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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2014-2015

College of Liberal Arts

» http://cola.unh.edu


Anthropology (ANTH)

» http://cola.unh.edu/anthropology

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Chairperson: Meghan C.L. Howey
Professor: Joe L.P. Lugalla
Associate Professor: Meghan C.L. Howey, Justus M. Ogembo, Robin E. Sheriff
Research Associate Professor: Curt D. Grimm
Assistant Professor: Eleanor Harrison-Buck, Svetlana Peshkova, Natalie Porter
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Satoru Murata, Astrid Runggaldier
Affiliate Faculty: Adam Kaeding
Lecturer: Marieka Brouwer Burg, Sara Withers

Anthropology asks the question: What does it mean to be human? We answer this fundamental query with a global perspective on the human condition as students explore both the similarity and diversity of human experience. Through courses that cover a wide range of societies throughout the world, we investigate the human condition, past and present. Introductory courses provide an overview of the fields of anthropology: social and cultural anthropology, archeology, physical anthropology, and linguistics. More advanced courses provide the opportunity for students to pursue intensive study of particular topics in cross-cultural perspective. The department emphasizes critical thinking and writing skills and encourages close faculty/student contact in seminar courses and at the upper level. Students, in consultation with their academic adviser, have the opportunity to take courses in other departments that complement specific foci in anthropology.

At this time of increasing globalization, anthropology provides students with a broad overview of diverse peoples and cultures. Majors are therefore well prepared to live in a rapidly changing world. The major both prepares students for graduate-level studies and serves as a foundation for a wide range of careers. With backgrounds in anthropology, our students become teachers, social workers, public policy experts, forensic investigators, health practitioners, primatologists, international business executives, and community and economic development specialists, as well as pursuing various other careers.

To declare a major in anthropology, students must have completed at least one introductory level anthropology course at the 400 or 500 level with a grade of C or better.

Majors must complete a minimum of 40 credits in anthropology with grades of C or better and in accordance with the following requirements:
 
Required
ANTH 411, 412, or 415
ANTH 500 or 501
ANTH 511
ANTH 513 or 514
ANTH 611

Four additional courses numbered 600 or above
(Note:  For ANTH 699, Senior Thesis; ANTH 699H, Honors Senior Thesis; and ANTH 675, Archaeology Summer Field School in Belize, these courses while 8 credits count only as one ANTH 600-level course requirement.)

The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing one 700-level course (seminar format). Seminar courses include ANTH 705, 730, 740, 750, 770, 785, and 797. Other courses, internships, or experiences may be substituted with the permission of the student's adviser and department chair.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

American Sign Language may not be applied toward the foreign language requirement.

Honors-in-major and senior thesis options are available.

Students who declare a major in anthropology are expected to make steady progress toward fulfillment of major requirements. Normally, this means taking at least one anthropology course per semester until all of the requirements have been met. A student who has fulfilled most of the major requirements may request an exception to this policy from his or her adviser.

Students wishing to major in anthropology should consult with the anthropology chairperson.

The anthropology minor consists of 20 credits in anthropology courses, at least one of which must be numbered above 600, with a C or better.

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Arabic (ARBC)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/arabic-studies

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Lecturer: Ruwa Majid-Pokorny

For program description, see Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

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Art and Art History (ARTS)

» http://cola.unh.edu/art-and-art-history

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Chairperson: Jennifer K. Moses
Professor: Grant Drumheller, Patricia A. Emison, Eleanor M. Hight, Craig A. Hood, Jennifer K. Moses, Scott Schnepf, David R. Smith
Associate Professor: Benjamin S. Cariens, Brian W.K. Chu, Julee Holcombe, Maryse Searls McConnell, Leah Woods
Lecturer: Richard Fox, Rebecca Karo, Stacy Mohammed, Trevor Verrot, Don Williams

The courses offered by the Department of Art and Art History provide an opportunity, within the liberal arts framework, for students to acquire a thorough knowledge of the basic means of visual expression, to study intensively the history of art, or to prepare themselves for a career in art teaching. In addition, these courses offer foundation experience for students who are interested in art but are majoring in other departments in the University. The Department of Art and Art History offers programs leading to a bachelor of arts degree in the arts with either a studio art or art history option, and a bachelor of fine arts degree in studio art. Certification for art teaching in the public schools is also offered in cooperation with the Department of Education (see Education, under Programs of Study).

The University reserves the right to retain selections from a student’s work for a period of not more than two years.

Bachelor of Arts Curriculum (The Arts: Studio Art Option)
Students selecting to work toward a bachelor of arts degree in studio art must complete a minimum of thirteen courses (52 credits), with a minimum grade of C- in each course.

The following courses are required
ARTS 480, Introduction to Art History
ARTS 532, Introductory Drawing
ARTS 546, Introductory Painting
ARTS 567, Introductory Sculpture
ARTS 632, Intermediate Drawing

One of the following
ARTS 536, Introductory Printmaking: Intaglio
ARTS 537, Introductory Printmaking: Lithography
ARTS 551, Darkroom Photography

One of the following
ARTS 501, Ceramics
ARTS 525, Woodworking
ARTS 667, Sculpture Workshop

Three additional courses in a studio concentration at 600 level or above
One additional studio elective
Two additional art history courses, at least one of which must be at the 600 level or above 

While these courses represent the minimum departmental requirements for the studio art option, students may wish to plan a program involving greater depth in one or several of the studio areas.

The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing a 600 level or above course in the studio concentration. The student will work with the course’s instructor to complete a mutually agreed upon capstone project associated with the course’s medium.   

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Curriculum (The Arts: Art History Option)
The art history curriculum provides a comprehensive, in-depth study of Western art from the ancient world to the present as well as some exposure to non-Western cultures and artistic traditions. All courses in the program teach basic skills of interpretation and critical analysis within the framework of broad cultural perspectives that connect the visual arts to larger historical developments. They also teach good writing and research skills. In addition, art history majors typically branch out into other fields, such as history, literature, and foreign languages. By the time they graduate, most majors are well equipped to pursue such traditional careers in the field as museum and gallery work, teaching, publishing, or librarianship. But because art historical education is so broad, it also prepares students for a variety of other, more flexible options, such as law, business, or architecture.

Students must complete a minimum of 10 courses (40 credits). 

The following courses are required
ARTS 480, Introduction to Art History
ARTS 532, Introductory Drawing
ARTS 795, Methods of Art History
ARTS 799, Seminar in Art History

Also required are six 600- or 700-level art history courses: one each from the Pre-Renaissance, Renaissance/Baroque, and Modern areas, and three in any area. These courses must be completed with a minimum grade of C-. Art history students receive preferential placement in ARTS 532. Students contemplating graduate school should learn German, and, if possible, either French, Italian, or another language relevant to their areas of interest.

The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing ARTS 795, Methods of Art History. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Major
Incoming first-year applicants wishing to enter the bachelor of fine arts (B.F.A.) degree program must first apply for, and be admitted to, the bachelor of arts (B.A.) in The Arts: Studio Art option. After taking the introductory studio art courses at UNH, interested students can then seek out two faculty members to sponsor their application for the B.F.A. program. Students generally wait until they are well into the intermediate-level courses before submitting a portfolio for the B.F.A. review, which is held before a full faculty committee twice a year.

The B.F.A. curriculum provides training for students who plan to enter professional graduate school or pursue careers as professional artists. Students selecting to work toward a B.F.A. degree must complete a minimum of 19 courses and 80 credits, with a minimum grade of C- in each course.

The following courses are required
ARTS 480, Introduction to Art History
ARTS 532, Introductory Drawing
ARTS 546, Introductory Painting
ARTS 551, Darkroom Photography
ARTS 567, Introductory Sculpture
ARTS 598, Sophomore Seminar
ARTS 632, Intermediate Drawing
ARTS 798, Seminar/Senior Thesis (8 credits)

Six courses in a studio concentration
Three additional art electives
Two additional art history courses, at least one of which must be at the 600 level or above

The possible areas of concentration within the department are painting, sculpture, ceramics, drawing, printmaking, photography, and furniture design. Proposals for individualized programs are accepted only by permission of the departmental chairperson, the major adviser, and the departmental bachelor of fine arts committee. Candidates applying for the bachelor of fine arts program are required to submit a portfolio to the B.F.A. committee, which meets each semester one week before preregistration.

The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing ARTS 798, Senior Seminar. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. 

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Art Education Curriculum
The program in art education is organized into a five-year, teacher-education sequence.

This curriculum is designed to prepare teachers of art in the public schools. The satisfactory completion of the B.A. studio art curriculum for art education students and required education courses, in conjunction with the fifth-year internship, will satisfy the initial certification requirements for teachers of art in the public schools of New Hampshire and in most other states. These requirements may change by the time students apply for certification and the students are required to fulfill the then-current requirements.

Art education students may take accredited crafts courses at other institutions as art electives.

Double Option in The Arts
Students may earn a B.A. degree in the arts with both a studio art option and an art history option provided the requirements for each option are met. No more than 8 credits used for one option may be used for the second option. These 8 credits will be in Introductory Drawing and Introduction  to Art History.

Minors in the Department of Art and Art History
Students must receive a minimum grade of C- in all required courses. For art majors, only two courses from the art and art history major requirements can be applied toward the minor.

A maximum of two courses (8 credits) may be transferred from another accredited institution, provided UNH has accepted them as transfer credits. Transfer courses must be a minimum of three credits. Students with transfer courses that are accepted with less than four semester credits must still meet the credit requirement for completion of the minor.

Minor in Architectural Studies
The minor in architectural studies provides students with an interdisciplinary introduction to the history, theory, and methods of architecture and its symbolism. The program allows students who are interested in this field to receive programmatic recognition of their work. It is designed to assist those who are contemplating enrollment at a school of architecture; are particularly interested in architectural history; want to supplement their technical majors (e.g., civil engineering) with strong academic minors; or plan to pursue careers in preservation, education, community service, and public relations.

The minor in architectural studies consists of five courses (18-20 credits) distributed in the following way:

ARTS 532, Introductory Drawing
ARTS 574, Introduction to Architectural History

One of the following:
ARTS 455,Architectural Design Studio
ARTS 525, Woodworking
ARTS 567, Introductory Sculpture

Two electives chosen in consultation with the minor coordinators. A list is available from the department.

Minor in Art
The minor in art consists of five courses (20 credits) chosen from the offerings of the department, two of which must be at the 500 level or above. Courses can be in studio art or art history.

Minor in Art History
The art history minor offers those majoring in other fields (including studio art) the chance to gain a serious knowledge of aspects of the history and meanings of Western art from antiquity to the modern world. Particularly for those working in history and the humanities, a minor in art history will provide new interdisciplinary perspectives on their major fields. The minor consists of five courses (20 credits) with a distribution that includes ARTS 480, Introduction to Art History, and four additional art history courses at the 600 level or above.

Minor in Studio Arts
The minor in studio arts consists of five courses (20 credits) with a distribution that includes ARTS 532, Introductory Drawing; two studio courses from the 600 level or above; and two additional studio courses chosen from the offerings of the department.

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Chinese (CHIN)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/asian-studies

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For program description, see Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.
 

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Classics (CLAS)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/classics-ba

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Professor: Stephen M. Trzaskoma
Associate Professor: Stephen Andrew Brunet, Robert Scott Smith
Senior Lecturer: Richard E. Clairmont
Lecturer: Susan Curry, Anna Newman, Robert Constantine Newman

Classics encompasses the interdisciplinary study of the ancient Greeks and Romans, as well as the ways in which the ancient world’s influence extends to the Medieval Period, the Renaissance, and contemporary societies. To study the classics, therefore, means to approach a wide range of material from several thousand years through the study of languages, literature, history, politics, law, archaeology, art, mythology and folklore, gender and sexuality, religious studies, philosophy, and more—all with methods derived from a variety of humanistic and social science perspectives. This breadth provides an excellent liberal arts education that prepares students for a variety of careers, as well as for further study. Classics majors from UNH have gone on to law school, medical school, and graduate school in classics and many related disciplines.

The classics major is offered by the classics program of the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. The minimum requirements for a major in classics are 40 credits offered by the classics program, at least 3 of which must be taken at the Durham campus. The core of the major is the study of Greek or Latin and at least 24 of these 40 credits must be in Greek (GREK) and/or Latin (LATN) language courses. At least one of these courses must be a 700-level course in Greek or Latin. Students should be sure, however, to pursue the study of areas of interest through courses in translation offered under the CLAS rubric. Opportunities also exist to study Hittite and Sanskrit to satisfy major requirements. Students are highly encouraged to take courses in related fields such as ancient history, archaeology, ancient philosophy, classical art, modern languages, and English, and to take part in overseas study programs in Greece and Italy such as the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. (UNH is a member of the consortium of this program.) Up to two outside courses may be used toward major requirements if they are tightly focused on the ancient world and the student obtains the permission of his or her classics major adviser. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing any classics, Latin, or Greek course at the 700 level or through another option (Honors thesis, etc) approved by the adviser. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Classics majors may satisfy Discovery Category requirements with CLAS, GREK, and LATN courses, but they may only count the credits from a maximum of two such courses for both major requirements and Discovery.

A minor in classics consists of five courses (20 credits) in classics, Greek, and/or Latin.

The coordinator is Stephen Brunet, Murkland Hall; Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; (603) 862-2077; e-mail stephen.brunet@unh.edu.

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College of Liberal Arts (COLA)

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Communication (CMN)

» http://cola.unh.edu/communication

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Chairperson: Joshua Meyrowitz
Professor: James M. Farrell, Sheila McNamee, Joshua Meyrowitz, Lawrence J. Prelli
Associate Professor: Jennifer L. Borda, Mardi J. Kidwell, John Lannamann
Assistant Professor: Kevin Healey, Josh Lauer, Danielle Pillet-Shore
Senior Lecturer: R. Michael Jackson
Lecturer: Per E. Fjelstad, Renee Heath, Mark Hungerford, Michelle Michaud, Michael Soha, Joseph Terry

The purpose of the communication major is to prepare students to engage more knowingly with the communicative patterns, problems, and practices that they will encounter in their personal, professional, and civic lives. This purpose requires that students learn to move beyond commonplace and conventional understandings of “communication” and acquire sophisticated perspectives—workable orientations—for describing, analyzing, reflecting upon, and engaging with those patterns, problems, and practices. Accordingly, the major not only acquaints students with a variety of empirical, critical, historical, theoretical, and pragmatic perspectives on communication phenomena, but encourages them to formulate workable orientations of their own for engaging with communication issues and questions. Students who graduate with a communication major are prepared to become thoughtful and proficient “communication decision-makers” during their postgraduate lives.

Students wishing to declare communication as a major should contact the department’s academic adviser, Andrew Sharp, for application information and requirements.

Communication Major
Majors must complete ten courses (40 credits) with a 2.0 overall average in the major. The distribution of required courses for the major is as follows:

Three introductory courses (12 credits)
CMN 455, 456, and 457 (12 credits). Majors must earn a grade of C or better in each introductory course.

Three 500-level communication analysis courses (12 credits)
At least two of the three 500-level courses must have different 400-level prerequisites. Majors must earn a grade of C- or better in all three of these analysis courses. CMN 500, Public Speaking, and CMN 599, Internship, cannot be used to fulfill an analysis course requirement.

Four upper-division courses (16 credits)
Students are eligible to take upper-division courses after successfully completing at least two of the 500-level analysis courses, each with a different 400-level prerequisite. Students will be encouraged to focus at least three of their upper-division courses on one of six thematic concentrations:  Histories and Traditions in Communication; Political Communication and Public Space; Communication, Community, and Everyday Life; Culture and Identities; Citizenship and Advocacy; and Visual Communication. At least one of the student’s four upper-division courses must be at the 700 level. Majors must earn a grade of C- or better in all upper-division courses.

A maximum of 4 credits of independent study (CMN 795) may be counted toward the major. CMN 799, Honors Thesis, and CMN 796, Commentary, cannot be used to fulfill an advanced course requirement. The Discovery Program Capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing any 700-level communication course except CMN 795 and CMN 796.

Transfer students must complete 20 credits of their communication coursework at UNH to complete the major satisfactorily. Exchange students may transfer no more than 10 approved credits from another institution to be applied toward completion of the communication major at UNH.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Communication Minor
The communication minor consists of five courses (20 credits). Students must complete a minimum of two 400-level introductory courses (CMN 455, CMN 456, or CMN 457), a minimum of two 500-level analysis courses, and a minimum of one advanced 600-level or 700-level course.

Students who pursue a communication minor must complete five courses within the minor with a C or better at the 400 level and with a C- or better at the 500, 600, and 700 levels, and maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.0.  The two 500-level analysis courses each must have a different 400-level prerequisite and be taken before enrolling in an advanced level course. No more than two transfer courses from other institutions can be applied to the minor and all transfers are contingent upon departmental approval.  No more than 4 credits of independent study can count toward the minor. No pass/fail or credit/fail courses can count toward the minor. CMN 500, Public Speaking, cannot be used to fulfill a minor requirement.

Media Practices Option

This option is designed for qualified students who want to augment their communication major at Durham with training in media production and applied media communication through courses in the communication arts department at the Manchester campus. Qualified students who meet all requirements will graduate with a B.A. degree in communication: media practices option. In addition to communication major requirements, students are required to take two designated media practices courses at the Manchester campus and earn a minimum grade of C-, and complete a 4-credit media practices internship (CMN 599). Students must maintain an in-major grade-point average of at least 2.5 to satisfactorily complete the media practices option.

Business Applications Option
This option is designed for qualified students who want to augment their communication major with professional training in such areas as marketing, advertising, and organizational behavior through courses at the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics. Qualified students who meet all requirements will graduate with a B.A. degree in communication: business applications option. In addition to communication major requirements, students are required to take three business applications option courses designated at PAUL and earn a minimum grade of C-, and complete a 4-credit business applications internship (CMN 599). Students must maintain an in-major grade-point average of at least 2.5 to satisfactorily complete the business applications option.

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Education (EDUC)

» http://cola.unh.edu/education

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Chairperson: Michael J. Middleton
Associate Chairperson: Leslie J. Couse
Professor: Eleanor D. Abrams, Todd A. DeMitchell, Bruce L. Mallory, Jane A. Nisbet, Sharon N. Oja, Paula M. Salvio
Affiliate Professor: Michael A. Gass, David C. Hagner, Sarah Redfield
Associate Professor: Eun Kyeong Cho, Vincent J. Connelly, Leslie J. Couse, Virginia E. Garland, Suzanne E. Graham, Georgia M. Kerns, Michael J. Middleton, Justus M. Ogembo, Joseph J. Onosko, Loan T. Phan, Harry J. Richards, Judith A. Robb, Thomas H. Schram, Judy Sharkey, Ruth M. Wharton-McDonald
Affiliate Associate Professor: Brent J. Bell, Jayson O. Seaman
Assistant Professor: Jade Caines, Elyse Hambacher, Emilie M. Reagan, Winston Thompson
Research Assistant Professor: Mary C Schuh
Affiliate Assistant Professor: John F. Hornstein, Cari A. Moorhead
Clinical Assistant Professor: Lara Gengarelly, Janet L. Thompson
Clinical Instructor: Shaleen Cassily
Affiliate Faculty: Mark Wiley
Senior Lecturer: Timothy J. Churchard
Lecturer: Cynthia Merrill, Lauren Provost, Bruce Turnquist

Basic Programs
At the undergraduate level, students have the opportunity to begin taking courses in teacher preparation programs, which will lead at the graduate level to teacher licensing in elementary and secondary education, early childhood education, early childhood special needs, and special education. They also may wait to prepare to teach solely at the graduate level.

Students majoring in music, mathematics, Pre-K-3rd grade, and physical education have the option of participating in a five-year program leading to licensure and a graduate degree. Or they may choose the four-year option in those majors, which leads to licensure at the undergraduate level. Students interested in the four-year option in these areas should contact the departments for information.

Elementary teaching and most secondary areas require completion of a minimum of a one-year graduate program, which leads to a master’s degree and teacher licensure. Most students who plan to teach in elementary and secondary schools apply to the graduate school to complete a five-year program. In the five-year program, students begin preparation for teaching at the undergraduate level with a semester of field experience (EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching) and professional coursework in education. Students complete a baccalaureate degree outside of education and move into a fifth year of study and a full-year internship leading to the M.Ed. or M.A.T. degree and licensure in teaching.*

There also are opportunities for study or certification at the graduate level in administration, counseling, elementary and secondary teaching, early childhood, special education, and adult and occupational education. The department encourages students interested in graduate study or in relevant undergraduate courses to meet with these graduate program coordinators in the Department of Education.

Students at the undergraduate level who are interested in special education or early childhood education can begin to complete prerequisite coursework for the graduate program leading to certification in special education (K-12) or early childhood education. For students seeking the M.Ed. in special education or early childhood education without certification in general education, it is not necessary to complete Education 500. For coursework that can be taken at the undergraduate level, students should see program advisers in the Department of Education.
________
*Students in the five-year program may combine their program for teacher licensure with a master's program in their major field department.

Program Philosophy and Mission
Unit Mission Statement 
The following conceptual framework guides all of the programs that prepare professionals in education at the University of New Hampshire:

The professional education unit at the University of New Hampshire seeks to prepare practitioners who will become leaders in their own practice settings and within their profession, applying knowledge to improve education for all students and enrich the lives of clients. Immersion in subject matter, research, theory, and field-based experience provides a base for our graduates to make well-reasoned judgments in complex situations, render informed decisions, model exemplary practice, and take initiative for planned change.

Students learn to establish caring environments that celebrate individual differences and backgrounds while fostering cooperation and educational improvement. We stress reflective critical inquiry as a mode of study, and community-building as a means for promoting change. We value and support both our students’ local practice and their broader leadership within the profession.

Mission of Programs in Teacher Education
The following mission statement gives direction to the basic and advanced programs in teacher education:

We seek to prepare beginning teachers who demonstrate excellence in classroom practice and who will become educational leaders. Our graduates will possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required for outstanding classroom practice and eventual leadership within the local school community and the larger education community.

Undergraduate Work toward Teacher Certification in Elementary and Secondary Education

Step I. Enroll in Exploring Teaching: Education 500
Students are encouraged to take EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching, as a sophomore, but completion during junior or senior year also can leave enough time for other education course requirements.

Step II. Professional Coursework in Education at the Undergraduate Level
Education 500 is a prerequisite to further work in the teacher education program. An undergraduate receives a co-adviser in the Department of Education (usually the Exploring Teaching instructor). Along with the major adviser, this co-adviser works with the student to plan the undergraduate portion of the five-year teacher education program.

Every student must take four credits in each of five areas, as follows: EDUC 700, Educational Structure and Change; EDUC 701, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology; EDUC 703, Alternative Teaching Models [or other required methods course(s)]; EDUC 705, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education; EDUC 751, Educating Exceptional Learners. EDUC 707, Teaching Reading through the Content Areas, is required for some secondary subject licensure areas. Elementary education students are required to have four methods courses: one each in the teaching of reading, mathematics, science, and social studies. Those who do not intend to use this coursework for initial licensing may enroll with instructor permission. All 700-level education courses at UNH are restricted to students with junior or senior standing. These courses may also be taken at the graduate 800 level.

Any course taken in the Department of Education that will be used to fulfill a teacher licensure requirement must be completed with a grade of B- or above.

Step III. Admission to the Internship and Graduate Phase of the Teacher Education Program
Undergraduate seniors should apply to the Graduate School by November 1 in the first semester of the senior year for the final phase of the teacher education program. Students with an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.2 or better admitted into the accelerated master's program may be allowed to begin the program in the second semester of the senior year, earning a maximum of  twelve graduate credits.

Undergraduate juniors with an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.2 or better should apply to the Graduate School in early February in the second semester of the junior year for the final phase of the teacher education program. Students with an undergraduate grade-point average of 3.2 or better admitted into the accelerated master's program may be allowed to begin the program in the first semester of the senior year, earning a maximum of twelve graduate credits during the senior year.

The final phase of the program includes a full-year internship, electives, and a program portfolio and colloquium. This phase normally takes an academic year plus a summer to complete.

The yearlong internship (EDUC 900/901) is part of the final stage of the five-year program. It meets the goals of increased clinical experience and better integration of theory and practice.

The internship is a teaching and learning experience in which the intern is involved in an elementary or secondary school over the course of an entire school year. Interns become a part of the school staff, sharing appropriate instructional tasks, and often carrying the full instructional duties in one or more classes.

Interns are mentored and supervised by a school staff member who is designated as a “cooperating teacher.” A UNH faculty member collaborates in intern supervision and conducts a weekly seminar for all interns with whom he/she is working.

The internship is a full-time experience for 6 graduate credits each semester. It typically begins in September and runs through May or June. Due to the intensive time commitment, it is recommended that, at most, only one course be taken in addition to the internship each semester.

Before the internship, all students will have completed a bachelor’s degree with a major outside of education. Because of this, they will possess a depth of knowledge in a subject area and a broad general education, in addition to substantive preparation for teaching. Secondary education candidates must have completed an approved major, or its equivalent, in the subject that they intend to teach. Elementary education candidates may pursue an undergraduate major in any area; however, majors in the core disciplines taught in elementary schools are desirable.

Undergraduates should apply for internship in September of their senior year. At the same time, it is advisable to begin the application process for graduate school. Arranging an appropriate placement is a time-consuming process. Starting early will facilitate finding the best setting for students’ needs and goals. The director of field experiences in Durham and the associate director of teacher education in Manchester play a major role in identifying internship sites and should be consulted regarding the placement process. Internship applications are available at the Department of Education, Durham, and the Office of Teacher Education, Manchester. Admission to the internship requires a completed application to the internship, admission to the graduate school, and a consultation with the director of field experiences. Please note: Undergraduates interested in the master’s degree in early childhood education, the early childhood special education option, and special education do not apply for internships in their senior year. Internships for this program are arranged with program faculty once core graduate requirements are met.

Admission to the Program
Step 1.
Exploring Teaching is open to all students, subject to available space. Approximately 150 students are accepted each semester.

Step 2.
Continuation in professional coursework is dependent upon positive recommendations from Education 500, Exploring Teaching.

Step 3. Admission to the internship and the graduate program requires acceptance to the Graduate School. The process is competitive because of high admissions standards and limited space in the program. Approximately 80 percent of applicants for Phase III are accepted.
In determining admission of students to teacher education graduate programs, several criteria are used:

1. Undergraduate Grade-Point Average
The undergraduate grade-point average of the middle 50 percent of students admitted to the graduate programs in teacher education falls in the range of 3.15-3.53.

2. The Graduate Record Examination Scores
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) minimum acceptable scores are as follows:  Verbal, 146-154; Quantitative, 140-152; Writing, 4.0-5.0.

3. Recommendations
Positive recommendations from EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching, or the equivalent and from those able to relay information about a candidate’s performance in teaching situations or related areas are important. Recommendations from undergraduate subject major professors also are important.

In the admission process, the program seeks evidence that candidates have the following knowledge, abilities, and dispositions: (1) motives to teach that include a strong social commitment to contribute to society through education; (2) a disposition to care for students—each and every one; (3) the ability to interact positively with children and adults; (4) the capacity to win the respect of their peers and be effective in group interaction, showing openness to the needs and views of others; (5) well-developed communication skills, including speaking, writing, and listening skills as well as an ability to engage others in both the giving and receiving of information and feelings; (6) perceptiveness: the ability to identify and process the relevant details in a given environment, especially in the context of a classroom; (7) the ability to make reasonable judgments in the context of complex situations that change from moment to moment; (8) the capacity for clear thinking and an ability to translate complex thoughts into simple and clear explanations; (9) superior academic skills: extensive knowledge of at least one major discipline, intellectual curiosity, and the ability to be open to the unknown; (10) a disposition to take charge of one’s own learning, which includes the active pursuit of feedback and the willingness to take thoughtful risks.

Accelerated Master's Program
UNH undergraduate seniors with a minimum of a 3.2 cumulative grade point average at the end of the first semester of their senior year and undergraduate juniors with a minimum of a 3.2 cumulative grade point average at the end of the second semester of their junior year can apply for “early admission” to the Graduate School (November 1st deadline for seniors, February 1st deadline for juniors). Such candidates may register for a maximum of 12 credits of dual-credit coursework (undergraduate/graduate level course work, e.g., 700/800) prior to completing their bachelor’s degree. A student must be admitted to the Graduate School before the start of the semester in which the course(s) will be taken in order to receive graduate credit. Once accepted a student must maintain the minimum 3.2 cumulative grade point average until their undergraduate degree is awarded. A student would apply for early admission on the regular Graduate School application available at www.gradschool.unh.edu.

Four-Year, Undergraduate Option
A bachelor’s degree including a one-semester student-teaching requirement allows students to be recommended for licensure in certain specialized areas. Those areas are mathematics, music, Pre-K-3rd grade, and physical education.

These program options include a major appropriate for the licensure being sought, in addition to the following core professional courses or their equivalent: EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching; EDUC 700, Educational Structure and Change; EDUC 701, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology; EDUC 703, Alternative Teaching Models; EDUC 705, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education; EDUC 751, Educating the Exceptional Learner; and EDUC 694, Supervised Student Teaching.

For admission to supervised student teaching, a minimum 2.8 cumulative grade-point average at the time of application to student teaching are required. Students in music, mathematics, and physical education need to apply by March 1st of the junior year and October 15th of the senior year for spring semester to the Department of Education for student teaching.  An unofficial transcript and a current résumé must accompany the application. Return applications to the Department of Education Office, 203 Morrill Hall.

Students also may become licensed for K-3 (early childhood licensure) by completing the master’s degree program in early childhood education.

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English (ENGL)

» http://cola.unh.edu/english

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Chairperson: Andrew H. Merton
Professor: Monica E. Chiu, Burt H. Feintuch, Michael K. Ferber, Diane P. Freedman, James Krasner, Douglas M. Lanier, Rochelle Lieber, Lisa MacFarlane, Mekeel McBride, Andrew H. Merton, Thomas R. Newkirk, David Rivard, Rachel Trubowitz, David H. Watters
Associate Professor: Brigitte Gabcke Bailey, Dennis Britton, Robin Hackett, Susan M. Hertz, Delia C. Konzett, Martin McKinsey, Lisa C. Miller, Sean D. Moore, Petar Ramadanovic, Siobhan Senier, Sarah Way Sherman, Sandhya Shetty
Affiliate Associate Professor: Georgeann Murphy
Assistant Professor: Maya Ravindranath Abtahian, Cristy Beemer, Tom Haines, Soo Hyon Kim, Alecia M. Magnifico, Courtney Marshall, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, Thomas Payne, Reginald A. Wilburn, Ann J. Williams
Instructor: Marcos J. Del Hierro
Senior Lecturer: Pamela Barksdale, Shelley Girdner, Clark Knowles, Cindy Pulkkinen, Janet Schofield
Lecturer: Mary Berguin, Molly Campbell, Kathleen Cobb, Kaia DeMatteo, Denise Desrosiers, Timothy Duffy, Stephanie Harzewski, Meghan Heckman, David Howland, Carolyn J. Hutton, Krista L. Jackman, Matthias Konzett, Rachel Lachance, Andrea Minnis, Christine O'Keefe, Thomas Palance, James Rioux, Elissa Scogland, Nancy Sell, Oksana Semenova, Laura A. Smith, Kevin Smith, Charli Valdez, Hulya Varlikli, Melinda White, Leah D. Williams, Carol A. Zickell

The English department offers four majors: English, English Literature, English Teaching, and English/Journalism. A fifth undergraduate program is the interdepartmental Linguistics major.

Through these diverse but interrelated programs of study, the English department pursues a three-pronged mission in undergraduate instruction. We seek first to train students in the professional study of literature in the English language.  In conjunction with this broad, multifaceted aim, we strive to educate students about the history and nature of English language in its spoken and written forms. As a third and equally important part of our mission, we teach students to write clearly, persuasively, and elegantly. In all five of its undergraduate majors, the English department provides students with the kinds of critical thinking, research, and writing skills that will serve them well in their personal and professional lives.

The English Major
The dual objectives of the general English major are to provide all students with a common core of literary experience and to offer the opportunity to shape a course of study suited to their personal interests. Flexible requirements place a responsibility on each student to devise a program that has an intelligent rationale. For example, students with a special interest in writing are free to take the minimum number of literature courses (five) and complete their major by taking offerings in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry writing.  All the undergraduate courses offered by the department are open to English majors so that students may sample a range of courses in literature, linguistics, creative or nonfiction writing, and English teaching, according to particular interests that change and grow. 

By its very nature, the English major is broad, open, and liberal.  It enables students to sample a variety of courses in order to understand the operation of language from many perspectives. 

For the English major, students must complete a minimum of 40 credits of major coursework with a grade of C- or better, with the exception of ENGL 419, which must be completed with a grade of C or better. Students must complete ENGL 419, two 500-level courses (or one 500-level course and ENGL/LING 405), six courses numbered 600 and above, and one additional 500-, 600-, or 700-level English course of their choosing. In selecting these courses, students must be sure to meet the following distribution requirements:

1. Two courses in literature written before 1800: either two advanced courses (numbered 600 or above), or one advanced course and ENGL 512 or ENGL 513.

2. Two courses in literature written since 1800: either two advanced courses, or one advanced course and one course from the following list: ENGL 514, 515, or 516.

3. One course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories. Students may choose from: ENGL 517, 540, 550, 609, 690, 738, 739, 740, 693R, 797R. Other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the adviser.

The Discovery Program capstone for English majors is one of the following: the English Major Seminar (ENGL 787), a 700-level class taken for capstone credit, one additional 700-level class, or a writing portfolio. (See the English Department website for specific descriptions of these requirements.)

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course toward their English major requirements.

Students interested in majoring in English should consult Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313.

The English Literature Major
The English literature major has been developed for those students looking for a more focused study of literature, especially those who plan to go on to graduate school in English or other fields in the humanities. Its requirements have been designed to engage students in a sustained study of literature that explores the formal, historical, cultural, and theoretical dimensions of written texts. 

These requirements are designed to strengthen students’ knowledge of literary history and cultural contexts, forms of literary expression, and the interpretive questions that shape critical inquiry. Students in this program will develop a deep understanding and appreciation of literatures in English, including both British and American literatures, as well as literary traditions organized around other principles, such as postcolonial or African-American.  The English literature major also encourages students to develop a higher proficiency in critical writing, in formulating and addressing complex problems, and in synthesizing research.

For the English literature major, students must complete a minimum of 40 credits of major coursework with a grade of C- or better, with the exception of ENGL 419, which must be completed with a grade of C or better. Additional requirements include two 500-level courses, one of which must be a survey course; ENGL 619; and ENGL 787. A minimum of six courses must be completed at the 600 level or higher. In selecting courses, students must be sure to meet the following distribution requirements (please note that, in many cases, a single course may satisfy a requirement in two or more categories):

1. Two courses in literature written prior to 1800: either two advanced courses (600 level and above) or one advanced course and ENGL 512 or ENGL 513.

2. Two courses in literature written since 1800: either two advanced courses or one advanced course and one of the following: ENGL 514, 515, or 516.

3. One American literature course at the 600/700 level.

4. One British literature course at the 600/700 level.

5. Two courses that investigate and question representations of identity (ENGL 517, 540, 555, 581, 585, 586, 681, 685, 690, 738, 739, 740, 775, or 777); genre, including film, with the exception of ENGL 533 (616, 618, 630, 631, 632, or 777); and/or theoretical positions (ENGL 713, 714). Other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the adviser.

6. One course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories. Students may choose from ENGL 517, 540, 550, 609, 690, 738, 739, 740, 693R, 797R. Other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the adviser.

The Discovery Program capstone for English Literature majors is the English Major Seminar, ENGL 787.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course toward their English major requirements.

Students interested in majoring in English Literature should consult Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313, or the director of the English Literature program.

The English Teaching Major
The English teaching major is designed for students wishing to teach English in middle or high schools (grades 5-12). Students receive a B.A. in English Teaching upon completion of their undergraduate studies. Completion of the undergraduate major does not in itself, however, meet state certification requirements to teach in public schools in New Hampshire. English teaching majors who want to gain certification at UNH must apply for admission to (and complete) graduate study, including coursework and a year-long internship within the Department of Education. (Students usually apply for the Master’s program in their senior year; please see the Department of Education for details on the M.A.T. and M.Ed. programs.) Much of the work for a master's degree may be completed during this fifth year, likely including additional time spent in summer courses or additional semesters. Most students, however, will earn certification at the end of the fifth year and receive the graduate degree. The New Hampshire teaching certificate is recognized by many but not all states. 

The goal of the English teaching major is to prepare students as informed, thoughtful, and skilled English teachers who will become educational leaders in their schools and, more broadly, in the profession itself. To that end, the department seeks to make its preservice teachers thoroughly familiar with the knowledge base available in the Departments of English and Education. From their courses within the English department, students learn what the study of English entails and how areas of knowledge and the abilities to read, write, and discuss can best be taught to students in grades 5-12. Preservice teachers also acquire knowledge of certain content areas, such as American and British literature and English grammar. From their courses within the education department, students learn about human development and learning, the history and structure of schools, and different philosophical perspectives on public education. Finally, through the yearlong teaching internship, students apply their knowledge from both sources to actual practice. This requirement reflects a core belief that the opportunity to combine theory and practice is essential in preparing effective beginning teachers.

Completion of the undergraduate teaching major does not in itself meet state certification requirements. Students should enroll in the undergraduate major and:

1.  Pass the following English courses with an average of 2.5 or better: ENGL 419; 514; 516; 657; 725 & 726 or 710 & 792; 718 or 791; two additional literature courses numbered 600 or above; one course that addresses race, the construction of race, and racial theories from a department-approved list (other courses may count, when relevant and with prior written approval of the student’s adviser); and any English department course in writing, linguistics, critical theory, film, or literature (except 401, 403, and 444). ENGL 512 or 513 may be substituted for one of the two required literature courses numbered 600 or above.

2.  Apply for the fifth-year teaching internship and master’s degree program by fall or spring of their senior year (usually September 30 for the internship and November 1 or February 1 for the master’s program). Students with a GPA of 3.2 or better can apply for the master's degree program in their junior year. If accepted early, the student can earn graduate credit for up to three undergraduate English or education courses.

3.  Complete a writing portfolio.

The Discovery Program capstone for English Teaching majors is the Writing Portfolio.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course towards their English major requirements.

Students interested in majoring in English teaching should consult Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313, or the director of the English Teaching program.

The English/Journalism Major
The English/journalism major focuses on the study and practice of rigorous reporting and nonfiction storytelling in many forms. It prepares students for careers in writing, editing, and digital journalism. It also incorporates the study of literature, an important foundation for critical thinking and storytelling. In addition to learning the basic skills of interviewing, fact gathering, verification, and writing in both news and feature styles, students are taught to produce stories for digital platforms using audio, photo, video, and more. These skills will launch successful careers in journalism or any vocation that requires strong research and communication skills.

English/journalism majors must complete ENGL 401 with a B or better before taking the first journalism course, ENGL 534, 21st Century Journalism: How the News Works. Students must get a B or better in 534 to continue on to ENGL 621, Writing and Reporting the News I. Students must then get a B or better in 621 to go on to ENGL 622, Writing and Reporting the News II, and ENGL 631, Introduction to Digital Reporting—both courses are required for the major.

Students then have to take two more journalism courses, choosing from ENGL 623, 711, 712, 722, 724, 735, 708. Certain courses publish student writing digitally, at times in collaboration with professional news outlets. Students are also encouraged to write and edit for student publications such as The New Hampshire and Main Street. Beyond these requirements, majors work at one media internship for a semester (ENGL 720). Students must get at least a B in 621 and permission of their 622 or 631 instructor to do the internship. A faculty member supervises the internships, which are central to the English/journalism major, requiring students to use their new skills in a professional environment.

In addition to their journalism courses, English/journalism majors must complete ENGL 419 with a grade of C or better. They must also take the following literature courses:

  1. one course in literature written prior to 1800;
  2. one course in literature written since 1800;
  3. one course that addresses race, the construction of race and racial theories. To fulfill this requirement, students may choose from ENGL 517, 540, 550, 609, 690, 738, 739, 740, 693R, 797R. Other courses may count when relevant and with prior written approval of the instructor.

Because media outlets expect even entry-level staff to have an area of expertise, English/journalism majors must take a three-course concentration in another field, such as sociology, German, environmental science, criminal justice, or other English disciplines (e.g. African American studies). Courses taken for a minor will count toward the three-course concentration.

The Discovery Program capstone for English/journalism majors is the Journalism Internship, ENGL 720.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Majors entering the department in Fall 2012 and beyond may only count one online course toward their English major requirements.

Students interested in the English/journalism major should see Carla Cannizzaro, coordinator of the Department of English, 113 Hamilton Smith Hall, (603) 862-1313, or the director of the Journalism Program.

English Minor
Students who wish to minor in English at UNH must complete five courses (20 credits). At least three of the courses must be at the 600 level or above. ENGL 419 is recommended as one of the five courses. ENGL 401, First-Year Writing, and ENGL 415, "Literature and...," courses cannot be applied toward the English minor. No more than two transfer courses can be applied toward the English minor. The minimum acceptable grade for each course is C-.

Writing Programs
The Department of English offers courses for students interested in becoming writers. Up to four consecutive creative writing workshops can be taken in fiction or in poetry, as well as a course in form and theory of either genre. The instructors for these courses are professional writers. 

Writing Minor
Students must complete at least five 4-credit courses (20 credits) from the list of approved courses. At least three of the courses must be at the 600 level or higher. ENGL 415, 'Literature and...,' courses cannot be applied toward the English writing minor. The minimum acceptable grade for each course is C-. No more than two transfer courses can be applied toward the English writing minor. English literature and English teaching majors may declare a writing minor with the approval of their faculty adviser. A maximum of two English courses (8 credits) are allowed to double-count toward the literature or teaching major and writing minor. Other English Department majors are not eligible to declare a writing minor.

 

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European Cultural Studies (ECS)

» https://cola.unh.edu/european-cultural-studies

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Coordinator: Mary E. Rhiel
Core Faculty: Arna Beth Bronstein, Carmen García de la Rasilla, Jeffry M. Diefendorf, Marco Dorfsman, Patricia A. Emison, Robert W. Eshbach, Aleksandra Fleszar, Piero Garofalo, Eliga H. Gould, Nicoletta F. Gullace, Eleanor M. Hight, Edward T. Larkin, Ronald D. LeBlanc, Claire-Lise Malarte-Feldman, Jaume Martí-Olivella, Catherine M. Peebles, Janet L. Polasky, Petar Ramadanovic, Mary E. Rhiel, Ruth J. Sample, Robert C. Scharff, Rachel Trubowitz

European Cultural Studies (ECS) is an interdisciplinary major in which students study the field of cultural analysis in conjunction with an individually designed focus on a European topic. Each student will work with an adviser and the ECS Steering Committee to design a course of study that best suits the student’s interests and goals. The ECS major is driven in part by the belief that language is an integral part of culture and not merely a tool for the study of literature. By the same token, the study of European history, philosophy, politics, and so forth can only be enriched by the addition of critical perspectives developed in literature and language study.

The ECS major has five objectives:

  1. It will introduce students to the major contours of European history, politics, languages, and arts.
  2. It will introduce students to the social, political, economic, and cultural developments of the new unifying Europe.
  3. The cultural studies component of the major highlights the contentious nature of this “unifying Europe.” Thus the major will prepare students for work in fields related to Europe and European/American relations. More generally, it will encourage a nuanced perception of cultural differences, which will in turn affect students’ perceptions of themselves and others as participants in an uneasily shared world.
  4. Cultural studies skills will facilitate and enable students to consider the past not just as an academic subject but as an unfolding inherited tradition.
  5. A B.A. in European cultural studies will be a preparatory degree for graduate study in numerous fields from international relations to the humanities.

European Cultural Studies Major
The ECS major consists of 40 credits to be distributed in the following way:

  1. Course on Europe (ECS 400). Course on European topics, covering art, literature, history, political science or other domains (4 credits).
  2. Course on cultural studies (ECS 500). Introduction to the field of cultural studies as applied to the study of Europe. In years when ECS 500 is not offered, students may take ENGL 619, Critical Approaches to Literature; or HIST 625, Intellectual European History (4 credits).
  3. Foundation Courses (8 credits):
    1. Languages: 504 or equivalent in a European language or an approved alternate course.
    2. Arts/humanities or social sciences: One course from the following offerings: ARTS 480 (Introduction to Art History), ENGL 651 or 652 (Comparative Literatures, when inclusive of European literatures), HUMA 501, 502, 503 (when focused on European topics), MUSI 402 (Survey of Music History), ECON 630 (Comparative Study of Economic Systems), HIST 435 or 436 (Western Civilization), HIST 565 (Women in European History), HIST 650 (European Socialism), HIST 656 (20th Century Europe), POLT 550 (Major Foreign Governments), POLT 552 (Contemporary European Politics).
  4.  Focus Courses: The focus portion of the major consists of an individually designed grouping of four courses that allows students to pursue their interests and will give coherence to the major. Students will discuss their proposed curriculum with an ECS adviser and submit a proposal to the ECS Steering Committee. Possible foci include: European art and identity; politics and culture in modern Europe; history of European science and philosophy; focus by nation. At least two courses for the focus must be at the 600 level or higher (16 credits).
  5. Course on Critical Methods in Cultural Studies (ECS 550) prepares student for research and writing techniques needed to complete the senior thesis. (4 credits). When ECS 550 is not offered, students may take Humanities 500.
  6. Discovery Program Capstone: Senior Thesis (ECS 798 and 799). Students will work together with their advisers to formulate their topic, consider appropriate approaches, locate relevant resources and write a thesis. At the end of the semester, students present their work to a committee of three ECS faculty members (4 credits).

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

European Cultural Studies Minor
The minor in European cultural studies consists of 20 credits (five courses), including ECS 400, 500, 504 level in a European language, two foundation courses, and one elective.

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French (FREN)

» https://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/french-ba

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Professor: Nadine S. Bérenguier, Claire-Lise Malarte-Feldman
Senior Lecturer: Claire-Helene Gaudissart, Anna K. Sandstrom
Lecturer: Kathy Richman, Emilie Talpin

The French Major
The French major offered by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures provides knowledge of the language, literature, and culture of France and other French-speaking countries around the world. An undergraduate major in French is useful in a variety of careers, such as business, law, government or public service, and teaching. Students considering a career in teaching should consult with the Department of Education. In addition, they should make special note of the LLC 791 requirement (which does not count toward completion of a major in French). 

A major consists of 40 credits in courses numbered 631 or above, in which readings are in French. Coursework for the French major must be completed with a grade of C or better. Majors are required to take FREN 631-632, 651, 652, 790, and at least two 700-level literature courses at the Durham campus. Students are required to enroll in at least one course each semester in their major program and to spend at least one semester abroad in a French-speaking country. The UNH-managed program in Dijon is highly recommended and offers year- and semester-long options. Other options are available, but non-UNH programs must be chosen in consultation with a major adviser and the UNH Center for International Education. Students in majors with inflexible curricula (like engineering, some sciences, and health care) who wish to complete a second major in French should consult with a French adviser about possible alternate means of satisfying the study abroad requirement.

Transfer students must earn a minimum of 12 major credits at the Durham campus. Of these 12 credits, one course must be FREN 790 and at least one 700-level course in French/Francophone literature. To complement their major, students are strongly encouraged to take either HIST 647 or 648 and courses in the literature of other countries as well as in fields such as music, art, philosophy, history, political science, and sociology that provide insight into nonliterary aspects of culture. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing FREN 790, Advanced Language and Style.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. However, majors may use the required study abroad experience to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement.

The French Studies Major
This major gives students a variety of perspectives not only on French literature but also on issues pertaining to the Francophone world. A major in French studies prepares graduates to negotiate successfully the economic reality of an increasingly international job market, and provides them with a wide range of career prospects after they leave the University.

The major consists of 44 credits in French courses numbered 631 or above and of cross-listed courses in other departments, including the following requirements: FREN 631-632, 651, 652, 675 or 676 or 677, 790, and two 700-level courses in French or Francophone literature. In addition, at least three elective courses (12 credits) closely related to French and Francophone cultural studies are required. These are to be chosen in consultation with a faculty adviser from among the following departments: history, geography, or anthropology, one 600- to 700-level course; art history or music, one 600- to 700-level course; economics, political science, or education, one 600- to 700-level course. Coursework for the French studies major must be completed with a grade of C or better. Students are required to enroll in at least one course each semester in their major program and to spend at least one semester abroad in a French-speaking country. The UNH-managed study abroad program in Dijon is highly recommended. It offers both year- and semester-long programs. Other options are available, but non-UNH programs must be chosen in close consultation with a major adviser and the UNH Center for International Education. Students in majors with inflexible curricula who wish to complete a second major in French Studies should consult with a French adviser about alternate means of satisfying the study abroad requirement.

Transfer students must earn a minimum of 12 credits on the Durham campus. Of these 12 credits, one course must be FREN 790 and at least one 700-level course in French/Francophone literature. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing FREN 790, Advanced Language and Style.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. However, majors may use the required study abroad experience to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement.

The French Minor
A minor in French consists of 20 credits in French courses numbered 503 and above. No fewer than three courses have to be taken at UNH. No more than one course conducted in English (e.g., FREN 525, 526, 621, 622) will be counted toward the minor, although students may elect to take more than one such course provided they earn more than 20 credits. Those entering the minor at FREN 504 or higher will be expected to complete FREN 651 or 652. LLC 791 does not count for the minor. 

The French Studies Minor
The minor in French studies consists of 20 credits numbered FREN 503 or above. No fewer than three courses have to be taken at UNH. No more than one course conducted in English (FREN 525, 526, 621, 622) will be counted toward the minor. Students entering the minor at FREN 504 or higher will be expected to complete FREN 651 or 652. LLC 791 does not count toward the minor. Members of the department supervise the work of both majors and minors.

Study Abroad in Dijon
The department offers a junior year and semesters abroad at the University of Burgundy in Dijon, France (see FREN 690). This program is open to all qualified students at the University of New Hampshire who have completed, with a grade of B- or better, FREN 631-632 and FREN 651-652 by the end of the semester preceding their departure. Early consultation with the director of the program is urged. Non-credit orientation meetings are required during the semester prior to departure.

Summer Study in Dijon
Eight weeks of intensive French literature, culture, and civilization courses at the CIEF (Centre International des Etudes Francaises) at the Université de Bourgogne in Dijon, France. The course is only open to French double majors who cannot spend a semester abroad for documented reasons. By petition only, with a minimum GPA of 2.5. Pre-requisites: FREN 631, 632, 651, and 652. Offered summer only. Special fee. 8 credits.

Teaching Assistantship in France
Each year the French government offers teaching assistantships in a French secondary school to graduating French majors or minors. Applications are accepted during the fall semester.
 

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Geography (GEOG)

» https://cola.unh.edu/geography

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Chairperson: Blake Gumprecht
Professor: Russell G. Congalton, Alasdair D. Drysdale
Associate Professor: Blake Gumprecht
Assistant Professor: Mary D. Stampone
Lecturer: Timothy Pruett

Geography is the study of how and why things vary from place to place around the world. Geographers study the environment. They study the geography of human activity. They study places and all that makes them distinctive. They study how people interact with the natural world.

Geography is a multifaceted and inherently interdisciplinary field. It is an integrating discipline, drawing on knowledge from many other fields in order to understand geographic patterns and the character of individual places. Geography is also a way of looking at the world. Nearly any subject can be viewed through a geographic lens.

The Department of Geography at UNH is strongest in cultural, political, urban, historical, and environmental geography, climatology, and geotechniques. Individual faculty members possess regional specialties in New England, North America, Latin America, the Middle East, and Japan.

The geography major provides undergraduates with a solid foundation in geography while enabling them to develop a specialization in one of the three main areas of geography—human geography, environmental geography, and geotechniques. A geography degree will prepare students to pursue a wide variety of careers or enter graduate school.

UNH geography graduates have gone on to careers as teachers, geographic information systems analysts, pilots, environmental consultants, hurricane hunters, city planners, emergency medical physicians, meteorologists, land surveyors, real estate agents, sports psychologists, “Jeopardy” clue researchers, cartographers, marketing managers, financial portfolio strategists, transportation planners, social analysts, travel consultants, college professors, and more. 

Requirements
To earn a bachelor of arts in geography, students must complete 10 geography courses with a minimum grade of C-minus: five core courses, four courses in one of three areas of concentration, plus one elective. Students must select an area of  concentration within six months of declaring geography as their major.

Core courses
All geography majors must complete five core courses:

GEOG 401, Regional Geography of the Western World
GEOG 402, Regional Geography of the Non-Western World
GEOG 572, Geography of the Natural Environment
GEOG 581, Human Geography
GEOG 658, Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

The core courses are intended to provide students a basic understanding of human, physical, and world regional geography, plus geographic information systems. They should be taken as early as possible in a student’s program because they provide a foundation for more advanced coursework.

Students are encouraged to complete GEOG 595, Statistics for Geographers, or another statistics course approved by their adviser, before enrolling in GEOG 658.

Human Geography Concentration
Intended for students most interested in the geography of human activity, including population, urban, cultural, political, and economic geography.

Students must complete three of the following, including one course at the 600-level or above:

GEOG 582, Economic Geography
GEOG 583, Urban Geography
GEOG 584, Political Geography
GEOG 588, Geography of Food
GEOG 673, Issues in Environmental Geography
GEOG 680, Historical Geography
GEOG 685, Geography of Population and Development
GEOG 690, Geography of Third-World Development

Students must complete one of the following regional geography courses:

GEOG 510, Geography of New England
GEOG 514, Geography of the United States and Canada
GEOG 520, Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
GEOG 540, Geography of the Middle East
GEOG 541, Geography of Japan
GEOG 550, Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa

Environmental Geography Concentration
Intended for students most interested in the geography of the natural environment, including weather, climate, landforms, biogeography, and human-environment interactions.

Students must complete three of the following, including one course at the 600-level or above:

GEOG 473, Elements of Weather
GEOG 560, Geography of Natural Hazards
GEOG 573, Biogeography
GEOG 574, Geography of Landforms
GEOG 670, Climatology
GEOG 671, Advanced Weather Analysis
GEOG 673, Issues in Environmental Geography

Students must also complete GEOG 595, Statistics for Geographers, or another statistics course approved by their adviser. If approved statistics course also satisfies a Discovery category requirement, student must take a fourth course from the above list.

Geotechniques Concentration
Intended for students most interested in geographic information systems, aerial photo interpretation, remote sensing, photogrammetry, and other geographic techniques.

Students must complete three of the following:

GEOG 650, Field Methods in Geography
GEOG 757, Remote Sensing of the Environment
GEOG 759, Digital Image Processing for Natural Resources
GEOG 760, Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources

Students must also complete GEOG 595, Statistics for Geographers, or another statistics course approved by their adviser. If approved statistics course also satisfies a Discovery category requirement, student must take a fourth course from the above list.

Additional Requirements
Students entering UNH beginning in August 2010 must pass a comprehensive examination in their senior year to fulfill the Discovery capstone requirement.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

The University’s foreign language requirement can be fulfilled by the following languages: French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Latin, or Greek. Other languages will be considered by petition.

No course may fulfill both a major requirement and a General Education or Discovery category requirement, except when geography is a student’s second major.

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German (GERM)

» https://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/german-ba

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Professor: Edward T. Larkin
Associate Professor: Mary E. Rhiel
Lecturer: Mary Marshall Campbell

The German major is offered by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. This program is of interest to the following groups of students:

• Those who have a special interest in the German language, literature, and culture.

• Those who intend to enter fields in which a background in foreign languages and literatures is desirable, such as international business and law, trade, journalism, science, library science, government service, and international service organizations.

• Those who plan to teach German in secondary schools. Since most secondary schools require their teachers to teach more than one subject, students planning to enter teaching at this level should plan their programs carefully. They should combine a major in one of the languages and its literature with a minor or at least a meaningful sequence of courses in another subject. Dual majors also are possible. For certification requirements, see the section coordinator.

A major consists of 10 courses in German beyond German 402. Required for the major are GERM 503, 504, 525, 601, 631, 632 (or their equivalents), and four more courses, which must be taken at the 600 or 700 levels. A grade of C- or better is required in all major coursework. Majors are required to spend a minimum of one semester in an approved German-speaking study abroad program, or equivalent. For students spending one semester abroad, three of the four upper-level courses are normally taken in Durham. For students spending an academic year abroad, two of the four upper-level courses are normally taken in Durham. LLC 791 does not count for major credit; 791 is recommended as an elective and required for teacher certification. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing any 700-level German course (including 797 and 798).

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. However, majors may use the required study abroad experience to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement.

A minor consists of five courses in German numbered 503 and above. The minor may include one course taught in English (521, 523, 524, 525) but not LLC 791.

Study Abroad
The University allows both German majors and minors and other students to attend approved study abroad programs for UNH credit. Students  may attend accredited semester or year programs at universities such as Berlin, Freiburg, Heidelberg, Innsbruck, Marburg, Munich, Tübingen, or Vienna. Most study abroad programs require a minimum of two years of college German. Intensive language study programs include the Goethe-Institut centers in Germany, which offer four- or eight-week courses. For details, see the German coordinator or the foreign study coordinator in the Center for International Education. Students may also do an internship in a German firm or organization (see GERM 595). Financial aid applies to all approved programs.

Summer Study in Berlin, Germany
The UNH German Program manages a five-week program in Berlin, Germany. Students earn 4 or 8 credits through German 586, designed to give students an immersion experience in the German language and culture. In the course of five weeks, students will receive eighty hours of intensive language instruction at the appropriate level (elementary, intermediate, or advanced) at the BSI Private Language School in central Berlin. No prior German language study is required. On designated weekday afternoons, students will gather for cultural excursions and discussions with the on-site UNH faculty member. Students enrolling for 4 credits can receive the UNH German Program language course equivalent of one semester of language study. Students enrolling for 8 credits will receive the UNH German Program language course equivalent of one semester of language study as well as engage in additional UNH faculty-guided cultural study, fulfilling German 525 and Discovery World Culture. Students may fulfill the bachelor of arts language requirement by taking the equivalent of Intermediate German at the BSI Language School or by taking the equivalent of the first semester of Elementary German with the program and then independently continuing language instruction at the BSI for one month beyond the program study period, for a total of 8 weeks. Required pretravel meetings at UNH will prepare students for the Berlin experience. In line with UNH’s goals to educate students to become global citizens, this immersion experience will give students insight into what it means to experience a different culture and language. For more information, contact Mary Rhiel at (603) 862-0063, e-mail berlin.program@unh.edu, or visit cola.unh.edu/study-abroad/program/germany-berlin.

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Greek (GREK)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/greek-ba

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Professor: Stephen M. Trzaskoma
Associate Professor: Stephen Andrew Brunet, Robert Scott Smith
Senior Lecturer: Richard E. Clairmont
Lecturer: Susan Curry, Anna Newman

The Greek major is offered by the classics program of the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

The minimum requirements for a major in Greek are 32 credits in Greek, including GREK 401-402. A Greek major must complete as a minimum a 700-level course in the Greek language. A minimum of three courses must be taken at the Durham campus. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing any Greek course at the 700 level or through another option (Honors thesis, etc.) approved by the adviser.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Greek majors may take GREK 503 or 504 to satisfy both the World Culture Discovery Program requirement and to satisfy major requirements.

A Greek minor requires 20 credits of coursework in Greek. Students are encouraged to take courses in related fields such as Latin, classics, and ancient history, and to take part in overseas study programs in Greece. 

The coordinator is Stephen Brunet; Murkland Hall; Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; (603) 862-2077; e-mail stephen.brunet@unh.edu.

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History (HIST)

» https://cola.unh.edu/history

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Chairperson: Eliga H. Gould
Professor: W. Jeffrey Bolster, Jeffry M. Diefendorf, Ellen Fitzpatrick, Cathy A. Frierson, Jan V. Golinski, Eliga H. Gould, J. William Harris, Janet L. Polasky
Affiliate Professor: Stephen H. Hardy, Benjamin Harris
Associate Professor: Funso Afolayan, David Bachrach, Kurk Dorsey, Marion Girard Dorsey, Nicoletta F. Gullace, Yan Lu, Gregory McMahon, Julia E. Rodriguez, Lucy E. Salyer, Cynthia J. Van Zandt, Ethel Sara Wolper
Affiliate Associate Professor: Robert L. Macieski
Assistant Professor: Jessica M. Lepler, Elizabeth W. Mellyn, Jason Sokol
Lecturer: Thomas Anderson, Kathryn Askins, Addis Mason

The study of history is an essential element of the liberal arts education. The history major provides both an awareness of the past and the tools to evaluate and express one’s knowledge. The student who majors in history will have the opportunity to study the breadth of the human past and will acquire the skills in critical reading and writing that form the foundation of the educated life. The study of history may include all of human culture and society and provides tremendous latitude in the subjects that may be studied. The interdisciplinary nature of the field makes it a natural focus for study that may encompass a variety of other fields.

To complete a major in history, students must take ten, 4-credit history courses or their equivalent. Students who enter the University as history majors or who declare a major in history should take the first required course, HIST 500, Introduction to Historical Thinking, as soon as possible. To declare a major in history, students must have completed two history courses with a grade of C- or better. HIST 500 is a prerequisite for the second required course, HIST 797, Colloquium in History, which fulfills the Discovery Program capstone requirement for history majors and is taken during the senior year. Students should consult the list of topics for HIST 797 advertised each semester. Besides HIST 500 and HIST 797, a major must take at least eight courses, of which a minimum of three must be at the 600 level or above. Only one, HIST 695, Independent Study, may be used to fulfill the 600-level requirement, and no more than two independent study courses may count toward the ten-course requirement. No more than two 400-level courses may be counted toward the major requirements. Students must receive at least a C in HIST 500, and at least a C- in the other nine courses. Majors must maintain a 2.0 or better in all history courses. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

History majors must satisfy the language requirement for the B.A. degree in an international language that they could use for historical research. That list includes: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Students may petition the department curriculum committee for exceptions.

A student’s program of study must include two parts:

1. An area of specialization. A student must select at least four courses to serve as an area of specialization within the major. Up to two courses (each four credits or their equivalent) in the area of specialization may be taken in other departments; such courses must be 500-level or above and have the approval of the student’s adviser. The area of specialization may be in a nation, region, a time period, or an interdisciplinary field.

2. Complementary courses. A student must select, in consultation with his or her adviser, at least three history courses in fields outside the area of specialization, chosen to broaden his or her understanding of the range of history. Normally, each major should take at least one course from each of Groups I, II, and III, unless explicitly excused by his or her adviser. Group I contains all American history courses, Group II contains all European history courses, and Group III contains all other history courses.

The program must be planned in consultation with an adviser. A copy of the program, signed by the adviser, must be placed in a student's file no later than the second semester of his or her junior year. Courses at the 700-level will be judged by the adviser as to their applicability for area of specialization or complementation. The program may be modified with the adviser’s approval.

For transfer students, a minimum of five of the semester courses used to fulfill the major requirements must be taken at the University. One upper-level course may be transferred to satisfy the requirement that a major must take at least three courses numbered 600 or above. Transfer students must complete both HIST 500 or its equivalent and HIST 797.

A minor in history consists of 20 semester credits with C- or better and at least a 2.0 grade-point average in courses that the Department of History approves. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis may not be used for the minor. No more than 12 credits in 400-level courses may be used for this minor. For transfer students, no more than two transfer courses, or 8 transfer credits, may be used toward the minor. 

Students intending further work in history beyond the bachelor’s degree are urged to take HIST 775, Historical Methods.

Students intending to major in history should consult with the department secretary in Horton 405. Suggested programs for students with special interests or professional plans are available in the department office.

Undergraduate Awards for Majors
The Philip M. Marston Scholarship, an award of $500, is available to students who are interested in colonial or New England history and have demonstrated financial need. There are course requirements for this scholarship. More details are available from the history office.

Each spring, the members of the departmental undergraduate committee choose history majors to receive the following prizes in history:

The William Greenleaf Prize is given for the best senior colloquium paper. Award candidates must have a minimum grade-point average of 3.2 in history courses. Individuals may nominate themselves or may be nominated by faculty members.

The Allen Linden Prize for the best senior history thesis is funded by the Signal Fund.

The Charles Clark Prize is for the best essay or research paper submitted by a history major and is funded by the Signal Fund.

Phi Alpha Theta, the history honor society, is an international scholastic organization dedicated to promoting historical study on the undergraduate and graduate levels. Admission to the UNH Psi Pi chapter is open to undergraduates with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 and a grade-point average of 3.1 or better in history courses.
 

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Humanities (HUMA)

» https://cola.unh.edu/humanities

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Coordinator: Catherine M. Peebles
Professor: Michael K. Ferber, Jan V. Golinski, Eleanor M. Hight, Charlotte Elizabeth Witt
Senior Lecturer: Catherine M. Peebles
Lecturer: Nicole Ruane
Core Faculty: Jennifer K. Armstrong, Willem A. deVries, Marco Dorfsman, R. Valentine Dusek, Robert Haskins, Rebecca Karo, John R. Kayser, Edward T. Larkin, Ronald D. LeBlanc, Gregory McMahon, Elizabeth W. Mellyn, Petar Ramadanovic, David M. Richman

The humanities program examines the fundamental questions and issues of human civilization. Through studying diverse texts in the arts, music, literature, history, philosophy, and science, students seek answers to questions that thoughtful human beings must address in the course of their lives. Whether these questions come from Socrates (What is justice?), from Sir Thomas More (What is obligation to God?), from Raphael (What is beauty?), from Newton (What are the laws of nature?), or from Martin Luther King, Jr. (What is freedom?), they direct our attention to enduring human concerns and to texts that have suggested or illustrated the most profound and powerful answers.

Humanities Major
The humanities major consists of a minimum of 42 credits of academic work, with a minimum grade of C, including the following core requirements:

Critical Methods in the Humanities (HUMA 500). Students will be made acquainted with the methods and technology required for research in the humanities. Students should take this 4-credit course during the sophomore or junior year.

Integrated Core Courses (HUMA 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515). Each student takes at least two courses (8 credits) from the 510-515 sequence, preferably in the freshman and/or sophomore year.

Seminar in the Humanities (HUMA 700). Each student takes at least one offering (4 credits) of the Seminar in the Humanities, preferably during the junior or senior year. This seminar provides an opportunity for in-depth reading, viewing, and/or listening to texts and artifacts. The emphasis is on the multiple perspectives and methodologies that can be brought to bear upon these works from several humanistic disciplines.

Discovery Program Capstone:
Research Project in the Humanities (HUMA 798 and 799). Each student participates in the research tutorial (for a total of 6 credits) throughout the senior year. The tutorial provides a context within which students may discuss and receive direction in the course of completing a major research paper, the senior thesis. At the end of the second semester, students present their research to the faculty and their fellow students.

Additional Requirements. Beyond the 22 credits of core requirements, each student must fulfill the following requirements: (1) a minimum of eight additional credits from other humanities program courses; (2) an additional 12 credits from humanities program offerings and/or from the offerings of other departments and programs, with the advice and approval of each student’s major adviser or the program coordinator. These offerings should bear some relation to the student’s particular interests and senior research paper, as seems appropriate in each individual case. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Humanities Minor
The humanities minor consists of the following courses: (1) two courses (8 credits) from the 510/511/512/513/514/515 sequence; (2) two courses (8 credits) from other humanities program courses, one of which should be at the 600 level; and (3) seminar in the humanities (HUMA 700) or another approved course.

Inquiries about the humanities major and minor should be directed to Catherine Peebles, coordinator of the humanities program, 104 Huddleston Hall, (603) 862-3638; e-mail huma@unh.edu.
 

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International Affairs Dual Major (IA)

» http://www.unh.edu/cie/international-affairs-dual-major-minor

The international affairs program is administered by the UNH Center for International Education. For program description, see Special University Programs.

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Italian Studies (ITAL)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/italian-studies-minor

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Associate Professor: Amy Boylan, Piero Garofalo
Lecturer: Giuseppina Di Filippo, Mariagabriella Gangi, Kristen Swann

The Italian studies minor is offered by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. It provides students with the opportunity to explore the language, culture, and society of Italy through an interdisciplinary program. The minor consists of five courses beyond the Elementary Italian (ITAL 401-402) sequence and may include one course from a related field of study (e.g., ARTS 681-682, ECS 400, HIST 641) with a minimum grade of C. In addition, students must demonstrate linguistic proficiency at the level of intermediate Italian (ITAL 504 or an equivalent).

The Italian studies minor is advantageous for applicants to graduate and professional schools in Italian, modern languages, linguistics, film, history, theater, philosophy, and law. It is also a valuable asset for careers in economics, international affairs, international business, fashion, teaching, communications, translation, interpretation, government, and Foreign Service.

New students will be assigned to the proper course in consultation with the section coordinator.

Study Abroad

Students may participate in the UNH-in-Italy Program in the medieval city of Ascoli Piceno for a semester, year, or summer (see ITAL 685). The program allows students to register for UNH courses taught by UNH faculty. Students with advanced language skills also may enroll in courses at the University of Ascoli Piceno. Internships are available. There is no language prerequisite.
 

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Japanese (JPN)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/asian-studies

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Lecturer: Pamela B. Ikegami

For program description, see Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.
 

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Justice Studies Dual Major (JUST)

» http://cola.unh.edu/justice-studies

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Coordinator: Ellen S. Cohn
Clinical Associate Professor: Charles T. Putnam
Clinical Assistant Professor: Donna M. Perkins
Lecturer: Katherine Abbott
Core Faculty: Victoria L. Banyard, John J. Cerullo, Drew Christie, Ellen S. Cohn, Todd A. DeMitchell, Marion Girard Dorsey, Robert P. Eckstein, David Finkelhor, John T. Kirkpatrick, Michelle D. Leichtman, Alynna J. Lyon, Mary Malone, Courtney Marshall, Charles T. Putnam, Cesar Rebellon, Lucy E. Salyer, Susan J. Siggelakis, Nicholas J. Smith, James Tucker, Karen Van Gundy

The justice studies dual major program is an interdisciplinary area that blends topics from humanities departments (e.g., philosophy), social science departments (e.g., psychology, sociology, women’s studies), departments that include both humanities and social science faculty (history, political science), and professionally oriented departments (education, family studies, social work). Topics studied include courts, family violence, rights, substance abuse, juvenile justice, school law, children as witnesses, hate crimes, and community policing. Students will be required to choose a first major before they will be able to declare justice studies as a second major. The goal is to produce graduates who have a higher level of knowledge about law and justice in American society and in the world so that they will mature into more knowledgeable and effective citizens. The justice studies dual major is intended for students who are looking for careers in the justice system or who seek graduate training in law or social sciences and humanities related to the law.

Required Courses
The dual major in justice studies requires students to take a minimum of eight courses (32 credits), each completed with a grade of a C- or better. Students are required to have a grade-point average of a 2.5 or better before they can be accepted into the program. The dual major cannot be declared until after a first major has been declared. Students can count no more than two courses for both the first major and dual major, and students are not allowed to take more than two courses from any one department (except for JUST). An unlimited number of dual major courses can be used to satisfy Discovery requirements.

JUST 401, Introduction to Justice Studies
JUST 501, Research Methods (prerequisite: a statistics course)
JUST 601, Internship (seniors only) or JUST 602, Research Internship (seniors only)
JUST 701, Senior Seminar (writing-intensive course)

And one of the following three courses
POLT 407, Law and Society
POLT 507, Politics of Crime and Justice
SOC 515, Introductory Criminology

Elective Courses
Students are required to select three elective courses from the justice studies approved course list. This list is approved and published yearly by the Justice Studies Executive Committee.

BIOL 420, Intro to Forensic Science
CD 717, Law of Community Planning (offered every other year)
CMN 703, Seminar in Rhetorical Theory: Controversy and Reasoning in Law
CMN 765, Police Talk 
EDUC 767, Students, Teachers, and the Law
FS 772, International Approaches to Child Advocacy
FS  776, Children, Adolescents, and the Law
FS 794, Families and the Law
HMP 734, Health Law
HIST 509, Law in American Life
HIST 600, Crime and Punishment in Modern History
HIST 609, Special Topics: American Legal History
HIST 645, 19th Century European Great PowersDiplomacy and International Law
HMGT 625, Hospitality Law (only HMGT majors allowed)
HMGT 627, Employment Law
HUMA 650, Humanities and the Law: The Problem of Justice in Western Civilization
INCO 404F, Medicine and Law in the United States
JUST 401, Introduction to Justice Studies (required course)
JUST 405, Technology, Crime, and  Society
JUST 501, Research Methods (required course; prerequisite: a statistics course)
JUST 530, Inside the Courtroom
JUST 550/551, Mock Trial (must take yearlong course)
JUST 591, Forensic Psychology
JUST 601/602, Internship/Research Internship (required course)
JUST 650/651,  Budapest Study Abroad
JUST 695, Special Topics in Justice Studies (no more than two courses)
JUST 701, Senior Seminar (required course, writing-intensive course)
JUST 767, Students, Teachers, and the Law
JUST 795, Reading and Research (variable credit)
KIN 798, Sports Law
MGT 647, Business Law (only Business Administration, Accounting, and Business Administration and Management allowed)
MGT 648, Business Law II
NR 566, Wildlife Enforcement I
NR 718, Law of Natural Resources and Environment
PHIL 436, Social and Political Philosophy
PHIL 635, Philosophy of Law
PHIL 660, Law, Medicine, and Morals
PHIL 701, Value Theory
PHIL 730, Theories of Justice
PHIL 740, Advanced Topics in Philosophy of Law
POLT 407, Law and Society
POLT 444B, Cruel and Unusual
POLT 507, Politics of Crime and Justice
POLT 508, Supreme Court and the Constitution
POLT 513, Civil Rights and Liberties
POLT 520, Justice and the Political Community
POLT 547, Race and Justice in the Americas
POLT 568, Introduction to Intelligence (only when taught by Professor MacPherson)
POLT 660, Terrorism and Political Violence
POLT 701, The Courts and Public Policy
POLT 707, Criminal Justice Administration
POLT 708, Administrative Law
POLT 797C, The Drug Wars
POLT 798B, Security Intelligence
PSYC 591, Forensic Psychology
PSYC 755, Psychology of Law (prerequisite: Research Methods)
PSYC 756, Psychology of Crime and Justice (prerequisite: Research Methods)
PSYC 791, Advanced Topics: Psychology of Hate and/or Psychology of Delinquency
RMP 772, Law and Public Policy in Leisure Services (must have junior/senior status)
SOC 515, Introductory Criminology
SOC 525, Juvenile Crime and Delinquency
SOC 535, Homicide
SOC 620, Drugs and Society
SOC 650, Family Violence (must have junior/senior status)
SOC 655, Sociology of  Law and Justice
SOC 656, Terrorism
SOC 715, Criminological Theory
SOC 720, Sociology of Drug Use
SOC 780, Social Conflict
SOC 797, Special Topics: Crime and Justice
SW 525, Introduction to Social Welfare Policy
WS 595, Special Topics: Violence Against Women
WS 595, Special Topics: Gender and the Law

The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing either JUST 601, Internship, or JUST 602, Research Internship, AND JUST 701, Senior Seminar.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Students who are interested in a dual major in justice studies will need to file an Intent to Dual Major form. The form is available in the justice studies office or can be downloaded from the program website at cola.unh.edu/justice-studies. Program offices are located in Room 202 of Huddleston Hall and are open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information, please contact Ellen Cohn at (603) 862-3197, e-mail ellen.cohn@unh.edu; or Debbie Briand at (603) 862-1716, e-mail justice.studies@unh.edu.

For program information on the justice studies minor, see Interdisciplinary Programs.

For program information on the forensics minor, see Interdisciplinary Programs.

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Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (LLC)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc

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Chairperson: Lina Lee
Professor: Nadine S. Bérenguier, Janet Gold, Edward T. Larkin, Ronald D. LeBlanc, Lina Lee, Claire-Lise Malarte-Feldman, Stephen M. Trzaskoma
Associate Professor: Amy Boylan, Arna Beth Bronstein, Stephen Andrew Brunet, Holly R. Cashman, John M. Chaston, Carmen García de la Rasilla, Marco Dorfsman, Aleksandra Fleszar, Piero Garofalo, Lori Hopkins, Jaume Martí-Olivella, Mary E. Rhiel, Robert Scott Smith
Assistant Professor: Scott E. Weintraub
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Richard C. House
Senior Lecturer: Richard E. Clairmont, Claire-Helene Gaudissart, Catherine M. Peebles, Anna K. Sandstrom, Linda J. Thomsen
Lecturer: Jorge Abril Sanchez, Eliani Benaion Basile, Mary Marshall Campbell, Susana Castillo-Rodriguez, Susan Curry, Giuseppina Di Filippo, Mariagabriella Gangi, Lili Guo, Sarah E. Hirsch, Pamela B. Ikegami, Ruwa Majid-Pokorny, Leticia Mantilla-Clavijo, Robert Constantine Newman, Anna Newman, Kathy Richman, Maria I. Rossi, Kristen Swann, Emilie Talpin, Yige Wang, Jia Xie, Xi Zang

The Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures offers undergraduate majors in classics, French, French studies, German, Greek, Latin, Russian, Spanish, and European cultural studies, plus a minor in Italian and coursework in Arabic, Chinese, Hittite, Sanskrit, Japanese, and Portuguese. An M.A. in Spanish is also offered.

In addition, the department sponsors several study abroad programs and a variety of co-curricular activities, including conversation hours and language clubs.

A B.A. degree at the University requires the fulfillment of a foreign language requirement. Students must fulfill this requirement by the end of their sophomore year. Please see the Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements.

Undergraduates who choose to pursue a major or minor in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures may wish to consider complementing their studies with the dual major in international affairs, with the teacher education program, or with any of the other majors and minors available through the University of New Hampshire. Such coursework will not only broaden a student’s intellectual horizons, but may also serve to enhance his or her employment opportunities or prospects for graduate education.

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Latin (LATN)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/latin-ba

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Professor: Stephen M. Trzaskoma
Associate Professor: Stephen Andrew Brunet, Robert Scott Smith
Senior Lecturer: Richard E. Clairmont
Lecturer: Susan Curry, Anna Newman

The Latin major is offered by the classics program of the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

The minimum requirements for a major in Latin are 32 credits in Latin, excluding LATN 401-402. A Latin major must complete at least one 700-level course in the Latin language. A minimum of three courses must be taken at the Durham campus. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing any Latin course at the 700 level or through another option (Honors thesis, etc.) approved by the adviser.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Latin majors may take LATN 503 or 504 to satisfy both the World Culture Discovery Program requirement and to satisfy major requirements.

Students who intend to pursue certification in the teaching of Latin at the middle- and high-school levels should consult with their adviser and plan an appropriate curriculum.

A Latin minor requires 20 credits of coursework in Latin. Students are encouraged to take courses in related fields such as Greek, classics, and ancient history, and to take part in overseas study programs in Italy. 

The coordinator is Stephen Brunet; Murkland Hall; Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; (603) 862-2077; e-mail stephen.brunet@unh.edu.

 

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Linguistics (LING)

» http://cola.unh.edu/linguistics

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Coordinator: Rochelle Lieber
Assistant Professor: Maya Ravindranath Abtahian, Soo Hyon Kim
Core Faculty: Holly R. Cashman, Richard E. Clairmont, Willem A. deVries, Aleksandra Fleszar, Piero Garofalo, Mardi J. Kidwell, Lina Lee, Rochelle Lieber, Gregory McMahon, Paul McNamara, Christina Ortmeier-Hooper

Linguistics is the study of one of the most important characteristics of human beings—language. It cuts across the boundaries between the sciences and the humanities. The program is an excellent liberal arts major or preprofessional major for education, law, medicine, clergy, and others. It is a particularly appropriate major for students who want to teach English as a second language. Dual majors with a foreign language, international affairs, business administration, and the like are quite feasible.

Students interested in the major or the minor should consult with the program coordinator or with any professor who teaches linguistics courses. To declare a major in linguistics, a student must meet with the linguistics coordinator to design a course of study. Information is available from the Advising Center, Hood House, and at www.unh.edu/linguistics.

A minor in linguistics also is available and consists of any five linguistics courses, including LING 405 or ENGL 405, approved by the linguistics coordinator.

Requirements for the Major
All of the following
LING 405, Introduction to Linguistics
LING 605, Intermediate Linguistic Analysis
LING 793, Phonetics and Phonology
LING 794, Syntax and Semantic Theory

One course in historical linguistics
CLAS 506, Introduction to Comparative and Historical Linguistics
ENGL 752, History of the English Language
ITAL 733, History of Italian
RUSS 733, History and Development of the Russian Language
SPAN 798A, History of the Spanish Language

Two years college study (or equivalent) of one foreign language

One of the following cognate specialties
One year college study (or equivalent) of a second foreign language from a different language family or subfamily (Old English may count as the second foreign language if the first foreign language is not in the Germanic family)

PSYC 712, Psychology of Language (with its prerequisite, either PSYC 512, Psychology of Primates, or PSYC 513, Cognitive Psychology)

Two elective courses from the list below
Anthropology: 670, Language and Culture; 795, 796, Reading and Research in Anthropology: B. Anthropological Linguistics
Communication: 572, Language and Social Interaction; 666, Conversation Analysis 
Communication Sciences and Disorders: 522, The Acquisition of Language; 738, Linguistics of American Sign Language; 775, Advanced Language Acquisition
English: 444F, Language Matters in America; 606, Languages of the World; 715, TESL: Theory and Methods; 716, Curriculum, Materials, and Assessment in English as a Second Language; 718, English Linguistics and Literature; 719, Sociolinguistics Survey; 727, Issues in Second Language Writing; 752, History of the English Language; 790, Special Topics in Linguistics; 791, English Grammar
LLC: 791, Methods of Foreign Language Teaching
Italian: 733, History of Italian
Latin: 795, 796, Special Studies in Latin (when topic is appropriate)
Linguistics: 444F, Language Matters in America; 606, Languages of the World; 620, Applied Experience in Linguistics; 719, Sociolinguistics Survey; 790, Special Topics in Linguistics; 795, 796, Independent Study
Philosophy: 550, Symbolic Logic; 618, Recent Anglo-American Philosophy
Psychology: 512, Psychology of Primates; 513, Cognitive Psychology; 712, Psychology of Language (Students may count either PSYC 512 or 513 toward the linguistics major or minor, but not both.)
Russian: 733, History and Development of the Russian Language
Spanish: 641, Spanish Phonetics; 645, Introduction to Spanish Linguistics; 798A, History of the Spanish Language 

Discovery Program Capstone Experience
Either LING 779, Linguistic Field Methods, or LING 695, Senior Honors

Other courses may be substituted, with the permission of the student’s adviser and the Linguistics Committee, when they are pertinent to the needs of the student’s program.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements, UNLESS Linguistics is your second major.

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Music (MUSI, MUED)

» http://cola.unh.edu/music

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Chairperson: Nicholas N. Orovich
Professor: Andrew A. Boysen, Lori E. Dobbins, William G. Kempster, Christopher Kies, Nicholas N. Orovich, David K. Ripley, David E. Seiler, Robert Stibler, Peggy A. Vagts
Affiliate Professor: Clark Terry
Associate Professor: Michael J. Annicchiarico, Daniel Beller-McKenna, Jenni Carbaugh Cook, Mark S. DeTurk, Robert W. Eshbach, Elizabeth Gunlogson, Robert Haskins, Peter W. Urquhart, Larry J. Veal
Senior Lecturer: Arlene P. Kies
Lecturer: Casey S. Goodwin, Rose Pruiksma, David Upham, Ryan Vigil, Mark Zielinski

The Department of Music offers two degree programs: the bachelor of arts in music and the bachelor of music.

The University of New Hampshire Department of Music is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. 

Prospective majors in music are advised to contact the department for information on acceptance into the major.

All music students must earn grades of C- or better in all required music and music education courses. 

Bachelor of Arts in Music

The bachelor of arts in music program offers students an opportunity to major in music within the liberal arts curriculum. This program is intended for those who wish to pursue the serious study of music and to acquire at the same time a broad general education; it is recommended for those considering graduate study leading to master's or doctoral degrees. 

To be admitted formally to the B.A. program, students must give evidence of satisfactory musical training by taking an admission audition. Students must declare music as a major before the beginning of the junior year, but it is highly recommended that they declare as early as possible, considering the large number of required courses.

The bachelor of arts degree is offered with three options: music liberal studies, performance study, and composition. Students enrolling in the B.A. music liberal studies program—a program that stresses the development of skills in analysis, writing, and critical thinking about a wide variety of music and the larger connection with history, culture, and society—are required to submit a writing sample and interview with one of the music liberal studies program faculty members. The writing sample should be non-fiction, preferably an assignment for a course in English, history, or a similar subject, 500 words or more in length. Students wanting to declare composition as their option must submit a music portfolio in addition to an audition on their major instrument.

For all options listed above, the Discovery Program capstone requirement is fulfilled by a final project or a public performance given during the senior year. For students in the music liberal studies option, there is a choice of completing a half recital or comparable final project; for students in the music composition option, a half lecture, half lecture-recital, or a half recital including at least one original composition; for those in performance study, a full recital.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. B.A. in music majors may use MUSI 502 (a required core course for the major) to satisfy the Inquiry Discovery requirement.

Requirements for the bachelor of arts in music and its options are listed below.

 


Bachelor of Arts in Music Core Curriculum

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUSI   471-472   Theory I   6  
MUSI   473-474   Ear Training I   2  
*MUSI   475-476   Functional Piano I   2  
MUSI   571-572   Theory II   6  
MUSI   573-574   Ear Training II   2  
*MUSI   575-576   Functional Piano II   2  
MUSI   501-502   History and Literature of Music   6  
MUSI   515   Music in World Cultures   4  
MUSI   703-715   Advanced Music History   3  
MUSI   771, 781 or 782   Counterpoint or Analysis: Form and Structure   3  
MUSI   541-564, 741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   Variable  
**MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   Variable  

*Students will be given the opportunity to test out of MUSI 475-476 and MUSI 575-576.

**A maximum of 8 ensemble credits may count toward graduation for all bachelor of arts in music students.



Option 1, Music Liberal Studies+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
*MUSI   771, 775-777, 779, 781-782, 703-715   Various advanced theory and music history courses   12 total  
**MUSI   536-564 or 736-764 and/or 441-464   Performance Study and/or Performing Ensemble   8 total  

* Any combination of advanced theory and history (12 credits) in addition to the core curriculum.

** Any combination of performance and/or ensemble study (8 credits total). 

+Degree program has plan approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Option 2, Music Composition+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUSI   771, 779, 781-782   Advanced Music Theory   6 total  
MUSI   775, 776, 777   Composition Lessons   8  
MUSI   731   Conducting   2  
MUSI   541-564/741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   4 total  
MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   8 total  

Students in the composition option, if not in a lesson studio, will attend composition seminar.

+Degree program has plan approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Option 3, Performance Study+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUSI   731   Conducting   2  
*MUSI   541-565/741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   16 total  
**MUSI   520-521   Diction for Singers I & II   4 credits total  
MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   8 total  

The language requirement for a student in the vocal performance option is satisfied by taking ITAL 401-402, GERM 401-402, or FREN 401-402.

* 2 credits per semester

** Required for vocal performance option only

+Degree program has final approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Bachelor of Music Degree Program

The bachelor of music degree program is offered to students who wish to develop their talent in performance, composition, or music education to a high professional level. The program is recommended to those considering graduate study leading to the M.M. or D.M.A. degrees. The music education option is part of the undergraduate certification program (see the Department of Education).

To be admitted to the B.M. program, students must demonstrate a high degree of musical competence or significant creative ability during an audition or examination. Selection is made on the professional requirements appropriate to each option. Students must formally declare the B.M. as a degree program before the beginning of the sophomore year. Continuation into the upper level of the program is subject to review by the department faculty.

Four degrees are offered in the bachelor of music curriculum: bachelor of music in music education*; bachelor of music in performance*; bachelor of music in composition+, and bachelor of music pre-teaching+. 

All bachelor of music students are required to give a public performance during their senior year, which fulfills the Discovery Program capstone requirement:

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. B.M. in music majors may use MUSI 502 (a required core course for the major) to satisfy the Inquiry Discovery category requirement, and MUSI 515 (a required core course for the major) to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement. Additionally, B.M. music education majors may use MUSI 501 to satisfy the Fine and Performing Arts Discovery category requirement.

Additional requirements, grouped by option, are shown below the core curriculum table.

*Degree program has final approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.

+Plan approval for degree program pending from the National Association of Schools of Music.


Bachelor of Music Core Curriculum

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUSI   471-472   Theory I   6  
MUSI   473-474   Ear Training I   2  
*MUSI   475-476   Functional Piano I   2  
MUSI   571-572   Theory II   6  
MUSI   573-574   Ear Training II   2  
*MUSI   575-576   Functional Piano II   2  
MUSI   501-502   History & Literature of Music   6  
MUSI   515   Music in World Cultures   4  
MUSI   731   Conducting   2  
MUSI   703-715   Advanced Music History   3  
MUSI   771, 781 or 782   Counterpoint or Analysis: Form & Structure   3  
MUSI   541-564/741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   Variable  
MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   Variable  

* Students will be given the opportunity to test out of MUSI 475-476 and MUSI 575-576.

 



Bachelor of Music in Performance (Voice)+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUED   741   Techniques & Methods in Choral Music   2  
MUED   755   Vocal Pedagogy   2  
MUSI   520-521   Diction for Singers I and II   4 total  
MUSI   713 or 715   Art Song or Survey of Opera   3  
*MUSI   545/745   Performance Study (voice lessons)   25 total  
**MUSI   441, 442, or 448   Performing Ensemble   8 total  
ITAL, GERM, or FREN   401-402   Elementary Italian, German, or French   8 total  

* Three credits of lessons each semester until the student's senior recital semester; then it is 4 credits.

** Four credits must be MUSI 441; the remaining 4 credits must be 441, 442, or 448.

+Degree program has final approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Bachelor of Music in Performance (Piano)+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUED   743   Material & Methods in Piano Music   2  
*MUSI   771, 781, or 782   Counterpoint or Analysis: Form & Structure   3  
**MUSI   775-777, or 779   Compostion or Orchestration   3  
**MUSI   700 Level   Advanced Music History or Advanced Music Theory   3  
MUSI   795V   Special Studies - advanced piano pedagogy   2  
MUSI   795E   Special Studies - piano literature   1-2  
MUSI   455   Piano Ensemble   4 total  
***MUSI   541/741   Performance Study (piano lessons)   25 total  
MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   4 total  

* A B.M. piano performance major must take a total of two of these three courses: 771, 781, and 782.

** A B.M. piano performance major must take an additional 700-level music history or music theory course.

*** Three credits of lessons each semester until the semester of the senior recital; then it is 4 credits.

+Degree program has final approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.

 



Bachelor of Music in Performance (all other instruments)+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
*MUED   745-751   Techniques & Methods   2-3  
**MUSI   700-level   Advanced Music History or Advanced Music Theory   3  
***MUSI   541-546/741-764   Performance Study   25 total  
MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   12 total  

* B.M. instrumental performance majors take one methods class in the appropriate instrumental family, e.g., a trumpet player would take MUED 749, Techniques & Methods in Brass Instruments, to fulfill this requirement.

** This is in addition to the advanced music history and advanced music theory class already required.

*** Three credits of lessons are taken each semester until the student's senior recital semester; then it is 4 credits.

+Degree program has final approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Bachelor of Music in Composition+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUSI   771, 772, 781, 782   Advanced Music Theory   9 total  
MUSI   775-776   Composition   4 total  
MUSI   777   Advanced Composition   12 total  
MUSI   779   Orchestration   3  
*MUSI   795   Advanced Music Theory   3  
MUSI   795   Electronic Music   2  
**MUSI   703-715   Advanced Music History   3  
MUSI   541-564/741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   8 total  
MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   8 total  

* This is in addition to the other 700-level theory classes outlined above.

** This is in addition to the core required 700-level music history class.

Students in the bachelor of music in composition degree program may use a maximum of 8 ensemble credits toward graduation.

Students in the bachelor of music in composition degree are required to attend 8 semesters of composition seminar.

+Plan approval for degree program pending from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Bachelor of Music (Music Education)

The bachelor of music degree in music education provides a route to undergraduate certification leading to state of New Hampshire teacher certification in music, grades K-12 (cert. #612.13). New Hampshire also participates in a reciprocal agreement with many other states: the Interstate Certification Compact.

Continuation in the B.M. music education program is made with the recommendation of the appropriate faculty members and contingent upon personal commitment to the teacher licensure program.

Students in music education must maintain an overall minimum 2.8 grade-point average at the time of application for student teaching (February 15 of junior year). Any education course taken for a teacher licensure requirement must be completed with a B- or better.

B.M. music education majors may use MUSI 501 (a required core course for the major) to satisfy the Fine and Performing Arts Discovery category requirement. In addition, they may use MUSI 502 (a required core course for the major) to satisfy the Inquiry Discovery category requirement, and MUSI 515 (a required core course for the major) to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement.

The four-year bachelor of music in music education curriculum is highly structured due to the number of required courses to complete. In the table below is the list of additional classes required to earn a degree and a certificate to teach. Students may elect a vocal/choral or instrumental emphasis. See curriculum chart for differing requirements.

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Bachelor of Music in Music Education Curriculum+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUED   741   Techniques & Methods in Choral Music   2  
MUED   745   Techniques & Methods in String Instruments   2  
MUED   747   Techniques & Methods in Woodwind Instruments   2 (vocal) or 3 (instrumental)  
MUED   749   Techniques & Methods in Brass Instruments   2  
MUED   751   Techniques & Methods in Percussion Instruments   2  
MUED   755   Vocal Pedagogy   2 (vocal) or 1 (instrumental)  
MUED   765   Instrumental Music Methods   2 Instrumental emphasis only  
MUED   790   Teaching Elementary School Music   2  
MUED   791   Teaching Secondary School Music   2  
MUSI   520   Diction I   2 Vocal emphasis only  
MUSI   732   Conducting   2 total  
MUSI   779   Orchestration   3  
MUSI   541-564/741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   8 total  
*MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   8  
EDUC   500   Exploring Teaching   4  
EDUC   700   Educational Structure & Change   4  
EDUC   701   Human Development & Learning Educational Psychology   4  
EDUC   705   Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education   4  
EDUC   751B   Educating Exceptional Learners: Secondary   4  
EDUC   694   Courses in Supervised Teaching   8  

* Students in the bachelor of music in music education degree program may use a maximum of 8 ensemble credits toward graduation. Of the 8 credits in ensemble performance (MUSI 441-464) required during the course of study, it is required that at least 4 credits will be from Concert Choir (MUSI 441), Symphony (MUSI 450), Wind Symphony (MUSI 452), Symphonic Band (MUSI 453), and/or Concert Band (MUSI 451). At least 1 credit of performance in a jazz ensemble (MUSI 460) and 1 credit of Marching Band (MUSI 454) are highly desirable.

+Degree program has final approval from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Bachelor of Music (Pre-Teaching)

The bachelor of music pre-teaching degree is the program of choice for most students seeking a five-year, combined bachelor's and master's degree program that includes certification to teach music in the public schools. Students will complete all of the skill and knowledge content requirements in this undergraduate program leaving a year-long internship and some advanced study in music and education for the fifth year. The B.M. pre-teaching curriculum is the same as the B.M. music education curriculum with the lone exception being the omission of student teaching during the undergraduate years. Therefore, students should enroll as B.M. music education when admitted and change to B.M. pre-teaching in their junior year.


Bachelor of Music Pre-Teaching Curriculum+

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MUED   741   Techniques & Methods in Choral Music   2  
MUED   745   Techniques & Methods in String Instruments   2  
MUED   747   Techniques & Methods in Woodwind Instruments   2 (vocal) or 3 (instrumental)  
MUED   749   Techniques & Methods in Brass Instruments   2  
MUED   751   Techniques & Methods in Percussion Instruments   2  
MUED   755   Vocal Pedagogy   2 (vocal) or 1 (instrumental)  
MUED   765   Instrumental Music Methods   2 Instrumental emphasis only  
MUED   790   Teaching Elementary School Music   2  
MUED   791   Teaching Secondary School Music   2  
MUSI   520   Diction I   2 Vocal emphasis only  
MUSI   732   Conducting   2  
MUSI   779   Orchestration   3  
MUSI   541-564/741-764   Performance Study (Applied Lessons)   8 total  
*MUSI   441-464   Performing Ensemble   8  
EDUC   500   Exploring Teaching   4  
EDUC   700   Educational Structure & Change   4  
EDUC   701   Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology   4  
EDUC   705   Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education   4  
EDUC   751B   Educating Exceptional Learners: Secondary   4  

*Students in the bachelor of music pre-teaching degree program may use a maximum of 8 ensemble credits toward graduation. Of the 8 credits in ensemble performance (MUSI 441-464) required during the course of study, it is required that at least 4 credits will be from Concert Choir (MUSI 441), Symphony (MUSI 450), Wind Symphony (MUSI 452), Symphonic Band (MUSI 453), and/or Concert Band (MUSI 451). At least 1 credit of performance in a jazz ensemble (MUSI 460) and 1 credit of Marching Band (MUSI 454) are highly desirable.

+Plan approval  for degree program pending from the National Association of Schools of Music.



Minor in Music

All students wishing to receive a minor in music must complete a minimum of 20 credits of coursework in music, of which the following are required: MUSI 471-474 or MUSI 411-412; and any two of the following: MUSI 401, 402, 444, 501, 502, 511, 515 or 610.


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Music Education (MUED)

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See music section for program description.

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Neuroscience and Behavior (NSB)

» http://cola.unh.edu/interdisciplinary-studies/program/neuroscience-and-behavior-bs

This interdisciplinary major is jointly housed in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture.

See description under College of Life Sciences and Agriculture for full program information.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

» http://cola.unh.edu/philosophy

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Chairperson: Paul McNamara
Professor: Willem A. deVries, R. Valentine Dusek, Robert C. Scharff, Duane H. Whittier, Charlotte Elizabeth Witt
Associate Professor: Drew Christie, Paul McNamara, Ruth J. Sample, Nicholas J. Smith, Timm A. Triplett
Assistant Professor: Subrena Smith
Senior Lecturer: Jennifer K. Armstrong
Lecturer: Matt Dowd

Each semester, detailed course descriptions are posted in the department office and on the department web page.

Philosophy has always been at the heart of liberal education, deepening and enriching the lives of those who pursue it. The philosophy major provides students with the opportunity to confront a wide variety of questions, especially those that cannot be dealt with in the framework of other disciplines. Such questions include those about the ultimate nature of reality: Does God exist? Are minds distinct from bodies? Are there more things between heaven and Earth than are dreamed of in science? Other questions probe what it is to know: Do we know that material bodies external to our minds exist? What does it mean to justify a belief? Still other questions are about how we ought to act: What is a good person? Are there moral rules? How are they justified? Must we obey them?

Philosophy also concerns itself with other disciplines: What makes something a work of art? What distinguishes a scientific theory from a religious theory or myth? Is capitalism amoral? Is legal authority moral or political?

The Department of Philosophy offers a wide range of courses exposing students to the full scope of philosophical activity. Grappling with major primary texts from the history of philosophy is an important emphasis of the program, for philosophy today is the continuation of a conversation that extends back to the ancient Greeks and the Vedic scriptures. Philosophy also always has wrestled with cutting-edge topics emerging in the current culture. Some recent examples are: What are the prospects for machines with mental lives? What are the implications of new views in cosmology? How do we handle the pressing ethical dilemmas brought on by emerging medical technologies, or by the historically unparalleled rate of destruction of the Earth’s environment? Are gender and race socially constructed concepts rather than biological concepts?

Career Opportunities
Philosophy offers excellent training for a variety of careers by providing a unique combination of lifelong skills: analytic and interpretive skills; critical reasoning skills; the enhanced capacity to detect problems and to solve them; excellence in oral and written presentation and defense of one’s ideas; skill at asking probing and central questions about the ideas of others (as well as about one’s own ideas); and skill at effectively understanding, organizing, and evaluating complex systems of thought.

Considering these skills, it is not surprising that philosophy majors score in the very top percentiles on the GRE, LSAT, and GMAT standardized exams. For example, in a recent GRE study, philosophy majors were ranked among the very top majors in their mean scores on the verbal, analytic, and quantitative components of the exam; in a recent LSAT study, philosophy majors had a higher mean score than even prelaw majors; and for recent GMAT tests, the mean score for philosophy majors exceeded that of any type of business major. Virtually no other major does this well on such a wide cross-section of standardized exams.

These results reflect the fact that the unique combination of skills acquired in philosophy, along with the breadth of subject matter, provide the philosophy major with an extremely adaptive and resilient mind-set. Philosophy provides superior preparation for a variety of vocational and professional endeavors, and perhaps more importantly, for being a professional.

The Philosophy Major

Majors must take a total of 10 philosophy courses. The following courses constitute a core required of all majors: PHIL 412, 500, 530, 570, 580, and one additional course in the history of philosophy (525, 571, 610, 616, 618, 620, or an approved seminar). Majors also must take two seminars (e.g., courses at the 700 level). Please note that a single course can satisfy multiple requirements for the major. PHIL 495 and 795 normally do not count toward fulfilling major requirement credits; exceptions may be granted by special permission. 

The Discovery capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing two 700-level seminars of the student's choice (as listed just above under "Core Requirements"), provided that at least one of these, if not both, is taken in the senior year. (As with all courses counting for the major, a grade of C- or better is required.)

Note that it is in the nature of 700-level seminars to presuppose by default that students have completed the main 400-level and 500-level core requirements (412, 500, 530, 570, 580) and so free reference is made to materials, views, techniques, etc. covered in those lower-level core requirements.

Although not required, students are strongly encouraged to consider the possibility of doing honors-in-major (and thus writing a thesis or an honors portfolio), and/or presenting research at the Undergraduate Research Conference, and/or fulfilling an undergraduate research grant in their senior year. This is especially encouraged for students considering graduate school in philosophy.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements, with the exception of PHIL 412, which may be used to satisfy both.

Special-Interest Program
Students may add to the above major a special-interest program that is of value in planning for postgraduate education or entry into such areas as law, medicine, business, education, theology, or social work. Special advisers are prepared to provide informal counsel to philosophy majors interested in these areas.

Graduate Preparatory Emphasis

This emphasis is strongly recommended for students who plan to do graduate work in philosophy. Beyond the 10 program courses, such students should select, with their advisers’ approval, two additional philosophy courses above the 400 level, for a total of 12 courses. One of these should be PHIL 550.

Distinction on Senior Thesis

Distinction on Senior Thesis is granted by a unanimous determination of the student’s committee that the thesis exceeds A-level work and is worthy of special recognition.

Honors in Philosophy

To receive Honors in Philosophy, students will be expected to pursue a philosophy curriculum that demands greater depth and rigor than what is required by the major; they will be expected to complete the curriculum at a consistently high level of achievement; they will be expected to engage in independent study and research (under the supervision of a faculty member) beyond the requirements of their coursework; and they will be expected to present and defend a culminating project that synthesizes aspects of their study. Students can demonstrate these expectations in either of two ways: a thesis option or a portfolio option. Consult the Department of Philosophy website for more details.

Philosophy Minor
A philosophy minor consists of five philosophy courses, one of which must be at the 500 level or higher (PHIL 495 and 795 with special approval only).

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Political Science (POLT)

» http://cola.unh.edu/political-science

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Professor: Marla A. Brettschneider, Melvin J. Dubnick, Mark W. Huddleston, Stacy D. VanDeveer
Affiliate Professor: Kenneth M. Johnson
Associate Professor: John R. Kayser, Alynna J. Lyon, Mary Malone, Lawrence C. Reardon, Dante J. Scala, Susan J. Siggelakis, Jeannie L. Sowers
Affiliate Associate Professor: Tom Kelly, Andrew E. Smith, James Varn
Assistant Professor: Daniel E. Bromberg
Senior Lecturer: Lionel R. Ingram
Lecturer: Richard Aliano, Tama Andrews, Rebecca Clark, Jan Kotowski, Andrew M. Macpherson

The study of government and politics, to which the courses and seminars of the Department of Political Science are devoted, includes the development of knowledge of political behavior by individuals and groups as well as knowledge about governments: their nature and functions, their problems and behavior, and their interactions—at the national and international levels and at the local, state, and regional levels.

Much of the learning offered by the Department of Political Science also can be regarded as essential for good citizenship, since political knowledge helps to explain the formal and informal institutions by which we are governed and the forces that lead to policy decisions, and also seeks to clarify the issues and principles that encourage people toward political involvement. It contributes to the store of knowledge necessary for informed citizenship. In addition, such learning is especially valuable to students planning to enter local or national government or other public service, including the Foreign Service, and it will be of great help to those who intend to study law and enter the legal profession. For teaching, particularly at the college level, and for many types of government service, graduate work may be indispensable. An undergraduate major in political science will provide a helpful foundation for any further study of politics and related fields in the social sciences and humanities. Such an emphasis also will be valuable for students seeking careers in journalism, international organizations, and the public affairs and administrative aspects of labor, financial, and business organizations.

The major program in political science consists of at least 10 courses (40 credits) and not more than 12 courses (48 credits). The minimum grade requirement is C- per course. Any grade lower will not count toward major. Courses are to be distributed in the following way:

1. Three 400-level courses: 401, 402, and 403. Once they declare the major, students must complete these three courses within the first calendar year.   

2. Six 500-level courses. Of these, at least one shall be chosen from each of the four subfields in which the department’s courses are organized: American politics, political thought, comparative politics, and international politics.

3. One 700-level course. 

The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing any 700-level Political Science course.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

Five-year B.A./M.A. Program
The five-year political science B.A./M.A. program (also known as a “dual degree, early admission” program) aims to (1) improve opportunities for excellent undergraduates to prepare for competitive Ph.D. programs or add an additional credential before entering a competitive job market; and (2) allow students interested in politics to advance and further specialize their political science education in only one additional year at UNH.

Students must fulfill all programmatic requirements for the current master’s degree program, as well as fulfill all programmatic requirements for their bachelor’s degree.

Interested students must submit a full graduate application (no GRE requirement) by February 15 of their junior year.  Minimum GPA required for admission is 3.2.

For additional information you may contact the Graduate Coordinator, Tama Andrews, 603-862-2321, tama.andrews@unh.edu

Minor in Political Science
The political science minor consists of five courses (20 credits total). These courses may be taken in any combination of the four subfields and levels (400-700) offered. The fields to choose from are: American politics, political thought, comparative politics, and international politics. No more than two courses can be taken at the 400 level.

The minimum grade requirement is C- per course. Any grade lower than a C- will not count toward the minor. Students wishing to use transfer credits from abroad or other universities should meet with a political science adviser to determine eligibility toward the minor.

Internships and Advanced Study

In addition to the courses regularly offered, the department could have available selected topics, advanced study in political science, and internships. Interested students should check  the department's website to learn about the offerings for a given semester.

The department also offers several internship opportunities that give students experience in various aspects of government, policy making, and the legal system at the local, state, and national levels. Student must have taken certain course prerequisites for each kind of internship. In addition, students must have junior or senior standing and normally have a 3.2 average or higher to be eligible for consideration. Students desiring to undertake internships must fully comply with the departmental guidelines as stated on the application forms, which are available on the department website. Applications must be received by the first day of the preregistration period prior to the semester the course will be undertaken. Internships can only fulfill non-subfield requirements at the 500-level. Washington placements are made either through the Department of Political Science or through the Washington Center located in the National Student Exchange Office in Hood House; major credit must be arranged through the department.  

Political Science Language Requirement
The bachelor of arts degree at the University of New Hampshire requires that a student satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement. The requirement may be met by demonstrating language proficiency equal to a one-year college-level course (401 and 402, 403 and 503, or 503 and above in spoken language).

The Department of Political Science does not allow American Sign Language (ASL) to count toward the language requirement effective for students who declare the major as of fall 2007.

Exceptions to this must be petitioned and approved by the Department of Political Sciences Undergraduate Committee and a students adviser.
 

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Portuguese (PORT)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/portuguese-studies

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Lecturer: Eliani Benaion Basile

For program description, see Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

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Psychology (PSYC)

» http://cola.unh.edu/psychology

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Chairperson: Robert G. Mair
Professor: Victoria L. Banyard, Victor A. Benassi, Ellen S. Cohn, Robert C. Drugan, Kenneth Fuld, Benjamin Harris, Robert G. Mair, John D. Mayer, Edward J. O'Brien, David B. Pillemer, Rebecca M. Warner, William R. Woodward
Associate Professor: J. Pablo Chavajay, Brett M. Gibson, Michelle D. Leichtman, Jill A. McGaughy, Carolyn J. Mebert, William Wren Stine
Research Associate Professor: Lisa M. Jones, Kimberly J. Mitchell
Affiliate Associate Professor: Julie E. Williams
Assistant Professor: Katie Edwards, Robert S. Ross
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Andrew Leber, Donna M. Perkins, Zorana Ivcevic Pringle
Clinical Assistant Professor: Joan Glutting, Jennifer Warkentin
Senior Lecturer: Robert P. Eckstein, Mark J. Henn, Michael A. Mangan, Peter Yarensky
Lecturer: Kari Dudley, Maureen Gillespie, Kelly Peracchi, Jan Tornick

The psychology major provides students with a broad education, while also allowing some specialization. The program exposes students to the scientific study of behavior and encourages an increased understanding of the behavior of humans and animals.

Students who wish to declare psychology as a major after enrolling in the University should consult with the department’s academic counselor for application procedures and criteria.

Students majoring in psychology must complete 44 credits with a minimum grade of C- in each course and a 2.0 overall average in all major requirements. The psychology department does not accept other departments’ statistics courses toward the psychology major. Students who have taken a statistics course other than PSYC 402 must pass a competency exam in order to apply to the major and/or register for PSYC 502. Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements (PSYC 401 cannot be used to fulfill a Social Science; PSYC 571 cannot be used to fulfill a Historical Perspective.) Students who use PSYC 402 for the Discovery requirement must take an additional psychology course that is eligible for major credit to replace PSYC 402 in the major. (PSYC 444 and 595 may NOT be used for this purpose.)

Requirements for the Major
A. Three core courses: PSYC 401, 402, and 502

B. Four breadth (500-level) courses as follows:

Two courses from Group I
PSYC 511, Sensation and Perception
PSYC 512, Psychology of Primates
PSYC 513, Cognition
PSYC 521, Behavior Analysis
PSYC 522, Behaviorism (offered in Manchester only)
PSYC 531, Psychobiology

Two courses from Group II
PSYC 552, Social Psychology
PSYC 553, Personality Psychology
PSYC 561, Abnormal Behavior
PSYC 571, Pioneers of Psychology
PSYC 581, Child Development
PSYC 582, Adult Development and Aging (offered in Manchester only)

C. Four depth (700-level) courses as follows:

Two courses from Group I
PSYC 702, Advanced Statistics (if not used in group II)
PSYC 705, Tests and Measurements (if not used in group II)
PSYC 710, Visual Perception
PSYC 712, Psychology of Language
PSYC 713, Psychology of Consciousness
PSYC 720, Animal Cognition
PSYC 722, Behaviorism, Culture, and Contemporary Society
PSYC 731, Brain and Behavior
PSYC 733, Drugs and Behavior
PSYC 735, Neurobiology of Mood Disorders
PSYC 736, Attention Disorders
PSYC 737, Behavioral Medicine
PSYC 741, A-D Advanced Topics

Two courses from Group II
PSYC 702, Advanced Statistics (if not used in group I)
PSYC 705, Tests and Measurements (if not used in group I)
PSYC 755, Psychology and Law
PSYC 756, Psychology of Crime and Justice
PSYC 758, Health Psychology
PSYC 762, Counseling
PSYC 763, Community Psychology
PSYC 765, Dysfunctional Families and Therapy
PSYC 771, Psychology in 20th Century Thought and Society
PSYC 775, Madness in America
PSYC 780, Prenatal Development/Infancy
PSYC 783, Cognitive Development
PSYC 785, Social Development
PSYC 791, A-G Advanced Topics
PSYC 793, Internship

Note: Most offerings have one or more prerequisite courses. Students (with the help of their advisers) are expected to select breadth courses that will later enable them to select depth courses appropriate to their interests and career goals.

The Discovery Program capstone requirement, taken during the senior year, may be fulfilled by completing one of the following options: (1) the Honors-in-Major program with honors project, Honors Seminar, and research presentation; (2) a 4-credit capstone designated independent study project; (3) PSYC 793, Internship; (4) Capstone Seminar; (5) Capstone-designated 700-level course.

Transfer students who elect to major in psychology must complete at least 24 credits in the program at UNH to qualify for the degree in psychology. Transfer students must earn a total of 44 approved credits for completion of the psychology major. The distribution of these credits will be determined by the department’s academic counselor. Transfer students should note that courses are allotted only the number of credits granted by the original institution (after adjustments for semester-hour equivalents). Thus, students transferring from an institution at which courses carry less than four credits each must make up for any credit deficit created by acceptance of transfer credits into the psychology major. Of the four 700-level courses required for the major, at least three must be taken at UNH.

Specific course selections should be discussed with advisers. Exceptions to the requirements for the major require compelling circumstances and a petition to the department.

Psychology majors planning to go on to graduate study in psychology are advised to include PSYC 702 and/or 705 among their courses.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

The minor in psychology consists of five psychology department courses (20 credits), including PSYC 401. No more than 4 credits of PSYC 795 may be applied to the minor. A maximum of 9 approved psychology transfer credits can be applied to the UNH psychology minor.

See the department student services assistant for further details on the major or minor in psychology.

Advising System
Students who enter the University as psychology majors are considered “provisional majors” and are advised in the University Advising and Career Center through their freshman year. Provisional psychology majors are encouraged to complete PSYC 401 and 402 during their first year. During the summer after the freshman year, provisional psychology majors’ advising files are transferred to the psychology department. Provisional majors then “confirm” their major in psychology during the fall semester of their sophomore year by attending a major orientation session scheduled by the department. “Provisional majors” are accorded all the rights and privileges of any psychology major. Undergraduate advising in the department is conducted jointly by the department’s academic counselor and the full-time faculty. The academic counselor has primary responsibility for advising newly declared freshman and sophomore psychology majors and is the initial contact for all majors in a state of transition (readmitted, transfer, newly declared, etc.). The academic counselor assists students in all phases of educational planning and decision making, including registration, long-range academic planning, degree and program requirements, and career selection and planning. Junior and senior psychology majors are assigned to a faculty adviser with appropriate consideration for student preferences. The advising relationship with a faculty member is designed to encourage refining career and educational decisions.

Undergraduate Awards for Majors
Each year the faculty chooses psychology undergraduates as the recipients of the following awards: the Herbert A. Carroll Award for an outstanding senior in psychology, the George M. Haslerud Award for an outstanding junior in psychology, and the Fuller Foundation Scholarship for an outstanding junior in psychology with demonstrated interests in clinical psychology. Psychology majors with at least a 3.2 grade-point average are eligible for these awards. Faculty nominate students from the eligibility list and final selection of recipients is made by vote of the full-time psychology faculty.

Honors Program in Psychology
The Department of Psychology sponsors an honors program for outstanding students in the major. Students may apply to the honors program in psychology in their sophomore or junior year.

Eligibility criteria include
1. Overall grade-point average of 3.2 or above and 3.4 in major courses
2. Completion of PSYC 401, 402, and 502 with a grade of B or above in each

Requirements of the program include

1. Designate three of the four 700-level psychology courses as honors or equivalent
2. PSYC 797, Senior Honors Tutorial (fall)
3. PSYC 799, Senior Honors Thesis (spring)

Students interested in applying to the honors program should contact the department’s academic counselor by the end of their sophomore year.

Undergraduate Research Conference
The Department of Psychology sponsors the annual George M. Haslerud Undergraduate Research Conference each spring. Undergraduate honors students present their theses at the conference. Contact the department’s academic counselor for more information.
 

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Religious Studies (RS)

» http://cola.unh.edu/interdisciplinary-studies/program/religious-studies-minor

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For program description, see religious studies interdisciplinary minor.

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Russian (RUSS)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/russian-ba

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Professor: Ronald D. LeBlanc
Associate Professor: Arna Beth Bronstein, Aleksandra Fleszar

The Russian major provides students with an opportunity to study one of the world’s most important languages, its literature, and its culture. In addition to the intrinsic value of Russian language, literature, and culture as a liberal arts experience, the Russian major leads to a number of careers, such as teaching, translation and interpreting, government, and the Foreign Service. It is also a valuable asset in preparing for careers in law, economics, and international trade, and it can serve as a double major with business administration, international affairs, the natural and physical sciences, and other liberal arts fields such as English, history, political science, sociology, philosophy, theatre, communication, linguistics, and other foreign languages.

New students will be assigned to the proper course after consultation with the Russian faculty. A student may not receive UNH credit for elementary Russian courses if he or she has had two or more years of secondary school Russian; however, a student may petition the Russian program to be admitted to the 400-level courses for credit. In the 503-790 range, a grade of C or better is required to advance to the next course in the language series (503, 504, 631, 632, 790).

The Russian major consists of a minimum of 40 credits above RUSS 504. Specific course requirements are RUSS 425, 521, 522, 601, 631-632, 691, and 790 and two or three electives, depending upon choice of option and concentration. Majors are required to spend a semester or summer on an approved study abroad program in Russia. Majors are required to take RUSS 631-632 and at least one 700-level Russian course at the Durham campus. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing one of the following: the honors-in-Russian thesis, RUSS 721, RUSS 725, RUSS 733, or RUSS 790. Transfer students must earn a minimum of 12 major credits at the Durham campus.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. However, majors may use the required study abroad experience to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement. Russian majors may take RUSS 521 to satisfy both a Discovery Inquiry requirement and a major requirement.

The minor in Russian consists of a minimum of 20 credits above RUSS 402; it must include RUSS 503-504 and at least one of the following: RUSS 631, 632, 691, 721, 725, or 790.

Students wishing to major in Russian should contact the program coordinator in Murkland Hall 303.

Russian Studies Minor
The Russian studies minor offers students an opportunity to pursue area study of Russia and the new states through an interdisciplinary program. The minor consists of a minimum of 20 credits (five courses) with a minimum grade of C. In addition to the required courses and electives, students must demonstrate a Russian language proficiency at the level of RUSS 504 or an equivalent.

Students wishing to minor in Russian studies should consult with any faculty member in Russian studies.

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Social Science (SCSC)

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Sociology (SOC)

» http://cola.unh.edu/sociology

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Chairperson: Michele Dillon
Professor: Michele Dillon, David Finkelhor, Lawrence C. Hamilton, Kenneth M. Johnson, Heather A. Turner
Associate Professor: Benjamin C. Brown, Sharyn J. Potter, Cesar Rebellon, Thomas G. Safford, James Tucker, Karen Van Gundy
Research Associate Professor: Wendy A. Walsh, Barbara A. Wauchope
Assistant Professor: Rebecca Glauber
Research Assistant Professor: Marybeth J. Mattingly, Kristin E. Smith
Clinical Professor: John T. Kirkpatrick
Senior Lecturer: Catherine L. Moran
Lecturer: Katherine Abbott

Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and how people interact within these contexts.

Since human behavior is shaped by social factors, the subject matter of sociology ranges from the intimate family to the hostile mob; from organized crime to religious cults; from the divisions of race, gender, and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture.

Majoring in sociology provides a solid, multifaceted foundation in the liberal arts, including analytical thinking and writing, and skills in collecting and analyzing data. Students learn diverse theoretical approaches to the social world and acquire tools for conducting and understanding social science research. The wide range of substantive areas taught in the UNH Department of Sociology include courses concentrating on family and work; environmental sociology; social policy; inequalities of race, class, and gender; criminology, social control, and deviant behavior; medical sociology; and religion.

Undergraduate training in sociology is an excellent background for a variety of careers, including the business world, where majors might work in marketing and sales or human resources; government and nonprofit  services, where majors might work in education, health services, social welfare, criminal justice; and research. An undergraduate degree in sociology is also excellent preparation for graduate work in law, social work, criminal justice, counseling, public administration, public health, business administration, urban planning, or further studies in sociology.

To declare a major in sociology, students must have completed at least one introductory-level sociology course with a grade of C or better. New students who declare the major upon admission to UNH must enroll in SOC 400 during their first semester and earn a grade of C to maintain status in the program.

Majors must complete a minimum of 40 semester credits in sociology courses with grades of C- or better in each course and a GPA of 2.0 or better in sociology courses. SOC 400, 502, 599, 601, and 611 are required. At least two of the additional five major courses must be at the 600 or 700 level (upper-level electives). Majors may meet the Discovery Program capstone requirement by completing SOC 611. Both SOC 502 and 599 are prerequisites for SOC 601; SOC 599 must be completed no later than the junior year and is a prerequisite for majors taking 600- and 700-level courses. SOC 595 can be used to fulfill one lower-level elective or SOC 699 can be used to fulfill one upper-level elective. Courses taken to complete the major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. SOC 599 can be used to satisfy both a major requirement and the Inquiry Discovery requirement. (Statistics courses taken in other disciplines are generally not acceptable as a substitute for SOC 502.) 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. B.A. candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Conjoint minors (allowing double-counting of one or two courses) are available for justice studies; gerontology; American studies; race, culture, and power; women’s studies; and other approved minors. Students also have the opportunity to pursue a second major, including justice studies. Students interested in social work or teaching can develop programs in conjunction with the appropriate departments. The departmental honors program is recommended for students with cumulative grade-point averages over 3.4, and especially for those anticipating graduate study.

Students interested in majoring in sociology should consult with the chair of the Undergraduate Committee in the sociology department for guidance. It is the responsibility of all sociology majors to obtain the latest information from the department office. A minor consists of any five 4-credit courses in sociology with a C- or better in each course and a grade-point average of 2.0 or better in these courses.

Sociology Language Requirement
The bachelor of arts degree at the University of New Hampshire requires that students satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement. The requirement may be met by demonstrating language proficiency equal to a one-year college-level course (401 and 402, 403 and 503, 501 [Latin only], or 503 and above in a spoken language). American Sign Language courses do not meet the foreign language requirement for sociology majors.

The Department of Sociology requires all students declaring the major after fall 2006 to choose from one of the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Exceptions to this list must be petitioned and approved by the Department of Sociology’s Undergraduate Committee and a student’s adviser.


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Spanish (SPAN)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/spanish-ba

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Professor: Janet Gold, Lina Lee
Associate Professor: Holly R. Cashman, John M. Chaston, Carmen García de la Rasilla, Marco Dorfsman, Lori Hopkins, Jaume Martí-Olivella
Assistant Professor: Scott E. Weintraub
Clinical Instructor: Matthew Frye
Senior Lecturer: Linda J. Thomsen
Lecturer: Jorge Abril Sanchez, Eliani Benaion Basile, Susana Castillo-Rodriguez, Sarah E. Hirsch, Leticia Mantilla-Clavijo, Maria I. Rossi

The major in Spanish is offered by the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. It is designed to help students develop proficiency in the Spanish language and an appreciation of the cultural and literary achievements of Hispanic societies around the globe. This dual emphasis on communication and understanding prepares students to live in a world community where Spanish is becoming increasingly important for both personal and professional reasons. In addition, the program offers courses in Portuguese. Students also have the option to complete honors in the major providing they complete the necessary classes and a senior thesis in Spanish.

Students who major in Spanish may prepare themselves for a variety of fields in which proficiency in the Spanish language and knowledge of Hispanic cultures are desirable. Such fields might include international relations, business administration, government, social service, and communications. In addition, students can prepare to teach Spanish at the elementary and secondary levels and in bilingual education programs through the foreign language teacher education program. The undergraduate major also provides a basis for graduate study in preparation for scholarly research and teaching at the college level. When combined with coursework or a dual major in other disciplines, the major prepares students for work in Spanish-speaking areas of the world as well as in bilingual regions of the United States.

The UNH study abroad program in Granada, Spain, open to majors and nonmajors, offers students the opportunity to live and study abroad for a spring semester. A six-week summer immersion program in Costa Rica also is available to students. Financial aid is available for eligible students. Visit cola.unh.edu/llc/program/spain-granada, cola.unh.edu/llc/program/costa-rica-san-joaquin-de-flores, or contact the departmental program directors for further information.


The Spanish Major
The major consists of a minimum of 40 credits. All coursework required for the Spanish major must be completed with a grade of C or better. Specific course requirements are 1) Spanish language: 631 and 632; 2) five culture, linguistics, and literature electives from the following: 641, 645, 647, 648, 650, 651, 652, 653, 654, 525 or 526*, or equivalent; 3) three courses taught in Spanish at the 700 level. An approved foreign study experience in a Spanish-speaking country of a minimum of one semester is required; a full academic year is highly recommended. The Discovery Program capstone requirement may be fulfilled by completing SPAN 797R, Senior Seminar, in the fall semester or any 700-level Spanish course in the spring semester. Students completing their Discovery capstone in the spring semester must designate one class as their capstone and present their final work in that class at the Undergraduate Research Conference that semester. 

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements. However, majors may use the required study abroad experience to satisfy the World Cultures Discovery category requirement.

*SPAN 525 or 526 may be used to satisfy one of these electives, but students are strongly encouraged to select courses taught in Spanish to meet their major requirements. Only one course taught in English may be counted toward the Spanish major.

The Spanish Minor
The Spanish minor consists of 20 credits in courses numbered 503 and above, including 631 and 632.  At least three courses must be taken in residence at UNH. All coursework required for the Spanish minor must be completed with a grade of C or better and may not be taken pass/fail.

The Latin American Studies Minor
Spanish program faculty coordinate an interdisciplinary minor in Latin American studies. Coursework is drawn not only from the Spanish program, but from other programs across campus, such as anthropology, history, and political science. See the Latin American studies page for more information.

For more information on the major, the minor, and options for the study abroad experience, please see the coordinator of Spanish.

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Theatre and Dance (THDA)

» http://cola.unh.edu/theatre-dance

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Chairperson: David J. Kaye
Professor: David J. Kaye, Deborah A. Kinghorn, H. Gay Nardone, David L. Ramsey, David M. Richman
Associate Professor: Raina S. Ames
Assistant Professor: John Berst, Szu-Feng Chen
Senior Lecturer: Carol J. Fisher, Sarah Jane Marschner, Daniel J. Raymond
Lecturer: Aimee Blesing, Susan Endrizzi, Melissa Manseau, Mary Beth Marino

The Department of Theatre and Dance offers a general theatre degree plus emphases in acting, design and theatre technology, musical theatre, secondary education and youth drama. We also offer a Dance option within our B.A. in theatre degree. Performance opportunities include six main-stage, faculty-directed productions; three touring productions; and more than 20 student-directed productions including plays, musical theatre, dance, puppetry, improvisation, comedy, and creative drama.

The award-winning faculty provide theatre majors with superlative training within a broad liberal arts context. Students may take courses in acting; voice and movement; dialects; directing; choreography; design and theatre technology; the history, theory, and criticism of drama and theatre; youth drama; secondary theatre education; playwriting; storytelling; puppetry; ballet; theatre dance (jazz and tap); aerial dance; and musical theatre. Students interested in performance, technical, and historical aspects are trained to step into professional careers. The program affords means for independent study and internships, special projects, and active personal involvement in lecture and laboratory classes, with the possibility for integration with other departments. To assist with financial needs, the department awards scholarships to selected majors each spring.

Requirements for the Major

In addition to general liberal arts preparation, six specific course sequences are available within the theatre major:

1. courses leading to a theatre major with an emphasis in acting;
2. courses leading to a theatre major with an option in dance: ballet, theatre dance (tap and jazz), and aerial dance;
3. courses leading to a theatre major with an emphasis in design and theatre technology;
4. courses leading to a theatre major with an emphasis in musical theatre;
5. courses leading to a theatre major that, if desired, may be combined with requirements of the Department of Education, in conjunction with a fifth year Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program, to prepare students for secondary school certification with an undergraduate specialization in secondary theatre education;
6. courses leading to a theatre major that, if desired, may be combined with requirements of the Department of Education, in conjunction with a fifth year Masters in Education (M.Ed.) program, to prepare students for elementary school certification with an undergraduate specialization in youth drama.

Auditions/interviews are required for all prospective students. The session will last approximately two (2) hours. In addition to the audition/interview, students will have an opportunity to ask questions during a comprehensive department overview. Please note that entrance into the Department of Theatre and Dance is contingent upon acceptance into the University of New Hampshire. Prospective students who live more than 250 miles away may contact the department to discuss other audition options. Audition/interview dates, as well as detailed entrance requirements, can be found at the Department of Theatre and Dance website.

The general theatre major allows students to explore a variety of areas. In the freshman and sophomore years, students should enroll for at least two theatre and two Discovery courses per semester. The minimum grade requirement  is C- per course. Any grade lower than C- will not count toward the major. Under department policy, students who complete both COMM 401 and 402 (American Sign Language) satisfy the language proficiency requirement. All majors must take courses in the following areas: performance, design/theatre technology, and theory/history as well as fulfill between four and eight practicums and complete a capstone course. Although timing will vary with each emphasis, it is strongly suggested that all introductory courses be taken prior to the end of the student's sophomore year.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements.

All UNH B.A. degrees require a minimum of 128 credit hours. Within those 128 credit hours, the theatre major offers seven specific course sequences:


Theatre (B.A.) General Theatre

Contact David Richman, Paul Creative Arts Center, (603) 862-2218, david.richman@unh.edu.


I. 26-30 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   436 or 438   History of Theatre I or II   4  
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   462 or 463   Ballet I or Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   551   Acting I   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   798 or 799   Senior Thesis or Capstone Project   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion).



II. 4 Credits from Theory/History

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   436 or 438   History of Theatre I or II   4  
THDA   444   Inquiry Course (Any Topic)   4  
THDA   450   History of Musical Theatre in America   4  
THDA   520   Creative Drama   4  
THDA   541   Arts and Theatre Administration   4  
THDA   632   Interpretation of Shakespeare in Theatre   4  
THDA   638   American Theatre: 1920-1970   4  
THDA   640   Playwriting   4  
THDA   657   Play Reading   4  
THDA   721   Arts Integration   4  
THDA   727   Methods of Teaching Theatre   4  
THDA   762   Women in 20th and 21st Century American Theatre   4  


III. 4 Credits from Design/Theatre Technology

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   458   Costume Construction   4  
THDA   475   Stage Makeup   2  
THDA   546   Costume Design for the Theatre   4  
THDA   547   Stage Properties   4  
THDA   548   Stage Lighting Design and Execution   4  
THDA   583   Introduction to Puppetry   4  
THDA   641   Stage Management   2  
THDA   650   Scene Painting for the Theatre   2  
THDA   651   Rendering for the Theatre   2  
THDA   652   Scene Design   4  
THDA   683   Advanced Puppetry   4  


IV. 4 Credits from Performance

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   462   Ballet I   4  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   470   Movement and Vocal Production   4  
THDA   532   The London Experience   2  
THDA   552   Acting II   4  
THDA   555   Musical Theatre I   4  
THDA   592A   Special Topics   4  
THDA   622   Storytelling, Story Theatre, and Involvement Drama   4  
THDA   624   Theatre for Young Audiences   4  
THDA   655   Musical Theatre Scene Study   4  
THDA   741   Directing I   4  
THDA   755   Advanced Musical Theatre   4  
THDA   756   Producing & Directing the Musical   4  
THDA   758   Acting III   4  


V: 8 Credits from any 600-800 level course

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
    Includes those in Sections II, III, and IV    
THDA   691/791   Internship in Theatre & Dance   1-8  
THDA   795/796   Independent Study   1-8  
THDA   798   Senior Thesis   2  
THDA   799   Capstone Project   2  


Total: 46-50 Credit Hours



Theatre (B.A.) Emphasis in Acting

The acting emphasis was created for students with an intense interest in acting and/or directing. The emphasis was designed to develop all aspects of the actor and the director as both an interpretive and creative artist. Students in the acting emphasis program are expected to strive for excellence in all areas of the art and craft of acting through highly challenging coursework, performance-based projects, and productions and special workshops with guest artists and instructors.

Contact David Kaye, Paul Creative Arts Center, (603) 862-0667, djk@unh.edu.


I. 46-50 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   436   History of Theater I   4  
THDA   438   History of Theater II   4  
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   462 or 463   Ballet I or Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   470   Movement and Vocal Production   4  
THDA   551   Acting I   4  
THDA   552   Acting II   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   758   Acting III   4  
THDA   759   Acting: Period and Style   4  
THDA   799   Capstone Project   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion). 



II. 4 Credits from Theory/History

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   450   History of Musical Theatre in America   4  
THDA   632   Interpretation of Shakespeare in Theatre   4  
THDA   638   American Theatre: 1920-1970   4  
THDA   640   Playwriting   4  
THDA   657   Play Reading   4  
THDA   762   Women in 20th and 21st Century American Theatre   4  


III. 12 Credits from any THDA course offering

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA     Choose from any THDA course   12  


Total: 62-66 Credit Hours



Theatre (B.A.) Option in Dance

A diverse program in dance is offered as an option within the Department of Theatre and Dance. This option is designed to give the dance teacher, choreographer, and/or performer the skills needed to embark on a successful career. Technique courses in ballet, pointe, tap, jazz, and the aerial arts are at the core of this program. Courses in pedagogy, composition, dance history, and choreography allow dancers to explore a variety of disciplines in the dance field. In addition, dancers are introduced to the technical aspects involved in staging a full-scale performance. Performance opportunities include yearly faculty-directed dance concerts and student-created dance showcases each semester. Dancers may focus on one or all dance forms.

Contact Gay Nardone, Newman Dance Studio, (603) 862-1728, gay.nardone@unh.edu.


I. 20-24 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   459 or 460   Stagecraft or Elements of Design   4  
THDA   487   The Dance   4  
THDA   551   Acting I   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   795W/796W   Independent Study in Performance (Writing Intensive)   2  
THDA   799   Capstone Project   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion).



II. 12 Credits Required from Theory

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   633   Dance Composition   4  
THDA   732   Choreography   4  
THDA   786   Dance Pedagogy   4  


III. 8 Credits from Fine Arts

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
ARTS   572   Art of the Age of Humanism   4  
ARTS   573   Art of the Modern World   4  
MUSI   411-412   Fundamentals of Music Theory   4  
MUSI   709   Music of the Romantic Period   4  
MUSI   711   Music of the 20th Century   4  
PHIL   421   Philosophy of the Arts   4  
THDA   444B   Famous Dancers of the 20th Century   4  
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   546   Costume Design for the Theatre   4  
THDA   548   Stage Lighting Design and Execution   4  
THDA   555   Musical Theatre I   4  
THDA   655   Musical Theatre Scene Study   4  
THDA   798   Senior Thesis   2  


IV. 16 Credits from Performance

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   462   Ballet I   4  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   562   Ballet II (May be repeated to 4 cr)   2  
THDA   563   Theatre Dance II (May be repeated to 4 cr)   2  
THDA   576   Pointe   2  
THDA   597   Dance Theatre Performance (Repeatable to 16 cr )   2  
THDA   662   Ballet III (May be repeated to 16 cr)   2  
THDA   663   Theatre Dance III (May be repeated to 16 cr)   2  
THDA   665   Aerial Dance (May be repeated to 16 cr)   2  
THDA   684   Special Topics   2-4  


Total: 56-60 Credit Hours



Theatre (B.A.) Emphasis in Design and Theatre Technology

The design and theatre technology emphasis prepares students for both practical and aesthetic work in the theatre through class work, production assignments, and everyday problem solving. UNH's theatre technicians and designers are in demand throughout the country, utilizing transferable skills not only in the theatre but in the allied arts and beyond. UNH-trained graduates hold careers across the nation as lighting, scenic, and costume designers; technical directors; property masters; head electricians; and scenic artists.

Contact Szu-Feng Chen, Paul Creative Arts Center, (603) 862-4445, szu-feng.chen@unh.edu.


I. 26-30 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   436 or 438   History of Theater I or II   4  
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   462 or 463   Ballet I or Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   551   Acting I   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   799   Capstone Project   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion).



II. 12 Credits from

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   458   Costume Construction   4  
THDA   546   Costume Design for the Theatre   4  
THDA   548   Stage Lighting Design and Execution   4  
THDA   652   Scene Design   4  


III. 8 Credits from

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   475   Stage Makeup   2  
THDA   541   Arts and Theatre Administration   4  
THDA   546   Costume Design for the Theatre   4  
THDA   547   Stage Properties   4  
THDA   548   Stage Lighting Design and Execution   4  
THDA   641   Stage Management   2  
THDA   650   Scene Painting for the Theatre   2  
THDA   651   Rendering for the Theatre   2  
THDA   652   Scene Design   4  
THDA   741   Directing I   4  


IV. 8 Credits from

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
ARTS   455   Introduction to Architecture   4  
ARTS   525   Woodworking   4  
ARTS   532   Introduction to Drawing   4  
ARTS   546   Introduction to Painting   4  
ENGL   631, 657, 746, 758, 781, 782   The Drama, Shakespeare, Studies in American...*   4  
FREN   522   French Drama in Translation   4  
GERM   640   German Drama   4  
SPAN   752, 757, 771   Drama & Poetry of the Siglode Oro, Spanish...**   4  
THDA   532   The London Experience   2  
THDA   583   Introduction to Puppetry   4  
THDA   691/791   Internship in Theatre   1-8  
THDA   795/796   Independent Study   1-8  

*The Drama, Shakespeare, Studies in American Drama, Shakespeare, The Drama of Shakespeare's Contemporaries, English Drama, Modern Drama

**Drama & Poetry of the Siglode Oro, Spanish Drama of the 20th Century, Latin American Drama



Total: 54-58 Credit Hours



Theatre (B.A.) Emphasis in Musical Theatre

The musical theatre emphasis is designed to cultivate and nurture the creative artistry of those highly motivated students who wish to develop their combined talent as singers, actors, and dancers. Students in the musical theatre emphasis program will thrive in this intense and dynamic program of coursework, practical application, performance-based projects, faculty- and student-directed productions, and special workshops with guest artists and instructors. Students will be expected to fully integrate their rigorous training as actors, dancers, and singers with the outstanding liberal arts education they will receive at UNH to become well-rounded and marketable musical theatre artists.

Contact John Berst, Paul Creative Arts Center, (603) 862-3288, john.berst@unh.edu.


I. 34-38 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   436 or 438   History of Theatre I or II   4  
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   462   Ballet I   4  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   470   Movement & Vocal Production   4  
THDA   551   Acting I   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   799   Capstone Project   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion).



II. 20 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   450   History of Musical Theatre in America   4  
THDA   555   Musical Theatre I   4  
THDA   655   Musical Theatre Scene Study   4  
THDA   755   Advanced Musical Theatre   4  
MUSI   411   Fundamentals of Music Theory   4  


III. 3 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   500   Musical Theatre Voice I   1  
THDA   600   Musical Theatre Voice II   1  
THDA   700   Musical Theatre Voice III (repeatable)   1  


IV. 4 Credits from

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA/MUSI     Non-repeating credits*   4  

*Choose four non-repeating credits from any THDA course or any MUSI course that involves vocal training/performance, music theory, ear training, or piano.



Total: 61-65 Credit Hours



Theatre (B.A.) Emphasis in Secondary Theatre Education

For candidates who want to teach drama courses and/or direct high school productions, the secondary theatre education emphasis offers practical and theoretical training for teachers. Through laboratory work, students obtain hands-on theatre teaching experience, so that by the time they reach their graduate school internship, they have spent significant hours working with the K-12 age group. Students are provided with extensive training and practical teaching experience specifically geared toward the goal of being a theatre teacher, either in a traditional classroom or as a teaching artist. Students will be expected to fully integrate education and theatre coursework so that they leave UNH prepared for the rigorous task of teaching.

Contact Raina Ames, Paul Creative Arts Center, (603) 862-3044, raina.ames@unh.edu.


I. 56-60 Credits Required from Theatre

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   436   History of Theater I   4  
THDA   438   History of Theater II   4  
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   475   Stage Makeup   2  
THDA   551   Acting I   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   624   Theatre for Young Audiences   4  
THDA   721   Arts Integration   4  
THDA   727**   Methods of Teaching Theatre   4  
THDA   729   Community-Oriented Drama Programs   4  
THDA   741   Directing I   4  
THDA   760   Teacher Planning for Theatre   4  
THDA   799   Capstone Project (must be taken in senior year)   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion).

**Must be taken before student teaching internship.



II. 4 Credits from Design/Theatre Technology

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   458   Costume Construction   4  
THDA   546   Costume Design for the Theatre   4  
THDA   548   Stage Lighting Design and Execution   4  


III. 4 Credits From Education

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
EDUC   500/935**   Exploring Teaching   4  


B.A. in Theatre with emphasis in Secondary Theatre Education


Total: 64-68 Credit Hours



IV. 16 Credits Required from Education*

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
EDUC   700/800   Educational Structure and Change   4  
EDUC   701/801   Human Development & Learning: Educational Psycholo   4  
EDUC   705/805   Alternate Perspectives on the Nature of Education   4  
EDUC   751B/851B   Educational Exceptional Learners: Secondary   4  

*May be taken at the undergraduate level or the graduate level.
 



B.A. in Theatre plus undergraduate coursework toward the M.A.T. in Education


Total: 80-84 Credit Hours



THDA Electives

Students should take at least 8 credits from the following courses (one of which should be another design course):
THDA 450, History of Musical Theatre in America; 520, Creative Drama; 547, Stage Properties; 583, Introduction to Puppetry; 622, Storytelling, Story Theatre, and Involvement Dramatics; 632, Interpretation of Shakespeare in Theatre; 638, American Theatre: 1920-1970; 640, Playwriting; 641, Stage Management; 652, Scene Design; 657, Play Reading; 683, Advanced Puppetry; 762, Women in 20th and 21st Century American Theater.

NOTE: It is understood that students will fulfill 20 internship contact hours with theatre students in their emphasis area: elementary, middle, or high school. Projects for 729 cannot count as internship hours. Students may fulfill this requirement through a variety of teaching opportunities with the department's outreach program (both during the school year and in the summer), or they may work with local schools teaching, coaching actors, assistant directing, choreographing, or in some other capacity as specifically arranged with their theatre adviser.

It also is understood that students involved in the above course curriculum in order to get state theatre arts certification must apply to either the UNH Department of Education or another university for acceptance into a fifth-year master of arts in teaching (M.A.T.) or master of education (M.Ed.) degree program that fulfills state requirements for certification.


Theatre (B.A.) Emphasis in Youth Drama

The youth drama emphasis is for those students who wish to use dramatic arts as a teaching tool, either in the elementary classroom or as a teaching artist. Our comprehensive curriculum is specifically designed to train teachers. Through laboratory work, students obtain hands-on theatrical teaching experience, so that by the time they reach their graduate school internship, they have spent significant hours working with children. Students will be expected to fully integrate education and theatre coursework so that they leave UNH with sound theoretical training in addition to practical instruction on how to use drama to enhance learning outcomes, address classroom discipline issues, and, of course, bring the arts to life in the classroom.

Contact Raina Ames, Paul Creative Arts Center, (603) 862-3044, raina.ames@unh.edu.


I. 54-58 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   459   Stagecraft   4  
THDA   460   Elements of Design   4  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   520   Creative Drama   4  
THDA   583   Introduction to Puppetry   4  
THDA   589 A-D   Practicum   4-8*  
THDA   622   Storytelling, Story Theatre & Involvement Drama   4  
THDA   624   Theatre For Young Audiences   4  
THDA   683   Advanced Puppetry   4  
THDA   721   Arts Integration   4  
THDA   727   Methods of Teaching Theatre   4  
THDA   729   Community-Oriented Drama Programs   4  
THDA   760   Teacher Planning for Theatre   4  
THDA   799   Capstone Project (must be taken in senior year)   2  

*Students are required to take at least one practicum for every semester they are a major in the Department of Theatre and Dance. In addition, each student must take each type of practicum at least once (Technical, Costume, Performance, Marketing & Promotion).



II. 4 Credits Required from Education

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
EDUC   500 / 935**   Exploring Teaching   4  

**Must be taken before student teaching internship.



B.A. in Theatre with emphasis in Youth Drama


Total: 58-62 Credit Hours



III. 24 Credits Required from Education

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
EDUC   700 / 800   Educational Structure & Change   4  
EDUC   701 / 801   Human Development & Learning   4  
EDUC   703F / 803F   Teaching Science   2  
EDUC   703M / 803M   Teaching Elementary Science & Social Studies   2  
EDUC   705 / 805*   Alternative Perspectives on Nature of Education   4  
EDUC   706 / 806*   Introduction to Reading Instruction   4  
EDUC   751A / 851A   Educating Exceptional Learners: Elementary   4  

*Must be taken before student teaching internship.



IV. 4 Credits From Math Education**

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
MATH   601 or 602   Exploring Mathematics for Teachers I or II   4  
MATH   621   Number Systems for Teachers   4  
MATH   622   Geometry for Teachers   4  
MATH   623   Topics in Mathematics for Teachers   4  
MATH   703   Teaching of Mathematics, K-6   4  
MATH   910   Teaching Elementary School Mathematics   4  
EDUC   741 / 841   Exploring Mathematics for Young Children   4  

*May be taken at the undergraduate level or the graduate level.
**Must be taken before student teaching internship.



B.A. in Theatre plus undergraduate coursework toward the M.Ed. in Elementary Education

 


Total Up To 90 Credit Hours



Minoring in Theatre and Dance

A minor acknowledges a level of competence and academic focus without the depth a major requires. Students may pursue a minor while majoring in another subject when the demands of that major prevent the possibility of a double major.


General Minor in Theatre

The general theatre minor provides the broadest overview of the discipline, allowing students to create their course of study by exploring theory and technique classes from acting, design and theatre technology, and history.

Contact Michael Wood, 862-3038, mike.wood@unh.edu.


I: 8 Credits From

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   435   Introduction to Theatre   4  
THDA   442   Introduction to the Art of Acting   4  


II. 4 Credits from Theory/History

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA     Choose from section II of General Theatre Major Requirements   4  


III. 4 Credits from Design/Theatre Technology

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA     Choose from section III of General Theatre Major Requirements   4  


IV. 4 Credits from any THDA Course

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA     Choose from any THDA course   4  


Total: 20 Credit Hours



Dance Minor

Students completing the dance minor demonstrate a basic knowledge in the two areas of dance learning: technique and nontechnique courses. A student will minor in dance to keep open the option of pursuing a career in dance by maintaining a level of dance skill.

Contact Michael Wood, 862-3038, mike.wood@unh.edu.


I. Up to 16 Credits

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   462   Ballet I   4  
THDA   562   Ballet II   2  
THDA   662   Ballet III   2  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   563   Theatre Dance II   2  
THDA   663   Theatre Dance III   2  
THDA   665   Aerial Dance   2  
THDA   597   Dance Theatre Performance   2  
THDA   576   Pointe   2  


II. At Least 4 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   487   The Dance   4  
THDA   633   Dance Composition   4  
THDA   684   Special Topics   2-4  
THDA   732   Choreography   4  
THDA   786   Dance Pedagogy   4  


Total: 20 Credit Hours



Musical Theatre Minor

The musical theatre minor offers the student basic knowledge of the history and canon of this uniquely American art form while providing for hands-on experience in both singing and dancing.

Contact Michael Wood, 862-3038, mike.wood@unh.edu.


I. 16 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   440 or 450   Exploring Musical Theatre or History of Musical Theatre in America   4  
THDA   442 or 551   Introduction to the Art of Acting or Acting I   4  
THDA   463   Theatre Dance I   4  
THDA   555   Musical Theatre I   4  


II. 4 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA     Choose from any THDA course excluding THDA 500, 600, and 700.   4  


Total: 20 Credit Hours



Youth Drama Minor

The youth drama minor is ideal for those who wish to explore the dramatic arts. Anyone with an interest in theatre for young audiences, either in acting or as a way to augment teaching strategies with activated and arts-infused methodology, would benefit from this minor.

Contact Michael Wood, 862-3038, mike.wood@unh.edu.


I. 24 Credits Required

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
THDA   520   Creative Drama   4  
THDA   583   Introduction to Puppetry   4  
THDA   622   Storytelling, Story Theatre & Involvement Drama   4  
THDA   624   Theatre for Young Audiences   4  
THDA   683   Advanced Puppetry   4  
THDA   721   Arts Integration   4  


Total: 24 Credit Hours



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Women's Studies (WS)

» http://cola.unh.edu/womens-studies

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Coordinator: Marla A. Brettschneider
Professor: Marla A. Brettschneider
Affiliate Professor: Sarah Redfield
Associate Professor: Carol B. Conaway
Affiliate Associate Professor: Sarra Lev, Mary M. Moynihan
Assistant Professor: Courtney Marshall
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Sharon Gershoni, Nancy Nield
Affiliate Faculty: Jane Stapleton
Lecturer: Joelle Ryan, Tamsin Whitehead
Core Faculty: Amy Boylan, Holly R. Cashman, Katie Edwards, Diane P. Freedman, Robin Hackett, Marc W. Herold, Lori Hopkins, Delia C. Konzett, Mary Malone, Svetlana Peshkova, Janet L. Polasky, Mary E. Rhiel, Judy Sharkey, Reginald A. Wilburn

The UNH Women’s Studies Program provides students with an understanding of the status of women and gender roles in various cultures and historical eras. Students learn the use of gender as a category of analysis, and increase their knowledge of women’s contributions to many fields and the roles gender plays in them. Women’s studies courses offer students critical perspectives on such basic questions of the social order as assumptions about gender roles and gender identity and the ways cross-cutting phenomena such as racism, heterosexim, religion, ablism, and ageism are a part of them.

A major or minor in women’s studies prepares students for careers where the changing roles of women, and gender more broadly, have a perceptible impact. Many women’s studies graduates go on to law school and graduate school in a variety of disciplines. With a women's studies degree, students often take positions with social change or family service agencies, and in fields such as politics, communications, community organizing, education, affirmative action, healthcare, and human resources.

Women’s Studies Major
The women’s studies major requires students to complete 40 credits of major-approved coursework with grades of C- or better and an overall grade point average in major courses of 2.00 or higher.

The following three courses are required:

The remaining seven courses may be chosen in consultation with a WS faculty adviser according to the following guidelines:

At least five courses for the major must be taken at the 600 level or above. Only two 400-level courses may be used to satisfy major requirements. The Discovery Program capstone requirement is to be fulfilled by taking one of the following: WS 798 or WS 799.

WS topic courses include WS 444s, WS 505s, and WS 798s:

444 Inquiry Courses
WS 444, Trans/forming Gender
WS 444a, Race Matters
WS 444b, Score: Gender & Diversity in Sports
WS 444c, On the Roads to Equality
WS 444d, Cyborgs, Avatars, and Feminists: Gender in the Virtual World

505 Surveys
How Do We Look? Gender, Race & Sexuality in Visual Culture
Sustainability & Spirituality
Feminist Activism
Race, Class, and Gender in the Media
19th Century Black Women in New England
Fashion This!
Global Sex Industry
Race, Gender and Environmental Justice

798 Colloquiums
Feminist Studies in Film
Women’s Fiber Arts Traditions
Feminism and Queer Theory
Conflicts within Feminism
The Body
Jewish Feminism, Politics & Culture
Feminist Autobiography
Global Feminist Issues
Women, Work, and Policy
Black Women in America
Black Feminist Thought
Queers & Kin
Women in Prison
Contemporary American Memoir: Autobiography/Theory
Dreamgirls: Dancing on the Pages of Diva (Auto)biographies
Transgender Feminism
Theater as a Provocative Act

For a list of currently-approved cross-counted offerings from other departments, please check the department website.

No more than four electives may be from the same department. Strongly recommended is a practicum, internship course, or research with faculty.

Major department courses taken to satisfy major requirements cannot be used to satisfy Discovery category requirements, unless women’s studies is your second major. First and second majors may double count no more than two courses between the WS major and another major or minor.

Candidates for a degree must satisfy all of the University Discovery Program requirements in addition to satisfying the requirements of each individual major program. Bachelor of arts candidates must also satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement. ASL: COMM 401 AND COMM 402 may be used to satisfy the language competency requirement.

Women’s Studies Minor
For the women’s studies minor, students must complete 20 credits of women’s studies courses with a grade of C- or better. Courses taken pass/fail may not be used toward the minor. No more than eight credits used to satisfy the requirements for another major or minor may be used for the women’s studies minor. Students electing the women’s studies minor must complete WS 401, Introduction to Women’s Studies, or WS 405, Gender, Power, and Privilege, and WS 798, Colloquium in Women’s Studies, normally taken at the beginning and end of the course sequence, respectively.  It may be possible to substitute WS  795, WS 797, Internships, or WS 796 and WS 799, Capstone Experiences, for WS 798, Colloquium, with permission from a women's studies adviser. Additionally, students must complete three other women’s studies courses, either program courses or those that are cross-counted with other departments. (For a more complete description of the women’s studies minor, see COLA/Interdisciplinary Programs.)

Students who wish to major or minor in women’s studies should consult with the coordinator or academic/student services assistant, 203 Huddleston Hall, (603) 862-2194.

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