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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2015-2016

College of Life Sciences and Agriculture

» http://www.colsa.unh.edu/


Animal Science (ANSC)

» http://www.animalsci.unh.edu/

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Professor: David L. Berlinsky, William E. Berndtson, Laurie Chapman-Bosco, Andrew B. Conroy, Peter S. Erickson, Thomas L. Foxall, Robert L. Taylor Jr., David H. Townson, Paul C. Tsang
Associate Professor: Patricia D. Bedker, Elizabeth P. Boulton
Assistant Professor: Andre F. Brito
Lecturer: Christina Keim, Sarah H. Rigg
Teacher/Trainer: Elizabeth L. Oertel

http://animalsci.unh.edu/

The undergraduate program in animal science is designed to prepare students for a variety of careers by providing strong fundamental and applied education in animal nutrition, reproduction, genetics, physiology, health, and large animal management. On-campus animal facilities available to provide practical experience with agricultural animals include the Fairchild Dairy Teaching and Research Center, the Lou and Lutza Smith Equine Center, the nearby organic dairy housed at the Burley-Demeritt Farm, and aquaculture facilities. Program graduates may be employed in farm ownership, management, marketing, the pharmaceutical industry, agribusiness, finance, manufacturing, public relations, extension, vocational education, or consulting. The animal science B.S. is designed for students interested in animal agriculture. Students who are considering continuing their studies through graduate school or veterinary school are advised to take the recommended additional courses in chemistry, math, and physics.

Animal Science Foundation Courses
BIOL 411, Introductory Biology: Molecular & Cellular
BIOL 412, Introductory Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity, Ecology
CHEM 403, General Chemistry I
CHEM 404, General Chemistry II
BIOL 528, Applied Biostatistics, or BIOL 555, Experimental Design & Analysis Lab, or equivalent (SOC 502 or PSYC 402)
BMS 503, General Microbiology
BMCB 501, Biological Chemistry
(Students interested in graduate school should take two semesters of Organic Chemistry and one semester of Biochemistry.)
CHEM 651/653, Organic Chemistry I/Organic Chemistry Lab
CHEM 652/654, Organic Chemistry II/Organic Chemistry Lab
BMCB 658/659, General Biochemistry/General Biochemistry Lab

Requirements for All Animal Science Majors
AAS 439, Fundamentals of Animal Health
ANSC 406, Careers in Animal Science
ANSC 421, Animal Agriculture Today
ANSC 511, Anatomy and Physiology
ANSC 512, Anatomy and Physiology
ANSC 543, Technical Writing in Animal Science or equivalent (ENGL 501, 502, 503 or 419) (WI)
ANSC 609, Principles of Nutrition
ANSC 612, Genetics of Domestic Animals

Ethics Course
ANSC 602, Animal Rights and Societal Issues (WI)

Disease Course (choose one)
AAS 574, Dairy Cattle Disease Seminar
ANSC 620, Equine Diseases

Reproduction Course (choose one)
ANSC 701, Physiology of Reproduction
ANSC 715, Physiology of Lactation
ANSC 724, Reproductive Management and Artificial Insemination
BMS 702, Endocrinology

http://animalsci.unh.edu/course-descriptions

Animal Science Electives
Three electives must be chosen and approved by the student's faculty adviser. At least two electives must be at the 500 level or above. For classes less than three credits, two classes must be taken together to count as one requirement. Electives: http://animalsci.unh.edu/electives.

Capstone Experience
The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course (e.g., ANSC 698, ANSC 728W, ANSC 795, or ANSC 797), created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors theses, mentored research projects, and other special student activities).

Requirements for Animal Science Students Interested in Graduate/Veterinary School
BMCB 658 and 659, General Biochemistry
CHEM 651/653, Organic Chemistry I
CHEM 652/654, Organic Chemistry II
MATH 424B, Calculus for Life Sciences
PHYS 401, Introduction to Physics I
PHYS 402, Introduction to Physics II

Students interested in veterinary medicine should consult the pre-veterinary medicine program website (http://www.prevet.unh.edu/).

Animal Science: Dairy Management B.S.
The ANSC: dairy management option is designed to provide students with solid training in areas important to the successful management of a dairy enterprise, for employment in related agribusinesses (e.g., pharmaceutical and feed industries), or for those wishing to pursue additional training leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in dairy science or its related disciplines. Dairy management students receive training in areas such as nutrition, reproduction, diseases, genetics, lactation physiology, forages, agribusiness finance, personnel management, computer science, and public relations. In addition, junior and senior students enrolled in this program will be given complete responsibility for managing the UNH teaching herd with other students, thereby acquiring actual management experience along with their basic subject matter training. The UNH Teaching and Research Center, a modern dairy facility, houses approximately one hundred milking cows plus a similar number of non-lactating animals. For additional information and answers to questions regarding the option in dairy management, email Dr. Peter Erickson.

Students are responsible for the completion of the animal science foundation courses and the requirements for all animal science majors (both sets of courses listed above).  In addition, animal science: dairy management B.S. students must also successfully complete:

AAS 423, Dairy Cattle Selection (Little Royal)
AAS 425, Introduction to Dairy Herd Management (may waive ANSC 421) 
AAS 432, Introduction to Forage and Grassland Management
AAS 574, Dairy Cattle Disease Seminar
ANSC 602, Animal Rights and Societal Issues (WI)
ANSC 650, Dairy Industry Travel Course
ANSC 698, CREAM (two-semester course)
ANSC 708, Ruminant Nutritional Physiology
ANSC 710, Dairy Nutrition
ANSC 715, Physiology of Lactation
ANSC 724, Reproductive Management and Artificial Insemination
ANSC 727, Advanced Dairy Management I
ANSC 728, Advanced Dairy Management II (WI); will also fulfill the Capstone requirement
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives

GPA Requirements for All Students in Animal Science
Students will be required to earn a C- or better in the foundation courses and all required courses for the animal science major to receive credit toward graduation. Students failing to do this will need to retake the course in order to receive credit.

Minor in Animal Science
A minor in animal science consists of a minimum of 20 credits of animal science (ANSC) courses. No more than 7 credits may be taken in the Thompson School of Applied Science (AAS) and at the 400- level.

ANSC 421, Animal Agriculture Today MUST be taken
ANSC 609, Principles of Animal Nutrition MUST be taken
ANSC 612, Genetics of Domestic Animals MUST be taken
One ANSC Disease course MUST be taken

Students must receive a minimum grade of C- in any course used for the minor. Students failing to do this will need to retake the course in order to receive credit. No courses taken on a pass (credit)/fail basis may count toward the minor. Students who transfer from other institutions may petition the animal science program faculty for course approval.

Students wanting to declare a minor in animal science must meet with animal science minor coordinator Dr. Elizabeth Boulton DVM, DACVS as early as possible and no later than first semester of their junior year.

Students must complete the minor form their final semester at UNH.

For additional information and answers to questions regarding the animal science B.S. degree, email Dr. Elizabeth Boulton, elizabeth.boulton@unh.edu.

Minor in Dairy Management
For a minor in dairy management, students are required to register for AAS 425, Introductory Dairy Herd Management; ANSC 710, Dairy Nutrition; ANSC 715, Physiology of Lactation. An additional 8 credits of coursework must also be taken from the following selection: AAS 423, Dairy Cattle Selection; AAS 574, Dairy Cattle Diseases; ANSC 698, CREAM; ANSC 728, Advanced Dairy Management II. The conditions stated above for MINORS apply also to a minor in dairy management.

Additional information and questions regarding the minor in dairy management may be obtained by e-mailing Dr. Peter Erickson.

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Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology (BMCB)

» http://www.bmcb.unh.edu/

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Professor: Richard H. Cote, Clyde L. Denis, Wayne R. Fagerberg, Thomas L. Foxall, Thomas M. Laue, Stacia A. Sower, Charles W. Walker
Research Professor: Vernon N. Reinhold
Associate Professor: Estelle M. Hrabak, David H. Townson
Assistant Professor: Feixia Chu

»Click to view faculty participating in the program [http://www.bmcb.unh.edu/faculty]

The field of biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology (BMCB) encompasses a broad range of the life sciences, from biophysics and biochemistry to applied biology and medicine. The B.S. in biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology is based on a solid foundation in biology, chemistry, physics, and math, along with advanced courses in molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics. The program offers specialized training in the areas of molecular genetics, gene regulation, cellular structure and function, cancer biology, endocrinology, macromolecular interactions, glycobiology, and lipid metabolism. BMCB students are highly-motivated and seek exposure to cutting-edge techniques and “hands-on” experience through laboratory- and research-based opportunities. Graduates are “profession-ready” people who are well-prepared for entry‐level positions in the health care and biotechnology industries, for graduate education, and for post‐baccalaureate professional programs (e.g., medical school, veterinary school, dental school, etc.).

The curriculum provides most of the required and recommended courses for students seeking admission to graduate schools and to professional schools in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and pharmacy. Students who major in BMCB can also use their training in conjunction with advanced degrees in law and business. Students obtaining the B.S. in BMCB enjoy excellent job prospects immediately upon graduation. There is currently a demand for skilled research technicians in biotechnology companies, pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, forensics, academic research laboratories, and hospitals. Graduates also have knowledge that is valuable in the fields of management, sales, marketing, regulatory affairs, technical writing, and scientific journalism. With additional courses in education, the B.S. in biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology also qualifies graduates to teach at the elementary, junior high, and high school levels.

Faculty participating in the BMCB major combine a passion for teaching and student advising with strong research expertise in their chosen discipline. BMCB faculty are committed to providing independent research experiences for undergraduate students, and many faculty have well-funded research programs utilizing state-of-the-art equipment and techniques. On-campus research facilities that students can use to enhance their research experience include the Hubbard Center for Genome Studies, the Center to Advance Molecular Interaction Science, and the Center for Comparative and Molecular Endocrinology, among others.

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology
Students majoring in BMCB must take: i) five BMCB core courses; ii) three major elective courses chosen from an extensive list; iii) four bioscience core courses; and iv) eight foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning.  The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other special student activity). In addition, courses for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed. For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, visit the BMCB website.

BMCB Core Courses
Opportunities in Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology (1 semester)
Genetics of Prokaryotic Microbes, or Molecular Genetics (1 semester)
Principles of Biochemistry (2 semesters)
Cell and Developmental Biology (1 semester)

BMCB/Biology Major Electives
One laboratory techniques course

Two other major elective courses in the areas of cell biology, biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, biomedical sciences, and health issues (list available at http://bmcb.unh.edu/4year/RequirementsListed#Major)

Bioscience Core Courses
Biology with laboratory (2 semesters)
Microbiology with laboratory (1 semester)
Genetics (1 semester)

Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with laboratory (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry with laboratory (2 semesters)
Calculus (1 semester)
Statistics (1 semester)
Physics with laboratory (2 semesters)

Pre-Professional Health Programs
Students interested in postgraduate careers in the health care professions should visit the Pre-Professional Health Programs Advising Office online (http://www.unh.edu/premed-advising) or in person (Hood House, Room 102). Requirements for specific professional schools (e.g., medical, dental, physician’s assistant, pharmacy, etc.) are provided at http://www.unh.edu/premed-advising/exploring-health-professions. Students interested in veterinary medicine should consult the Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program website (http://www.prevet.unh.edu/). While many of the prerequisite courses required by professional schools are also requirements of the BMCB major, you should consult with your faculty adviser to create a plan of study that best prepares you for pursuing a career in one of these health professions.

Minor in Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular Biology (BMCB)
Students who wish to develop focused competencies in biochemistry, molecular biology, and/or cell biology can complement their major academic program with a minor in biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology (BMCB). The intent to complete a minor in BMCB should be communicated by the end of the junior year. The general requirements for completion of a minor can be found in the minor section of the Undergraduate Catalog. Specific courses that fulfill the requirements for the BMCB minor can be found at http://www.bmcb.unh.edu/Minor.    

For additional information on the BMCB major or minor, contact the undergraduate program coordinator, Dr. David H. Townson (dave.townson@unh.edu).

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Biology (BIOL)

» http://www.biology.unh.edu/

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Professor: William E. Berndtson, John F. Burger, Donald S. Chandler, Thomas M. Davis, Larry G. Harris, Arthur C. Mathieson, Subhash C. Minocha, Christopher D. Neefus
Affiliate Professor: Rakesh Minocha
Associate Professor: Alan L. Baker, Patricia D. Bedker, Jessica A. Bolker, Anita S. Klein
Assistant Professor: Iago L. Hale, Sandra M. Rehan

The biology major is designed to provide a strong, broad background in biological sciences to students interested in education in the life sciences. The biology major integrates theoretical and practical (hands-on laboratory and field work) courses in different aspects of the biology of animals, microbes, and plants. The curriculum is designed to reflect the diversity of the biological systems in nature. It encompasses the study of structural and functional relationships of living organisms at the molecular, cellular, and organismal level; the interactions of the living systems with the environment and with each other; and the evolutionary relationships of various forms of life. The goal is to create a facilitative environment for those with a scholarly interest in the biological sciences, and to extend their understanding, awareness, and appreciation of the diversity of the biological sciences.

The major is aimed at promoting excellence in biological science education by involving undergraduate students in strong interaction with faculty both in the classroom and research laboratories, and encouraging the development of quality undergraduate programs in all aspects of biology.

The biology major prepares students for graduate work in the biological, medical, and agricultural sciences, and for job opportunities in industry (biomedical, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, environmental, and biotechnological) and governmental research, and secondary school teaching, or a general education about living organisms. Completion of the four-year undergraduate program plus a fifth-year internship will be necessary for biology teaching certification. Students who plan to enter medical, dental, or related professional schools are advised to confer with their faculty adviser to build the requirements for these programs into their academic majors.

Courses in the biology major are selected from departments that constitute the biological sciences community at UNH. The flexibility of the curriculum allows student choice of a wide selection of courses in various departments. Students in the major take a biology core curriculum involving introductory and upper-level science courses. They must also take seven additional courses in the biological sciences; three of these must be selected from course lists in three broad categories.

While students are advised to declare the biology major as incoming first-year students to assure adequate program planning, transfer into the program at a later stage is also possible. Since several of the other biological sciences majors share the same biology core curriculum, it is quite easy to change to or from other biological sciences majors.

Academic Requirements
To receive the B.S. degree in biology, students must complete 128 credit hours with a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average. Courses must include all UNH Discovery Program requirements, biology core curriculum requirements, plus seven additional courses from the biological sciences. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, and other special student activity). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors. A minimum grade of C- is required in all biological science courses that are counted toward the requirements for a degree in biology. Students who expect to compete successfully for post-baccalaureate programs should attain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher by the end of the sophomore year and maintain it at that level.

Biology Core Curriculum
The biology courses in the core curriculum constitute an integrated sequence of courses imparting basic skills and concepts of biology to expose students to the breadth of knowledge inherent in the biological sciences. The biology core allows a student to obtain a broad background in biology and related physical sciences and math.

Biology Core Curriculum Courses
BIOL 400, Professional Perspectives on Biology1
BIOL 412, Introductory Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity, and Ecology
BIOL 411, Introductory Biology: Molecular and Cellular
BIOL 541, General Ecology
BMS 503, General Microbiology
GEN 604, Principles of Genetics
CHEM 403 & 404, General Chemistry
CHEM 545/546, Organic Chemistry, and BMCB 658/659, General Biochemistry, or CHEM 651/653 and CHEM 652/654, Organic Chemistry2,3 
MATH 424B, Calculus for Life Sciences, or MATH 425, Calculus I 
BIOL 528, Applied Biostatistics, or BIOL 555, Experimental Design and Analysis Lab
PHYS 401 and 402, Introduction to Physics
ENGL 501, Introduction to Creative Nonfiction, or equivalent3
EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching4

Typically, students take BIOL 400; BIOL 412 & 411; CHEM 403-404; and MATH 424B in the first year, and then complete the remainder of their core requirements during the sophomore and junior years.
_______
1BIOL 400 is required only for first-year biology majors.
2The sequence CHEM 545/546-BMCB 658/659 is preferred to CHEM 651/653-652/654 for biology majors, except for those who are premedical or pre-health profession students.
3CHEM 651/653 and 652/654 and ENGL 501 are required for premedical or affiliated professional programs.
4EDUC 500 is required only for those preparing for teacher certification.

Biology Electives
In addition to the biology core curriculum, students must complete seven biology elective courses. Three of the seven courses are to be selected from courses listed in three categories/disciplines; the other four can come from the category lists or can be any other biological sciences course with approval of the student’s adviser. The seven selected courses should include at least one each from the three categories and must include one animal-identified course and one plant-identified course. A complete list of approved courses in each category/discipline is available from the student’s adviser, the Department of Biological Sciences office, and the biology website at biology.unh.edu. Corequisite lecture and lab courses count as one course. All UNH students must take four writing-intensive courses and one must be in their major.

Note: It is strongly recommended that students participate in an exchange semester at another university or in a field-oriented program or internship. There are many exchange opportunities available in which a full semester of credits toward the major may be earned. In addition, students should explore the courses at the Shoals Marine Laboratory (SML), which provides an excellent setting for several “field-oriented” courses during the summer. Often there is financial support available for the SML programs. (See the SML website at https://marine.unh.edu/SML or the Cornell website at www.sml.cornell.edu for details.) It is further recommended that students explore possibilities of one or more semesters of independent investigation (research projects). For details, students should contact their adviser. Financial support is available for most of these programs.

One 600, 795, or 796 experience totaling three or more credits or any two 795-796 experiences of two credits each can fulfill one course requirement in any category with adviser approval. A Petition for Academic Variance approved by the chair of the Department of Biological Sciences is required to count 795-796 experiences for more than one major required course. Students should check the biology website (biology.unh.edu) and the UNH online catalog for updates and current course offerings.

Pre-Health Professional Program
Students who wish to pursue postgraduate degrees in the health care professions should visit the premedical advising office in Room 102, Hood House for additional information on requirements for specific professional schools. Call (603) 862-7740 or visit the program’s web page at www.unh.edu/premed-advising. The following elective courses will be helpful in preparing for admission to post-baccalaureate programs in the health professions and for their required aptitude examinations: BMS 702, ZOOL 518, ZOOL 625/626, BMCB 605, BMCB 751/752, ANSC 511/512.

Biology Teacher Certification and General Science Certification
Biology teacher certification for students preparing to teach high school biology may be obtained through the Department of Education’s five-year, undergraduate-graduate degree program. Students are required to take EDUC 500 (preferably in the sophomore year), earn a bachelor’s degree in one of the biological sciences, and complete a fifth year, which includes an internship and coursework leading to a master’s degree in education. General science certification for students preparing to teach science in middle and junior high schools can be obtained through the Department of Education’s general science certification program. For further information, see education, or contact the Department of Education’s teacher education coordinator.

Biology Minor
Students must take BIOL 411-412, or PBIO 412 and ZOOL 412 plus three additional courses in the biological sciences: either BIOL 541 or ZOOL 690 (both are writing intensive), and two courses dealing with organismal surveys: one must focus on animals and the other on plants. The minimum acceptable grade in these courses is a C-, and the average grade for these courses must be a C or better.

Students interested in a biology major or minor should contact Dr. Donald S. Chandler, Spaulding 266, 862-1735, Donald.Chandler@unh.edu.

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Biomedical Science (BMS)

» http://www.biomedical.unh.edu/

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Professor: Thomas L. Foxall, Aaron B. Margolin, Thomas G. Pistole, Paul C. Tsang
Associate Professor: David H. Townson
Clinical Associate Professor: Mary Katherine Lockwood
Clinical Assistant Professor: Stephanie L. Clarke, Barry Corriveau, Michelle Fleetwood, Adele Marone, Inga F. Sidor, Elise R. Sullivan
Lecturer: Davida L. Margolin, Timothy P. Montminy, Joyce R. Stone

»Click to view faculty participating in the program [http://www.biomedical.unh.edu/faculty]

Biomedical science lies at the interface between biology-based science and the application of medicine and veterinary medicine. With the complexity of 21st century human and animal health care, the biomedical sciences have become increasingly sophisticated and involve a wide variety of disciplines that study all aspects of life processes. The biomedical sciences have as primary objectives the development and application of bioscience to the diagnosis and prevention of disease, to the development of treatments and to the monitoring and promotion of health and wellness in both humans and animals.

The biomedical science (BMS) major at UNH encompasses three options: medical laboratory sciences (MLS), medical microbiology (MM), medical and veterinary sciences (MVS). These options possess diverse curricula but are linked by their common interests in the disciplines of medical and veterinary sciences. Students are attracted to these options by a profound interest in human and animal physiology and diseases. Each of the options in the BMS degree is based on solid foundations in biology, chemistry, physics, and math, along with advanced courses in laboratory-based disciplines, mechanisms of disease induction, and therapy. For descriptions of each option and their curricular details, visit www.biomedical.unh.edu.

Biomedical science is a dynamic discipline with excellent long-term career prospects in research, clinical practice, education, management, and laboratory-based disciplines. At UNH the BMS curriculum provides graduating students with the required and recommended courses for admission to graduate school and the professional schools of medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy, as well as to physician assistant and pathology assistant programs. With the current high demand for skilled biomedical scientists as research technicians in biotechnology companies, pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, forensics, academic research laboratories, and hospitals, BMS majors also enjoy excellent job prospects upon graduation. BMS graduates also have a knowledge base that is valuable in the fields of sales, marketing, regulatory affairs, technical writing, patent law, and scientific journalism. With additional courses in education, the B.S. in biomedical science also qualifies graduates to teach at the elementary, junior high, and high school levels.

Faculty participating in the BMS curriculum have expertise in a variety of areas of biomedical science, including infectious diseases, veterinary pathology, virology, disease mechanisms, laboratory medicine, and treatment. The biomedical science faculty strongly encourage students to complement their academic courses with experiential learning opportunities through internships, field experience, and independent research projects conducted with biomedical research faculty on campus. Facilities include state-of-the-art research and teaching laboratories. The New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostics Laboratory (NHVDL) provides unique opportunities for students interested in veterinary medicine and pathobiology to work alongside veterinary pathologists in the diagnostic laboratories.

Biomedical Science: Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS) Option
The medical laboratory sciences (MLS) program at UNH is NAACLS accredited and follows accreditation requirements. Students in this option take six required MLS core courses, five major elective courses, five bioscience core courses, and four foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning.  The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other special student activity). A grade of C- or above is required in core courses within the major. For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, visit: www.biomedical.unh.edu/4year/MajorRequirementsMLS. In addition, all other University academic requirements for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

BMS-MLS Core Courses
Professional Perspectives in Biomedical Sciences, required of freshmen only (1 semester)
Pathogenic Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Clinical Immunology and Serology with lab (1 semester)
Body Fluids with lab (1 semester)
Molecular Diagnostics (1 semester)
Mycology/Parasitology/Virology (1 semester)

BMS-MLS Major Electives
A total of five unique courses from a range of subject areas that includes hematology, medical biochemistry, phlebotomy, immunohematology, and case studies or clinical internships.

Bioscience Core Courses
Anatomy and Physiology with lab (2 semesters)
Microbes in Human Disease or General Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Principles of Genetics (1 semester)
General Biochemistry with lab (1 semester)

Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with lab (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry with lab (1 or 2 semesters depending on course selection)
Statistics (1 semester)

Biomedical Science: Medical Microbiology (MM) Option
Students in the medical microbiology (MM) option take four required MM core courses, five major elective courses, five bioscience core courses, and seven foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other special student activity). A grade of C- or above is required in offerings within the major. For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, visit: www.biomedical.unh.edu/4year/MajorRequirementsMM.  In addition, all other University academic requirements for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

BMS-MM Core Courses
Professional Perspectives in Biomedical Sciences, required of freshmen only (1 semester)
Pathogenic Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Immunology with lab (1 semester)
Virology with lab (1 semester)

BMS-MM Major Elective Courses
A total of five unique major elective courses is required. At least one course must be taken in each of the following subject areas: host-microbe interaction, molecular biology, and community.  Two additional courses are taken from the entire set of approved major elective courses that include virology, molecular microbiology, genetics of prokaryotic microbes, and ethics and issues in  biomedical science.

Bioscience Core Courses
General Biology with lab (2 semesters)
General Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Principles of Genetics (1 semester)
General Biochemistry with lab (1 semester)

Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with lab (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry with lab (1 or 2 semesters depending on course selection)
Calculus (1 semester)
Biostatistics (1 semester)
Physics with lab (2 semesters)

Biomedical Sciences: Medical and Veterinary Sciences (MVS) Option
Students in the medical and veterinary sciences (MVS) option take three MVS core courses, seven MVS major elective courses, five bioscience core courses, and eight foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors.  The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning.  The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other special student activity). A grade of C- or above is required in courses within the major. For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, visit: www.biomedical.unh.edu/4year/MajorRequirementsMVS. In addition, all other university academic requirements for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

BMS-MVS Core Courses
Professional Perspectives in Biomedical Sciences, required of freshmen only (1 semester)
Anatomy and Physiology with lab (2 semesters)

BMS-MVS Major Elective Courses
A total of seven unique major elective courses are required. At least two courses must be taken in each of the following subject areas: biomedical systems, pathobiology and disease, and health and environmental issues. One additional course is taken from the entire set of approved major elective courses that include dairy management, endocrinology, physiology, microbiology, cell biology, and public health.

Bioscience Core Courses
General Biology with lab (2 semesters)
General Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Principles of Genetics (1 semester)
General Biochemistry with lab (1 semester)

Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with lab (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry with lab (2 semesters)
Calculus (1 semester)
Biostatistics (1 semester)
Physics with lab (2 semesters)

Pre-Professional Health Programs
Students interested in postgraduate careers in the health care professions should visit the Pre-Professional Health Programs Advising Office online (www.unh.edu/premed-advising) or in person (Hood House, Room 102).  Requirements for specific types of professional schools (e.g., medical, dental, physician’s assistant, pharmacy, etc.) are provided at http://www.unh.edu/premed-advising/exploring-health-professions.  Students interested in veterinary medicine should consult the Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program website (http://www.prevet.unh.edu/).  While many of the prerequisite courses required by professional schools are also requirements of the biomedical science major, students should consult with their faculty adviser to create a plan of study that best prepares them for pursuing a career in one of these health professions.

Minor in Biomedical Science (BMS)
Students who wish to develop focused competencies in the broad area of the biomedical sciences can complement their major academic program with a minor in biomedical science (BMS).  The general requirements for completion of a minor can be found in the minor section of the Undergraduate Catalog. Courses that fulfill the requirements of the BMS minor and groups from which they must be selected can be found at http://www.biomedical.unh.edu/minor-biomedical-science.  The intent to complete a minor in BMS should be communicated by the end of the junior year.  

For additional information on the BMS major or minor, contact the Undergraduate Program Coordinator.

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Community and Environmental Planning (CEP)

» http://www.plan.unh.edu/

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Professor: Russell G. Congalton, John M. Halstead
Associate Professor: Kelly L. Cullen, Alberto B. Manalo, Robert A. Robertson
Assistant Professor: Catherine M. Ashcraft
Senior Lecturer: Mary Adamo Friedman
Lecturer: Clayton R. Mitchell
Extension Associate Professor: Charles A. French

The community and environmental planning (CEP) program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills that will equip them to be effective community planners. Both natural resource and human systems sustainability principles are embedded in all aspects of this program. Students will develop their capacities to integrate human and natural systems as they develop critical thinking and technical planning skills. They will have the ability to facilitate citizens’ engagement in planning for the community’s future. They will be able to analyze community and environmental problems, and recommend viable alternative solutions designed to ensure that a desirable quality of life exists in the future.

The CEP core requirements include planning and decision making, sustainability principles, communications, law, governance, conflict resolution, environmental and social systems, economics, and statistics, as well as a community planning internship experience. Students are encouraged to undertake independent research. In addition to the core, students, in consultation with their adviser, design a focus area or minor in which they can develop specialty tools and field experiences geared toward entry-level jobs in the community and environmental planning fields. For example, elective courses in geographic information systems and remote sensing, watershed management, wetlands management, pollution control, forest management, sustainable agriculture, justice studies, environmental policy, social impact assessment, or tourism can form a focus area of expertise.

The program also provides a firm base for graduate study in a variety of areas such as regional planning, public administration, and environmental planning.

Students interested in contributing their energy and talents to mastering the challenges of community and environmental planning should consult with Mary Friedman, CEP program coordinator, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, G62 James Hall, (603) 862-4456 or by e-mail: .mary.friedman@unh.edu

Required Core Courses
CEP 415, Community Development Perspectives
CEP 508, Applied Community Development
CEP 614, Fundamentals of Planning
CEP 777, Topics in Community Planning (Capstone for the major)
CEP 794, Community and Environmental Planning Internship
CMN 500, Public Speaking
ENGL 401, First-Year Writing
ENGL 502, Professional and Technical Writing
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives
EREC 525, Statistical Methods and Applications, PSYC 402, Statistics in Psychology, or SOC 502, Statistics
EREC 627, Community Economics
ESCI 409, Geology and the Environment
PBIO 412, Introductory Botany
NR 435, Contemporary Conservation Issues and Environmental Awareness
NR 527, Forest Ecology, or BIOL 541, General Ecology
NR 658, Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
NR 718, Law of Natural Resources and Environment, or NR 602, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy
NR 724, Resolving Environmental Conflicts
NR 785, Systems Thinking for Sustainable Living

Choose one of these
POLT 502, State and Local Government, or 
POLT 508, Supreme Court and the Constitution, or 
alternative approval by adviser

Choose one of these
SOC 530, Race and Ethnic Relations, or
SOC 540, Private Troubles, Public Issues: Contemporary Social Problems, or SOC 645, Class Status and Power, or SOC 660, Urban Sociology
ECON 669, Women and Economic Development, or 
alternative approval by adviser

Living Green (choose two)
NR 507, Introduction to Energy Systems ENE 520, Environmental Pollution and Prevention
NR 784, Sustainable Living
CEP 673, Green Real Estate
ECOG 401, Introduction to EcoGastronomy

Electives (21-25 hours): focus area or a minor
These may include a second internship, directed research, independent study, community service and leadership, economics (EREC 606, Land Economics Perspectives; EREC 756, Rural and Regional Economic Development; ECON 707, Economic Growth and Environmental Quality); and/or other courses that help students add expertise to their CEP "toolbox."

Discovery Program Requirements
Writing Skills (ENGL 401)
Quantitative Reasoning (Statistics)
Inquiry Course
Sciences (three courses; one must be a lab course)
   Biological Sciences (PBIO 412)
   Environment, Technology, and Society (NR 435)   
   Physical Sciences (ESCI 409)
Historical Perspectives
World Cultures (study abroad, language courses, geography, anthropology)
Fine and Performing Arts
Social Science (EREC 411)
Humanities

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Environmental and Resource Economics (EREC)

» http://www.envecon.unh.edu/

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Professor: John M. Halstead, Theodore E. Howard
Associate Professor: Kelly L. Cullen, Alberto B. Manalo
Senior Lecturer: Mary Adamo Friedman
Extension Associate Professor: Charles A. French

This program offers training in environmental and resource economics, including public resource policy, resource management, natural resource and environmental economics, and community economics and finance. The curriculum emphasizes applied economics in the context of public policy. Training is also available in agricultural economics, including agribusiness, small business management, food marketing, agricultural policy, and world food supplies.

Students majoring in environmental and resource economics will normally concentrate in one of the following three areas: environmental and natural resource economics, agricultural economics, or community economics. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors.  The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning.  The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, and other special student activity). In addition, students must satisfy University requirements, including those for the Discovery Program.  Majors interested in the economic or business aspects of agriculture and natural resources will be expected to take courses in the biological sciences.

Students majoring in any of the social science, life science, and agriculture departments of the University may find it to their advantage to elect courses or a minor in environmental and resource economics or agribusiness. By doing so, their basic training can be supplemented in a specific area of interest, such as resource development and natural resource policy for social science majors, farm management and agricultural marketing for agricultural majors, and community economics and finance for students interested in local government and development.

Required Courses
All of the following
ECON 401, Principles of Economics (Macro)
ECON 605, Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
ECON 611, Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis, or ECON 635, Money and Banking
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives or equivalent
    (EREC 411 cannot be used to satisfy the Social Science Discovery program requirement)
EREC 525, Statistical Methods and Applications
MATH 420, Finite Mathematics, or MATH 424B, Calculus for Life Sciences

At least six of the following, of which two must be 700 level
EREC 501, Agriculture and Natural Resource Product Marketing
EREC 572, Introduction to Natural Resource Economics
EREC 606, Land Economics Perspectives: Uses, Policies, and Taxes
EREC 627, Community Economics
EREC 633, Economics of Travel and Tourism
EREC 680, Agricultural and Food Policy
EREC 708, Environmental Economics
EREC 756, Rural and Regional Economic Development
NR 602, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy
NR 643, Economics of Forestry
TOUR 700, Marketing Communications Research: Methodological Foundations
CEP 614, Fundamentals of Planning

Students who major in environmental and resource economics are qualified for a wide variety of opportunities upon graduation. Private business, public institutions, and government agencies currently have a strong demand for specialists trained in natural resource development; land and water use policy; natural resource and small business management; agricultural, fisheries, and forestry marketing; and community development. In many cases, students may wish to improve their qualifications by pursuing more specialized graduate studies in one or more of the above areas.

Departmental Honors
Honors in environmental and resource economics will be awarded to students who complete 16 credits of honors courses in environmental and resource economics (including a minimum of four credits of a senior research project), and who maintain a minimum grade-point average of 3.4 in the major. Students interested in the environmental and resource economics honors program should contact the environmental and resource economics coordinator in James Hall for more information.

Students interested in a major or minor in environmental and resource economics should contact John M. Halstead, James Hall, (603) 862-3914.

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Environmental Conservation and Sustainability

» http://www.envconservation.unh.edu/

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Professor: John E. Carroll, Russell G. Congalton, Mark J. Ducey, Paul C. Johnson, Marianne Klauser Litvaitis, James T. Taylor
Associate Professor: Heidi Asbjornsen, Thomas D. Lee
Assistant Professor: Catherine M. Ashcraft
Senior Lecturer: Debra Straussfogel
Lecturer: Clayton R. Mitchell, Jennifer L. Purrenhage

The environmental conservation and sustainability (ECS) major gives students a broad, interdisciplinary background for developing their understanding of environmental and resource problems and what sustainable solutions are needed to solve them. It also provides a solid foundation for the development of critical thinking skills. The program is designed to ensure that graduates possess broad-based, integrated knowledge of how local and global ecological systems work as well as an understanding of the interdependency between people and the environment. Building on a solid natural science base, students discover how political, institutional, and economic systems relate to environmental quality and learn ways to sustainably manage human activities within the constraints of the Earth’s ecological systems. Students acquire a set of basic skills and problem-solving tools that enable them to tackle complex environmental conservation problems. Graduates will have gained hands-on practical experience integrating and applying their accumulated knowledge and skills in real-world situations.

International education to support ECS students’ educational goals is encouraged as a means to broaden their perspectives and knowledge, particularly through the UNH-EcoQuest New Zealand field studies program. ECS students may also take advantage of a wide range of undergraduate research opportunities.

ECS students meet a set of 19 core requirements, through which they develop a foundation in natural resources, biology, ecology, chemistry, water quality management, soils, natural resources and environmental policy, sustainability, economics, environmental ethics, and environmental law. They also acquire basic statistics, oral communication, writing, and geographic information skills. Students develop abilities to apply knowledge and skills professionally through a practicum (internship) and a capstone course.

In addition to the core, each student chooses a 36-credit-hour specialization, which may be selected from a range of natural resources and environmental policy and management course sequences that provide a specific focus as each student develops an area of academic competency and the skill sets to help meet her or his career goals. For example, students can choose specializations in the following subject areas: land and water resource policy and management; international environmental and natural resource policy and sustainable development; or environmental education, communication, public participation, and leadership. A student may also design a specialization in consultation with his or her adviser.

Students with strong interests in field-based natural resource management careers can choose a focus on a particular land or water natural resource system, such as forest resources, marine and coastal resources, watersheds or wetlands, or food production to build their expertise. Students with interests in environmental policy, politics, law and administration, or sustainable community development may want to gain additional background through selected courses in the social sciences. Those with interests in environmental education may want to obtain a teaching certificate or develop expertise in outdoor education or leadership. Others may want to pursue interests in environmental communication through courses in journalism or the visual or theater arts. Many undergraduates in ECS participate in faculty research or gain experience through UNH’s undergraduate research opportunities programs. Students with particular interests in international environmental studies may want to participate in the dual major in international affairs.

Students graduating with a B.S. degree in ECS with excellent academic records are qualified for graduate work in environmental studies, environmental sciences, natural resources and environmental policy, resource management, conservation biology, environmental law, or environmental education and communication. ECS graduates work with private or nongovernmental conservation organizations; local, state or federal natural resources or planning agencies; land trusts; industrial firms (e.g., waste management, compliance, land protection, watershed management, community planning, energy conservation, etc.); in primary and secondary education; field studies programs; journalism; and specialized environmental consulting firms. A number of graduates also choose to serve in the Peace Corps or with AmeriCorps prior to making more specific career path commitments.  

In addition to the degree core requirements (below), students must complete the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirements.  

Degree Core Requirements
NR 400, Professional Perspectives in Natural Resources
NR 401, Introduction to Natural Resources (Inquiry Course for major)
NR 4XX, Environmental Biology
BIOL 412, Principles of Biology
NR 437, Principles of Sustainability
NR 501, Studio Soils
NR 504, Freshwater Resources
NR 602, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy
NR 637, Practicum in Environmental Conservation (Internship)
NR 658, Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
NR 718, Law of Natural Resources and Environment
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives, or ECON 402, Principles of Economics (Micro)
Capstone: NR 786, Leadership for Sustainability or 2, 2-credit seminars in (NR7XX) Critical Issues in Sustainability or NR 663, EcoQuest directed research 

One ecology elective
BIOL 541, General Ecology
NR 527, Forest Ecology
NR 660, Ecology and Biogeography of New Zealand (only for UNH-EcoQuest NZ program students)
ZOOL 503, Introduction to Marine Biology

One physical science (relevant to specialization)
CHEM 403, General Chemistry
ESCI 409, Geology and the Environment
PHYS 401, Introduction to Physics I
ENE 520, Environmental Pollution and Protection
CHE 410, Energy and Environment
NR 458, The Science of Where

One course in environmental ethics and values
NR 701, Ecological Sustainability and Values
NR 784, Sustainable Living
HIST 618, American Environmental History
SOC 565, Environmental Sociology

One statistical skills course
BIOL 528, PSYC 402, SOC 502, or equivalent

One communication skills course
CMN 500, Public Speaking
THDA 520, Creative Drama (Children’s Theater)
THDA 583, Introduction to Puppetry
THDA 622, Storytelling, Story Theater and Involvement Dramatics
THDA 624, Theater for Young Audiences

One writing skills course (beyond ENGL 401)
ENG 502, 503, 521, 621, or 623

Specialization (36 credits required)
Students select one from the following listed specialization areas to develop their expertise in an area of interest. Alternatively, a student may, in consultation with his or her adviser, design a specialization area.

A. Land and Water Resource Policy and Management; International Environmental and Natural Resource Policy and Sustainable Development
B. Environmental Education, Communication, Public Participation, and Leadership

For each area of specialization students are required to select one listed course from each of five specified categories:

Category 1:  Ecology (a listed 600 or higher level course)
Category 2:  Economics (a listed 600 or higher level course)
Category 3:  Theory (from identified courses relevant to the specialization)
Category 4:  Problem-Solving Skills (from identified courses relevant to the specialization)
Category 5:  Professional and/or Field Skills (from identified courses relevant to the specialization)

Students select four additional courses in their specialization to complete their 36-hour specialization. These four courses may be selected from any of the five categories. The majority of courses selected for the student’s specialization should be at the 600 or 700 level. Special permission will be required to apply a 400- or 500-level course to fulfill a specialization requirement. Students must achieve a grade of C- or better for all courses they wish to be counted for their environmental conservation studies major. Students work closely with a faculty adviser to plan their program of study.

Students interested in the environmental conservation studies program may consult with program coordinator Thomas Lee, (603) 862-3791, tom.lee@unh.edu.

Environmental Conservation and Sustainability Minor
A minor in environmental conservation studies (five courses totaling at least 20 credits) is available to students outside of the environmental conservation studies major.

Required Courses
Students select one course from each of the following five categories. Twenty credits must be completed with grades of C- or better, and if a 3-credit course is used, a sixth course will be required. Pass/fail courses may not be used, and no more than 8 credits used to satisfy major requirements may be used for the minor.

  1. Natural Science Foundations: BIOL 411, BIOL 412, PBIO 412, ZOOL 412      
  2. Conservation and Sustainability: NR 401, NR 437, NR 435
  3. Ecology: NR 425, NR 433, NR 527, NR 660, BIOL 541, NR 502
  4. Professional Focus/Skills: NR 662, NR 718, NR 720, NR 724, NR 731, NR 786, NR 507, EREC 606, EREC 627      
  5. Advanced Topics in Conservation and Sustainability: NR 501, NR 504, NR 661, NR 785, NR 787

Students interested in the ECS minor should contact Debra Straussfogel, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, (603) 862-3923, debra.straussfogel@unh.edu.

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Environmental Sciences

» http://www.envsci.unh.edu/

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University Professor: John D. Aber
Professor: Russell G. Congalton, Serita D. Frey, William H. McDowell, Scott V. Ollinger
Associate Professor: J. Matthew Davis, Kevin H. Gardner, A. Stuart Grandy, Jennifer M. Jacobs, Thomas D. Lee, Ruth K. Varner
Assistant Professor: Anne Lightbody, Mary D. Stampone, Wilfred M. Wollheim
Research Assistant Professor: Michael W. Palace

The College of Life Sciences and Agriculture (COLSA) and the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (CEPS) jointly offer a bachelor of science degree in environmental sciences. Environmental sciences is an interdisciplinary field concerned with the interaction of biological, chemical, and physical processes that shape our natural environment. Students graduating with a degree in environmental sciences will have an understanding of these interacting processes, the ability to communicate effectively with both scientific and lay audiences, competency in field methods appropriate for entry-level environmental science positions, competency in the use and application of geographic information systems (GIS), a basic understanding of environmental policy, and the ability to contribute to multidisciplinary teams. The University of New Hampshire is a recognized leader in environmental sciences research, and the environmental sciences program capitalizes on faculty expertise in this area. The program has 12 full-time faculty members, with major teaching and research emphases in the areas of biogeochemical cycling, environmental chemistry, ecosystem science, global change, hydrology, plant ecology, soil science, and water resource management.

Employment opportunities include environmental consulting firms; educational facilities (e.g., science centers); environmental monitoring laboratories (e.g., water treatment plants, the Environmental Protection Agency); government agencies (e.g., the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Land Management, Natural Resource Conservation Service), university and government research laboratories; and nongovernment environmental organizations. The environmental sciences program also constitutes an excellent preparation for graduate programs in several areas relating to the environment. Students should consult with their adviser early if their goals include further study.

Requirements
In addition to the Discovery Program and University Writing requirements, all students will take Introduction to Environmental Science (NR 403) and Professional Perspectives in Natural Resources (NR 400), plus one other elective introductory environmental science course. Foundation courses include two semesters of chemistry (CHEM 403, 404) and calculus (MATH 425, 426), one semester of geology (ESCI 401, 402, or 409), one semester of statistics (MATH 644 or BIOL 528), one semester of physics (PHYS 407), and one approved biology course. Core courses include Techniques in Environmental Sciences (ESCI 534), Introduction to GIS (NR 658), Fate and Transport in the Environment (ESCI 654), Natural Resources and Environmental Policy (NR 602), and a capstone experience (NR 791 and an independent study or capstone course approved by their adviser and the program coordinator).

Students must complete an additional eight courses in one of the following options:

Ecosystems
NR 527, Forest Ecology, or BIOL 541, General Ecology
NR 730, Terrestrial Ecosystems
NR 751, Aquatic Ecosystems
NR 765, Community Ecology
Four approved electives 

Hydrology
PHYS 408, General Physics II
ESCI 561, Landscape Evolution
NR 501, Studio Soils, or ESCI 512, Principles of Mineralogy
ESCI 705, Principles of Hydrology
ESCI 710, Groundwater Hydrology
A course in quantitative analysis
Two approved electives

Soil and Watershed Management
PHYS 408, General Physics II, or NR 527, Forest Ecology, or BIOL 541, General Ecology
NR 501, Studio Soils
NR 703, Watershed Water Quality Management
NR 706, Soil Ecology, or NR 744, Biogeochemistry
Four approved electives

For a list of approved elective courses and for further information about the major, students may consult with the program coordinator: Michael Palace, Michael.Palace@unh.edu, (603) 862-4193.

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Equine Studies

» http://www.equine.unh.edu

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Professor: William E. Berndtson
Associate Professor: Elizabeth P. Boulton, Laurie Chapman-Bosco
Lecturer: Christina Keim, Sarah H. Rigg
Teacher/Trainer: Elizabeth L. Oertel

The equine studies degree program at UNH offers a unique and well-rounded program of study to students pursuing a career in the horse industry. All students receive a background in science and business, as well as equine-specific courses that incorporate outstanding opportunities for experiential learning. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, and other special student activity). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors. Students then choose a specialization in one of three options:

Equine Industry and Management
This option combines business classes and hands-on equine classes, such as teaching training, stable management, and competition management for students interested in a traditional equine or equine business career.

Therapeutic Riding
This option includes classes in equine studies, therapeutic riding, non-profit organizations, and human development and special needs for students interested in a career in therapeutic riding. Students also test for NARHA instructor certification.

Equine Science
This option combines equine classes with a more intensive science curriculum, which includes genetics, reproduction, and nutrition. This program is suited for pre-veterinary students or those interested in graduate education or research.

In addition, courses for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

Students interested in the equine studies major should contact Sarah Hamilton Rigg, Sarah.Rigg@unh.edu.

OPTION I: EQUINE INDUSTRY AND MANAGEMENT

 


Equine Industry and Management Core Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
AAS   437   Equine Handling and Care Techniques  
AAS   546   Animal Business Applications  
ANSC   402   Horsemanship at I-2 level or above (or ANSC 405BB Horsemanship Theory)  
ANSC   411   Freshman Seminar in Equine Science  
AAS   432   Intro to Forage and Grassland Management  
ANSC   504   Equine Science  
ANSC   511-512   Anatomy & Physiology*  
ANSC   565   Principles of Horse Trials Mgmt  
ANSC   600   Field Experience*  
ANSC   609   Principles of Nutrition  
ANSC   612   Genetics of Domestic Animals (or GEN 604 or ANSC 706)  
ANSC   620   Equine Diseases  
ANSC   796   Equine Seminar  
ANSC   724   Reproductive Management & AI  
ANSC   725   Equine Sports Medicine  
ANSC   797   Equine Capstone Experience  
BIOL   411-412   Intro Biology: Molecular/Cellular and Intro Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity & Ecology  
ENGL   501   Intro to Creative Non-fiction (or ENGL 419, 502 or 503 or ANSC 543)  
EREC   411   Env. & Resource Economics Perspectives (or ECON 402)  
TSAS   295   Top/Animal Business Concepts (or AAS 548)  

*waived for TSAS equine management graduates



Equine Industry and Management Electives

Four electives must be chosen by the student and approved by the student’s faculty adviser. See curriculum requirements at http://www.equine.unh.edu/major-requirements.


OPTION II: THERAPEUTIC RIDING

 


Therapeutic Riding Core Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
ANSC   402   Horsemanship at I-2 level or above OR ANSC 405BB Horsemanship Theory  
AAS   426   Equine Conformation & Lameness  
AAS   437   Equine Handling and Care Techniques  
AAS   546   Animal Business Applications  
AAS   547   Applied Equine Management  
ANSC   411   Freshman Seminar in Equine Science  
ANSC   500   Methods of Therapeutic Riding  
ANSC   504   Equine Science  
ANSC   565   Principles of Horse Trials Management  
ANSC   600   Field Experience*  
ANSC   612   Genetics of Domestic Animals  
ANSC   620   Equine Diseases  
ANSC   640   Principles of Riding Instruction  
ANSC   643   Principles of Therapeutic Riding Instruction  
ANSC   796   Equine Seminar  
ANSC   725   Equine Sports Medicine  
ANSC   797   Equine Capstone Experience  
BIOL   411-412   Intro Biology: Molecular/Cellular and Intro Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity & Ecology  
ENGL   501   Intro to Creative Non-fiction (or ENGL 419, 502 or 503 or ANSC 543)  
EREC   411   Env. & Resource Economics Perspectives (or ECON 402)  
KIN   798   Special Topics  
BMS   507-508   Human Anatomy & Physiology  

*waived for TSAS equine management graduates



Therapeutic Riding Electives

Five electives must be chosen by the student and approved by the student’s faculty adviser. See curriculum requirements at http://www.equine.unh.edu/major-requirements.  


OPTION III: EQUINE SCIENCE

 


Equine Science Core Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
ANSC   402   Horsemanship at I-2 level or above OR ANSC 405BB Horsemanship Theory  
AAS   437   Equine Handling and Care Techniques  
ANSC   411   Freshman Seminar in Equine Science  
ANSC   504   Equine Science  
ANSC   511-512   Anatomy & Physiology  
ANSC   565   Principles of Horse Trials Management  
ANSC   600   Field Experience*  
ANSC   609   Principles of Nutrition, (or NUTR 750)  
ANSC   612   Genetics of Domestic Animals (or GEN 604 or ANSC 706)  
ANSC   620   Equine Diseases  
ANSC   796   Equine Seminar  
ANSC   724   Reproductive Management & AI or  
ANSC   701   Physiology of Reproduction  
ANSC   725   Equine Sports Medicine  
ANSC   797   Equine Capstone Experience  
BIOL   411-412   Intro Biology: Molecular/Cellular and Intro Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity & Ecology  
BIOL   555 or 528   Eng Design & Analysis Lab or Applied Biostatistics I  
CHEM   403-404   General Chemistry I & II  
EREC   411   Env. & Resource Economics Perspectives (or ECON 402)  
ENGL   501   Intro to Creative Non-fiction (or ENGL 419, 502 or 503 or ANSC 543)  

*waived for TSAS equine management graduates



Equine Science Electives

Five electives must be chosen by the student and approved by the student’s faculty adviser. See curriculum requirements at http://www.equine.unh.edu/major-requirements.  


Diploma Program Providing Preparation for NARHA Certification

 


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title
ANSC   504   Equine Science  
or AAS   437   Equine Handling and Care Techniques  
ANSC   402   Horsemanship  
KIN   501   First Aid-Responding to Emergencies  
ANSC   500   Methods of Therapeutic Riding  
ANSC   795   Investigations  
    a seminar on teaching therapeutic riding  


GPA Requirements for All Students in Equine Studies

All students enrolled in the equine studies major will be required to receive a minimum grade of C- in all classes required for the major. Students failing to do this will need to retake the course in order to receive credit.


Honors-in-Major Requirements for B.S. in Equine Studies

The B.S. in equine studies (formerly called the B.S. in animal science: equine sciences) offers three academic options: equine industry and management; therapeutic riding; and equine science. The honors-in-major requirements for the B.S. in equine studies in each of these three options are as follows:

1.  Students are required to maintain an overall 3.40 grade point average and a 3.40 in major coursework.

2.  Students will complete a total of 16 credits including the Honors Senior Thesis to meet equine studies B.S. honors-in major requirements. Usually 8-12 credits come from coursework and 4-8 come from the completion of the Honors Senior Thesis. Many courses required for the equine studies major can be designated as honors courses with the consent of the course instructor. In order to justify the honors designation, the instructor will likely implement additional assignments such as readings, writing, laboratory or field experiences, or classroom presentations. In order to receive credit for an honors designation, the student must achieve at least a B- grade in the course.

3. Students must choose two to three courses from the following courses and designate them as honors (8-12 credits) http://www.unh.edu/registrar/regforms/honorsform.pdf:

ANSC 504H, Equine Science
ANSC 620H, Equine Diseases 
ANSC 640H, Principles of Riding Instruction
ANSC 641H, Principles of Dressage Instruction
ANSC 642H, Principles of Jumping Instruction 
ANSC 643H, Principles of Therapeutic Riding Instruction
ANSC 724H, Reproductive Management and AI 
ANSC 725H, Equine Sports Medicine
KIN 798H, Equine Facilitated Mental Health
ANSC 512H, Anatomy and Physiology
ANSC 612H, Genetics of Domestic Animals
ANSC 620H, Equine Diseases            
ANSC 640H, Principles of Riding Instruction
ANSC 643H, Principles of Therapeutic Riding Instruction            
ANSC 701H, Physiology of Reproduction
BMS 718H, Mammalian Physiology
ANSC 724H, Reproductive Management and AI
ANSC 725H, Equine Sports Medicine

Additional courses may be considered for Equine Studies Honors- in- Major requirements with the approval of the Honors-in-Major coordinator

Instructors shall retain flexibility in implementing additional assignments that elevate the course’s educational content to justify honors designation, which will likely involve activities such as extra reading or writing assignments, laboratory or field experiences, or classroom presentations.

4.  Students must complete ANSC 799, Honors Senior Thesis (4-8 credits required; 1-4 credits can be taken per semester; two semesters and a written thesis are required).

Thesis work must encompass two consecutive semesters of 1-4 credits each semester, and the student should expect to spend two to three hours per week for each hour of course credit. Students will receive a grade for the course. A “B” or better on the thesis is required for completion of honors in major.


Minor in Equine Studies

A minor in equine studies consists of a minimum of 20 credits of equine-related animal science (ANSC) courses. A maximum of eight credits may be taken at the 400 level.  In addition, not more than eight credits may be from the TSAS Applied Animal Science program. ANSC 504, Equine Science, MUST be taken. Students must receive a minimum grade of C- in any course used for the minor. Students failing to do this will need to retake the course in order to receive credit. No courses taken on a pass (credit)/fail basis may count toward the minor. See http://www.equine.unh.edu/minor for a list of equine-related Animal Science courses. Students may petition equine faculty in their junior year to include a course that is not listed. Students who transfer from other institutions may petition the equine program faculty for course approval. Students who choose both ANSC 500 and ANSC 643 as two of their courses toward the minor in equine studies will be eligible for PATH International therapeutic riding instructor certification.

Students interested in the equine studies minor should contact Elizabeth Boulton, Elizabeth.Boulton@unh.edu.

 


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Forestry

» http://www.forestry.unh.edu/

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Professor: Russell G. Congalton, Mark J. Ducey, Paul C. Johnson, Scott V. Ollinger
Affiliate Professor: Jeffrey H. Gove, William B. Leak
Associate Professor: Heidi Asbjornsen, Thomas D. Lee
Affiliate Associate Professor: Kevin J. Dodds, Nathan W. Siegert
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Richard A. Hallett, Ryan P. Hanavan, Linda S. Heath, Isabel A. Munck
Extension Professor: Karen P. Bennett

Climate change, carbon storage, biodiversity, and ecosystem integrity in the context of sustainable human use of forests and associated resources are important scientific and social issues. The forestry program at the University of New Hampshire prepares its graduates with the scientific and managerial knowledge and skills to address these environmental and resource management problems at local, regional, and global levels.

Forestry is the art and science of managing and understanding the natural and human dimensions of forests and forest use. Forestry education at UNH focuses on sustainable management of forests for biodiversity, productivity, and health, based on a multidisciplinary approach. The program's goal is to provide a sound professional preparation, a broad general education, and the flexibility to cultivate special abilities and interests, leading to a bachelor of science in forestry degree (B.S.F.) accredited by the Society of American Foresters (SAF). The SAF is recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education as the accrediting body for forestry in the United States. Students are encouraged to develop an area of concentration or to complete a minor in consultation with their academic adviser.

UNH forestry graduates manage forests to provide wildlife habitat and recreation opportunities, care for soil and water resources, protect and restore forest ecosystems, and assure a sustainable supply of forest products. They are employed by private industry, public agencies, public interest groups, education institutions, research organizations, and consulting firms. Many students enter graduate school for advanced study in forest biology or management while others have found challenging international opportunities.

Freshman Year
BIOL 528, Applied Biostatistics I, or equivalent
ENGL 401, First-Year Writing
MATH 424B, Calculus for Life Sciences, or MATH 420, Finite Mathematics
NR 400, Professional Perspectives in Natural Resources
NR 401, Introduction to Natural Resources
NR 425, Field Dendrology
NR 433, Wildlife Ecology
NR 542, Forestland Measurement and Mapping
PBIO 412, Introductory Botany
Discovery elective (FPA, HP, HUM, or WC)

Sophomore Year
CHEM 403, General Chemistry
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives, or ECON 402, Principles of Economics (Micro)
NR 501, Studio Soils
NR 504, Freshwater Resources
NR 506, Forest Entomology
NR 527, Forest Ecology
NR 599, Work Experience
Oral Communications Skills Course
Discovery elective (FPA, HP, HUM, or WC)

Junior Year
NR 602, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy
NR 643, Economics of Forestry
NR 658, Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
FORT 579, Forest Fire Control and Use
NR 502, Forest Ecosystems and Environmental Change
NR 729, Silviculture
NR 757, Remote Sensing of the Environment
NR 782, Monitoring Forest Health, or PBIO 651, Plant Pathology
Discovery elective (FPA, HP, HUM, or WC)

Senior Year
NR 745, Forest Management (Capstone)
NR 749, Forest Inventory and Modeling
RMP 711, Recreation Resource Management
Discovery elective (FPA, HP, HUM, or WC)

All forestry majors must satisfy the B.S.F. requirements and all Discovery Program requirements. Students must satisfy the Inquiry requirement of the Discovery Program by completing an Inquiry or Inquiry-attribute course. Seniors must also satisfy the capstone experience requirement of the Discovery Program.  The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course (NR 745, Forest Management), created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, and other special student activity). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors.

Students interested in the forestry program may consult with the program coordinator, Mark Ducey, (603) 862-4429.

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Genetics (GEN)

» http://www.genetics.unh.edu/

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Professor: Thomas M. Davis, Subhash C. Minocha, W. Kelley Thomas, Louis S. Tisa
Associate Professor: John J. Collins, Vaughn S. Cooper, Estelle M. Hrabak, Anita S. Klein, Cheryl A. Whistler
Assistant Professor: Jeffrey T. Foster, Matthew D. MacManes, David C. Plachetzki
Research Assistant Professor: Kevin Culligan, Dennis E. Mathews

»Click to view faculty participating in the program.

Genetics and genomics are central to all aspects of the life sciences. Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with heredity, variation of genes among individuals in a population, and the expression and regulation of genes. Genomics focuses on determining the structure and function of genomes and includes the mapping of genes, high-throughput DNA sequencing, and investigating the molecular mechanisms by which genetic and environmental factors contribute to phenotypes. Every day, scientists are using the tools of genetics and genomics to make exciting discoveries in fields such as molecular medicine, cancer research, biodiversity, and sustainability.

A major in genetics provides a solid foundation in biology, biochemistry, microbiology, chemistry, physics, math, and cell biology. Students also take advanced courses in molecular genetics, bioinformatics, molecular evolution, genomics, and laboratory techniques. There are many opportunities for interested students to gain research experience through formal or informal research projects in faculty members' laboratories. A student majoring in genetics with an option in genomics receives additional training in genomics and computer programming for bioinformatics.

Students with degrees in genetics or genomics are well prepared to apply to graduate schools (e.g., for training as genetic counselors or researchers) and professional schools, or to pursue careers in biotechnology companies, forensics labs, hospitals, university research laboratories, and government agencies. Two additional courses are needed for application to professional programs (e.g., medical or dental school). Graduates may also be employed in fields such as management, sales, marketing, regulatory affairs, technical writing, or science journalism. With supplementary courses in education, graduates with a bachelor's degree in genetics or genomics can teach at the elementary, middle, or high school level.

The genetics faculty conduct research on diverse topics such as evolution, gene structure and function, host-microbe interactions, genome sequencing and analysis, heredity, and diversity in populations. Faculty research areas encompass microbial, plant, and animal genetics. Genetics faculty are committed to mentoring undergraduate students in independent research experiences in their laboratories, which provide students with exposure to and training in cutting-edge research technologies.

Bachelor of Science in Genetics  
Students majoring in genetics take: i) four genetics core courses; ii) five major elective courses chosen from an extensive list; iii) six bioscience core courses; and iv) seven foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, a created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other approved student activity). A minimum grade of C minus must be earned in all courses offered by the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture. In addition, coursework for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed. For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, click here.

Genetics Core Courses
Professional Perspectives in Genetics (1 semester)
Genetics Lab (1 semester)
Molecular Genetics or Prokaryotic Genetics (1 semester)
Genomics and Bioinformatics (1 semester)

Major Electives
One course with a significant laboratory component 

One course in population genetics or molecular evolution

Three upper-level courses in biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, or others, chosen from an approved list.

Bioscience Core Courses
Biology with lab (2 semesters)
Genetics (1 semester)
Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Cell and Developmental Biology (1 semester)
Biochemistry with lab (1 semester)

Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with lab (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry with lab (1 semester)
Calculus (1 semester)
Statistics (1 semester)
Physics with lab (2 semesters)

Bachelor of Science in Genetics: Genomics Option 
Students majoring in genetics with the genomics option take: i) four genetics core courses; ii) five major elective courses; iii) six bioscience core courses; and iv) seven foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other approved student activity).  A minimum grade of C minus must be earned in all courses offered by the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture. In addition, courses for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed. For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, click here.

Genetics Core Courses
Professional Perspectives in Genetics (1 semester)
Genetics Lab (1 semester)
Molecular Genetics or Prokaryotic Genetics (1 semester)
Genomics and Bioinformatics (1 semester)

Major Electives
Introduction to Perl Programming for Bioinformatics (1 semester)
Comparative Genomics (1 semester)
Population/Evolutionary Genetics (2 semesters)
One upper-level course in biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, or others, chosen from an approved list.

Bioscience Core Courses
Biology with lab (2 semesters)
Genetics (1 semester)
Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Cell and Developmental Biology (1 semester)
Biochemistry with lab (1 semester)

Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with lab (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry with lab (1 semester)
Calculus (1 semester)
Statistics (1 semester)
Physics with lab (2 semesters)

Pre-Professional Health Programs
Students interested in postgraduate careers in the health care professions should visit the Pre-Professional Health Programs Advising website or visit the office in person (Hood House, Room 102). Requirements for specific types of professional schools (e.g., medical, dental, physician’s assistant, pharmacy, etc.) are provided here. Students interested in veterinary medicine should consult the Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program. While many of the prerequisite courses required by professional schools are also requirements of the genetics major, students should consult with their faculty adviser to create a plan of study that best prepares them for pursuing a career in one of these health professions.

Minor in Genetics (GEN)
Students in other majors who wish to develop a focus in the area of genetics and genomics can complement their major academic program with a minor in genetics. The general requirements for completion of a minor and the courses that fulfill the minor requirements in genetics can be found at http://www.genetics.unh.edu/minor-genetics. Students intending to complete a genetics minor should meet with the program coordinator, Professor Matthew MacManes (matthew.macmanes@unh.edu) as early as possible, but no later than the end of junior year.   

For additional information on the genetics major, contact the genetics undergraduate program coordinator: Estelle Hrabak, estelle.hrabak@unh.edu.

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Life Sciences and Agriculture (LSA)

» http://www.colsa.unh.edu/

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Affiliate Professor: Stephen K. Crawford, George C. Hurtt, Jeffery S. Kahl, John A. McCracken, Ronald E. Rompalla
Affiliate Associate Professor: Andrew B. Cooper, Coeli M. Hoover, Herman A. Karl, Jianhua Li, Peter A. Maddison, Gary B. Smejkal, Kathy J. Soder, Arthur F. Stucchi
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Matthew J. Baber, John L. Campbell, Jennifer Dijkstra, Dean R. Elder, Christopher Longson, Bo R. Rueda, Deena J. Small, Nathan L. Smith, James A Sulikowski, Irina L. Trubetskova, Mariko Yamasaki
Clinical Assistant Professor: Shannon A. Martinson


 


Marine, Estuarine and Freshwater Biology (MEFB)

» http://www.mefb.unh.edu/

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Professor: David L. Berlinsky, James F. Haney, Larry G. Harris, W. Huntting Howell, Leland S. Jahnke, Marianne Klauser Litvaitis, Arthur C. Mathieson, Subhash C. Minocha, Christopher D. Neefus, Stacia A. Sower, Paul C. Tsang, Charles W. Walker, Winsor H. Watson III
Research Professor: Christopher W. Glass, Raymond E. Grizzle, Michael P. Lesser, Frederick T. Short
Associate Professor: Alan L. Baker, Jessica A. Bolker, Anita S. Klein, Jonathan R. Pennock
Research Associate Professor: David M. Burdick
Research Assistant Professor: Elizabeth A. Fairchild, Gregg E. Moore
Clinical Assistant Professor: Inga F. Sidor
Extension Professor: Jeffrey A. Schloss
Extension Assistant Professor: Erik Chapman

The marine, estuarine, and freshwater biology (MEFB) B.S. program is designed to provide a broad background for undergraduates interested in marine, estuarine, and freshwater biology, aquaculture, and fisheries. The program integrates theoretical and practical (hands-on laboratory and field) courses. Students are encouraged to become involved in one or more of the numerous undergraduate research opportunities available in the marine, estuarine, and freshwater sciences.

UNH is located on a seacoast that provides an extraordinary diversity of marine and estuarine habitats. It is also only a short distance from mountain streams, rivers, marshes, bogs, ponds, and lakes. All of the habitats provide outstanding resources for field courses and research. The marine, estuarine, and freshwater faculty are spread across all three departments of the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture. UNH is a Sea Grant university and has an international reputation for teaching and research in aquatic sciences. UNH has aquaculture facilities, and coastal and estuarine research laboratories. In collaboration with Cornell, UNH jointly administers the summer undergraduate programs at the Shoals Marine Laboratory on Appledore Island, seven miles off the coast of New Hampshire and Maine.

Academic Requirements
To receive the B.S. degree in marine, estuarine, and freshwater biology, students must complete 128 credit hours with a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average. Courses must include all UNH Discovery Program requirements, the biological sciences core curriculum requirements, MEFB 401, MEFB 525, MEFB 527, PBIO/ZOOL 503, three flexible MEFB major requirement courses, and three MEFB electives. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, and other special student activity). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors. A minimum grade of C- is required in all biological science courses that are counted toward the requirements for a degree in MEFB. Students who expect to compete successfully for post-baccalaureate programs should attain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher by the end of the sophomore year and maintain it at that level.

MEFB Core Curriculum
The MEFB major uses a core curriculum similar to the biology B.S. core. It constitutes an integrated sequence of courses imparting basic knowledge of biology to expose students to the breadth of knowledge inherent in the biological sciences. The core allows a student to obtain a broad background in biology and related physical sciences and math, and prepares them for upper-level courses in marine, estuarine, and freshwater biology.  

Biological Sciences Core Curriculum Courses
BIOL 412, Introductory Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity, and Ecology
BIOL 411, Introductory Biology: Molecular and Cellular
BIOL 541, General Ecology
BMS 503, General Microbiology
GEN 604, Principles of Genetics
CHEM 403 & 404, General Chemistry
CHEM 545/546, Organic Chemistry 
BMCB 658/659, General Biochemistry
MATH 424B, Calculus for Life Sciences, or 425, Calculus I
BIOL 528, Applied Biostatistics I, or BIOL 555 Experimental Design and Analysis Lab
PHYS 401 and 402, Introduction to Physics

Typically, students take MEFB 401; BIOL 411 & 412; CHEM 403-404; and Calculus 424B in the first year, and then complete the remainder of their core requirements during the sophomore and junior years.
_______

MEFB Requirement Courses
In addition to the MEFB core curriculum, students must complete MEFB 401 (Marine, Estuarine, and Freshwater Seminar); PBIO/ZOOL 503 (Introduction to Marine Biology); MEFB 525 (Introduction to Aquatic Botany); and MEFB 527 (Aquatic Animal Diversity); plus one course selected from each of the three MEFB major requirement categories and three MEFB electives. A complete list of approved courses in each category is available from the student’s adviser, the Department of Biological Sciences office, and the MEFB website at https://mefb.unh.edu/sites/mefb.unh.edu/files/MEFB-checklist-requirements.pdf. Corequisite lecture and lab courses count as one course. Courses listed in more than one category will satisfy requirements in only one category.

Note: It is strongly recommended that students participate in an exchange semester at another university or in a field-oriented program or internship. There are many exchange opportunities available in which a full semester of credits toward the major may be earned. In addition, students should explore the courses at the Shoals Marine Laboratory (SML), which provides an excellent setting for several “field-oriented” courses during the summer. Often there is financial support available for the SML programs (see the SML website for details http://marine.unh.edu/sml/ or the Cornell web site at www.sml.cornell.edu). It is further recommended that students explore possibilities of one or more semesters of independent investigation (research projects). For details, students should contact their adviser. Financial support is available for most of these programs.

One 600 or 795 experience totaling three or more credits or any two 795 experiences of two credits each can fulfill one course requirement in any category with adviser approval. A Petition for Academic Variance approved by the chair of the Department of Biological Sciences is required to count 795 experiences for more than one major required course. Students should check the MEFB website (http://www.mefb.unh.edu/), and the UNH online catalog for updates and current course offerings.

Pre-health Professional Program
MEFB majors who wish to pursue postgraduate degrees in the health care professions should visit the premedical advising office in Room 102, Hood House for additional information on requirements for specific professional schools. Call (603) 862-7740 or visit the program’s web page at www.unh.edu/premed-advising. The following elective courses will be helpful in preparing for admission to post-baccalaureate programs in the health professions and for their required aptitude examinations: BMS 702, ZOOL 518, ZOOL 625/626, BMCB 605, BMCB 751/752, ANSC 511/512.

Students interested in the marine, estuarine, and freshwater biology (MEFB) B.S. major can contact the Department of Biological Sciences, (603) 862-3205.

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Natural Resources (NR)

» http://www.nre.unh.edu/

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Affiliate Professor: Changsheng Li, Rakesh Minocha, Lawrence J. Prelli, Andrew A. Rosenberg
Associate Professor: Mimi Larsen Becker, Jonathan R. Pennock
Affiliate Associate Professor: Kevin J. Dodds, Nathan W. Siegert
Assistant Professor: Catherine M. Ashcraft
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Ria Brejaart, John R. Coon, Ryan P. Hanavan, Mary E. Martin, Kalle Matso, Isabel A. Munck

 


Neuroscience and Behavior (NSB)

» http://neuroscience.unh.edu/

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Professor: Robert C. Drugan, Thomas L. Foxall, Robert G. Mair, Stacia A. Sower, Winsor H. Watson III
Associate Professor: Brett M. Gibson, Jill A. McGaughy, William Wren Stine
Assistant Professor: Sandra M. Rehan, Robert S. Ross
Lecturer: Leslie J. Curren

www.neuroscience.unh.edu/

The major in neuroscience and behavior (NSB) offers an interdisciplinary approach to human and non-human behavior, focusing on the evolution and adaptiveness of certain behaviors, as well as their underlying neural mechanisms. Students who have always been fascinated by how the brain functions will be well served by this major, as will those who love wild animals and wish to better understand their behavior. The B.S. in neuroscience and behavior is based on a solid foundation in biology and chemistry with some physics and statistics (foundation courses). These are followed by three of the following core courses: Animal Behavior, Drugs and Behavior, Genetics, Neurobiology and Behavior, and Psychobiology. Then students can pick four more electives focusing on an area of interest.

NSB students are encouraged to take advantage of research experiences in the laboratories of the psychology and biology faculty in the program. This provides valuable experience with cutting-edge equipment and techniques. Some students may share aspects of a larger project whereas others may be relatively independent and design their own project under supervision. In either case, important skills are gained by the discipline of gathering data, analyzing and interpreting it, and presenting it to a broader audience.

The curriculum provides most of the requirements and recommended courses for students seeking admission to graduate school and to professional schools in medicine and veterinary medicine. Students who might choose not to go on for advanced degrees are well prepared for employment as skilled technicians in research laboratories or, if their interests are in animal behavior, as field research assistants or animal trainers. With additional courses in education, the B.S. in NSB also qualifies graduates to teach at the elementary, junior high, and high school levels.

Faculty participating in the NSB major combine a love of teaching and student mentoring with a passion for research. All NSB faculty have active research programs and encourage student participation. Research facilities that students can use include the aviary, the confocal imaging center, the Hubbard Center for Genomic Studies, and the many marine, freshwater, and estuarine laboratories associated with UNH programs. Students can also take summer courses at the Shoals Marine Laboratory.

Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience and Behavior
Students majoring in NSB are required to take foundation courses in basic science, core courses (choice of three from a list of five), and four electives from an extensive list of courses, including some offered by other departments including biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and natural resources. Finally, a capstone experience is required. This may be independent research, an advanced seminar, or other special student activity. It is meant to integrate prior experience and take the student to a new level in an area of special interest.

NSB Foundation courses
First-year Introductory Seminar (1 credit)
Introductory Biology (2 semesters)
Introductory Chemistry (2 semesters)
Organic Chemistry
Biochemistry
Physics
Statistics

Core courses
Choose three of five, which include Animal Behavior, Psychobiology, Neurobiology and Behavior, Genetics, and Drugs and Behavior.

Electives
Four NSB major electives

Capstone
2-8 credits

Students interested in the neuroscience and behavior major can contact the Department of Biological Sciences, (603) 862-3205.

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Nutrition (NUTR)

» http://www.nutrition.unh.edu/

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Professor: Gale B. Carey, Joanne Curran-Celentano
Associate Professor: Colette H. Janson-Sand
Clinical Associate Professor: Joanne D. Burke, Mary Katherine Lockwood, Ruth A. Reilly
Clinical Assistant Professor: Maggie L. Dylewski, Kevin J. Pietro
Lecturer: Jesse Stabile Morrell
Extension Professor: Deborah Luppold, Catherine A. Violette

»http://www.nutrition.unh.edu/

»Click to view faculty participating in the program: [http://www.nutrition.unh.edu/faculty]

Nutrition is the study of how nutrients and food components function at molecular, cellular, and whole-body levels to impact human health and disease. Students are grounded in fundamental sciences as they develop nutrition-specific competencies in nutrition and health, foods, nutritional assessment, wellness, life cycle nutrition, and/or metabolic biochemistry.

Students pursuing the B.S. degree in nutrition can chose from three areas of specialization: dietetics option, nutrition and wellness option, and nutritional sciences option. For descriptions of each option and their curricular details, visit www.nutrition.unh.edu.

The nutrition program prepares students for entry-level positions in health care, education, or the biotechnology industry, or entry into post-baccalaureate professional programs such as dietetic internship, medical school, dental school, or graduate school. Upon completion of the B.S. in nutrition, dietetics option, students are eligible to apply for a dietetic internship, a prerequisite for becoming a registered dietitian. The dietetics curriculum is accredited by the Academic Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). Nutrition and wellness option students are prepared for jobs in agencies and businesses that have an emphasis on health and wellness, including schools, fitness centers, and non-profit and community organizations. Nutritional sciences option students most often enter the biomedical/biotechnology workplace or enroll in a post-graduate educational degree program (e.g., medical school, graduate school, dental school, etc.).

Nutrition faculty have expertise in obesity, diabetes, sports nutrition, food safety, food science, cardiovascular disease risk, and young adult health. Undergraduate students actively participate in ongoing research projects in these areas. The Center for Health Enhancement (CHE) and the College Health and Nutrition Assessment Survey (CHANAS) are two resources that support nutrition research at the University of New Hampshire.

B.S. in Nutrition: Dietetics Option
Students majoring in the dietetics option must take: (i) four nutrition core courses, (ii) thirteen courses in nutrition and other subject areas required by the option, (iii) three bioscience core courses and (iv) three foundation courses. One capstone experience is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through NUTR 780 (Critical Issues). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors. A minimum grade of C- must be earned in all NUTR courses required by the major. For a detailed list of curricular requirements, visit the dietetics homepage at http://nutrition.unh.edu/4year/dietetics. In addition, all other university academic requirements for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

Nutrition Core Courses
Nutrition in Health and Well-Being (1 semester)
Nutritional Assessment (1 semester)
Life Cycle Nutrition (1 semester)
Professional Perspectives on Nutrition (1 semester)

Nutrition/Other Courses
A total of 13 courses, as well as a capstone experience reading and writing about nutrition research, are required for this option:

Community Nutrition (1 semester)
Clinical Nutrition (1 semester)
Practical Applications in Medical Nutrition Therapy (1 semester)
Nutritional Biochemistry (1 semester)
Nutrition Education and Counseling (1 semester)
Food Science (1 semester)
Life Cycle Nutrition (1 semester)
U.S. Health Care Systems (1 semester)
Psychology or Sociology (1 semester)
Managerial Skills in Dietetics (1 semester)
Introduction to Food & Beverage Management (1 semester)
Managerial Accounting (1 semester)
Statistics course (1 semester)

Bioscience Core Courses
Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Anatomy and Physiology with lab (2 semesters)

Foundation Courses
Introductory Chemistry for Life Sciences (1 semester)
Biological Chemistry (1 semester)
Statistics (1 semester)

B.S. in Nutrition: Nutrition and Wellness Option
Students choosing the nutrition and wellness option must take (i) four nutrition core courses, (ii) 11 courses in nutrition and other subject areas required by the option, (iii) three bioscience core courses, and (iv) foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through NUTR 755, Treatment of Adult Obesity, created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other special student activity). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors. A minimum grade of C- must be earned in all NUTR courses required by the major. For a detailed list of curricular requirements, visit the nutrition and wellness homepage at http://nutrition.unh.edu/4year/NutritionandWellness. In addition, all other university academic requirements for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

Nutrition Core Courses
Nutrition in Health and Well-Being (1 semester)
Nutritional Assessment (1 semester)
Life Cycle Nutrition (1 semester)
Professional Perspectives on Nutrition (1 semester)

Nutrition/Other Courses
A total of 11 courses are required for this option:

Nutrition and Wellness (1 semester)
Nutrition for Exercise and Sport (1 semester)
Stressed Out (1 semester)
Physiology of Exercise or Current Issues in Teaching Health (1 semester)
Technical or Persuasive Writing (1 semester)
Nutrition Education & Counseling (1 semester)
Community Nutrition (1 semester)
Treatment of Adult Obesity (1 semester)
Introduction to Food & Beverage Management (1 semester)
U.S. Health Care systems (1 semester)
Epidemiology & Community Medicine (1 semester)
Introduction to Sociology or Introduction to Psychology (1 semester)

Bioscience Core Courses
Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Anatomy and Physiology with lab (2 semester)

Foundation Courses
Introductory Chemistry for Life Sciences (1 semester)
Biological Chemistry (1 semester)
Statistics (1 semester)

B.S. in Nutrition: Nutritional Sciences Option
Students choosing the nutritional sciences option must take: (i) four nutrition core courses; (ii) three nutritional science core courses; (iii) two nutrition elective courses and one other elective outside the major, specific to the career objectives of the student, in consultation with their adviser; (iv) seven bioscience core courses; and, (v) five foundation courses. One capstone experience, supervised and approved within the major, is required of all seniors. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning. The capstone requirement may be satisfied through a course (NUTR 751), created work or product, or some form of experiential learning (e.g., honors thesis, mentored research project, or other special student activity). Departments are responsible for certifying that graduating seniors have met the capstone requirement for their majors. A minimum grade of C- must be earned in all NUTR courses required by the major. For a detailed list of curricular requirements, visit the nutritional sciences homepage at http://nutrition.unh.edu/4year/nutritionalsciences. In addition, all other University academic requirements for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

I. Nutrition Core Courses
Nutrition in Health and Well-Being (1 semester)
Nutritional Assessment (1 semester)
Life Cycle Nutrition (1 semester)
Professional Perspectives on Nutrition (1 semester)

II. Nutritional Science Core Courses
Nutritional Biochemistry (1 semester)
Nutritional Biochemistry of Micronutrients (1 semester) (capstone)
Introduction to Sociology or Introduction to Psychology (1 semester)

III. Nutrition/Other Major Electives
A total of three elective courses are required for this option.  Two courses are chosen from a list of nutrition electives and a third course outside the major is chosen in consultation with the student's adviser, based on the student's career interests.

IV. Bioscience Core Courses
General Biology with lab (2 semester)
Genetics (1 semester)
Microbiology with lab (1 semester)
Biochemistry with lab (1 semester)
Anatomy & Physiology with lab (2 semester)

V. Foundation Courses
General Chemistry with lab (2 semester)
Organic Chemistry with lab (1 semester)
Statistics (1 semester)
Calculus (1 semester)

For additional information on the nutrition major, contact the Nutrition Undergraduate Program Coordinator.

Pre-Professional Health Programs
Students interested in postgraduate careers in the health care professions should visit the Pre-Professional Health Programs Advising Office online (www.unh.edu/premed-advising) or in person (Hood House, Room 102). Requirements for specific types of professional schools (e.g., medical, dental, physician’s assistant, pharmacy, etc.) are provided at http://www.unh.edu/premed-advising/exploring-health-professions. Students interested in veterinary medicine should consult the Pre-Veterinary Medicine Program website (http://www.prevet.unh.edu). While many of the prerequisite courses required by professional schools are also requirements of the nutrition major, you should consult with your faculty adviser to create a plan of study that best prepares you for pursuing a career in one of these health professions.

Minor in Nutrition (NUTR)
The nutrition minor is particularly suited to students interested in pursuing professional careers related to human health and wellness. The general requirements for completion of a minor can be found in the minors section of the Undergraduate Catalog. Courses that fulfill the requirements of the nutrition minor can be found at http://nutrition.unh.edu/4year/MinorinNutrition. Students "declare" the nutrition minor by submitting the Intent to Minor in Nutrition form. Submission of the Intent to Minor form is required to gain registration preference in certain courses if space is available and by discretion of the instructor. This form should be completed and submitted to the minor supervisor as soon as students become interested in the minor, preferably prior to the start of their junior year. For additional information on the nutrition minor, contact the minor supervisor in nutrition, Jesse Stabile Morrell (jesse.morrell@unh.edu).

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Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems (SAFS)

» http://sustainableag.unh.edu/

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Professor: David L. Berlinsky, William E. Berndtson, John E. Carroll, Andrew B. Conroy, Thomas M. Davis, Jon M. Wraith
Associate Professor: Alberto B. Manalo, David H. Townson
Assistant Professor: Andre F. Brito, Kirk D. Broders, Iago L. Hale, Richard G. Smith
Clinical Associate Professor: Joanne D. Burke
Lecturer: Andrew B. Ogden
Extension Professor: Catherine A. Neal, Rebecca Grube Sideman, Cheryl A. Smith
Extension Assistant Professor: Brian A. Krug

The sustainable agriculture and food systems (SAFS) program offers a flexible curriculum to students seeking to acquire integrated knowledge and experiences related to modern agricultural and food systems and/or preparing for varied careers in these fields. It draws upon the diverse course offerings by the three academic departments in the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture and the Thompson School of Applied Science as well as from other colleges at UNH.

Students in this program will obtain knowledge in a variety of topics including sustainable agricultural practices, the promotion of healthy eating through sustainable food production and food policies, the science and management of working landscapes, locally produced foods, and value-added agricultural products. SAFS graduates will be prepared to pursue careers in a wide range of fields including, but not limited to, integrated agriculture; the production of food, fiber, and agricultural services; management and marketing of agricultural operations; management of working lands and landscapes; agriculture/food/nutrition/natural resources-related research; policy-making; and other current and emerging professions.

The program offers both a bachelor of science (B.S.) degree and a bachelor of arts (B.A.) degree. The B.A. degree will be particularly useful to those interested in having more flexibility to take courses from a variety of disciplines or pursuing a dual degree, second major, or minor. The B.S. degree will best serve those seeking a strong foundation in scientific and technical knowledge and/or who envision pursuing an advanced degree.

Foundation Requirements
All students pursuing either a B.A. or B.S. in SAFS are required to earn 38 credits of foundation courses, which will provide them with fundamental knowledge in disciplines relevant to agricultural production and management. Most of these courses are offered by departments in the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture. The specific courses that meet foundation requirements are as follows:

SAFS 405, Sustainable Agriculture and Food Production
CHEM 411, Introductory Chemistry for Life Sciences, or equivalent
SAFS 502, Agroecology
NUTR 405, Food and Society
ANSC 421, Animal Agriculture Today
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives
PBIO 421, Introductory Horticulture
NR 501, Studio Soils
BIOL 528, Applied Biostatistics I

Other Requirements for B.A. Students
Student-Designed Emphasis Area
: Earn 20 credits to complete the emphasis area requirement. Students may select a cohesive group of courses from the List of Approved Program Electives, or may use a group of courses transferred from a completed two-year degree program such as the Thompson School of Applied Sciences. Students will define their emphasis area and submit it to the SAFS program advisory committee for approval prior to the start of their fifth semester or third year.

Program Electives: Complete 20 credits of courses found in the List of Approved Program Elective Courses.

Senior Capstone Experience: Earn at least four credits in a course approved and supervised by the SAFS Program. Capstone experiences may include formal coursework, pre-approved honors theses or mentored research projects, or other special student activities accepted by the SAFS program. 

Of the emphasis and program elective courses, at least 16 credits (not counting the capstone) must be earned at the 600 or 700 level. Furthermore, at least four credits must qualify as experiential.

Other Requirements for B.S. Students
B.S. students must meet the Student-Designed Emphasis Area, Program Electives, and Senior Capstone Experience requirements described above for B.A. students.  In addition, they must satisfy the Core Science Courses requirement by completing 12 credits of science courses chosen from the List of Approved Core Science Courses.

Of the core science emphasis and program elective courses, at least 20 credits (not counting the capstone) must be earned at the 600 or 700 level.  Moreover, at least four credits must qualify as experiential.

The List of Approved Program Elective Courses, which includes those classified as Experiential, and List of Approved Core Science Courses may be obtained from the program director.

University Requirements
In addition to meeting the SAFS major requirements, students must satisfy all University requirements including those that pertain to the minimum number of credits, grade-point average, writing-intensive courses, the Discovery Program, and foreign language (only for B.A. students).

Students interested in the sustainable agriculture and food systems program should contact Becky Sideman at (603) 862-3203 or becky.sideman@unh.edu.

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Wildlife and Conservation Biology

» http://www.wildlife.unh.edu/

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Professor: John A. Litvaitis, Marianne Klauser Litvaitis, Peter J. Pekins, James T. Taylor
Associate Professor: Thomas D. Lee
Research Associate Professor: Adrienne I. Kovach
Assistant Professor: Rebecca J Rowe
Extension Associate Professor: Matthew D. Tarr

The wildlife and conservation biology major is for students interested in the ecology, conservation, and management of the wildlife resource and habitat. It is designed to provide knowledge of wildlife species and their various forest, field, and wetland habitats; related policy and law; and ultimately, wildlife management and conservation. Students are prepared for employment with public and private agencies in wildlife conservation and management, or for continued study at the graduate level.

Students are encouraged to participate in ongoing field and laboratory research conducted by faculty and graduate students during the academic year.  It is very important for students to obtain pertinent work experience during summers.

Freshman Year
NR 400, Professional Perspectives in Natural Resources
NR 401, Introduction to Natural Resources
BIOL 411, Introductory Biology: Molecular and Cellular
BIOL 412, Introductory Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity and Ecology
ENGL 401, First-Year Writing
MATH 424B, Calculus for Life Sciences, or MATH 420, Finite Mathematics
NR 425, Field Dendrology, or PBIO 566 Systematic Botany
NR 433, Wildlife Ecology
Discovery electives

Sophomore Year
BIOL 528, Applied Biostatistics I
CHEM 403 and CHEM 404, General Chemistry or
CHEM 411, General Chemistry and BMCB 501, Biological Chemistry
ENGL 501, Introduction to Creative Nonfiction, or ENGL 502, Professional and Technical Writing, or ENGL 503, Persuasive Writing, or CMN 500, Public Speaking
EREC 411, Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives
NR 527, Forest Ecology, or BIOL 541, General Ecology
NR 640, Wildlife Population Ecology
NR 655, Vertebrate Biology, or NR 712, Mammology, or ZOOL 542, Ornithology, or ZOOL 710, Ichthyology
Discovery electives

Junior Year
NR 602, Natural Resources and Environmental Policy
NR 650, Conservation Biology
NR 658, Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
NR 615, Wildlife Habitats, or NR 603, Landscape Ecology
NR 664, Conservation Genetics, or ZOOL 690, Evolution
NR 625, Physiological Ecology, or ZOOL 625, Animal Physiology, or ZOOL 713, Animal Behavior
Discovery electives

Senior Year
Capstone course
NR 642, Biogeography, or NR 765, Community Ecology, or NR 603, Landscape Ecology
Electives
Discovery electives

Course choices for electives and the capstone requirement are provided in the detailed curricular guidelines available from the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment. Do not double count elective courses with courses taken for specific requirements.

Students interested in the wildlife and conservation biology major may consult with the program coordinator, John A. Litvaitis: john@unh.edu, (603) 862-2094.

General Science Certification
See Department of Education and COLSA/Degrees.

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Zoology (ZOOL)

» http://www.zoology.unh.edu/

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Professor: John F. Burger, Donald S. Chandler, James F. Haney, Larry G. Harris, W. Huntting Howell, Winsor H. Watson III
Research Professor: Raymond E. Grizzle
Affiliate Professor: Maryellen M. Lutcavage
Associate Professor: Jessica A. Bolker
Affiliate Associate Professor: James E. Byers, Richard Langan
Research Assistant Professor: Elizabeth A. Fairchild
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Dwight D. Trueblood, Barry J. Wicklow

The zoology majors (B.S. and B.A.) build on the common background of the biology core curriculum (two semesters of introductory biology, ecology, and genetics), with an additional six (B.A.) or seven (B.S.) courses that include morphology; physiology; three choices between courses in development, evolution, and animal survey; and one (B.A.) or two (B.S.) electives in a biological science. The B.A. also has a foreign language requirement. Zoology majors are required to achieve a 2.0 average and a minimum of C- in each biological science course. The zoology majors also require passing grades in chemistry (two semesters for the B.A. and four for the B.S.), physics (one semester for the B.A. and two for the B.S.), and mathematics (calculus or biostatistics for the B.A. and both courses for the B.S.). Students will have opportunities in these majors to specialize in areas of their own interest, such as completing a minor in animal behavior.

The University’s location and facilities provide unique opportunities for the study of aquatic and terrestrial animals due to its access to the seacoast and the lakes region of New Hampshire, the White Mountains National Forest, and the presence of two coastal marine laboratories, as well as estuarine and freshwater facilities. There is a strong teaching and research emphasis on ecological and physiological processes in aquatic animals and ecosystems. Major strengths of the program are the hands-on approach to teaching and emphasis on involving undergraduates in research.

For a detailed list of curriculum requirements, go to the zoology homepage at www.zoology.unh.edu.

In addition, courses for the Discovery Program and the University Writing Requirement must be completed.

New England Regional Student Program
The bachelor’s degree in zoology is one of the specialized curricula recognized by the New England Board of Higher Education and participates in the New England Regional Student Program. Under this program, students from the state of Massachusetts pay the UNH in-state tuition rate plus 75 percent.  

Students who are interested in a zoology major should contact James Haney, Department of Biological Sciences, (603) 862-2105.

General Science Certification
See Department of Education and COLSA/Degrees.

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