor

This interdisciplinary minor is offered by the Department of Recreation Management and Policy and the Department of Human Development and Family Studies. All students must complete two required courses: RMP 668 and HDFS 624. Students then select three additional courses from an interdisciplinary list of courses approved for the minor. RMP majors may use only RMP 668 to meet both major and minor requirements. Additional information and the application for the minor may be obtained from the sponsoring department offices or at Adolescent and Youth Development Minor.



Social Work (SW)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/sw/index

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Chairperson: Cynthia Anne Broussard
Associate Professor: Mary Banach, Linda Rene Bergeron, Cynthia Anne Broussard, Vernon Brooks Carter, Jerry D. Marx, Sharon B. Murphy, Patrick Shannon, Anita Tucker, Melissa Wells
Research Associate Professor: Joan B Beasley
Clinical Associate Professor: Susan A. Lord
Clinical Assistant Professor: Gretchen Bean, Martha A. Byam, Kim Kelsey, Brian Miller, Lee P. Rush

The Department of Social Work’s undergraduate program offers both a major and a minor in social work. It is a specialized degree that prepares graduates for generalist social work practice with a solid foundation in the liberal arts and in the knowledge, skills, and value base of social work. Through the mastery of core competencies, social work graduates apply their education working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. In addition, the program prepares qualified students to pursue graduate education in schools of social work and related fields.

The baccalaureate program at the University of New Hampshire is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and must meet rigorous academic standards to retain this accreditation. Social work majors pursue a program that encompasses the professional social work competencies of professional identity, critical thinking, knowledge of diversity and human rights, social and economic justice, social welfare policy and services, social work practice with all client system sizes, human behavior in the social environment, research, and ethics. 

To connect the theoretical and conceptual content of the classroom with the practice world, students must complete 40 hours of volunteer service in approved agency/program setting prior to entering the field in the senior year. Twenty hours of the 40 must be in the same agency/program. The remaining hours may be across multiple sites/programs. This experience may be paid or volunteer and must be pre-approved by the student's faculty adviser.  The service hours must be completed post high school and before entering field work (SW 640/640A). In addition, students complete a 450 hour internship over two semesters during the senior year. This is the senior capstone experience. The field placement in the final year of the baccalaureate program is arranged between the student and the field education coordinator. Evaluation of this senior field placement is one tool that measures student achievement of program competencies. Students are required to pay a liability insurance fee for their off-campus field education experience. In compliance with CSWE accreditation standards, the B.S. in social work program does not grant social work course credits for life experience or work experience.

Social work majors earn a B.S. degree in social work. Graduates are eligible for practice in a variety of social work settings throughout the United States. In addition, qualified graduates are eligible to apply for advanced standing in MSW programs that offer advanced standing.  Depending upon the program, this can mean earning the MSW in one calendar year versus two academic years.

Academic Program
Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of  the social work major. Social work majors are required to take SW 424, 525, 550, 551, 601, 622, 623, 625, and the senior capstone course sequence 640, 640A, 641, 641A. In addition, students are expected to successfully complete four courses taken from the disciplines of anthropology/sociology, zoology, philosophy, and psychology. Many of these also may fulfill Discovery Program requirements.  Students wishing to minor in social work are required to take SW 424, SW 525, and any three other courses offered by the department, excluding SW 640, 641. Students interested in either a major or minor in social work should consult with the undergraduate program coordinator, Martha Byam, Pettee Hall, Room 231, (603) 862-1077.
 

 

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