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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2015-2016

College of Liberal Arts

» http://cola.unh.edu


English (ENGL)

» http://cola.unh.edu/english

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Chairperson: Rachel Trubowitz
Professor: Monica E. Chiu, Burt H. Feintuch, Michael K. Ferber, Diane P. Freedman, James Krasner, Douglas M. Lanier, Rochelle Lieber, Mekeel McBride, David Rivard, Sarah Way Sherman, Rachel Trubowitz, David H. Watters
Associate Professor: Brigitte Gabcke Bailey, Dennis Britton, Robin Hackett, Susan M. Hertz, Delia C. Konzett, Martin McKinsey, Lisa C. Miller, Sean D. Moore, Thomas Payne, Petar Ramadanovic, Siobhan Senier, Sandhya Shetty, Reginald A. Wilburn, Ann J. Williams
Affiliate Associate Professor: Georgeann Murphy
Assistant Professor: Cristy Beemer, Jaed Coffin, Marcos Del Hierro, Tom Haines, Soo Hyon Kim, Alecia M. Magnifico, Courtney Marshall, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, Samantha Seal
Senior Lecturer: Pamela Barksdale, Shelley Girdner, David Howland, Krista L. Jackman, Clark Knowles, Cindy Pulkkinen, Nancy Sell, Oksana Semenova, Leah D. Williams
Lecturer: Lawrence Beemer, Mary Berguin, Molly Campbell, Denise Desrosiers, Meaghan Dunn, Joseph C. Dunn, Sarah Earle, Stephanie Harzewski, Meghan Heckman, Lindsay Huff, Carolyn J. Hutton, Matthias Konzett, Rachel Lachance, Sean Madigan, Patrick Mello, Andrea Minnis, Christine O'Keefe, Prentiss Phillips, James Rioux, Elissa Scogland, Laura A. Smith, Kevin Smith, Charli Valdez, Hulya Varlikli, Nathan Webster, Melinda White, Carol A. Zickell

The English department offers four majors: English, English Literature, English Teaching, and English/Journalism. A fifth undergraduate program is the interdepartmental Linguistics major.

Through these diverse but interrelated programs of study, the English department pursues a three-pronged mission in undergraduate instruction. We seek first to train students in the professional study of literature in the English language. In conjunction with this broad, multifaceted aim, we strive to educate students about the history and nature of English language in its spoken and written forms. As a third and equally important part of our mission, we teach students to write clearly, persuasively, and elegantly. In all five of its undergraduate majors, the English department provides students with the kinds of critical thinking, research, and writing skills that will serve them well in their personal and professional lives.

The English Major
The dual objectives of the general English major are to provide all students with a common core of literary experience and to offer the opportunity to shape a course of study suited to their personal interests. Flexible requirements place a responsibility on each student to devise a program that has an intelligent rationale. For example, students with a special interest in writing are free to take the minimum number of literature courses (five) and complete their major by taking offerings in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry writing.  All the undergraduate courses offered by the department are open to English majors so that students may sample a range of courses in literature, linguistics, creative or nonfiction writing, and English teaching, according to particular interests that change and grow. 

By its very nature, the English major is broad, open, and liberal. It enables students to sample a variety of courses in order to understand the operation of language from many perspectives. 

For the English major, students must complete a minimum of 40 credits of major coursework with a grade of C- or better, with the exception of ENGL 419, which must be completed with a grade of C or better. ENGL 401, 403, 415, or 444 classes may not be used to satisfy major requirements.

Students must complete ENGL 419, two 500-level courses (or one 500-level course and ENGL/LING 405), six courses numbered 600 and above, and one additional 500-, 600-, or 700-level English course of their choosing. In selecting these courses, students must be sure to meet the following distribution requirements:

1. Two courses in literature written before 1800: either two advanced courses (numbered 600 or above), or one advanced course and ENGL 512 or ENGL 513.

2. Two courses in literature written since 1800: either two advanced courses, or one advanced course and one course from the following list: ENGL 514, 515, or 516.

3. One course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories. Students may choose from: ENGL 517, 540, 550, 609, 690, 738, 739, 740, 693R, 797R. Other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the adviser.

The Discovery Program capstone for English majors is one of the following: 

Capstone requirement may be fulfilled by one 700-level class in addition to the 10-course major. Minimum grade required: C. The course selected for capstone may not be double-counted toward English major requirements. Students should submit a Capstone Declaration form indicating the English course taken for capstone credit at the time of registration. capstone Declaration forms are available in the English Department main office.

Capstone requirement may be fulfilled by the English Major Seminar (ENGL 787), a 700-level class taken for capstone credit, one additional 700-level class, or a writing portfolio. (See the English Department website for specific descriptions of these requirements.)

The required minimum overall GPA in major coursework is 2.0.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses may not be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements except in the case of a second or dual major.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course toward their English major requirements.

Students interested in majoring in English should consult Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313.

The English Literature Major
The English literature major has been developed for those students looking for a more focused study of literature, especially those who plan to go on to graduate school in English or other fields in the humanities. Its requirements have been designed to engage students in a sustained study of literature that explores the formal, historical, cultural, and theoretical dimensions of written texts. 

These requirements are designed to strengthen students’ knowledge of literary history and cultural contexts, forms of literary expression, and the interpretive questions that shape critical inquiry. Students in this program will develop a deep understanding and appreciation of literatures in English, including both British and American literatures, as well as literary traditions organized around other principles, such as postcolonial or African-American.  The English literature major also encourages students to develop a higher proficiency in critical writing, in formulating and addressing complex problems, and in synthesizing research.

For the English literature major, students must complete a minimum of 40 credits of major coursework with a grade of C- or better, with the exception of ENGL 419, which must be completed with a grade of C or better. ENGL 401, 403, 415, or 444 classes may not be used to satisfy major requirements.

Additional requirements include two 500-level courses, one of which must be a survey course; ENGL 619; and ENGL 787. A minimum of six courses must be completed at the 600 level or higher. In selecting courses, students must be sure to meet the following distribution requirements (please note that, in many cases, a single course may satisfy a requirement in two or more categories):

1. Two courses in literature written prior to 1800: either two advanced courses (600 level and above) or one advanced course and ENGL 512 or ENGL 513.

2. Two courses in literature written since 1800: either two advanced courses or one advanced course and one of the following: ENGL 514, 515, or 516.

3. One American literature course at the 600/700 level.

4. One British literature course at the 600/700 level.

5. Two courses that investigate and question representations of identity (ENGL 517, 540, 555, 581, 585, 586, 681, 685, 690, 738, 739, 740, 775, or 777); genre, including film, with the exception of ENGL 533 (616, 618, 630, 631, 632, or 777); and/or theoretical positions (ENGL 713, 714). Other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the adviser.

6. One course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories. Students may choose from ENGL 517, 540, 550, 609, 690, 738, 739, 740, 693R, or 797R. Other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the adviser.

The Discovery Program capstone for English Literature majors is the English Major Seminar, ENGL 787.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

The required minimum overall GPA in major coursework is 2.0.

Major department courses may not be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements except in the case of a second or dual major.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course toward their English major requirements.

Students interested in majoring in English Literature should consult Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313, or the director of the English Literature program.

The English Teaching Major
The English teaching major is designed for students wishing to teach English in middle or high schools (grades 5-12). Students receive a B.A. in English Teaching upon completion of their undergraduate studies. Completion of the undergraduate major does not in itself, however, meet state certification requirements to teach in public schools in New Hampshire. English teaching majors who want to gain certification at UNH must apply for admission to (and complete) graduate study, including coursework and a year-long internship within the Department of Education. (Students usually apply for the master’s program in their senior year; please see the Department of Education for details on the M.A.T. and M.Ed. programs.) Much of the work for a master's degree may be completed during this fifth year, likely including additional time spent in summer courses or additional semesters. Most students, however, will be recommended for certification at the end of the fifth year and receive the graduate degree. The New Hampshire teaching certificate is recognized by many but not all states. 

The goal of the English teaching major is to prepare students as informed, thoughtful, and skilled English teachers who will become educational leaders in their schools and, more broadly, in the profession itself. To that end, the department seeks to make its preservice teachers thoroughly familiar with the knowledge base available in the Departments of English and Education. From their courses within the English department, students learn what the study of English entails and how areas of knowledge and the abilities to read, write, and discuss can best be taught to students in grades 5-12. Preservice teachers also acquire knowledge of certain content areas, such as American and British literature and English grammar. From their courses within the education department, students learn about human development and learning, the history and structure of schools, and different philosophical perspectives on public education. Finally, through the yearlong teaching internship, students apply their knowledge from both sources to actual practice. This requirement reflects a core belief that the opportunity to combine theory and practice is essential in preparing effective beginning teachers.

Completion of the undergraduate teaching major does not in itself meet state certification requirements. Students should enroll in the undergraduate major and:

1.  Pass the following English courses with an average of 2.5 or better: ENGL 419; 514; 516; 657; 725 and 726 or 710 and 792; 718 or 791; two additional literature courses numbered 600 or above; one course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories from a department-approved list (other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the student’s adviser); and any English department course in writing, linguistics, critical theory, film, or literature (except 401, 403, 415, and 444). ENGL 512 or 513 may be substituted for one of the two required literature courses numbered 600 or above.

2.  Apply for the fifth-year teaching internship and master’s degree program by fall or spring of their senior year (usually September 30 for the internship and November 1 or February 1 for the master’s program). Students with a GPA of 3.2 or better can apply for the master's degree program in their junior year. If accepted early, the student can earn graduate credit for up to three undergraduate English or education courses.

3.  Complete a writing portfolio.

The Discovery Program capstone for English Teaching majors is the Writing Portfolio.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of Arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses may not be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements except in the case of a second or dual major.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course towards their English major requirements.

Students interested in majoring in English teaching should consult Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313, or the director of the English teaching program.

The English/Journalism Major
The English/journalism major focuses on the study and practice of rigorous reporting and nonfiction storytelling in many forms. It prepares students for careers in writing, editing, and digital journalism. It also incorporates the study of literature, an important foundation for critical thinking and storytelling. In addition to learning the basic skills of interviewing, fact gathering, verification, and writing in both news and feature styles, students are taught to produce stories for digital platforms using audio, photo, video, and more. These skills will launch successful careers in journalism or any vocation that requires strong research and communication skills.

English/journalism majors must complete ENGL 401 with a B or better before taking the first journalism course, ENGL 534, 21st Century Journalism: How the News Works. After completing ENGL 534, majors may move on to ENGL 621, Writing and Reporting the News I. Students must get a B or better in 621 to go on to ENGL 622, Writing and Reporting the News II, and ENGL 631, Introduction to Digital Reporting—both courses are required for the major.

Students then have to take two more journalism courses, choosing from ENGL 623, 711, 712, 722, 724, 735, or 708. Certain courses publish student writing digitally, at times in collaboration with professional news outlets. Students are also encouraged to write and edit for student publications such as The New Hampshire and Main Street. Beyond these requirements, majors work at one media internship for a semester (ENGL 720). Students must get at least a B in 621 and permission of their 622 or 631 instructor to do the internship. A faculty member supervises the internships, which are central to the English/journalism major, requiring students to use their new skills in a professional environment.

In addition to their journalism courses, English/journalism majors must complete ENGL 419 with a grade of C or better. They must also take the following literature courses:

  1. one course in literature written prior to 1800;
  2. one course in literature written since 1800;
  3. one course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories. To fulfill this requirement, students may choose from ENGL 517, 540, 550, 609, 690, 738, 739, 740, 693R, or 797R. Other courses may count when relevant and with prior written approval of the instructor.

ENGL 419 is the only 400-level course that may be used to satisfy English/journalism requirements; ENGL 401, 403, 415, or 444 classes may not be used to satisfy major requirements.

Because media outlets expect even entry-level staff to have an area of expertise, English/journalism majors must take a three-course concentration in another field, such as sociology, German, environmental science, criminal justice, or other English disciplines (e.g., African American studies). Courses taken for a minor will count toward the three-course concentration.

The Discovery Program capstone for English/journalism majors is the Journalism Internship, ENGL 720.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses may not be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements except in the case of a second or dual major.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course toward their English major requirements.

Students interested in the English/journalism major should see Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313, or the director of the Journalism Program.

English Minor
Students who wish to minor in English at UNH must complete five courses (20 credits). At least three of the courses must be at the 600 level or above. ENGL 419 is recommended as one of the five courses. ENGL 401, First-Year Writing, and ENGL 415, "Literature and...," courses cannot be applied toward the English minor. No more than two transfer courses can be applied toward the English minor. The minimum acceptable grade for each course is C-.

Writing Programs
The Department of English offers courses for students interested in becoming writers. Up to four consecutive creative writing workshops can be taken in fiction or in poetry, as well as a course in form and theory of either genre. The instructors for these courses are professional writers. 

Writing Minor
Students must complete at least five 4-credit courses (20 credits) from the list of approved courses. At least three of the courses must be at the 600 level or higher. ENGL 415, 'Literature and...,' courses cannot be applied toward the English writing minor. The minimum acceptable grade for each course is C-. No more than two transfer courses can be applied toward the English writing minor. English literature and English teaching majors may declare a writing minor with the approval of their faculty adviser. A maximum of two English courses (8 credits) are allowed to double-count toward the literature or teaching major and writing minor. Other English Department majors are not eligible to declare a writing minor.

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