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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2014-2015

University of New Hampshire at Manchester

» http://www.manchester.unh.edu


American Sign Language (ASL)

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Anthropology (ANTH)

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Assistant Professor: Natalie Porter

 


Art and Art History (ARTS)

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Biochemistry, Molecular, and Cellular Biology (BMCB)

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Biological Science (BSCI)

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Biological Sciences

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/associates-biology

Associate Professor: Stephen R. Pugh
Assistant Professor: Patricia Halpin, Sandra M. Rehan

Biological Sciences (A.S.)
Biology is the study of living organisms in both laboratory and field conditions. It concerns itself with questions of understanding the living world, its complex interrelationships, and the role of human beings within it.

The associate of science in biological sciences program at UNH Manchester is designed to serve either as a terminal degree or as a springboard for students interested in the life sciences, which include majors in biology, microbiology, zoology, plant biology, wildlife management, environmental conservation, biochemistry and animal sciences. Employment opportunities in the public and private sectors include education, food, water, wastewater and other industrial laboratories, clinical laboratories, biotechnology, environmental research and monitoring, and animal behavior.

Students must complete a minimum of 64 credits to graduate. There are two tracks in the A.S. degree program at UNH Manchester: biology and microbiology.

Biology Track Requirements
Math 425, Calculus I, or MATH 424b, Calculus for Life Sciences
PSYC 402, Statistics in Psychology (other statistics courses such as BIOL 528 or BUS 430 may be used to satisfy this requirement).
BIOL 413, Principles of Biology I
BIOL 414, Principles of Biology II
CHEM 403, General Chemistry I
CHEM 404, General Chemistry II
BMS 503, General Microbiology
CHEM 545/546, Organic Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratory
BMCB 658/659, General Biochemistry and General Biochemistry Laboratory
BIOL 541, General Ecology
GEN 604, Principles of Genetics

Microbiology Track Requirements
Students opting for the microbiology track must take all courses listed in the biological sciences program with the exception of BIOL 541, General Ecology. Two additional courses selected from BMS 504, Brewing and Industrial Microbiology; BMS 602, Pathogenic Microbiology; or BMS 601, Bacteriology of Food are required of students in the microbiology track.

Note: Pre-medical and pre-dental students should enroll in CHEM 651-652 and 653-654 at Durham. These courses may substitute for CHEM 545/546 and BMCB 658-659. In addition, students should also enroll in MATH 426.

For more information, contact Stephen Pugh, program coordinator, at (603) 641-4128, or Stephen.Pugh@unh.edu, or contact the Office of Admissions.

The associate of science degree includes the following Discovery Program course requirements:

Discovery Foundation Skills Inquiry course (or INQ attribute course). 
This course may fulfill a Discovery category and/or a departmental requirement. It should be taken during a student’s first or second year or prior to completion of 48 credits.

One course in writing skills. Most students will satisfy the first-year writing requirement with English 401. This course should be taken during a student’s first year or prior to the completion of 32 credits.

One course in quantitative reasoning. This course must be completed by the end of the first year or 32 credits.

Discovery in the Disciplines
Students must take courses from the Discovery categories at the 400-600 levels. Inquiry courses that carry Discovery category designations may be used to satisfy this requirement.

Two courses chosen from two of these three categories: Biological Sciences (BS)*,Physical Sciences (PS)*, or Environment, Technology, and Society (ETS).

* One of these two courses must have a lab component.

Three courses chosen from three of these five categories: Historical Perspectives (HP), World Cultures  (WC), Fine and Performing Arts (FPA), Social Science (SS), or Humanities (HUMA) with no more than one course from any single category.

Additional Information
Discovery Program requirements shall not be waived on the basis of special examinations or placement tests, except for the College Board Advanced Placement tests and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests. All students transferring to UNH in academic year 2013-14 will come in under Discovery Program requirements. For students who transfer in with 26 or more credits, the INQ requirement is waived.

Note to Faculty: Waiver of requirements in the Discovery Program. Students may petition the Discovery Committee to waive or replace a requirement. The student’s petition must be approved by his or her major adviser and the dean of his or her college.

The required courses cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. No single course may be counted in more than one Discovery discipline category. Academic departments may or may not permit Discovery courses to count toward requirements for a major. Thompson School of Applied Sciences (TSAS) courses may not be used for general-education (1984-2009), writing-intensive, or foreign language requirements. TSAS courses that are 400-600 level and Discovery-approved may count for Discovery requirements. All Discovery courses carry 3-4 credits.

The most current list of Discovery courses may be found on the Registrar’s Office website at http://www.unh.edu/registrar/registration-courses/discovery-program.html.

Discovery Program Courses

Writing Skills (WS)
ENGL 401

Quantitative Reasoning (QR)
+BUS 430
BIOL 528, 555
EREC 525
HHS 540
+MATH 444
MATH 420, 424A, 424B, 425, 439
PHIL 412
PSYC 402
SOC 502

Biological Science (BS)
ANSC 401 (DLAB)
ANTH 415 (DLAB)
BIOL 411 (DLAB), 412 (DLAB), 413 (DLAB),414 (DLAB), 420 (DLAB), 444B
BMS 407, 444A (DLAB), 501 (DLAB), 507 (DLAB), 508 (DLAB)
BSCI 405 (DLAB), 406 (DLAB), 421, 422, 431 (DLAB
ECE 444 (DLAB)
HMP 501 (DLAB)
KIN 527 (DLAB), 607
NR 410 (DLAB), 433 (DLAB), 444E
NUTR 400 (DLAB)
OT 513 (DLAB)
PBIO 400 (DLAB), 412 (DLAB), 421 (DLAB)
ZOOL 401 (DLAB), 412 (DLAB), 444, 444A

Physical Science (PS)
CHE 410
CHEM 403 (DLAB), 404 (DLAB), 405 (DLAB), 409, 444, 444A, 444B, 444G
ESCI 401 (DLAB), 402 (DLAB), 405, 409 (DLAB), 410, 420, 444, 501 (DLAB)
GEOG 473 (DLAB), 572, 574
MS 401
NR 504 (DLAB)
PHYS 401 (DLAB), 402 (DLAB), 404 (DLAB), 405, 406 (DLAB), 407 (DLAB), 408 (DLAB), 409 (DLAB), 444A

Fine and Performing Arts (FPA)
ARTS 444, 444A, 480, 487, 532, 574
CA 444, 502
HUMA 510A, 511A, 512A, 513A, 514A, 515A
ITAL 525
LLC 444D
MUSI 401, 402, 444, 511
PHIL 421
THDA 435,436, 438, 440, 442, 444, 444A, 444B, 459, 462, 463, 583

Historical Perspectives (HP)
AMST 444D
ANSC 444
ANTH 444
BMS 444B
CLAS 405, 406, 444C, 550, 560
COLA 657F1
FS 444
HIST 405, 406, 410, 421, 422, 435, 436, 444, 444A, 444B, 444C, 444D, 444E, 444F, 483, 498, 506, 511, 521, 522, 532, 565, 579
HMP 505
HUMA 510C, 511C, 512C, 513C, 514C, 515C
ITAL 681A, 682A
KIN 444B, 561
LLC 444G, 540
POLT 403
+PS 501, 503, 508
PSYC 571
RS 483
RUSS 525
SW 525
WS 444A, 444C, 505

Humanities (HUMA)
AMST 444B, 444E, 501, 502
ANSC 444B
CLAS 401, 421, 422, 444, 444A, 444B, 520, 530
CMN 444, 456
+ECN 444
ECS 550
ENGL 403, 444D, 444E, 444G, 444J, 444K, 444M 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 520, 521, 533, 535,
550, 555, 575
GERM 521, 524
HUMA 401, +411, +412, 444, 444A, 444B, 444C, 500, 510D, 511D, 512D, 513D, 514D, 515D, 519
IA 444A
ITAL 521, 522, 657F2, 681B, 682B
LLC 444, 444C, 444E, 444F, 551, 552
PHIL 401, 430, 436, 444A, 565
POLT 401, 444A, 524
+PS 504
RMP 511
SPAN 651, 652, 653, 654
WS 405

Social Science
ADMN 444
ANTH 412
CEP 415
CLAS 506
CMN 455, 457
+ECN 411, 412
ECON 401, 402, 444
EDUC 444, 444A, 444B, 520
ENGL 405, 444B, 444F
EREC 409, 411
FS 444A, 525, 545
GEOG 581, 582
HHS 444
HMP 401
+INTR 438
KIN 444A, 444C
LING 405, 444B, 444F
NURS 535
NUTR 405
POLT 402, 512, 560
+PS 407, 502, 505, 507
PSYC 401, 444A
RMP 444, 444A, 490
SOC 400, 444, 540
SW 444, 550
WS 401, 444, 444B

World Cultures (WC)
ANSC 510
ANTH 411, 500, 501
CHIN 425, 503, 504
COLA 657
COMM 525
ENGL 581
EREC 444
FREN 503, 504, 525, 526
GEOG 401, 402, 550
GERM 503, 504, 525
GREK 503, 504, 505, 506
HIST 425, 563
HMP 444A
HUMA 510B, 511B, 512B, 513B, 514B, 515B
ITAL 425, 503, 504
JPN 425, 503, 504
LATN 503, 504
LLC 444A, 444B, 503, 504
MUSI 515
POLT 543, 550
RUSS 425, 503, 504
SPAN 503, 504, 525, 526, 631, 632, 686
TECH 685

Environment, Technology, and Society (ETS)
ANSC 444A
ARTS 552
BIOL 520, 444A, 544
BMS 650
CIE 402, 444
COMP 405, 411
CS 401, 404, 408, 444
DS 444
ENE 520
ESCI 444A
GEOG 560
HMP 444
IA 555
JUST 405
MATH 445
MGT 444
NR 415, 435, 444B, 444C, 502
NURS 450
OT 444
PBIO 405
PHIL 424, 435, 444, 447, 450
PHYS 444, 444B
POLT 444
SOC 444A, 565
WS 444D
+ = UNHM
(DLAB) = Discovery

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Biology (BIOL)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/biology

» Click to view course offerings

Associate Professor: Stephen R. Pugh
Assistant Professor: Patricia Halpin

Biological Sciences (B.A.)
Biology is the study of living organisms in both laboratory and field conditions. It concerns itself with questions of understanding the living world, its complex interrelationships, and the role of human beings within it.

The B.A. in biological sciences at UNH Manchester is designed to: 1) allow students to earn a baccalaureate degree in biology at UNH Manchester; 2) allow students to combine study in biology with other programs and disciplines by completing a second major, a minor, or a self-designed set of elective courses along with their biology degree; 3) allow students to complete a major in biology while taking required courses in education in preparation for the five-year MAT or M.Ed. programs and state certification in secondary science education; and 4) provide an opportunity for students to complete a baccalaureate degree in biology while completing the required courses for admission to medical, dental, veterinary, physician assistant, pharmacy, physical therapy, and other professional graduate programs.

The biological sciences program at UNH Manchester can also serve as a springboard for students interested in the B.S. programs in the life sciences at UNH Durham, which include majors in biology, microbiology, zoology, plant biology, wildlife management, environmental conservation, biochemistry, and animal sciences.

Employment opportunities in the public and private sectors include education, food, water, wastewater and other industrial laboratories, clinical laboratories, biotechnology, environmental research and monitoring, and animal behavior.

Students must complete a minimum of 128 credits and satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements. BIOL 413, 414 may be used to satisfy the biological sciences Discovery requirement and CHEM 403, 404 may be used to satisfy the Physical Sciences Discovery requirement. PSYC 402 may be used to satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Discovery requirement; however, students interested in graduate or professional programs are encouraged to take MATH 425, Calculus I, or MATH 424b, Calculus for Life Sciences, to satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

The UNH Manchester B.A. in biological sciences program is structured with three levels of coursework.

Biology Core Curriculum (9 courses, 37 credits)
The biology core curriculum consists of five required biology courses:
BIOL 413-414, Principles of Biology I and II
BMS 503, General Microbiology
BIOL 541, General Ecology
GEN 604, Principles of Genetics

Two required chemistry courses:
CHEM 403-404, General Chemistry I and II

One course in mathematics:
MATH 418, Analysis and Application of Functions, or MATH 425, Calculus I, or MATH 424b, Calculus for Life Sciences

One course in statistics:
PSYC 402, Statistics in Psychology (other statistics courses such as BIOL 528 or BUS 430 may used to satisfy this requirement).

Depending on their specific academic and career goals and in consultation with their adviser, students may elect to take additional supporting science courses such as CHEM 545/546, Organic Chemistry with lab (one semester); CHEM 651/653 - 652/654, Organic Chemistry I and II with lab (two semesters); BMCB 658/659, Biochemistry with lab; MATH 426, Calculus II; and PHYS 407-408, General Physics I and II. These courses are often required for admission to medical, professional, and other graduate programs.

Self-Designed Concentration in Biology (4 courses, 16 credits)
Students will select, in consultation with their adviser, four biology courses at the 600-700 level to be taken at UNH Manchester or UNH Durham.

Capstone Experience
The capstone experience will be fulfilled by taking the one-credit course, BSCI 701, Senior Seminar, during either semester of the senior year and a capstone experience, such as BSCI 792, Research; BSCI 793, Internship; or BSCI 795, Independent Study. Senior Seminar will meet weekly during either semester of the senior year in a seminar format to share information about students’ research or independent study activities, listen to presentations on timely issues in biology, and support and provide training in poster production, PowerPoint and other methods of oral presentation and scientific writing as students prepare to present the results of their capstone activities at the Undergraduate Research Conference or other venues.

In addition, all students will take elective courses to fulfill the 128-credit requirement for a B.A. degree. These elective courses could fulfill the requirements for a major or minor in another program or they could fulfill a self-designed interdisciplinary concentration. They could include some of the supporting science courses listed above. These courses would be selected in consultation with the adviser and the appropriate faculty adviser in another program.

Note: Pre-medical and pre-dental students should enroll in CHEM 651/653 and 652/654. These courses may substitute for CHEM 545/546 and BMCB 658/659. In addition, students should also enroll in MATH 426.

For more information contact Stephen Pugh, program coordinator, at (603) 641-4128 or Stephen.Pugh@unh.edu; or contact the Office of Admissions.

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Biomedical Science (BMS)

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Business (BUS)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/business

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Professor: Thomas D. Birch
Associate Professor: Kelly Kilcrease
Lecturer: William Troy

Business (B.A.)
The bachelor of arts in business has a strong interdisciplinary focus. The curriculum adheres to a philosophy that effective decision making requires a broad understanding of the institutional and cultural climate within which businesses are operating. The program uses the resources of Manchester’s business community and its economic strengths to provide students with skills, knowledge, and opportunities.

The business program offers areas of focus in accounting, business economics and political economy, business and technology, management, marketing, and human resource management. Students with a unique interest can create a self-designed concentration with approval of his/her adviser and the coordinator of the business program.

A culminating capstone experience enables students to apply their knowledge in the form of an internship, applied senior project, or special topics seminar. Because this is a bachelor of arts program, students fulfill the foreign language requirement. Students have the opportunity to enhance fluency through community experiences and internships. Graduates of UNH Manchester’s business program are in demand because they offer future employers a portfolio of practical and theoretical knowledge and experience combined with effective communication and leadership skills.

Program of Study
Students must complete 128 credits to graduate. Each required course must be completed with a minimum grade of C-. Students must attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in major courses required for graduation. Majors cannot use BUS 430, ECN 411, or ECN 412 to satisfy both Discovery Program and major requirements. Transfer students must complete at least half of their credits in the major and the 8-credit capstone experience in residence at UNH Manchester.

Introductory Business Core Courses (8 courses)
BUS 400, Introduction to Business
ECN 411, Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles
ECN 412, Introduction to Microeconomic Principles
CIS 411, Introduction to Computer Applications
CIS 510, Computer Information Systems
BUS 430, Business Statistics
BUS 532, Financial Accounting
BUS 533, Managerial Accounting

Intermediate Business Core (3 courses)
BUS 610, Marketing Principles and Applications
BUS 620, Organizational Behavior
BUS 601: Financial Management

Capstone
Business Capstone Experience (two courses: BUS 701 and one senior business seminar [BUS 750, 760, or 770]) fulfills the Discovery Program capstone requirement for business majors and is taken during the senior year)

BUS 701, Business, Government and Society and
BUS 750, Business Internship Seminar or
BUS 760, Applied Senior Project or
BUS 770, Special Topics Senior Seminar

Note: Because this is a bachelor of arts program, students must fulfill a language requirement. Efforts will be made to enhance fluency through subsequent courses and community experiences.

Areas of Study
Accounting
Junior Year
BUS 603, Intermediate Financial Accounting I
BUS 615, Intermediate Financial Accounting II
BUS 629, Advanced Managerial Accounting (spring semester)

Senior Year
BUS 710, Federal Taxation (fall semester)
BUS 720, Auditing (fall semester)

Business Economics and Political Economy
Four courses from the following (including at least one course at 600 level or above):
POLT 401, Politics and Society
POLT 403, United States in World Affairs
POLT 560, World Politics
ECN 640, Business Law and Economics
ECN 625, Regulation of Business
ECN 635, Money, Banking and Macroeconomic Activity
ECN 650, Economics for Managers
ECN 670, Public Sector Economics
HUMA 412, Industry and Welfare
HUMA 660, The Moral Dimensions of Economic Life
POLT 595, 596 Explorations in Politics
POLT 762, International Political Economy
BUS 695, Independent Study

Business and Technology
Four courses from the following:
CIS 405, Introduction to the Internet and Web Authoring
CIS 425, Introduction to Computer Programming
CIS 515, Multimedia: Introduction and Applications
CIS 520, Database Design and Development
CIS 550, Networking Concepts
CIS 610, System Analysis and Design

Management
Four courses from the following:
BUS 453, Leadership for Managers
BUS 550, Business Law
BUS 630, International Management
BUS 650, Operations Management
ECN 650, Economics for Managers

Marketing
Four courses from the following:
A. At least two must be from marketing
BUS 565, Selling & Sales Management
BUS 661, Integrated Marketing Communications
BUS 663, Services Marketing & Operations Management
BUS 665, International Marketing Strategy Management

B. May also include two courses from:
BUS 675, Special Topics: Negotiations
BUS 695, Independent Study (Marketing/Communication Project)
UMST 500, Internship (in Marketing or Communication)
CIS 405, Internet & Web Authoring

Human Resource Management
Four courses from the following:
BUS 455, Management of Human Resources
BUS 520,  Training and Development
BUS 640, Business Communication and Conflict
BUS 660, Employment and Labor Law

Self Designed
Four courses (or 16 credit hours) with faculty approval, including at least one course at 500 level or above.

For more information, contact Kelly Kilcrease, program coordinator, at (603) 641-4186 or kelly.kilcrease@unh.edu, or contact the Office of Admissions.

 

 

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Business Administration

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/business-administration

Professor: Thomas D. Birch
Assistant Professor: Kelly Kilcrease
Lecturer: William Troy

Business Administration (A.S.)
Students must complete a minimum of 64 credits to graduate with an associate of science degree in business administration. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 is required for graduation. In addition to completing eight Discovery Program courses and one Inquiry or Inquiry-attribute course within their first 48 earned credits, students must complete seven courses (28 credits) in the major and one elective course.

Required Courses
BUS 400, Introduction to Business
COMP 411, Introduction to Computer Applications
ECN 412, Introduction to Microeconomics
BUS 532, Introduction to Financial Accounting
BUS 533, Introduction to Managerial Accounting

Business Administration Electives
Choose two of the following courses. Students may select electives from 600-level ECN or BUS courses with adviser permission.*

BUS 430, Introduction to Business Statistics
COMP 405, Introduction to Internet and Web Authoring
COMP 510, Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems
COMP 515, Multimedia: Introduction and Applications
COMP 520, Database Management Concepts
COMP 542, Operating System Applications
CMN 457, Introduction to Interpersonal Communication
CA 450, Public Speaking
ECN 411, Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles
ECN 625, The Regulation of Business
ECN 635, Money, Banking, and Macroeconomic Activity
ECN 640, Business Law and Economics
ECN 650, Economics for Managers
Other 600-level ECN or BUS courses by permission

*Students planning to pursue the B.A. in business should select BUS 430, Introduction to Business Statistics, and ECN 411, Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles.

For more information, contact Kelly Kilcrease, program coordinator, at (603) 641-4186 or kelly.kilcrease@unh.edu, or contact the Office of Admissions.

The Associate in Science Degree includes the following Discovery Program course requirements:

Discovery Foundation Skills Inquiry course (or INQ attribute course). 
This course may fulfill a Discovery category and/or a departmental requirement. It should be taken during a student’s first or second year or prior to completion of 48 credits.

One course in writing skills. Most students will satisfy the first-year writing requirement with English 401. This course should be taken during a student’s first year or prior to the completion of 32 credits.

One course in quantitative reasoning. This course must be completed by the end of the first year or 32 credits.

Discovery in the Disciplines
Students must take courses from the Discovery categories at the 400-600 levels. Inquiry courses that carry Discovery category designations may be used to satisfy this requirement.

Two courses chosen from two of these three categories: Biological Sciences (BS)*, Physical Sciences (PS)*, or Environment, Technology, and Society (ETS).

*One of these two courses must have a lab component.

Three courses chosen from three of these five categories: Historical Perspectives (HP), World Cultures (WC), Fine and Performing Arts (FPA), Social Science (SS), or Humanities (HUMA) with no more than one course from any single category.

Additional Information
Discovery Program requirements shall not be waived on the basis of special examinations or placement tests, except for the College Board Advanced Placement tests and the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests. All students transferring to UNH in academic year 2013-14 will come in under Discovery Program requirements. For students who transfer in with 26 or more credits, the INQ requirement is waived.

Note to Faculty: Waiver of requirements in the Discovery Program. Students may petition the Discovery Committee to waive or replace a requirement. The student’s petition must be approved by his or her major adviser and the dean of his or her college.

The required courses cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. No single course may be counted in more than one Discovery discipline category. Academic departments may or may not permit Discovery courses to count toward requirements for a major. Thompson School of Applied Sciences (TSAS) courses may not be used for general-education (1984-2009), writing-intensive, or foreign language requirements. TSAS courses that are 400-600 level and Discovery-approved may count for Discovery requirements. All Discovery courses carry 3-4 credits.

The most current list of Discovery courses may be found on the Registrar’s Office website at www.unh.edu/registrar/registration-courses/discovery-program.html.

Discovery Program Courses

Writing Skills (WS)
ENGL 401

Quantitative Reasoning (QR)
+BUS 430
BIOL 528, 555
EREC 525
HHS 540
+MATH 444
MATH 420, 424A, 424B, 425, 439
PHIL 412
PSYC 402
SOC 502

Biological Science (BS)
ANSC 401 (DLAB)
ANTH 415 (DLAB)
BIOL 411 (DLAB), 412 (DLAB), 413 (DLAB),414 (DLAB), 420 (DLAB), 444B
BMS 407, 444A (DLAB), 501 (DLAB), 507 (DLAB), 508 (DLAB)
BSCI 405 (DLAB), 406 (DLAB), 421, 422, 431 (DLAB
ECE 444 (DLAB)
HMP 501 (DLAB)
KIN 527 (DLAB), 607
NR 410 (DLAB), 433 (DLAB), 444E
NUTR 400 (DLAB)
OT 513 (DLAB)
PBIO 400 (DLAB), 412 (DLAB), 421 (DLAB)
ZOOL 401 (DLAB), 412 (DLAB), 444, 444A

Physical Science (PS)
CHE 410
CHEM 403 (DLAB), 404 (DLAB), 405 (DLAB), 409, 444, 444A, 444B, 444G
ESCI 401 (DLAB), 402 (DLAB), 405, 409 (DLAB), 410, 420, 444, 501 (DLAB)
GEOG 473 (DLAB), 572, 574
MS 401
NR 504 (DLAB)
PHYS 401 (DLAB), 402 (DLAB), 404 (DLAB), 405, 406 (DLAB), 407 (DLAB), 408 (DLAB), 409 (DLAB), 444A

Fine and Performing Arts (FPA)
ARTS 444, 444A, 480, 487, 532, 574
CA 444, 502
HUMA 510A, 511A, 512A, 513A, 514A, 515A
ITAL 525
LLC 444D
MUSI 401, 402, 444, 511
PHIL 421
THDA 435,436, 438, 440, 442, 444, 444A, 444B, 459, 462, 463, 583

Historical Perspectives (HP)
AMST 444D
ANSC 444
ANTH 444
BMS 444B
CLAS 405, 406, 444C, 550, 560
COLA 657F1
FS 444
HIST 405, 406, 410, 421, 422, 435, 436, 444, 444A, 444B, 444C, 444D, 444E, 444F, 483, 498, 506, 511, 521, 522, 532, 565, 579
HMP 505
HUMA 510C, 511C, 512C, 513C, 514C, 515C
ITAL 681A, 682A
KIN 444B, 561
LLC 444G, 540
POLT 403
+PS 501, 503, 508
PSYC 571
RS 483
RUSS 525
SW 525
WS 444A, 444C, 505

Humanities (HUMA)
AMST 444B, 444E, 501, 502
ANSC 444B
CLAS 401, 421, 422, 444, 444A, 444B, 520, 530
CMN 444, 456
+ECN 444
ECS 550
ENGL 403, 444D, 444E, 444G, 444J, 444K, 444M 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 520, 521, 533, 535,
550, 555, 575
GERM 521, 524
HUMA 401, +411, +412, 444, 444A, 444B, 444C, 500, 510D, 511D, 512D, 513D, 514D, 515D, 519
IA 444A
ITAL 521, 522, 657F2, 681B, 682B
LLC 444, 444C, 444E, 444F, 551, 552
PHIL 401, 430, 436, 444A, 565
POLT 401, 444A, 524
+PS 504
RMP 511
SPAN 651, 652, 653, 654
WS 405

Social Science
ADMN 444
ANTH 412
CEP 415
CLAS 506
CMN 455, 457
+ECN 411, 412
ECON 401, 402, 444
EDUC 444, 444A, 444B, 520
ENGL 405, 444B, 444F
EREC 409, 411
FS 444A, 525, 545
GEOG 581, 582
HHS 444
HMP 401
+INTR 438
KIN 444A, 444C
LING 405, 444B, 444F
NURS 535
NUTR 405
POLT 402, 512, 560
+PS 407, 502, 505, 507
PSYC 401, 444A
RMP 444, 444A, 490
SOC 400, 444, 540
SW 444, 550
WS 401, 444, 444B

World Cultures (WC)
ANSC 510
ANTH 411, 500, 501
CHIN 425, 503, 504
COLA 657
COMM 525
ENGL 581
EREC 444
FREN 503, 504, 525, 526
GEOG 401, 402, 550
GERM 503, 504, 525
GREK 503, 504, 505, 506
HIST 425, 563
HMP 444A
HUMA 510B, 511B, 512B, 513B, 514B, 515B
ITAL 425, 503, 504
JPN 425, 503, 504
LATN 503, 504
LLC 444A, 444B, 503, 504
MUSI 515
POLT 543, 550
RUSS 425, 503, 504
SPAN 503, 504, 525, 526, 631, 632, 686
TECH 685

Environment, Technology, and Society (ETS)
ANSC 444A
ARTS 552
BIOL 520, 444A, 544
BMS 650
CIE 402, 444
COMP 405, 411
CS 401, 404, 408, 444
DS 444
ENE 520
ESCI 444A
GEOG 560
HMP 444
IA 555
JUST 405
MATH 445
MGT 444
NR 415, 435, 444B, 444C, 502
NURS 450
OT 444
PBIO 405
PHIL 424, 435, 444, 447, 450
PHYS 444, 444B
POLT 444
SOC 444A, 565
WS 444D
+ = UNHM
(DLAB) = Discovery

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Chemistry (CHEM)

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Chinese (CHIN)

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Lecturer: Lili Guo, Yige Wang, Jia Xie, Xi Zang

 


Communication (CMN)

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Communication Arts (CA)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/communication-arts

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Associate Professor: Barbara J. Jago, Jeffrey F. Klenotic, Anthony Tenczar
Senior Lecturer: Patrice T. Mettauer

Communication Arts (B.A.)
Students majoring in communication arts (CA) explore the creativity, artistry, and social impact of communication. Course content ranges from working with cutting-edge digital media technology to discovering the complexities of human relationships and media cultures. While majors may select coursework from across the program’s curriculum, there are three suggested tracks of study: Media & Cinema Arts, News & Public Relations, and Relational Communication. The communication arts program strives to provide students with essential knowledge and skills that will help them excel as professional communicators and media artists in an increasingly complex communication-driven society.

Communication arts faculty are highly qualified in their areas of expertise and actively engaged in creative work and research. Many are working professionals who bring current, real-world experience into the classroom. In addition to classroom instruction, the program provides students with fieldwork opportunities (internships, community-based research, service learning, and media production) that connect them to the urban community and integrate their education within real-life settings. Further, through internships, students have the opportunity to learn more about their chosen fields and begin the transition to professional life.

Communication arts prepares students for many careers and postgraduate options, including advanced graduate study. Students emerge from the program with an important combination of hands-on and theoretical knowledge that is attractive to employers in professions such as media production, radio, television, film, digital video, web, journalism, public relations, corporate/organizational communication, sales, advertising, counseling, conflict mediation, and others. The communication arts degree also translates to related work in government, social service, and community affairs. Employers in the general business community seeking well-rounded graduates with a strong liberal arts-based professional education who can think creatively and communicate effectively in a variety of formats also find graduates highly desirable.

Degree Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of 128 credits and satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements. Communication arts majors must complete 10 courses (40 credits) and maintain an overall grade point average in the major of 2.0 or better. Transfer students must complete at least 20 credits in the CA major at UNH Manchester. CMN 455, 456, and 457 may not be used to satisfy Discovery Program requirements for CA majors. Information on prerequisites for CA courses can be found in the course descriptions at the back of this catalog. CA majors considering taking COMP 515, HIST 690, HUMA 796, or PSYC 762 must meet the prerequisites for each course and should consult with their faculty adviser before registering. Degree requirements for the major are presented below.

I. Required Core Courses, 12 credits (3 courses): Students must earn a “C” or better in each course if it is to count toward either the UNH Manchester communication arts major or the UNH Durham communication major.
CMN 455, Introduction to Media Studies
CMN 456, Propaganda and Persuasion
CMN 457, Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

II. Selected Coursework, 28 credits (three courses from area A, two from area B, two from area C). Students must earn a “C -” or better in each selected course to satisfy CA requirements.

A. Communication Practices: Applied (12 credits). Any three courses.
CA 525, Media Programming     
CA 444, Manipulating Media: Exploring Image and Sound Aesthetics
CA 450, Introduction to Public Speaking
CA 500, Media Writing 
CA 501, Internship: Communication in the Urban Community
CA 502, Image and Sound
CA 503, Techniques for News Reporting
CA 504, Film Criticism
CA 506, Gender
CA 508, Conflict in Relational Communication
CA 510, Language and Interaction
CA 512, Scriptwriting
CA 513, Radio News Production
CA 514, Fundamentals of Video Production
CA 515, Advanced Video Production
CA 516, Speechwriting
CA 517, Fundamentals of Audio Production
CA 520, Special Topics in Applied Communication
COMP 515, Multimedia: Introduction and Applications
HIST 690, Introduction to Public History
PSYC 762, Counseling 

B. Communication Practices: Organization, History, and Policy (8 credits). Any two courses.
CA 525, Media Programming
CA 526, Organization of Newswork
CA 527, History of Film
CA 528, Media Policy and Law
CA 531, History and Organization of Advertising
CA 535, Marital Communication
CA 539, Communicating in Families
CA 540, Public Relations
CA 550, Special Topics in Communication Organization, History and Policy
HUMA 640, Birth of Rock and Roll

C. Communication Practices: Theory and Research (8 credits). Any two courses.
CA 600, Research Methods: Media
CA 601, Exploring Relationships
CA 610, Communication Technologies and Culture
CA 611, Theories of Relational Communication
CA 612, Narrative
CA 614, Communication and Power
CA 615, Film History: Theory and Method
CA 618, Documentary
CA 720, Seminar in Communication Arts
CA 795, Independent Study

Capstone Requirement
The capstone requirement will be satisfied in a student’s senior year by completion of a specific four-credit capstone course at the 600 or 700 level. Students may not enroll in a capstone course until they have completed all three CA program core courses (CMN 455, 456, and 457) and all CA Area A and Area B requirements. The capstone course can also fulfill an Area C course requirement.

The capstone experience offers seniors an opportunity to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills gained throughout their communication arts major coursework. The capstone course requires students to conduct an original research study, a creative media project, an internship, community-based research, or an advanced service learning project in communication arts under the close supervision of a communication arts faculty member. Students are strongly encouraged to share their capstone projects with the larger UNH community through participation in the Undergraduate Research Conference, a presentation in the Brown Bag lunch series, publication in the UNH undergraduate journal Inquiry, or presentation in some other public venue. Students should work closely with their advisers to make sure the capstone requirement has been satisfied.

Courses that satisfy this requirement include but are not limited to: CA 601, Exploring Relationships; CA 614, Communication and Power; CA 615, Film History: Theory and Method; CA 720, Seminar in Communication Arts; and CA 795, Independent Study.

The core requirements for communication arts are identical to those for communication; therefore, credit for CMN 455, CMN 456, and CMN 457 automatically transfers for students transferring from Manchester to Durham to major in communication, as well as for students transferring from Durham to Manchester to major in communication arts. All other courses in communication arts have a CA designation. The transfer of these courses to satisfy degree requirements for the communication major in Durham is determined on a course-by-course basis by communication faculty. Likewise, the transfer of communication courses (other than CMN 455, 456, 457) to satisfy degree requirements for the communication arts major in Manchester is determined on a course-by-course basis by communication arts faculty.

Suggested Tracks of Study in Communication Arts
Students are welcome to choose courses from across the communication arts curriculum, but those wishing to meet specific academic or professional goals may plan coursework using one of the academic tracks suggested below. In addition, students may enhance their studies with activities beyond the classroom, including a wide range of internships available across the region. Communication arts students may also participate in the University’s undergraduate research conference as well as in numerous regional film festivals.

Media and Cinema Arts
CA 444, Manipulating Media: Exploring Image and Sound Aesthetics
CA 500, Media Writing
CA 501, Internship: Communication in the Urban Community
CA 502, Image and Sound
CA 504, Film Criticism
CA 512, Scriptwriting
CA 514, Fundamentals of Video Production
CA 515, Advanced Video Production
CA 517, Fundamentals of Audio Production
CA 525, Media Programming
CA 527, History of Film
CA 600, Research Methods: Media
CA 610, Communication Technologies and Culture
CA 615, Film History: Theory and Method
CA 618, Documentary
CA 720, Seminar in Communication Arts

News and Public Relations
CA 450, Introduction to Public Speaking
CA 500, Media Writing
CA 501, Internship: Communication in the Urban Community
CA 503, Techniques for News Reporting
CA 513, Radio News Production
CA 516, Speechwriting
CA 517, Fundamentals of Audio Production
CA 525, Media Programming
CA 526, Organization of Newswork
CA 528, Media Policy and Law
CA 531, History and Organization of Advertising
CA 540, Public Relations
CA 600, Research Methods: Media
CA 610, Communication Technologies and Culture
CA 618, Documentary
CA 720, Seminar in Communication Arts

Relational Communication
CA 501, Internship: Communication in the Urban Community
CA 506, Gender
CA 508, Conflict in Relational Communication
CA 510, Language and Interaction
CA 535, Marital Communication
CA 539, Communicating in Families
CA 601, Exploring Relationships
CA 611, Theories of Relational Communication
CA 612, Narrative
CA 614, Communication and Power
CA 720, Seminar in Communication Arts

For more information, contact Anthony Tenczar, program director, at (603) 641-4316, or e-mail Anthony.Tenczar@unh.edu, or contact the Office of Admissions.

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Computer Information Systems (COMP)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/computer-information-systems

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Associate Professor: Mihaela Sabin
Assistant Professor: Michael Jonas, Karla E. Vogel

Computer Information Systems (B.S.)
The computer information systems (CIS) or information technology field, in its broadest sense, encompasses all aspects of computing technology. As an academic discipline, CIS is concerned with issues related to selecting, creating, applying, integrating, and administrating computing technologies. CIS is also concerned with aspects related to advocating for users of computing technologies and meeting their needs within an organizational context.

The bachelor of science degree in computer information systems prepares graduates with knowledge, skills, and best practices to work in the highly integrated field of computing technologies and to grow into leadership positions. The program also enables graduates to further their studies at the graduate level and pursue research in a computing-related discipline.

Career opportunities for students with a CIS degree are varied, but may include such areas as software applications developer, data security specialist, database developer/administrator, e-commerce analyst/programmer, help desk manager, multimedia developer, network/system administrator, technical writer, technology trainer, user support specialist, testing and quality assurance specialist, or web developer. Career options exist in a wide range of organizations as all businesses, industries, and nonprofits continue to use, develop, and integrate information technology solutions.

Program Educational Objectives
Within five years of graduation a CIS student should be able to:

Program Outcomes
The program enables students to achieve, by time of graduation, the following competencies:

The CIS program outcomes are aligned with criteria for accrediting computing programs (the first nine outcomes listed above) and information technology programs (the last five outcomes listed above) as recommended by the ABET Computing Accreditation Commission and the ACM Computing Curricula – IT 2008 Information Technology guidelines.

Program of Study
Students majoring in computer information systems must complete 128 credits to graduate, satisfy the University’s Discovery Program, and complete 60 credits in the major with a minimum of C- in each course and 16 credits in a self-designed concentration in an area of study that enhances learning in the CIS discipline. Students must maintain an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better.

Transfer students who elect to major in computer information systems must earn 60 approved credits for completion of the CIS major, of which at least 24 credits must be completed at UNH Manchester; and 16 approved credits for completion of a self-designed concentration.

Program Requirements
The CIS program of study requires one mathematics course from the following: MATH 420, Finite Math; MATH 424B, Calculus for Biological Sciences; or MATH 425, Calculus I. Any of these courses may be used to satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Discovery skills requirement. 

Introductory Core (4 courses, 16 credits) 
COMP 405, Introduction to the Internet and Web Authoring (may be used to satisfy the Environment, Technology and Society, Discovery breadth requirement)
COMP 425, Introduction to Programming
COMP 510, Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems
COMP 542, Operating Systems Applications

Intermediate Core (4 courses, 16 credits) 
COMP 505, Advanced Web Authoring
COMP 520, Database Design and Development
COMP 550, Networking Concepts
COMP 560, Computer Law and Ethics

Integrative and Professional Experience (5 courses, 16 credits)
COMP 730, Object-Oriented Software Development
COMP 715, Information Security
COMP 685, Professional Development Seminar (1 credit)
COMP 690, Internship Experience (3 credits)
COMP 790, Capstone Project (satisfies the Discovery senior capstone experience requirement)
CIS electives (3 courses, 12 credits)
Candidate CIS elective courses are COMP 515, COMP 620, COMP 630, COMP 640, COMP 698, COMP 705, COMP 720.

Concentration (4 courses, 16 credits)
Majors can creatively design a concentration of courses that meet their academic and professional goals and career plans. Four courses can be selected across a wide university curriculum, reflecting majors’ interests in a liberal arts, scientific, engineering, interdisciplinary, or professional area of study. The concentration must be approved by the student’s adviser before the student’s junior year.

For additional information about the computer information systems program, contact Mihaela Sabin, program coordinator, (603) 641-4144, mihaela.sabin@unh.edu, or contact the UNH Manchester Office of Admissions, (603) 641-4150, unhm.admissions@unh.edu.

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Computer Science (CS)

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Computer Science & Entrepreneurship (CS&E)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/computer-science-entrepreneurship

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Associate Professor: Mihaela Sabin
Assistant Professor: Michael Jonas

The computer science & entrepreneurship program combines a solid foundation in computing with the entrepreneurial and business skills necessary to succeed in today’s start-up and high-tech environments. The program was designed in response to market demand for students proficient in computer science with business knowledge.

Students in the computer science & entrepreneurship program are required to complete three sponsored projects focusing on entrepreneurship, engineering, and a new venture creation. The courses will give students the opportunity to work with industry experts through internships and sponsored research. Students will also be required to create a business plan, which they'll have to pitch to venture capitalists and industry professionals.

Students will focus on developing a solid computer science foundation by taking a set of six courses that include:

Additional courses in the major that help round out the student skill set and address the entrepreneurship component include:

Students will also select three advanced computing topic courses to further develop their computing skills and computational practices.

Sponsored Projects Courses
The CS&E program also requires students to complete three sponsored project courses. These courses will help you build your experience and your resume while networking with industry experts.

Entrepreneurship project (sophomore year): In addition to the required business courses, students will also develop skills by completing a project with entrepreneurial value and develop a business plan to pitch to venture capitalists. Projects are judged by local industry professionals and venture capitalists.

Engineering project (junior year): Through an internship course, students will work with an industry partner to build and implement a service or system to add value to the sponsor of the project.

Capstone project and new ventures creation (senior year): The capstone is the culminating experience, which addresses a project or need from a local company. As entrepreneurs, students will develop a product or service and sell it with the same expertise and persuasion that someone would need in the private industry.

The following is an example of a course sequence. The sequence may vary depending upon a student's academic history and transfer credits. Students should contact their academic adviser with specific questions. Courses are subject to change.

First Year

Fall Semester
COMP 415, Mobile Computing First and For Most
MATH 425, Calculus
BUS 401, Introduction to Entrepreneurship
ENGL 401, Freshman English

Spring Semester
COMP 425, Programming Fundamentals
COMP 430, Systems Fundamentals*
COMP 490, Statistics in Computing & Engineering*
PHYS 407, General Physics I

Second Year

Fall Semester
COMP 500, Discrete Structures*
COMP 525, Data Structures Fundamentals*
Biological Sciences
Social Sciences

Spring Semester
COMP 530, Machine & Network Architecture*
COMP 560, Social Issues & Professional Practice
COMP 590, Internship: Entrepreneurship Project
COMP 625, Data Structures and Algorithms

Third Year

Fall Semester
COMP 630, Systems Software*
COMP 685, Professional Development Seminar
COMP Topic Course
BUS 453, Leadership for Management
Elective Course

Spring Semester
COMP 690, Internship: Engineering Project
COMP Topic Course
Fine and Performing Arts
Elective Course

Fourth Year

Fall Semester
COMP Topic Course
BUS 565, Sales & Sales Management
Historical Perspectives
World Cultures

Spring Semester
COMP 790, Capstone Project
BUS 600, New Ventures Creation
Elective Course
Elective Course

* Course is under development.

Our campus is located in the economic center of the region, which gives students unique opportunities to get real experience working with businesses and organizations. Students can enhance their resumes by getting involved on campus and in the community. Here are just a few examples of what students can do:

Putting a Degree to Work

Computer science develops students’ computational and critical thinking skills and shows them how to create, not simply use, new technologies.

Computer science is America's untapped opportunity. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Code.org, there will be one million more computing jobs than students in 2020. Graduates of computer science make an average starting salary of $60,000 according to a 2013 report by The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Our students are hired by companies looking for proficiency in problem solving skills, computational thinking, communication, and collaboration. Our students are creative and resourceful team members. Here is a sample of careers to pursue with a computer science degree:

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Earth Sciences (ESCI)

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Extension Assistant Professor: Erik Chapman

 


Economics (ECN)

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Education (EDUC)

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Engineering Technology (ET)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/mechanical-engineering-technology

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Associate Professor: David A. Forest
Assistant Professor: Christopher LeBlanc

Engineering Technology Program (ET)
Engineering technology requires the application of engineering and scientific knowledge and methods combined with technical skills in support of engineering activities. Graduates may work in a variety of areas including engineering design, manufacturing, field service, testing, and sales and may work in management positions related to engineering, manufacturing, and computer technology.

The UNH Manchester engineering technology programs are accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, Tel: 410-347-7700.

The engineering technology program at UNH Manchester offers only junior- and senior-level coursework. Students admitted to this program must have an appropriate associate degree from the New Hampshire Technical Institute or an equivalent institution accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ETAC/ABET) or show academic evidence of ability to successfully complete the requirements of this calculus-based program. After two major courses, non-matriculated students must either be admitted to the program or declare that they are not planning to pursue a degree in engineering technology.

The programs at UNH Manchester are designed to meet the needs of both full- and part-time students with a mix of classes scheduled during the day and in the evening.

Program of Study
Students may major in electrical engineering technology, electrical engineering technology with a concentration in computer engineering technology, or mechanical engineering technology. All entering ET students should have completed mathematics through differential and integral calculus (Calculus I & II). Students without Calculus II will be required to take ET 630, Analytical Methods in Technology. Students with Calculus II may have ET 630 waived, although it is recommended that it still be taken as there are other useful topics covered. Students must complete a minimum of 128 credits and satisfy the University’s Discovery Program.

Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) and Electrical Engineering Technology with a concentration in Computer Engineering Technology (EET-CET) Educational Objectives
Program educational objectives are the skills and abilities graduates are expected to demonstrate during the first few years of employment. EET and EET-CT program educational objectives include:

1.  Achieving employment in an EET- and EET/CET-related position with appropriate title and compensation.
2.  Demonstrating EET- or EET/CET-related technical problem-solving skills.
3.  Functioning effectively in diverse and multidisciplinary teams.
4.  Communicating effectively with both technical and non-technical audiences.
5.  Adapting to changes in technology through continuous personal and professional development.
6.  Being capable of assuming increasing professional responsibility.
7.  Conducting all professional activities with integrity, and demonstrating a sense of social and environmental responsibility.

EET and EET-CET Program Outcomes
Program outcomes are the skills and abilities students are expected to demonstrate at graduation. Program outcomes for the EET and EET-CET program include:
1.  Using principles and tools of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology to design, implement, and evaluate solutions to complex technical problems.
2. Developing electronic and computer systems using appropriate test equipment (with an awareness of related hardware and software issues) and using results of analyses to improve designs or methodologies.
3. Successfully developing a meaningful hardware/software-based project considering ethical, social, economic, and technical constraints.
4. Communicating effectively both orally and in writing.
5. Working effectively in a team environment.
6. Developing research and problem-solving skills to support lifelong personal and professional development.
7. Evaluating the broader effects of technology and identifying connections between technology and economics, politics, culture, ethical responsibility, social structure, the environment, and other areas.

Program Courses:
Electrical Engineering Technology (EET)
ET 625, Technical Communications
ET 630, Analytical Methods in Technology
ET 655, ET Seminar Series
ET 671, Digital Systems
ET 674, Control Systems & Components
ET 677, Analog Systems
ET 680, Communications and Fields
ET 697,  Topics in Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engineering Technology
ET 733, Business Organization and Law
ET 734, Economics of Bus. Activities
ET 762, Illumination Engineering
ET 788, Introduction to Digital Signal Processing
ET 790, Microcomputer Technology
ET 791, Electrical Engineering Technology Project (Senior Capstone Project, two semesters; satisfies the Discovery Senior Capstone Experience requirement)
CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
Discovery Program Requirements and Writing Intensive (WI) Requirement

EET Computer Engineering Technology Option (EET-CET)
ET 601, Data Structure & Databases
ET 625, Technical Communications
ET 627, Advanced Developmental Theory of E-commerce*
ET 630, Analytical Methods in Technology
ET 647, Adv. Perspectives in Programming
ET 655, ET Seminar Series
ET 667, Graphics and Animation*
ET 671, Digital Systems
ET 697, Topics in Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engineering Technology*
ET 707, Object Oriented Design and Documentation
ET 717, Network Security
ET 733, Business Organization and Law
ET 734, Economics of Business Activities
ET 737, Web Server Databases*
ET 747, User Interface Design*
ET 777, Advanced Distributed Programming Trends*
ET 787, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems*
ET 790, Microcomputer Systems
ET 791, Electrical Engineering Technology Project (Senior Capstone Project, two semesters; satisfies the Discovery Senior Capstone Experience requirement.
Discovery Program Requirements and Writing Intensive (WI) Requirement

Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET) Educational Objectives
Program educational objectives are the skills and abilities graduates are expected to demonstrate during the first few years of employment. MET program educational objectives include:
1. Achieving employment in a MET-related position with appropriate title and compensation.
2. Demonstrating MET-related technical problem-solving skills.
3. Functioning effectively in diverse and multidisciplinary teams.
4. Communicating effectively with both technical and non-technical audiences.
5. Adapting to changes in technology through continuous personal and professional development.
6. Being capable of assuming increasing professional responsibility.
7. Conducting all professional activities with integrity and demonstrating a sense of social and environmental responsibility.

MET Program Outcomes
Program outcomes are the skills and abilities students are expected to demonstrate at graduation. Program outcomes for the MET program include:
1. Using principles and tools of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology to design, implement, and evaluate solutions to complex technical problems.
2. Developing mechanical systems and using results of analyses to improve designs or methodologies.
3. Successfully developing a meaningful mechanical-based project considering ethical, social, economic, and technical constraints.
4. Communicating effectively both orally and in writing.
5. Working effectively in a team environment.
6. Developing research and problem-solving skills to support lifelong personal and professional development.
7. Evaluating the broader effects of technology and identifying connections between technology and economics, politics, culture, ethical responsibility, social structure, the environment, and other areas.

Program Courses:
Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET)
ET 625, Technical Communications
ET 630, Analytic Methods in Technology
ET 635,  Fluids and Heat Transfer
ET 639,  HVAC
ET 641, Production Systems
ET 644, MET Concepts in Design and Analysis
ET 655, ET Seminar Series
ET 674, Control Systems and Components
ET 675, Electrical Technology
ET 733, Business Organization & Law
ET 734, Economics of Business Activities
ET 762, Illumination Engineering|
ET 751, Mechanical Engineering Technology Project (Senior Capstone Project, two semesters; satisfies the Discovery Senior Capstone Experience requirement)
CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
Discovery Program Requirements and Writing Intensive (WI) Requirement

Mechanical engineering technology students must satisfactorily complete CHEM 403, General Chemistry, or offer evidence of equivalent coursework.

For information about the engineering technology program, contact B.S. engineering technology program coordinator for the electrical engineering technology (EET) and the EET computer engineering technology option,  David A. Forest, at (603) 641-4320, or David.Forest@unh.edu.

For information about the mechanical engineering technology program (MET), contact Christopher LeBlanc, mechanical engineering technology program coordinator, at (603) 641-4323 or Christopher.Leblanc@unh.edu.

For admissions information, contact the Office of Admissions at (603) 641-4150.

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English (ENGL)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/english

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Professor: Deborah Brown, Fred Metting
Associate Professor: Susanne F. Paterson, Susan A. Walsh
Assistant Professor: Gail Fensom
Senior Lecturer: Robert M. Pugh

English (B.A.)
Through the study of a wide variety of literary materials, English majors deepen their understanding of history, culture, language, and human behavior. They also gain skill in writing, reading, and critical thinking.

The faculty of the UNH Manchester English department specializes in 20th century poetry, poetry writing, women’s literary traditions, American and British fiction, Victorian literature and art, Renaissance drama, interdisciplinary studies, composition, journalism, and grammar.

Many upper-level courses are conducted as seminars, and individual conferences with professors are common. When possible, field trips to see local performances of drama and poetry readings are planned in conjunction with specific literature courses.

Job prospects for English majors after graduation are varied. English majors find employment in libraries and museums, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, publishing companies, journalism, the media, marketing, advertising, social work, banking, and many other fields. English graduates also are well prepared to enter graduate study in fields such as law and business.

English Program of Study
For the English major at UNH Manchester, students must complete a minimum of 128 credits and satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements, and complete a minimum of 40 credits in major coursework. Introduction to Critical Analysis (ENGL 419) must be completed with a grade of C or better. Except for ENGL 419, all courses must be completed with a grade of C- or above in order to count toward the English major.

Major requirements include ENGL 419, two 500-level courses, six courses numbered 600 or above, one course numbered 500 or above, and, of these, one course that qualifies as a Diversity offering, with an overall grade-point average in the major of 2.0 or better. The capstone will be a 700-level course designated as such by the instructor in consultation with the student, or the Senior Seminar, ENGL 787. In selecting these courses, students must meet the following distribution requirements:

ENGL 419, Introduction to Literary Analysis, or ENGL 529, Writing About Literature

Literature before 1800: Either two advanced courses (numbered 600 or above), or one advanced course and ENGL 512 or 513

Literature after 1800: Either two advanced courses, or one advanced course and one course from the following list: ENGL 514, 515, or 516

Total English courses must include ENGL 419, two 500 level courses, six courses numbered 600 and above, one course numbered 500 level and above, and, of these, one must include a diversity course

A typical first-year program in the first semester consists of First-Year English and three Discovery Program requirements or electives. In the second semester, the student typically would take Introduction to Critical Analysis, an introductory literature course, and two Discovery Program requirements or electives.

Writing Focus for English Majors
The English department offers a writing focus for English majors interested in creative or other specialized types of writing. Students who might be interested include students with an interest in graduate school in English or writing; students thinking about teaching and teaching writing; students considering law school or journalism training; students looking for careers in marketing and advertising; students wanting to write for corporate in-house publications; students thinking about freelance writing for magazines; and students who enjoy creative writing.

Four of the following nine courses are required. Students should take at least one 500-level course before taking 600- and 700-level courses.

English 501, Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
English 502, Technical Writing
English 503, Persuasive Writing
English 623, Essay Writing
English 625/626, Writing Fiction
English 627/628, Writing Poetry
English 710, Teaching Writing
Special Studies in Writing courses will be offered on an occasional basis.

For more information about the English program, contact Susanne Paterson, program coordinator, (603) 641-4115, or susanne.paterson@unh.edu. Or contact the UNH Manchester Office of Admissions at (603) 641-4150, or unhm.admissions@unh.edu.

 

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English (ENG)

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English Teaching (ENGLTCH)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/english-teaching

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Program Coordinator: Susanne F. Paterson
Professor: Deborah Brown, Fred Metting
Associate Professor: Susan A. Walsh
Assistant Professor: Gail Fensom
Senior Lecturer: Robert M. Pugh

English Teaching, (B.A.)

The English teaching major uses language, literature, and standards-based teaching as a means to explore education.

The English teaching major is designed for students wishing to teach English or language arts in middle or high schools, grades 5-12. Students learn what the study of English entails and how areas of knowledge and the abilities to read, write, and discuss can best be taught to students in grades 5-12.

This major takes the guesswork out of course selection by clearly delineating the prerequisites necessary for New Hampshire state teaching certification and UNH’s master of arts in teaching.

For the English teaching major at UNH Manchester, students must complete a minimum of 128 credits and satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements, and complete a minimum of 40 credits in major coursework. The major requirements consist of a minimum of 10 courses, including ENGL 419, two 500-level courses (or one 500-level and ENGL 405), six courses numbered 600 and above and one additional 500-, 600-, or 700-level class of your choosing. These 10 courses (40 credits) must include the Diversity requirement and the capstone requirement. The capstone will be a 700-level course designated as such by the instructor in consultation with the student, or the Senior Seminar, ENGL 787. To count toward the major, grades must be C- or above, except ENGL 419, which must be completed with a minimum grade of C. In selecting these courses, students must meet the following distribution requirements:

Program Requirements
ENGL 419, Introduction to Critical Analysis
ENGL 514, Survey of British Literature, 1800-President
ENGL 516, Survey of American Literature, Civil War to Present
An additional 500/600/700 level English course
Two literature courses 600/700 level
ENGL 657, Shakespeare
ENGL 710, Teaching Writing
ENGL 791, English Grammar
ENGL 792, Teaching Secondary School English

Combine the English teaching major with UNH’s renowned master of arts in teaching, taken at the Manchester campus, and in five years students can be state certified to teach English language arts. With the five-year master’s option, students can apply 12 undergraduate credits to the advanced degree. The English teaching major includes courses that will introduce students to the Common Core Standards, a nationwide effort now transforming K-12 education.

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Exchange (EXCH)

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French (FREN)

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General Studies

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/general-studies

General Studies (A.A.)
The associate of arts in general studies offers students academic flexibility in a program that combines the foundations of a liberal education and elective courses that satisfy personal interests. The A.A. in general studies is the first two years of a baccalaureate program and all 400-level courses transfer to and fulfill the University’s Discovery requirements. Students who earn an A.A. in general studies have a foundation for continued study in any major while they develop problem-solving skills, cognitive skills, and learning techniques that are vital to a life-time of learning. Many students begin their college study in the A.A. general studies program. Depending on personal interests and academic goals, students may choose to apply to a baccalaureate degree program prior to completion of the A.A. degree.

To graduate with an associate of arts degree in general studies, students must complete 64 credits, earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0, and fulfill two types of requirements: University Discovery Program and degree requirements and earn a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. The program includes nine courses from the Discovery Program curriculum. Working with their advisers, students enhance their program of study with elective courses where they can explore their interests and possible baccalaureate degree majors. The last 16 hours of credit must be UNH courses completed following admission and matriculation, unless permission is granted to transfer part of this work from another institution.

The A.A. general studies program includes the following course requirements:
Two writing-intensive courses, one of which must be ENGL 401, First-Year Writing
One course in quantitative reasoning
Two courses chosen from two different categories: Biological Sciences, Physical Sciences, or Environment, Technology and Society.  One must be a lab course.
One course in Historical Perspectives                         
One course in World Culture or Fine and Performing Arts
One course in Social Science
One course in Humanities
Completion of interdisciplinary core course, Humanities I or Humanities II
One Inquiry or Inquiry attribute course, to be completed within the student’s first 48 earned credits
Elective courses

For more information, contact the Office of Admissions at (603)-641-4150 or unhm.admissions@unh.edu.

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Genetics (GEN)

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Professor: J. Brent Loy
Assistant Professor: Jeffrey T. Foster

 


Geography (GEOG)

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History (HIST)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/history

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Professor: John J. Cerullo, John P. Resch
Associate Professor: Robert L. Macieski
Lecturer: Phillip Deen

History (B.A.)
The study of history is an essential element of a liberal arts education. The history major develops both an awareness of the past, and the tools to express one’s knowledge. Study of the past gives meaning to the present, increasing understanding of the political, social, economic, and cultural forces that influence contemporary life. 

The study of history may encompass all of human culture and society, and UNH Manchester’s history program allows great latitude in the subjects that students may select as their focus. In fact, the study of those subjects is often best pursued through an interdisciplinary approach, something we much encourage.   

The student who majors in history will not only have the opportunity to study the breadth of human experience, but will also acquire most important and broadly applicable skills conferred by a liberal-arts education: critical thinking, independent research, and effective writing skills. Students of history learn to analyze conflicting evidence, to find cause and effect, to express themselves clearly, to ask relevant questions, and to seek out their own answers. In explaining human events, they come to value careful observation and balanced, informed evaluations of the information at hand. Those are the skills that characterize effective, productive individuals in any and all walks of life. 

Students majoring in history must complete a minimum of 128 credits, satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements, and take ten 4-credit history courses or their equivalent. Students must receive at least a C in HIST 500 and HIST 797, and at least a C- in the other eight courses with an overall average in these courses of 2.0 or better. History majors are urged to complete HIST 500 in the semester following the major declaration, and HIST 797 during the senior year.

A major must take at least eight additional history courses, of which a minimum of three must be at the 600 level or above. Four of those eight courses will comprise the student’s area of concentration or specialization; all four courses within that concentration must be either 500 or 600 level. No more than two 695/696 courses (Independent Studies) may be put toward the ten-course requirement; and only one 695/696 (Independent Study) course may be put the (three-course) 600-level requirement. No more than two 400-level courses may be counted toward the major.  The program must be planned in consultation with an adviser.

The distribution of required courses for the major is as follows:

HIST 500, Introduction to Historical Thinking
HIST 797, Colloquium in History (fulfills the Discovery Program capstone requirement for history majors and is taken during the senior year)

An approved area of specialization: Four courses numbered 500 and above centered around a nation, region, time period, interdisciplinary theme, or other subject approved by a faculty adviser. Two of these courses may be in another program, if the student’s adviser approves.

Three complementary history courses: at least three history courses from outside the area of specialization.

One history elective. This may be a history course from either the area of specialization, or from a complementary area.

A particular feature of the history program at UNH Manchester is the opportunity to do internships for academic credit. These internships, which enable students to work in museums, historical societies, government agencies, archives, and in other institutional settings, are arranged with the help of the faculty.   

A typical first-year program consists of at least two history courses (e.g., Introduction to Historical Thinking, Western Civilization, Historical Survey of American Civilization, etc.); First-Year English; three to five Discovery Program requirements; and/or electives.

For more information about the history program, contact John Cerullo, program coordinator, at (603) 641-4109 or John.Cerullo@unh.edu. Or, contact the UNH Manchester Office of Admissions at (603) 641-4150 or unhm.admissions@unh.edu.

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Humanities (HUMA)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/humanities

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Professor: John J. Cerullo, Fred Metting, John P. Resch
Associate Professor: Ann E. Donahue
Lecturer: Phillip Deen

Humanities (B.A.)
The UNH Manchester humanities program is an interdisciplinary study of the human condition, past and present. The program is based on careful examination of substantial works from a variety of disciplines and is intended to develop intellectual skills, specialized knowledge, and breadth of understanding. It provides students with a broad foundation of knowledge and skills in the liberal arts combined with a coordinated, self-designed program of studies in an area of individual student interest.

The program attracts highly motivated students who wish to assume significant responsibility for the content and direction of their studies. Humanities students develop skills of analysis, critical assessment, and effective communication as they study diverse works of art, music, literature, history, philosophy, and the sciences. Individually designed programs may cover the full range of student interests: for example, the social and ethical implications of genetic engineering or the examination of an historical period through study of its literature, arts, history, philosophy, and sciences. Students complete their major with two capstone seminars. The first, HUMA 795, Study of Creativity, explores the nature of creativity through the lives and works of individuals such as Leonardo da Vinci, Kathe Kollwitz, Mozart, Freud, Einstein, and Georgia O’Keeffe. The second seminar, HUMA 796, Study of Contemporary Issues, explores current social and political issues with a focus on developments in public policy, science, and business, and their impact on social values.

Humanities majors find employment in a wide range of fields or pursue graduate study in subjects such as law or education. Skills and knowledge developed through the major are important in virtually all social and career responsibilities. A humanities major or minor can also complement work in other majors such as elementary or secondary education, business, communications, or computer information systems.

Program of Study
For the humanities major at UNH Manchester, students must complete a minimum of 128 credits and satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements, and students must complete 40 credits with a minimum grade of C in each course. The required courses for the humanities major are:

Core Courses (required of all majors)
HIST 500, Introduction to Historical Thinking
or
ENGL 419, Introduction to Literary Analysis
HUMA 411, Humanities I
HUMA 412, Humanities II

Discovery Program Capstone Courses:
HUMA 795, Humanities: Study of Creativity
HUMA 796, Humanities: Study of Contemporary Issues

Self-Designed Concentration
This is an approved program of studies designed by the student in consultation with a faculty adviser. In addition to courses available on the Manchester campus, students may, with prior approval, use courses from area colleges and the University’s Durham campus. The concentration is made up of two humanities courses (HUMA prefix) at the 600 or 700 level and three courses from any relevant discipline at any level.

For more information contact Jack Resch, program coordinator, at Jack.Resch@unh.edu or (603) 641-4134; or contact the Office of Admissions.

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Intercollege (INCO)

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Italian (ITAL)

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Mathematics (MATH)

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Lecturer: Jeremiah W. Johnson, Donald Plante

 


Music (MUSI)

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Nutrition (NUTR)

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Philosophy (PHIL)

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Physics (PHYS)

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Assistant Professor: NoƩ Lugaz, Patricia H. Solvignon

 


Plant Biology (PBIO)

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Political Science (POLT)

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Chairperson: Stacy D. VanDeveer

 


Politics and Society (PS)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/politics-society

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Professor: Thaddeus M. Piotrowski
Associate Professor: Michael Contarino
Assistant Professor: Melinda Negron

Politics and Society (B.A.)
The bachelor of arts degree in politics and society provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of politics. The program emphasizes the many ways in which politics both shapes and is shaped by social, cultural, economic, and historical context. The program explores such issues as the historical context of political processes and ideas, how economics and politics impact one another, and how political ideas are framed, legitimized, de-legitimized, and manipulated in different social contexts.

Politics and society majors develop critical thinking, communication, and research skills essential for careers in government, politics, journalism, diplomacy, and business. Graduates of the program also will be well-prepared for graduate studies in law, political science, sociology, public policy, public administration, business administration, journalism, diplomacy, international relations, and history.

As the University’s urban campus, UNH Manchester is well-positioned to connect students to local, state, and national politics through coursework, research, and internships. Students will have opportunities to work on local and national political campaigns, in local government, and with community organizations for credit as a part of their senior capstone project.

The politics and society program is designed to meet the needs of the region’s diverse student population including traditional-age and older students. Students will fulfill the University’s Discovery Program and major requirements by attending classes either full or part time. Transfer students are encouraged to apply.

For complete more information contact program coordinator Melinda Negron-Gonzales at (603) 641-4364 or melinda.negron@unh.edu; or contact the Office of Admissions.

Program of Study
Students must complete 128 credits to graduate, including 56 credits in the politics and society major.

Students must maintain an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a cumulative GPA in the major of 2.0. No credit toward the major will be given for any course in which the student receives a grade of less than C-. Students also must fulfill the UNH Discovery Program requirements. Up to three courses may be used toward both the politics and society major and UNH Discovery Program requirements. Transfer students must take at least 28 credits in the major at UNH Manchester.

Program Requirements
The politics and society major includes:
Seven 500/600/700 politics and society (PS) or political science (POLT) courses. One must be at the 700 level; must include at least two POLT courses and at least four PS courses

The PS 701 capstone project and interdisciplinary seminar

Students should complete lower-level courses before beginning their upper-level program. Substitutions may be approved with permission of the politics and society program coordinator. Writing-intensive (“W”) courses are included at all levels and will be offered all semesters. Students are encouraged to take a course in statistics and an Inquiry course in a related area.

Required Courses
Six 400-Level Courses
All of the following
POLT 401, Politics and Society
SOC 400, Introductory Sociology
ANTH 411, Global Perspectives on the Human Condition
ECN 411, Introduction to Macroeconomic Principles

One of the following
POLT 402, Introduction to American Government
POLT 403, United States in World Affairs 
PS 407, Politics and Law in Contemporary Society

One of the following
HIST 410, Historical Survey of American Civilization
HIST 405, History of Early America
HIST 406, History of the Modern United States
HIST 422, World History in the Modern Era
HIST 435/436, Western Civilization

Seven 500/600/700-Level POLT or PS Courses
MUST include at least two POLT courses (all UNH POLT courses are approved) and at least four interdisciplinary PS courses. (Up to two SOC courses may substitute for POLT/PS courses, but only if approved by program coordinator)

Current and soon-to-be offered PS courses include:
PS 501, Social and Political-Economic Theory
PS 502, Political Psychology
PS 503, Political Theory and Historical and Social Context
PS 504, Empire, Democracy, and War
PS 505, Political Violence and Terrorism
PS 506, Civil Society and Public Policy
PS 507, Justice, Law, and Politics
PS 508, The Supreme Court in American Society
PS 509, Political and Social Change in Developing Countries
PS 510, The Politics of Food
PS 511, Women and War
PS 651, Selected Topics in Politics and Society
PS 702, International Relations: Interdisciplinary Approaches
PS 703, Dictatorship and Democracy

One Capstone 700-Level PS Course
PS 701W, Senior Project and Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar in Politics and Society

For more information, contact Melinda Negron-Gonzales at melinda.negron@unh.edu or (603) 641-4364.

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Psychology (PSYC)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/psychology

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Associate Professor: Gary S. Goldstein, Alison K. Paglia, John E. Sparrow

Psychology (B.A.)

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior. The UNH Manchester psychology program provides students with a broad background in psychology, introducing them to both the experimental and clinical perspectives in the field. Students majoring in psychology will explore the fundamental principles involved in how people and animals learn and adapt to their environments.

The psychology program, through its independent study and internship programs, offers opportunities for participation in cooperating New Hampshire mental health, human services, and rehabilitation facilities. Students have worked in hospitals, halfway houses, mental health centers, and other agencies. The department also invites guest speakers to discuss important issues in the field and sponsors a Psychology Club.

Psychology graduates find employment as trained research assistants, mental health aides in a wide variety of human services agencies, social welfare caseworkers, teachers in special education programs, and professionals in government, business, and industry. It is normally expected that students who wish to do professional work in the field of psychology will pursue graduate training at the M.A., M.S., Ph.D., or Psy.D. level.

Psychology Program of Study
Students majoring in psychology must complete a minimum of 128 credits, satisfy the University’s Discovery Program and foreign language requirements, and complete 44 credits with a minimum of C- in each course and a 2.0 overall grade-point average in all major requirements. 

Transfer students who elect to major in psychology must complete at least 24 credits in the program at UNH/UNH Manchester to qualify for the degree in psychology. Transfer students must earn a total of 44 approved credits for completion of the psychology major. The department’s academic advisers will determine the distribution of these credits. Transfer students should note that courses are allotted only the number of credits granted by the original institution (after adjustments for semester-hour equivalents). Thus, students transferring from an institution at which courses carry less than four credits each must make up for any credit deficit created by acceptance of transfer credits into the psychology major.  

Specific course selections should be discussed with the adviser. Exceptions to the requirements for the major require a petition to the department.

Program Requirements

A. Three core courses

PSYC 401, Introduction to Psychology; PSYC 402, Statistics in Psychology; and PSYC 502, Research Methods in Psychology

B. Four 500-level breadth courses, as follows:

Group I: Two courses:

PSYC 511, Sensation and Perception; PSYC 512, Psychology of Primates; PSYC 513, Cognitive Psychology; PSYC 521, Behavior Analysis; PSYC 522, Behaviorism; PSYC 531, Psychobiology

Group II: Two courses:

PSYC 552, Social Psychology; PSYC 553, Personality; PSYC 561, Abnormal Behavior; PSYC 571, Pioneers of Psychology; PSYC 581, Child Development; PSYC 582, Adult Development and Aging

Note:  PSYC 522, Behaviorism, may not be used for transfer credit to Durham.

C. Four 700-level depth courses, as follows:

Group I: One or more:

PSYC 702, Advanced Statistics and Research Methodology; PSYC 705, Tests and Measurement; PSYC 710, Visual Perception; PSYC 712, Psychology of Language; PSYC 713, Psychology of Consciousness; PSYC 720, Animal Cognition; PSYC 722, Behaviorism, Culture, and Contemporary Society; PSYC 731, Brain and Behavior; PSYC 733, Drugs and Behavior; PSYC 735, Neurobiology of Mood Disorders; PSYC 737, Behavioral Medicine; PSYC 741, Advanced Topics

Group II: One or more:

PSYC 702, Advanced Statistics and Research Methodology; PSYC 705, Tests and Measurement; PSYC 755, Psychology and Law; PSYC 756, Psychology of Crime and Justice; PSYC 758, Health Psychology; PSYC 762, Counseling; PSYC 763, Community Psychology; PSYC 765, Dysfunctional Families and Therapy; PSYC 771, Psychology in 20th Century Thought and Society; PSYC 780, Prenatal Development and Infancy; PSYC 783, Cognitive Development; PSYC 785, Social Development; PSYC 791, Advanced Topics: Adult Development; PSYC 793, Externship

Note: PSYC 702, Advanced Statistics and Research Methodology, and PSYC 705, Tests and Measurement, may be substituted for a group I or group II course, but they may not both be used to fill the same group.

D. Capstone Requirement:

PSYC 793, Internship, or PSYC 795, Independent Study with UNHM URC presentation or capstone seminar. You may also use any 700-level course as a capstone experience if the professor agrees to let you do so. You will be required to do extra class work or an extra assignment (worked out in advance with the professor) to receive capstone credit.

The Durham psychology major has slightly different requirements. Students who plan to transfer to Durham should consult with their adviser.

For more information about the psychology program, contact Gary Goldstein, program coordinator, (603) 641-4179, or gary.goldstein@unh.edu. Or contact the UNH Manchester Office of Admissions at (603) 641-4150, or unhm.admissions@unh.edu.

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Sign Language Interpretation (INTR)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/academics/degree-programs/sign-language-interpretation

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Associate Professor: Jack E. Hoza
Lecturer: Patrick F. McCarthy

Sign Language Interpretation (B.S.)
The sign language interpretation program at UNH Manchester is a specialized, in-depth program with a national reputation for quality and has twice been recognized at the national level. In 1999, the program became the first interpreting program in the country to be found in compliance with the National Interpreter Education Standards of the Conference of Interpreter Trainers (CIT). In 2007, the program became the first interpreting program in the nation to be accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education (CCIE). UNH Manchester also houses one of northern New England’s most comprehensive collections of books and media materials on sign language interpretation.

The program is guided by the premise that deaf people, as a linguistic minority, possess their own cultural values, literature, history, traditions, and social conventions. Interpretation requires bilingual and bicultural competence in spoken English and American Sign Language. The sign language interpretation program at UNH Manchester provides students with a strong theoretical foundation as generalists in ASL/English interpretation and helps prepare students for either state-level interpreter screening or national Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) interpreter certification, depending on students’ skill level and experience.

Graduates may go on to pursue specialty areas in interpretation or related fields of study.

Students who complete the bachelor of science degree in sign language interpretation graduate with a varied and flexible academic base. Interpretation requires skills such as sustained powers of concentration, versatility in dealing with a variety of people and content areas, fast-thinking and excellent communication skills in the respective languages. Students seeking to become interpreters receive a foundation in American Sign Language, deaf culture, and the interpretation process, and their programs of study often include elective courses in linguistics, sociology, communication, and psychology. Students also gain a thorough grounding in the liberal arts through the University’s Discovery program.

Graduates of the sign language interpretation program may pursue careers in ASL/English interpretation, deaf education, rehabilitation, health care, audiology, social work, counseling, and the media. The program provides students with a varied and flexible academic base. Graduates are prepared for further study in such fields as psychology, communication, linguistics, sociology, and anthropology.

Program of Study
Students must complete 64 credits in the major, 40 credits in the University’s Discovery program, and 24 credits in elective courses. Students must complete 64 credits in the major with a grade of C or better. Students who earn less than a C on a particular course may repeat that course only once. Students must achieve a GPA of 2.5 or better in major courses and must pass both ASL 531 and INTR 630 with at least a B- (or successfully demonstrate competence in American Sign Language and consecutive interpretation, respectively). Transfer students must complete a minimum of eight SLI courses at UNH Manchester.

Required Courses
Language Courses
ASL 435, American Sign Language I
ASL 436, American Sign Language II
ASL 531, American Sign Language III
ASL 532, American Sign Language IV
ASL 621, Advanced ASL Discourse I
ASL 622, Advanced ASL Discourse II

Culture and Linguistic Courses
INTR 438, A Sociocultural Perspective on the Deaf Community
INTR 539, Comparative Linguistic Analysis for Interpreters

Interpreting Courses
INTR 430, Introduction to Interpretation
INTR 439, Ethics & Professional Standards for Interpreters
INTR 540, Principles and Practice of Translation
INTR 630, Principles and Practice of Consecutive Interpretation
INTR 636, Principles and Practice of Simultaneous Interpretation
INTR 732, Simultaneous Interpretation of Discussions, Speeches, and Reports
INTR 734, Field Experience and Seminar I
INTR 735, Field Experience and Seminar II

Capstone Experience
The capstone experience in the bachelor of science degree program in sign language interpretation (SLI) is met by the INTR 735, Field Experience and Seminar II Course, which is a senior-level course and the last in the sequence of courses required for the major. This course meets the following two criteria of the capstone experience for this major: 1) the capstone synthesizes and applies disciplinary knowledge and skills, 2) the capstone demonstrates emerging professional competencies.

For more information, contact Jack Hoza, program director, at (603) 641-4143 or jack.hoza@unh.edu; or contact the Office of Admissions.

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Sociology (SOC)

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Affiliate Associate Professor: Ana Liberato

 


Spanish (SPAN)

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Theatre & Dance (THDA)

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UNHM Independent Study (UMIS)

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UNHM Misc. Non-Credit (UMNA)

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UNHM Special Topics (UMST)

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Women's Studies (WS)

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Zoology (ZOOL)

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