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Undergraduate Course Catalog 2016-2017

College of Engineering and Physical Sciences

» http://www.ceps.unh.edu


Bioengineering (BENG)

» http://www.unh.edu/chemical-engineering/bachelor-science-bioengineering

Chairperson: Russell T. Carr
Professor: Dale P. Barkey, Russell T. Carr, Palligarnai T. Vasudevan
Associate Professor: Nivedita R. Gupta, Xiaowei Teng
Assistant Professor: Jeffrey M. Halpern, Kyung Jae Jeong, Harish Vashisth, Kang Wu, Nan Yi
Lecturer: Adam St. Jean
Adjunct Faculty: Deborah Audino

Bioengineering, as defined by the NIH, is "the application of life sciences, mathematics, and engineering principles to define and solve problems in biology, medicine, health care, and other fields."

The bioengineering program will train graduates in biology and physiology as well as engineering. The program will provide graduates with capabilities in advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statics), science, and engineering. Graduates will be conversant with solving problems at the interface of biology and engineering that may arise in the fields of biotechnology and pharmaceuticals, as well as medicine and biofuels. By graduation, students will have experience measuring and interpreting data from living systems and addressing the interactions between living and non-living materials.

Students are required to obtain a minimum 2.0 grade-point average in CHE 501/502 and in overall standing at the end of the sophomore year in order to continue in the major. Study abroad (Exchange) students are required to have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in math, physics, chemistry, and other required courses at the end of the semester prior to their exchange semester.

For more information on the bioengineering program, please contact Russell Carr, professor and chair, Russell.Carr@unh.edu.

 


Freshman Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CHE   400   Freshmen Seminar   1   -  
MATH   425-426   Calculus I and II   4   4  
CHEM   405   General Chemistry   4   -  
GEN   604   Genetics     4  
PHYS   407   Physics I   -   4  
BIOL   410   Cellular Biology   3   -  
ENGL   401   Freshman English   -   4 WI  
Discovery Program Elective (1)       4    
TOTAL       16   16  

1. CHEM 405 satisfies the Discovery Physical Science (with lab) category. Bioengineering students cannot take CHEM 401, CHEM 402, or CHEM 409 toward degree requirements.

2. MATH 425 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Quantitative Reasoning category.

3. ENGL 401 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Writing Skills category.

 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CHE   501-502   Introduction to Chemical Engineering I and II   3   3 INQ  
MATH   527   Differential Equations with Linear Algebra   4   -  
CHEM   545/546   Organic Chemistry/Lab   -   5  
MATH   644   Statistics for Engineers and Scientists   -   4  
BMS   503   Microbiology/Lab   5   -  
Discovery Program Elective (2)       4   4  
TOTAL       16   16  

 



Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CHE   601   Fluid Mechanics   3   -  
CHE   604   Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics   -   3  
CHE   762   Biomedical Engineering   4 WI    
CHE   761   Biochemical Engineering     4  
ZOOL   625/626   Physiol/Lab   5 WI   -  
BMCB   658-659   General Biochemistry/Lab   -   5  
BENG   766   Biomaterials   4   -  
Program Elective (1)       -   4  
TOTAL       16   16  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
BENG   763-764   Bioengineering Design I and II   1   4 WI  
CHE   614   Separations   -   3  
Discovery Program Electives (2)       4   4  
Bioengineering Electives (2)       4   4  
Bioengineering Electives (2)       8   -  
TOTAL       17   15  

33 credits engineering, 16 credits math, 14 credits chemistry, 13 credits life science 

Five electives: 15 to 16 credits engineering; 4 credits science, math, or engineering



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Chemical Engineering (CHE)

» http://www.unh.edu/chemical-engineering/

» Click to view course offerings

Chairperson: Russell T. Carr
Professor: Dale P. Barkey, Russell T. Carr, Palligarnai T. Vasudevan
Associate Professor: Nivedita R. Gupta, Xiaowei Teng
Assistant Professor: Jeffrey M. Halpern, Kyung Jae Jeong, Harish Vashisth, Kang Wu, Nan Yi
Lecturer: Adam St. Jean
Adjunct Faculty: Deborah Audino

The Department of Chemical Engineering currently offers the undergraduate degree program in chemical engineering with options in bioengineering, energy engineering, and environmental engineering. 

The B.S. program in chemical engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.

Chemical engineering is concerned with the analysis and design of processes that deal with the transfer and transformation of energy and material.

The practice of chemical engineering includes the conception, development, design, and application of physicochemical processes and their products; the development, design, construction, operation, control, and management of plants for these processes; and activities relating to public service, education, and research.

The curriculum prepares students for productive careers in industry or government and provides a foundation for graduate studies. The college’s program emphasizes chemical engineering fundamentals while offering opportunities for focused study in energy, environmental, or bioengineering.

Traditional employment areas in the chemical process industries include industrial chemicals, petroleum and petrochemicals, plastics, pharmaceuticals, metals, textiles, and food. Chemical engineers are also working in increasing numbers in the areas of energy engineering, pollution abatement, and biochemical and biomedical engineering; in addition, they are employed by many government laboratories and agencies as well as private industries and institutions.

Mission
The department strives to prepare students for productive careers in industry or government as well as to provide a foundation for graduate studies. The program emphasizes chemical engineering fundamentals while offering opportunities for focused study in energy, environmental, or bioengineering.

Program Educational Objectives
The chemical engineering program seeks to provide an environment that enables students to pursue their goals in an innovative, rigorous, and challenging program with a diversity of offerings. 

The program has the following major educational objectives with the expectation that our alumni will have successful careers in the many diverse areas of the chemical engineering profession. Within a few years of obtaining a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering, we expect our graduates to have the following attributes:

Depth.  To be effective in applying chemical engineering principles in engineering practice or for advanced study in chemical engineering.
Breadth. To have a productive career in the many diverse fields of chemical engineering such as bioengineering, energy, and the environment, or in the pursuit of graduate education in disciplines such as chemical engineering, medicine, law, or business.
Professionalism. To function effectively in the complex modern work environment with the ability to assume professional leadership roles.

 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineering is concerned with the analysis and design of processes that deal with the transfer and transformation of energy and material.

The practice of chemical engineering includes the conception, development, design, and application of physicochemical processes and their products; the development, design, construction, operation, control, and management of plants for these processes; and activities relating to public service, education, and research.

The curriculum prepares students for productive careers in industry or government and provides a foundation for graduate studies. The program emphasizes chemical engineering fundamentals while offering opportunities for focused study in energy, environmental, or bioengineering.

Traditional employment areas in the chemical process industries include industrial chemicals, petroleum and petrochemicals, plastics, pharmaceuticals, metals, textiles, and food. Chemical engineers also are working in increasing numbers in the areas of energy engineering, pollution abatement, and biochemical and biomedical engineering; in addition, they are employed by many government laboratories and agencies as well as private industries and institutions.

Graduates from the program have the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to identify, formulate, and solve chemical engineering problems as well as to design and conduct experiments safely and analyze and interpret data. They are prepared to pursue advanced studies in chemical engineering. Program graduates gain a sense of professional and ethical responsibility with the ability to apply environmental, safety, economic, and ethical criteria in the design of engineering processes. They learn to function in individual and group working environments, and learn skills in written and oral communication and the effective use of computers for engineering practice, including information search in the library and on the Internet. They also understand the need for lifelong learning and the significance of societal and global issues relevant to chemical engineering.

A minimum of 129 credits is required for graduation with the degree of bachelor of science in chemical engineering. There are ten electives in the chemical engineering curriculum. Six of these are for the Discovery Program requirements. The remaining four electives should consist of three chemical engineering electives and one additional technical elective.

Students are required to obtain a minimum 2.0 grade-point average in CHE 501-502 and in overall standing at the end of the sophomore year in order to continue in the major. Study abroad (Exchange) chemical engineering students are required to have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in math, physics, chemistry, and CHE courses at the end of the semester prior to their exchange semester.
 


Freshman Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing   4   -  
MATH   425-426   Calculus I and II   4   4  
PHYS   407   General Physics I   -   4  
CHEM   405   General Chemistry   4   -  
CHE   400   CHE Lectures   1   -  
Discovery Program Electives (3)       4   8  
Total       17   16  

1. PHYS 407 OR CHEM 405 satisfies the Discovery Physical Science (with lab) category. Chemical engineering students cannot take CHEM 401, CHEM 402, or CHEM 409 toward degree requirements. 

2. MATH 425 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Quantitative Reasoning category.

3. ENGL 401 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Writing Skills category.

4. CHE students do not have to take a course in the Discovery ETS category since they satisfy this requirement through a combination of courses in the CHE curriculum. 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CHEM   683-684   Physical Chemistry I and II   3   3  
CHEM   685-686   Physical Chemistry Laboratory   2   2  
MATH   527   Differential Equations with Linear Algebra   4   -  
PHYS   408   General Physics II   4   -  
CHE   501-502   Introduction to Chemical Engineering I and II   3   3  
MATH   740 or 644   Design of Experiments or Statistics for Engineers   -   4  
Discovery Program Elective (1)       -   4  
Total       16   16  

1. CHE 502 satisfies the Discovery Inquiry requirement.

2. Math 740 (Design of Experiments) or MATH 644 (Statistics for Engineers or Scientists) is the recommended technical elective.



Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CHEM   651-652A   Organic Chemistry   3   3  
CHEM   653   Organic Chemistry Laboratory   2   -  
CHE   601   Fluid Mechanics and Unit Operations   3   -  
CHE   602   Heat Transfer and Unit Operations   -   3  
CHE   603   Applied Mathematics for Chemical Engineers   4   -  
CHE   604   Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics   -   3  
CHE   612   Chemical Engineering Laboratory I   -   3  
CHE Elective       4   -  
Discovery Program Elective (1)       -   4  
Total       16   16  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CHE   614   Separations   -   3  
CHE   703   Mass Transfer and Stagewise Operations   3   -  
CHE   707   Chemical Engineering Kinetics   3   -  
CHE   708   Chemical Engineering Design   -   4  
CHE   713   Chemical Engineering Laboratory II   3   -  
CHE   752   Process Dynamics and Control   -   4  
CHE Electives (2)       4   4  
Discovery Program Elective (1)       4   -  
Total       17   15  

1. CHE 708 satisfies the Discovery Capstone Experience/Course.

 



Bioengineering Option

Under this option, the required courses deal with the application of basic biological sciences and chemical engineering principles to the design and operation of large-scale bioprocesses for the production of high-value medicinal, food and beverage, pharmaceutical, biomedical, genetic engineering, and health care products. The elective courses permit the student to study topics of special interest in more depth or gain a broader perspective in bioengineering or some closely related subjects such as biochemistry or biotechnology experience in manufacturing or research. Three courses are required, and a minimum of two additional courses of at least three credits each should be selected from the electives list. Students interested in the bioengineering option should declare their intention to the department faculty during the sophomore year. They may consult with Russell Carr, (603) 862-1429.


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CHE   651   Biomanufacturing   4  
CHE   761   Biochemical Engineering   4  
CHE   766   Biomaterials   4  
Total       12  


Elective Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CHE   695   Chemical Engineering Project   3-4  
CHE   696   Independent Study   3-4  
CHE   762   Biomedical Engineering   4  
BMCB   750   Physical Biochemistry   3  
BMCB   751   Principles in Biochemistry   4  
BMCB   752   Principles in Biochemistry   4  
MATH   740   Design of Experiments I   4  
Total       6-8  


Energy Option

This option covers the major areas of current interest in the energy field. The required courses provide students with a general background knowledge of fossil fuels, nuclear power, solar energy, and other alternative energy resources. The elective courses will permit the student to study topics of special interest in more depth or gain a broader perspective on energy and some closely related subjects. Three courses are required, and a minimum of two additional courses of at least three credits each should be selected from the electives list. Students interested in the energy option should declare their intention to the department faculty during the sophomore year. They may consult with Russell Carr, (603) 862-1429.


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CHE   705   Fossil Fuels and Renewable Energy Sources   4  
CHE   706   Electrochemical Methods for Energy Applications   4  
CHE   712   Introduction to Nuclear Engineering   4  
Total       12  


Elective Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CHE   695   Chemical Engineering Project   3-4  
CHE   696   Independent Study   3-4  
CHE   761   Biochemical Engineering   4  
ENE   772   Physicochemical Processes for Water/Air Quality   4  
MATH   740   Design of Experiments I   4  
ME   705   Thermal Systems Analysis and Design   4  
    Special Topics on Energy*   3-4  
Total       6-8  

* This requires approval of the department; students should check with their adviser. Courses offered in the past include Renewable Electrical Power, Renewable Energy, and Peak Oil.



Environmental Engineering Option

The chemical engineering program, with its substantial requirements in chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, unit operations, and reaction kinetics, provides students with a unique preparation to deal with many aspects of environmental pollution problems. The option gives students a special focus on the application of chemical engineering principles and processes to the solution of problems relating to air pollution, water pollution, and the disposal of solid and hazardous waste. Three required courses must be selected, plus two electives from the electives list. Each course must carry a minimum of three credits. Students interested in the environmental engineering option should declare their intention to the department faculty during the sophomore year. They may consult with Russell Carr, (603) 862-1429.


Required Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
ENE   709   Fundamentals of Air Pollution and Its Control   4  
ENE   772   Physicochemical Processes for Water/Air   4  
ENE   742   Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering   3  
Total       11  


Elective Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
CHE   695   Chemical Engineering Project   3-4  
CHE   696   Independent Study   3-4  
CHE   744   Corrosion   4  
ENE   746   Bioenvironmental Engineering Design   3  
ENE   749   Water Chemistry   4  
MATH   740   Design of Experiments I   4  
Total       6-8  


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Chemistry (CHEM)

» http://www.unh.edu/chemistry/

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Chairperson: Glen P. Miller
Professor: Christopher F. Bauer, Arthur Greenberg, Richard P. Johnson, Howard R. Mayne, W. Rudolf Seitz, Sterling A. Tomellini, Charles K. Zercher
Associate Professor: Erik Berda, Margaret E. Greenslade, Gonghu Li, Samuel Pazicni, Roy Paul Planalp, John G. Tsavalas
Assistant Professor: Marc Andrew Boudreau , Christine A. Caputo, Leila Deravi

A study in chemistry is the pathway to multiple options. These options include careers in education, law, forensics, medicine, biotechnology, environmental protection, technical sales, pharmaceutical research, semiconductors, and industrial chemical production. The potential is limitless. Students interested in pursuing chemistry as an undergraduate degree have two options available to them, which are based on their career plans. These are the bachelor of science degree (B.S.) and a bachelor of arts degree (B.A.). Since the required chemistry courses in each degree program are the same the first year, it is easy to change from one program to another. A chemistry faculty adviser is assigned to a student once she/he enters the program. The student's adviser provides academic guidance concerning the choice of courses to meet requirements for the major and overall.

First-Year Student Requirements
In general, a first-year student should register for the following courses, and this applies to both programs (B.A. and B.S.): 

Chemistry Major Requirements
        1. UNH Discovery Program requirements must be satisfied. 
        2.  Specific chemistry major course requirements are listed in the Baccalaureate Degree Required Chemistry Courses table. 
        3. Chemistry majors cannot use CHEM 403, CHEM 404, or CHEM 405 to satisfy Discovery Program requirements.

Inquiry Course
Chemistry 574 provides an Inquiry Course experience for chemistry majors. This 4-credit course has a mandatory recitation session that enables students to explore and inquire about the open-ended lecture material in greater depth. This enhances the term project experience within the course.

Writing-Intensive Courses
Chemistry 698, Senior Seminar, and Chemistry 699, Senior Thesis, are writing-intensive courses for chemistry majors. Writing-intensive courses are required for every program, but these two courses serve to enhance a student's educational program by being capstone courses as well.

Capstone Experience 
A capstone experience is required for all chemistry majors during their senior year. The B.S. major requires CHEM 699, Senior Thesis, as the capstone experience. 

Senior thesis is a year-long project involving literature research, developing scientific writing skills, and obtaining lab experience using a variety of techniques and equipment. Senior thesis research is focused on an area of specialty within a research group in the Department of Chemistry. Possible areas of research include analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, and materials chemistry. Students must interview with a faculty member before choosing to register for CHEM 699. The interview process enables the student to explore areas of interest and the faculty adviser to determine a potential project. The senior thesis experience immerses the student in the lab environment: working with peers, graduate students, and the faculty research adviser. This creates a community to facilitate discussion, questions, and new ideas for projects. 

Completing a senior thesis in chemistry provides valuable field experience for careers in chemistry or closely related fields. Students combine their research with another course, CHEM 698, Senior Seminar, to develop posters exhibiting their research. These are presented at the UNH Undergraduate Research Conference. This is in addition to creating a written, bound thesis. Copies of student theses are displayed in the chemistry library and the adviser’s personal library, and students retain personal copies. Choosing to complete a senior thesis enables a student's B.S. degree to be ACS certified.

The B.A. major offers CHEM 698, Senior Seminar, as the capstone experience. Students work with the faculty member teaching the seminar to prepare a presentation based upon a research project or subject-driven professional engagement. The ability to integrate detailed subject matter and communicate this to the broader community, both scientific and general society, is encouraged. This exercise enhances the student’s writing ability, aids in the development of broader communication skills, and enables the student to obtain valuable research experience. 

B.A. majors have an additional research opportunity by taking CHEM 696, Independent Study. This course can be taken prior to, or in parallel with, the capstone course to enhance the program of study.

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry

Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry
This curriculum offers students the opportunity to combine the chemistry major with other interests, such as pre-professional programs, education, or business.

Requirements
1. UNH Discovery Program requirements must be satisfied.
2. For specific course requirements, see the B.A. section in the Baccalaureate Degree Required Chemistry Courses table. 


Baccalaureate Degree Required Chemistry Courses

Course Number Title BS BA
400   Freshman Seminar   x   x  
403, 404   General Chemistry   x   x  
517, 518   Quantitative Analysis   x   x  
547 & 549   Organic Chemistry I   x   x  
548 & 550   Organic Chemistry II   x   x  
574   Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry   x   x  
683 & 685   Physical Chemistry I   x   x  
684 & 686   Physical Chemistry II   x   x  
762 & 763   Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis   x   x  
698   Seminar   x   x  
699   Thesis   x    
755 & 756   Advanced Organic Chemistry   x    
774 & 775   Advanced Inorganic Chemistry   x    
776   Physical Chemistry III   x    
708   Spectroscopic Investigations of Organic Molecules      

Other Requirements:

All majors: MATH 425-426, Calculus I and II. Math 425 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Quantitative Reasoning Category.

B.S. degree: General Physics I and II, PHYS 407-408; Biochemistry, BCHM 658 or 751; one chemistry-related course.† Check course listings to see which meet a physical science discovery criteria or a biological science course criteria as a part of the Discovery Program.

B.A. degree, chemistry major: General Physics I, PHYS 407, or Introduction to Physics I and II, PHYS 401-402; two other CHEM courses, except 698, or two approved chemistry-related courses.†
_______
† Suggested courses: MATH 527, 528; PHYS 505; EE 620; the student's adviser may approve an alternative.
 



Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

This curriculum prepares students for careers requiring a thorough knowledge of chemistry and provides a strong foundation for careers in industry, professional schools (e.g., medical schools), and for graduate study in chemistry or in interdisciplinary areas. The curriculum requires a greater depth in chemistry and physics than do the other degree programs.

Requirements

1. UNH Discovery Program requirements must be satisfied.
2. For specific course requirements, see the B.S. section in the Baccalaureate Degree Required Chemistry Courses table. 

 


Minor in Chemistry

Minor in Chemistry
A chemistry minor is achieved by taking courses with a "CHEM" label. The student must have a total of 20 credit hours in chemistry unless she/he has completed Physical Chemistry 1 (CHEM 683) and the accompanying laboratory course (CHEM 685), in which case 18 credit hours suffice.

Biochemistry (BMCB) courses do not count toward a chemistry minor. The following CHEM courses are not acceptable as part of the 20 credits: CHEM 400 (Freshman Seminar), CHEM 696 (Independent Study), CHEM 698 (Seminar), and CHEM 501/502 (Peer-Led Team Learning).

No more than 8 credit hours of chemistry coursework required by the student’s major may be counted toward the chemistry minor. The remaining credits must come from CHEM courses that are not required for the student’s major. None of the chemistry courses for a chemistry minor can be taken on a pass/fail basis. A grade of C- or better is required in all chemistry minor coursework. A cumulative GPA of 2.00 is also required for all chemistry minor coursework.

Transfer credits can only be applied to the chemistry minor with the permission of the Chemistry Department undergraduate coordinator or chair, and only up to a maximum of 8 credit hours. The transferred courses must meet the minimum grade requirements.

A student interested in obtaining a chemistry minor should discuss his/her plan with the Chemistry Department’s undergraduate coordinator.


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Civil Engineering (CIE)

» http://www.unh.edu/civil-engineering/

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Chairperson: Erin S. Bell
Professor: Jean Benoit, M. Robin Collins, Jo S. Daniel, Kevin H. Gardner, David L. Gress, Jennifer M. Jacobs, Nancy E. Kinner, James P. Malley Jr.
Research Professor: Paul H. Kirshen
Associate Professor: Thomas P. Ballestero, Erin S. Bell, Raymond A. Cook, Charles H. Goodspeed, Robert M. Henry, Ricardo A. Medina
Assistant Professor: Eshan Dave, Tat S. Fu, Majid Ghayoomi, Weiwei Mo
Research Assistant Professor: Alison W. Watts

Civil engineering involves the planning, design, and construction of public works: buildings, bridges, roads, dams, water transmission systems, water treatment systems, tunnels, and more. These facilities must provide efficient service, be cost effective, and be compatible with the environment. Moreover, civil engineers work under a code of ethics in which their primary, overriding responsibility is to uphold the public’s trust by working to plan, design, build, and restore safe, sustainable, and environmentally responsible public works.

Civil engineers work as private consultants and for government agencies in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor settings around the world. There is a strong and constant market for civil engineers due to the demands placed on the profession to construct, maintain, and repair the infrastructure.

As civil engineering is such a broad field, it is traditionally divided into sub-disciplines. At the University of New Hampshire, six are offered: civil engineering materials, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, and water resources engineering. Civil engineering majors may choose the sub-discipline in which to focus their studies during their senior year. Additionally, the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, through the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering offers a B.S. in environmental engineering (ENE), which is a major for students who choose to specifically focus their attention solely in that area. (Students who are interested in environmental engineering but who also want a broader or more traditional civil engineering focus should pursue the civil engineering major and elect environmental engineering courses in their senior year.) Students may readily transfer between the civil engineering (CIE) and ENE programs within the first two semesters. Both the B.S. in civil engineering and the B.S. in environmental engineering provide a firm base in mathematics and engineering, and all majors are expected to develop excellent communication and computer skills. Graduates are prepared to enter the profession and to pursue advanced study. Because of the broad technical background attained, some graduates also successfully pursue further education in business, architecture, education, and law.

Mission
The mission of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New Hampshire is fourfold:

Educational Objectives
In accordance with its University, college, and department missions, the faculty of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering has established clear educational objectives for graduates to help them find rewarding professional employment, primarily in the civil and environmental engineering disciplines; to help them participate in post-graduate continuing education, coursework, and research; to help them attain positions of leadership, directing the work of others; to help them achieve professional licensure or certification in civil engineering disciplines and other professions; and to help them participate and find positions in community, public, and professional service. Thus, the civil engineering program is designed to provide the following student outcomes: 

  1. To have obtained a working knowledge in the areas of civil engineering materials, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, and water resources engineering
  2. To be able to locate, assess, and compile existing information and data, to design and perform experiments to gather new information and data, and to analyze such to draw conclusions.
  3. To have an ability to use and independently learn new techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools and software necessary for engineering practice.
  4. To be able to work effectively as a team member or a team leader on multidisciplinary teams.
  5. To be able to communicate and defend ideas in documents and public presentations to a variety of audiences and to make effective use of visuals in doing so.
  6. To be able to apply mathematics, science, and engineering to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  7. To have been prepared for and have taken the fundamentals of engineering examination.
  8. To have the broad education necessary to have an understanding of contemporary issues and the interaction between sustainable and ethical engineering practice and global, social, economic, political, and environmental issues.
  9. To have a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, lifelong learning and to understand the importance of professional licensure.
  10. Given realistic economic, environmental, social, political, and ethical constraints, to be able to critically analyze and design equipment, structures, systems, or processes to meet society’s current needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet theirs.

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

Matriculating students should have strong aptitudes in mathematics and science along with imagination, spatial and graphic abilities, communication skills, and creativity. Students then follow a four-year program that conforms to the guidelines of, and is accredited by, the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.

The first two years of the program provide the necessary technical knowledge in mathematics, chemistry, and physics, while introducing and developing problem-solving techniques in eight courses tailored to civil engineering students. The junior year provides courses in each of the civil engineering sub-disciplines, providing students with skills in each and allowing students to determine which they wish to pursue further. The senior year is flexible, allowing students to choose where to focus attention by selecting from more than thirty elective courses in civil and environmental engineering.

The required curriculum includes eight writing-intensive courses, thereby not only satisfying but exceeding the University’s writing requirement. (See University Academic Requirements.)

Electives
Approximately one-third of the major’s total credits and nearly all of the senior-level courses are elected by the student. Of these, there are Discovery Program electives required by the University and other electives required by the department in order to satisfy departmental objectives and accreditation requirements.

  1. The Discovery Program is described in University Academic Requirements. Courses required by the BSCE major fulfill requirements in Inquiry (CIE 402); Writing Skills (ENGL 401); Quantitative Reasoning (MATH 425); Physical Sciences (PHYS 407); Laboratory Coursework (PHYS 407); Environment, Technology, and Society (CIE 402); and a Senior Capstone Experience (CIE 784/788). Therefore, students select electives to satisfy Discovery requirements in Biological Science, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Historical Perspectives, World Cultures, and Social Science.
  2. In the senior year, students take seven 700-level electives subject to the following restrictions:
    1. Four of six concentration areas (environmental, geotechnical, civil engineering materials, structural, sustainability, and water resources) must be covered.
    2. Of the four concentration-area electives, at least three must be design courses.
    3. Of the three design courses, at least one must be a principal design elective.
    4. Electives that do not have a concentration area cannot be taken as one of the four concentration area courses.
    5. One of the seven 700-level courses is a senior technical elective, which can be any CEPS 700-level course of 3 credits or more including CIE and ENE courses, GEOG 757 (cross listed as NR 757), and TECH 759. Lists of courses that fulfill these electives are available from the department.

Additional Program Policies and Requirements

  1. To transfer into the BSCE major, a student must have the following:
    1. an overall grade-point average of 2.33 or greater;
    2. an overall grade-point average of 2.33 or greater for all CIE and ENE courses taken to date;
    3. a grade-point average of 2.33 in courses taken to date of MATH 425, PHYS 407, CHEM 405 or CHEM 403, CIE 525 or ME 525, and CIE 526 or ME 526;
    4. if CIE or ME 525 has been taken, a minimum grade of C+ in CIE or ME 525 if CIE or ME 526 has not yet been taken or an average grade of 2.33 in CIE or ME 525 and CIE or ME 526.
  2. Students who are transferring into the BSCE major may only transfer in CIE and ENE 600- and 700-level courses in which the student has received a grade of C- or better.
  3. BSCE majors wishing to participate in domestic or international exchange programs must achieve a cumulative grade-point average of 2.50 or better in all CIE, and ENE courses taken to date at the time of application to the exchange program.
  4. To begin taking the required 600-level courses in the junior year, students must complete CIE or ME 525, CIE or ME 526, MATH 425, PHYS 407, and CHEM 405 or CHEM 403 and achieve a GPA of 2.00 or greater in each of the following categories:
    1. CIE or ME 525 and CIE or ME 526
    2. CIE and ENE courses
    3. CIE or ME 525, CIE or ME 526, MATH 425, PHYS 407, and CHEM 405 or CHEM 403
  5. To graduate with a bachelor of science in civil engineering, a student must achieve the following:
    1. 129 or more credits,
    2. credit for the civil engineering program’s major and elective courses,
    3. satisfaction of the University’s Discovery Program requirements,
    4. satisfaction of the University’s writing-intensive course requirements,
    5. a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or better for all courses,
    6. a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 or better for all CIE and ENE courses.


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CIE   402   Intro. to Civil Engineering   4   -  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing   4   -  
TECH   564   Fundamentals of CAD   3   -  
Elective (2)     Discovery Program requirement*   4   4  
CIE   505   Surveying and Mapping   -   4  
MATH   425   Calculus I   -   4  
PHYS   407   General Physics I   -   4  
Total       15   16  

*A course satisfying one each of the Discovery Program categories of Biological Science, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Historical Perspectives, World Cultures, and Social Science.
 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CIE   525   Statics   3   -  
ENGL   502   Technical Writing   4   -  
MATH   426   Calculus II   4   -  
PHYS   408   General Physics II   4   -  
ENE   520   Environmental Pollution and Protection   4   -  
Elective     Discovery Program requirement*   -   4  
CHEM   405   General Chemistry   -   4  
CIE   526   Strength of Materials   -   3  
CIE   533   Project Engineering   -   3  
MATH   527   Differential Equations with Linear Algebra   -   4  
Total       19   18  

*A course satisfying one each of the Discovery Program categories of Biological Science, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Historical Perspectives, World Cultures, and Social Science.
 



Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CIE   622   Engineering Materials   4   -  
CIE   642   Fluid Mechanics   4   -  
CIE   681   Classical Structural Analysis   3   -  
CIE   665   Soil Mechanics   -   4  
ENE   645   Fundamental Aspects of Environmental Engineering   -   4  
MATH   644   Statistics for Engineers and Scientists   -   4  
Elective (2)     Discovery Program requirement*   4   4  
Total       16   15  

*A course satisfying one each of the Discovery Program categories of Biological Science, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Historical Perspectives, World Cultures, and Social Science.
 



Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CIE   784   Intro. to Project Planning and Design***   1   -  
Elective (1)     Principal Design Elective**   4   -  
Elective (1)     Design Elective 2**   3   -  
Elective (2)   -   Civil Engineering**   3   3  
Elective (1)     Discovery Program requirement*   4    
CIE or ENE   788   Project Planning and Design***   -   3  
Elective (1)   -   Design Elective 3**   -   3  
Elective (1)   -   Area Elective   -   3  
Elective (1)     Senior Technical Elective**   -   3  
Total       16   15  

*A course satisfying one each of the Discovery Program categories of Biological Science, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Historical Perspectives, World Cultures, and Social Science.

** Approved list available in the CIE office.

*** Satisfies capstone requirement for Discovery.

 



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Computer Science (CS)

» http://www.cs.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

Chairperson: Radim Bartos
Professor: Philip J. Hatcher, Colin Ware
Affiliate Professor: Jason H. Moore
Associate Professor: Radim Bartos, Michel Charpentier, Wheeler Ruml, Elizabeth Varki, James L. Weiner
Affiliate Associate Professor: Sylvia Weber Russell
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Kevin Ma , Michael S. Deutsch, Michael Jonas, Kurt Schwehr
Lecturer: Mark L. Bochert, Michael Gildersleeve, Alejo Hausner, Sofia Lemons, Arvind Narayan, Matthew Plumlee, Collette Mathias Powers, Karl Shump, Israel J. Yost

 

Computer Science

Undergraduate students may choose from one of two degree options: the B.S. in computer science, which is intended for students interested in the design and implementation of software systems, or the B.S. in information technology, which focuses on the application of existing computing technologies to meet the information needs of organizations and individual computer users. The B.S. in computer science also offers a bioinformatics option, which is designed for students who wish to apply computer science expertise in the life sciences.


Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

Computer science focuses on problem solving with a particular emphasis on the design of computer-efficient solutions. Within a few years of obtaining a bachelor's degree in either of the two computer science options, alumni will have:

1.  Engaged in successful careers in diverse areas of software development and will be pursuing advanced education in computer science or related fields;
2.  Applied the full range of core computer science concepts and techniques to fill software development needs of an organization;
3.  Adapted to changing directions of computing technology and used state-of-the-art techniques to confront new problems effectively;
4.  Navigated the complex interconnections between software and the goals and constraints of the organization served;
5.  Participated responsibly in the pervasive and changing role of computing technology in global society as both software engineers and citizens;
6.  Operated collaboratively in a team environment and assumed leadership roles.

The B.S. in computer science programs are accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.

B.S. in computer science requirements:
Computer science majors must complete the following coursework in computer science, mathematics, computer engineering, science, English, and philosophy (all courses are 4 credits unless indicated otherwise):

Computer science courses: 

One of the course sequences:  
CS 415, Introduction to Computer Science I, and CS 416, Introduction to Computer Science II; or CS 414, From Problems to Algorithms, and CS 417, From Programs to Computer Science; or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming, and CS 417, From Programs to Computer Science 
CS 400, Introduction to Computing (1 cr) 
IT 403, Introduction to Internet Technologies, 
CS 501, Professional Ethics and Communication in Technology-Related Fields
CS 515, Data Structures 
CS 520, Assembly Language Programming and Machine Organization
CS 619, Introduction to Software Design and Development
CS 620, Operating System Fundamentals
CS 659, Introduction to the Theory of Computation
CS 671, Programming Language Concepts and Features
CS 7.., CS elective 1
CS 7.., CS elective 2
CS 7.., CS elective 3
CS 7.., CS elective 4 
CS 791, Senior Project I (senior capstone experience) (2 cr)
CS 792, Senior Project II (senior capstone experience) (2 cr)

A professional elective, chosen from a list of approved courses. One of the four CS electives must be "implementation intensive" (CS 712, CS 720, CS 730, CS 735, CS 770); another one must be "theory" (CS 712, CS 745, CS 758).

Mathematics courses:
MATH 425, Calculus I 
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539 or MATH 644, Statistics

Electrical and computer engineering courses:
ECE 543, Introduction to Digital Systems 
ECE 562, Computer Organization

Science courses:
Science 1 and 2 (two-course sequence): BIOL 411-412 or CHEM 403-404 or ESCI 401-402 or ESCI 409-402 or PHYS 407-408 
Science 3: any Discovery lab science course (DLAB)  

Other courses:
ENGL 502, Technical Writing
Discovery requirements not already covered by required courses  

Computer science majors must maintain an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or better in all required computer science, mathematics, and computer engineering courses in order to graduate. If at the end of any semester, including the first, a student’s cumulative grade-point average in these courses falls below 2.0, the student may not be allowed to continue as a CS major. 

CS 414 must be passed with a B- or better.  The following courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better:  IT 403, CS 415, CS 416, CS 417, CS 515, and CS 520.  If a student wishing to transfer into the computer science major has any coursework that is applicable to the major, the grades in those courses must satisfy the minimum grade requirements for the B.S. degree in computer science. The student must have an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or better in all courses taken at the University.


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   400   Introduction to Computing   1    
IT   403   Introduction to Internet Technologies   4    
CS   415   Introduction to Computer Science I   4    
MATH   425   Calculus I   4    
    Other Requirements   4    
CS   416   Introduction to Computer Science II     4  
MATH   426   Calculus II     4  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing     4  
ECE   543   Introduction to Digital Systems     4  
    Total   17   16  

 

 

 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   515   Data Structures   4    
MATH   531   Mathematical Proof   4    
    Other Requirements   8    
CS   520   Assembly Language Programming and Machine Organization     4  
CS   659   Introduction to the Theory of Computation     4  
    Other Requirements     8  
    Total   16   16  


Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   620   Operating System Fundamentals   4    
CS   671   Programming Language Concepts and Features   4    
    Other Requirements   8    
ECE   562   Computer Organization     4  
CS   619   Introduction to Software Design and Development     4  
CS   7...   CS elective 1     4  
    Other Requirements     4  
    Total   16   16  


 

 



Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   791   Senior Project I   2    
CS   7..   CS Elective 2   4    
CS   7..   CS Elective 3   4    
    Other Requirements   4    
CS   792   Senior Project II     2  
CS   7..   CS Elective 4     4  
    Professional Elective     4  
    Other Requirements     4  
    Total   14   14  

 

 



Bachelor of Science in Computer Science: Bioinformatics Option

The bioinformatics field is an increasingly important sub-discipline in computer science. The demand for computer science graduates who can apply their knowledge in the life sciences is significant and is expected to continue to grow. Students who choose this path are still computer science majors but have a concentration in the life sciences. The option has the same core as the B.S. program but requires appropriate coursework in chemistry, biology, genetics, and statistics.

The B.S. in computer science programs are accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.

Bioinformatics Requirements
Bioinformatics students must complete the following coursework in computer science, mathematics, computer engineering, science, and English. (All courses are 4 credits unless indicated otherwise.):

Computer science courses:

Choose one of the following sequences: CS 415 and CS 416; CS 414 and CS 417; or CS 410 and CS 417
CS 400
IT 403 

CS 501, CS 515, CS 520, CS 619, CS 620, CS 659, CS 671
CS 758, Algorithms (CS theory)
CS 7.., CS WI elective with project in bioinformatics
CS 775, Database Systems
CS 791, Senior Project I (senior capstone experience) (2 cr)
CS 792, Senior Project II (senior capstone experience) (2 cr)

Mathematics courses: 
MATH 425, Calculus I
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539 or MATH 644, Statistics 1
MATH 739, Statistics 2

Electrical and computer engineering course:
ECE543, Introduction to Digital Systems

Science courses:
BIOL 411, Introductory Biology: Molecular and Cellular
BIOL 412, Introductory Biology: Evolution, Biodiversity and Ecology
BIOL 604/GEN 604, Genetics
CHEM 405, Chemical Principles for Everyone
GEN 711, Genomics and Bioinformatics

Other courses:
ENGL 502, Technical Writing
Discovery requirements not already covered by required courses


Minor in Computer Science

The minor in computer science is designed for students in other majors who want to learn the fundamentals of designing and implementing computer software.

Credit toward the minor will be given only for courses passed with C- or better, and a 2.0 grade-point average must be maintained in courses for the minor. Courses taken on the pass/fail basis may not be used for the minor. Students should declare their intent to earn a minor as early as possible and no later than the end of the junior year. During the final term, an application should be made to the dean of the student’s major college to have the minor shown on the academic record. Students must consult with their major adviser and also the minor supervisor.


Requirements:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
CS   415 or 414 or 410   first introductory course  
CS   416 or 417   second introductory course  
CS   515   Data Structures  


Two additional courses chosen from:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
CS   619   Introduction to Software Design and Development  
CS   520   Assembly Language Programming and Machine Organization  
CS   620   Operating System Fundamentals  
*CS   659   Introduction to the Theory of Computation  
CS   671   Programming Language Concepts and Features  
    An approved CS 700-level course  

*CS 659 has mathematics prerequisites: MATH 425, MATH 426, and MATH 531.



Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Information technology is concerned primarily with the application of existing computing technologies to the information needs of organizations and individual computer users.  The IT program aims to provide graduates with the skills and knowledge to take on appropriate professional positions in information technology upon graduation and grow into leadership positions in the field. Potential careers include network administrator, database developer, system administrator, and webmaster.

The broad objectives for B.S. in information technology graduates are:

1.  Apply the full range of core IT concepts and techniques to fill the IT needs of an organization and be prepared to assume managerial and other advanced responsibilities,
2.  Confront new problems effectively and anticipate the changing directions of technology,
3.  Communicate effectively with diverse stakeholders as well as function appropriately in a team environment,
4.  Navigate within the complex relationships between IT and larger organizational goals, and
5.  Understand the pervasive and changing role of computing technology in global society, and participate responsibly as both IT professional and citizen.

The B.S. in information technology program is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD  21202-4012. Phone:  (410) 347-7700. www.abet.org/.

B.S. in information technology requirements:

Information technology courses:
One of the following sequences:
CS 415, Introduction to Computer Science I, and CS 416, Introduction to Computer Science II; or CS 414, From Problems to Algorithms, and CS 417, From Programs to Computer Science; or CS 410, From Scientific Programming/C, and CS 417, From Programs to Computer Science
CS 400, Introduction to Computing (1 cr)
IT 403, Introduction to Internet Technologies
C 501, Professional Ethics and Communication in Technology Related Fields
IT 502, Intermediate Web Design
IT 505, Database Programming
IT 520, Computer Architecture
IT 609, Network/Systems Administration
IT 666, Computer Security
IT 699, Internship (1 cr)
IT 6.., IT elective 1
IT 6.., IT elective 2
IT 7.., IT elective 3
IT 705, Project Management for Information Technology
II 710, Senior Project (senior capstone experience) 
IT 775, Database Technology

Mathematics courses:
MATH 425, Calculus I
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis

Other courses:
Science 1 and 2 (two-course sequence): BIOL 411-412 or CHEM 403-404 or ESCI 401-402 or ESCI 409-402 or PHYS 401-402
ENGL 502, Technical Writing
Second discipline (see below for details)

Information technology majors must maintain an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or better in all required information technology and computer science required courses in order to graduate. If at the end of any semester, including the first, a student’s cumulative grade-point average in these courses falls below 2.0, the student may not be allowed to continue as an IT major. CS 414 must be passed with a B- or better. The following courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better in order to meet IT major requirements: IT 403, CS 415, CS 416, CS 417, IT 502, IT 505, IT 520.

If a student wishing to transfer into the information technology major has any coursework that is applicable to the major, the grades in those courses must satisfy the minimum grade requirements for the B.S. degree in information technology. The student must have an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or better in all courses taken at the University.

In addition to the above requirements, each student must choose a second discipline in a particular domain outside of IT to which the student’s IT skills can be applied. Second disciplines (typically four courses) have been defined by the CS department in such areas as business administration, health management and policy, and justice studies. If a student is interested in an area that is not currently defined, the option of a student-designed second discipline is also available.

The following is a sample schedule depicting the necessary requirements and the layout of the curriculum. Students must consult with their advisers in order to come up with the proper schedule for themselves.


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   400   Introduction to Computing   1    
MATH   425   Calculus I (Discovery)   4    
IT   403   Introduction to Internet Technologies   4    
CS   415   Introduction to Computer Science I   4    
    Discovery   4    
CS   416   Intro to Computer Science II     4  
IT   502   Intermediate Web Design     4  
    Discovery     4  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing (Discovery)     4  
    Total   17   16  

 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
MATH   539   Introduction to Statistical Analysis   4    
IT   505   Database Programming   4    
    Discovery   4    
    Lab Science I & II (Discovery)   4   4  
IT   520   Computer Architecture     4  
ENGL   502   Technical Writing     4  
    Second Discipline I     4  
    Total   16   16  

 



Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   501   Professional Ethics and Communication in Technology-related Fields   4    
IT   666   Computer Security   4    
IT   609   Network/Systems Administration   4    
    Discovery   4    
    600-Level IT Elective     4  
    600-Level IT Elective     4  
    Second Discipline II     4  
    Discovery     4  
IT   699   Internship     1  
    Total   16   17  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
IT   705   Project Management   4    
IT   775   Database Technology   4    
    Second Discipline III   4    
    Discovery   4    
IT   710   Senior Project     4  
    Second Discipline IV     4  
    700-Level IT Elective     4  
    Free Elective     4  
    Total   16   16  

 



Minor in Information Technology

The information technology (IT) minor is a way for students in non-technical majors to bridge the gap between a primarily non-technical education and a technical world. Graduates from a variety of fields are discovering that there is a great need to have computer competency in addition to the knowledge they gain in their major; the IT minor, which is tailored to grow students’ understanding of computer and information technology applications, helps prepare students for the future.

Students who minor in IT must complete a minimum of 20 credits of IT courses. All students must take IT 520, Computer Architecture, as well as an approved introductory programming course. The other three courses may be chosen from the list below.  

*Courses not in the list below may be allowed at the discretion of the minor coordinator, but approval for such exceptions should be sought before the coures are taken.

Credit toward the minor will be given only for courses passed with C- or better, and a 2.0 grade-point average must be maintained in courses for the minor. Courses taken on the pass/fail basis may not be used for the minor. Students should declare their intent to earn a minor as early as possible and no later than the end of the junior year. During the final term, an application should be made to the dean of the student’s major college to have the minor shown on the academic record. Students must consult with their major adviser and also the minor coordinator.


Requirements:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
    1.  
IT   520   Computer Architecture  
     
    2. A programming course chosen from the following list:  
CS   405   Introduction to Applications Programming with Visual Basic  
CS   410   Introduction to Scientific Programming  
CS   414   From Problems to Algorithms to Programs  
     
    3. Three courses from the following list:  
IT   403   Introduction to Internet Technologies  
CS   417   From Programs to Computer Science  
IT   502   Intermediate Web Design  
IT   505   Database Programming  
IT   604   Intermediate Web Development  
IT   609   Network/System Administration  
IT   666   Computer Security  



Earth Sciences (ESCI)

» http://ceps.unh.edu/earth-sciences

» Click to view course offerings

Chairperson: Julia G. Bryce
Professor: William C. Clyde, John E. Hughes-Clarke, Larry A. Mayer, David C. Mosher, Samuel B. Mukasa
Research Professor: Stephen E. Frolking, Cameron P. Wake
Affiliate Professor: Andrew Armstrong, Christopher E. Parrish
Associate Professor: Margaret S. Boettcher, Julia G. Bryce, J. Matthew Davis, Joel E. Johnson, Jo Laird, Joseph M. Licciardi, Thomas C. Lippmann, Michael W. Palace, James M. Pringle, Ruth K. Varner
Research Associate Professor: Jack E. Dibb, Larry G. Ward
Affiliate Associate Professor: Mary D. Stampone
Assistant Professor: Rosemarie E. Came, Anne Lightbody
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Joseph Salisbury
Affiliate Research Professor: Erik A. Hobbie, Douglas C. Vandemark

The courses offered in the Department of Earth Sciences cover the broad spectrum of geosciences, with emphases on geology, climate, geochemistry, geophysics, hydrology, and oceanography. The curriculum encompasses a group of related disciplines concerned with an understanding of Earth and its environment. Studies of the processes that shape the continents and oceans, drive the hydrologic cycle and ocean circulation, and affect climate change and the evolution of life are based on a foundation of basic mathematics, physics, and chemistry.

The need for people trained in the Earth and environmental sciences has been increasing in response to growing societal demands for sound environmental and resource management. Issues of particular concern include global climate change impacts, management of water resources, development of energy and mineral resources, waste disposal, and the assessment of natural hazards. In addition, the demand for well-trained secondary school teachers of Earth sciences has been steadily increasing.

The Department of Earth Sciences offers four majors: B.S. Earth sciences, B.S. environmental sciences (interdisciplinary with the College of Life Sciences and Agriculture), B.A. Earth sciences, and B.A. Earth sciences teaching. These programs prepare students for advanced study in the geosciences; for entry-level professional employment in public or private institutions concerned with environmental and resource management, including consulting firms, government agencies, energy- and resource-extraction firms, utilities, and nonprofit organizations; and for secondary-school teaching of Earth sciences.

The Department of Earth Sciences also offers a minor in Earth sciences, as well as an interdisciplinary minor in oceanography.

Descriptions and requirements for the majors and minors are arranged alphabetically.

Bachelor of Arts in Earth Sciences
The bachelor of arts in Earth sciences is offered through the Department of Earth Sciences. This program provides students an opportunity to obtain a broad education and a general background in the Earth sciences with a greater degree of freedom in choosing electives than in the bachelor of science programs. Through careful choice of electives, students can prepare for graduate school, business, or industry.

Requirements
1. Satisfy the Discovery Program requirements. Note that ESCI 401, 402, 405, 409, 420, 501 cannot be taken to fulfill Discovery Program requirements for majors in the Department of Earth Sciences.
2. Satisfy the bachelor of arts degree requirements.
3. Complete (with a C- or better in each course) a minimum of eight courses in the department, including ESCI 401, The Dynamic Earth, or ESCI 409, Geology and the Environment; ESCI 402, Earth History; ESCI 512, Principles of Mineralogy; and five advanced-level courses, two of which must be 700-level or above.
4. Math requirements: 425, Calculus I, and 426, Calculus II.

It is strongly advised that students complete, as early as possible, a year each of college chemistry and physics.

Bachelor of Arts in Earth Sciences Teaching
The bachelor of arts in Earth sciences teaching program is offered by the Department of Earth Sciences in coordination with the Department of Education. The program is specifically designed to prepare students to teach Earth sciences in secondary school. With careful planning, upon graduation from this program, qualified students are prepared to complete a M.A.T./M.Ed. degree in education with an additional year of graduate study, which includes a year-long internship (EDUC 900/901). After completing this typically five-year program, students receive full teacher certification for New Hampshire, which is recognized in many other states.

Requirements
1. Satisfy the Discovery Program requirements.
2. Satisfy the bachelor of arts degree requirements.
3. Complete the following: ESCI 401, The Dynamic Earth, or ESCI 409, Geology and the Environment; ESCI 402, Earth History; ESCI 501, Introduction to Oceanography; GEOG 473, The Weather; CHEM 403 and 404 (or CHEM 405 if applicable), General Chemistry; PHYS 401 and 402 or PHYS 407 and 408; PHYS 406, Introduction to Modern Astronomy; plus 12 approved elective credits from intermediate and/or advanced Earth sciences courses.
4. Math requirements: 425, Calculus I, and 426, Calculus II.
5. Satisfy the secondary-school teacher education program.

General Science Certification
Students majoring in animal sciences, biochemistry, biology, Earth sciences, environmental conservation studies, environmental sciences, forestry, microbiology, plant biology, wildlife management, or zoology may seek certification to teach science at the middle, junior, or high school level.

For further information, contact the coordinator of teacher education in the Department of Education.

Bachelor of Science in Earth Sciences
The bachelor of science in Earth sciences is offered through the Department of Earth Sciences. The program represents a strong concentration in the Earth sciences and is especially well-suited for students who plan to continue their studies in graduate school. Beyond a central core of courses, there are several possible specializations (geology, geophysics, oceanography, climate) from which students must chose in order to develop depth in a particular area of Earth sciences. Students are encouraged to attend a summer off-campus field experience, for which scholarship funds may be available.

Requirements
1. Satisfy the Discovery Program requirements and the bachelor of science degree requirements.
2. Satisfactorily complete MATH 425 and 426, CHEM 403 and 404 (or CHEM 405 if applicable), PHYS 407 and 408. Some of these courses may also satisfy Discovery Program requirements.
3. Complete the core curriculum that includes a ESCI 401, The Dynamic Earth, or ESCI 409, Geology and the Environment; ESCI 402, Earth History; ESCI 501, Introduction to Oceanography; ESCI 512, Principles of Mineralogy; ESCI 530, Geological Field Methods, or ESCI 534, Techniques in Environmental Sciences; and ESCI 654, Fate and Transport in the Environment, ESCI 701, Quantitative Methods in the Earth Sciences, or ESCI 731, Geodynamics.
4. Complete one of the approved concentrations:

Climate: ESCI 514; ESCI 561; at least two of the following four courses: ESCI 758, ESCI 760, ESCI 762, ESCI 765; and three advanced-level approved electives.
Geology: ESCI 561, ESCI 614, ESCI 631, ESCI 652, and two approved 700-level electives.
Geophysics: MATH 527, MATH 528, ESCI 561 or ESCI 614, ESCI 631, at least two of the following five courses:  ESCI 731, ESCI 734, ESCI 735, ESCI 756, ESCI 759.
Oceanography: BIO 411 (satisfies BS Discovery requirement); ESCI 514; at least three of the following four courses: ESCI 750, ESCI 752, ESCI 758, ESCI 759; and three advanced-level approved electives.

5. Complete three additional approved science/math electives. The following should be considered: additional 700-level Earth sciences courses; additional chemistry, mathematics, and physics courses; courses in computer science, engineering, and the biological sciences; and an off-campus field camp.

Capstone Experience
A capstone experience is required of all undergraduate Earth sciences majors during their senior year. All capstone experiences at UNH must meet one or more of the following criteria:

1. The capstone synthesizes and applies disciplinary knowledge and skills.
2. The capstone fosters reflection on undergraduate learning and experience.
3. The capstone demonstrates emerging professional competencies.
4. The capstone applies, analyzes, and/or interprets research or data or artistic expression.
5. The capstone explores areas of interest based on the integration of prior learning.

Examples of Department of Earth Sciences capstone experiences include Senior Thesis (ESCI 799), UROP/SURF projects, environmental or geologic field camps, or Earth sciences education and outreach activities. Additional experiences may qualify (e.g., ESCI 795/796 field courses, INCO 590, INCO 790, internships) if they are designed according to the above criteria. Students should work closely with their advisers to define the most appropriate capstone experience for the Earth sciences degree option and all capstone experiences must be approved by the Department of Earth Sciences undergraduate coordinator. Presentation of projects or experiences developed for the capstone is encouraged at the annual UNH Undergraduate Research Conference or other appropriate venue.

Earth Sciences Minor
The Department of Earth Sciences offers a minor in Earth sciences available to all University students. The Earth sciences minor provides an opportunity for students to complement their major field of study with foundational knowledge and essential skills in the geosciences.  As with all minors offered at UNH, the Earth sciences minor adheres to the following University requirements:

Courses in the Earth sciences minor must include both introductory and more advanced ESCI courses. Strongly recommended introductory courses include ESCI 401, The Dynamic Earth, or ESCI 409, Geology and the Environment, (students may not receive credit for both ESCI 401 and ESCI 409) and ESCI 402, Earth History. More advanced courses must include at least one at the 600 or 700 level. Specific courses in the program are selected in consultation with a minor adviser in the Department of Earth Sciences, with flexibility in approved courses to accommodate interests in different aspects of the geosciences.  Interested students should see the Earth sciences undergraduate program coordinator, Jo Laird, (603) 862-3140; jl@cisunix.unh.edu, and complete an Intent to Minor form no later than their junior year. Forms can be picked up in the Earth sciences main office, 214 James Hall.

Oceanography Minor
The minor in oceanography is available to all students in the University interested in obtaining a broad background in oceanography. The minor consists of a minimum of five courses with grades of C (2.00) or better and no pass/fail courses. No more than 8 major requirement credits may be used. All courses in the program are selected in consultation with the oceanography minor adviser, Dr. Jamie Pringle, (603) 862-5000, jpringle@unh.edu. Students must complete an Intent to Minor form no later than their junior year. Forms can be picked up in the Earth Sciences departmental office, 214 James Hall.

Required courses include one (1) ESCI 501, Introduction to Oceanography; two (2) of the following courses: ESCI 750, Biological Oceanography; ESCI 752, Chemical Oceanography; ESCI 758, Introductory Physical Oceanography; ESCI 759, Geological Oceanography; 3) any two of the following courses, or a suitable substitute approved by the minor adviser (at least one of these courses should be in the biological sciences): PBIO 625, 722; CIE 757; ENE 747, 753; ESCI 653, 701, 754, 756, 760, 770, 771; MICR 707; OE 690, 710, 753, 754, 757, 785; EREC 611; TECH 797; ZOOL 503, 560, 674, 720, 725, 730, 751, 753, 772, 775; ZOOL/ESCI 750.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Sciences
http://www.envsci.unh.edu/
The College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (CEPS), together with the College of Life Science and Agriculture (COLSA), jointly offers a bachelor of science degree in environmental sciences. Environmental sciences is an interdisciplinary field concerned with the interaction of biological, chemical, and physical processes that shape our natural environment. Students graduating with a degree in environmental sciences will have an understanding of these interacting processes, the ability to effectively communicate with both scientific and lay audiences, competency in field methods appropriate for entry-level environmental science positions, competency in the use and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), a basic understanding of environmental policy, and the ability to contribute to multidisciplinary teams. The University of New Hampshire is a recognized leader in environmental sciences research, and the environmental sciences program capitalizes on faculty expertise in this area. The program has 125 full-time faculty members, with major teaching and research emphases in the areas of biogeochemical cycling, environmental chemistry, ecosystem science, global change, hydrology, plant ecology, soil science, and water resource management. 

Employment opportunities include: environmental consulting firms, educational facilities (e.g., science centers), environmental monitoring laboratories (e.g., water treatment plants; the Environmental Protection Agency), government agencies (e.g., the U.S. Geological Survey, Bureau of Land Management, Natural Resource Conservation Service), university and government research laboratories, and nongovernment environmental organizations. The environmental sciences program also constitutes an excellent preparation for graduate programs in several areas relating to the environment. Students should consult with their adviser early if their goals include further study.

The Program has three options: ecosystems, soils and watersheds, and hydrology. Environmental science B.S. degrees with options in ecosystems and soil and watersheds are managed by the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment in COLSA. The Department of Earth Sciences in CEPS offers the hydrology option of the B.S. environmental sciences degree. Specific course requirements for the major vary by option.

Requirements
In addition to Discovery Program and University writing requirements, all students will take Introduction to Environmental Science (NR 403) and Professional Perspectives in Natural Resources (NR 400). Students in the ecosystems or soils and watersheds option will also take either NR 435 (Issues in Natural Resource Conservation) or NR 437 (Principles of Sustainability), while hydrology majors will choose an introductory environmental science course from a list of approved courses.

Foundation courses for the hydrology degree option include:
Biology: BIOL 411 or 412
Physics: PHYS 407 and 408
Chemistry: CHEM 403 and 404, or 405
Calculus: MATH 425 and 426
Statistics: BIOL 528 or MATH 644
Geology: ESCI 401, 402, or 409

Core courses for all options comprise Techniques in Environmental Sciences (ESCI 534), Introduction to GIS (NR 658), Fate and Transport in the Environment (ESCI 654), Natural Resources and Environmental Policy (NR 602), or Issues in Environmental Geography  (GEOG 673), and a capstone experience (NR 791 and an independent study or capstone course approved by their adviser and the program coordinator). Successful completion of the EcoQuest program, which is an interdisciplinary field studies program in applied ecology, resource management, and environmental policy in New Zealand, satisfies the policy and capstone requirements.

Students must complete additional courses for the hydrology option to total 23 courses in the major, plus a capstone experience:

Landscape Evolution: ESCI 561
Soils/Mineralogy: NR 501 or ESCI 512
Surface Water Hydrology: ESCI 705 or CIE 745
Groundwater Hydrology: ESCI 710
A course in quantitative analysis
Two or three approved electives

For a list of approved elective courses and for further information about the major, students may consult with the program coordinator: Michael Palace, Michael.Palace@unh.edu, (603) 862-4193.
 

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Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

» http://www.ece.unh.edu/

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Professor: Kent A. Chamberlin, John R. LaCourse, W. Thomas Miller III
Associate Professor: Michael J. Carter, Nicholas J. Kirsch, Andrew L. Kun, Richard A. Messner
Affiliate Associate Professor: Brian R. Calder, Dragan Vidacic
Assistant Professor: Edward Song, Se Young (Pablo) Yoon, Qiaoyan Yu
Affiliate Assistant Professor: Paula L. McWilliam
Senior Lecturer: Wayne J. Smith

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers a B.S. in electrical engineering and a B.S. in computer engineering. Both degree programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone (401) 347-7700.

Electrical engineers design, develop, and produce the electrical and electronic systems upon which modern society has come to depend: basic infrastructure, such as the electric power grid and fiber optic communication lines; public conveniences, such as mag lev transporters and LED signs; consumer products, such as iPods and MP3 players; personal communication devices, such as smart phones; military systems, such as rail guns and laser weapons; instruments that can image the ocean floor or analyze the Earth’s atmosphere from satellites; and medical diagnostic machines like CAT and MRI scanners. Almost every facet of modern life is touched by the work of electrical engineers.

At UNH, the cornerstone of the electrical engineering program is the involvement of students in the solution of real-world problems. Students electing this major gain knowledge of advanced electronic circuit and system design through the use of computer-aided design tools, hardware circuit prototyping, and hands-on laboratory testing.

Computers have become embedded in virtually every engineering system, including everyday items ranging from watches to automobiles. Computer engineering, traditionally a subset of electrical engineering, is a rapidly growing field that emphasizes the design, interfacing, hardware/software tradeoffs, and real-time applications of embedded computers. Students who elect this major will gain a knowledge of both hardware and software concepts, and will learn to design, build, and test systems containing digital computers.

ECE Department Mission
The mission of the department is to foster and advance knowledge in electrical and computer engineering. 

The mission involves:

The graduate ECE program shall lead to the degrees of master of science in electrical engineering and the doctor of philosophy in electrical and computer engineering. Research and scholarship are core components of the department’s mission and they directly impact undergraduate and graduate education. Success in obtaining funds to procure equipment and support research efforts is therefore an essential objective for the department.

The department recognizes the need to conduct periodic reviews and adjustments to meet the current and projected needs of the state and nation according to its mission objectives. The current mission was approved by the ECE faculty in March 2001 and again on October 27, 2009, approved by the ECE Student Advisory Board in October 2001, and ratified by the ECE Industrial Advisory Board in April 2002. The mission was reaffirmed by the ECE Industrial Advisory Board in November 22, 2004 and on October 26, 2009.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering Program Educational Objectives
The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has adopted a set of program educational objectives that consists of statements describing the expected accomplishments of graduates during the first several years following graduation from either program:

Electrical Engineering Program Educational Objectives

Depth: To be effective in applying electrical engineering principles in engineering practice or for advanced study in electrical engineering.

Breadth: To have a productive career in the many diverse fields of electrical engineering such as analog engineering, bioengineering, communications, and electromagnetics and waves, or in the pursuit of graduate education in disciplines such as electrical engineering, medicine, law, or business.

Professionalism: To function effectively in the complex modern work environment with the ability to assume professional leadership roles.

Computer Engineering Program Educational Objectives

Depth: To be effective in applying computer engineering principles in engineering practice or for advanced study in computer engineering.

Breadth: To have a productive career in the many diverse fields of computer engineering such as digital engineering, bioengineering, communications, and embedded systems, or in the pursuit of graduate education in disciplines such as computer engineering, medicine, law, or business.

Professionalism: To function effectively in the complex modern work environment with the ability to assume professional leadership roles.

The electrical and computer engineering educational program objectives were approved by the ECE faculty and the ECE Student Advisory Board in September 2012 and then ratified by the ECE Industrial Advisory Board in October 2012. 

Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering Program Educational Outcomes
The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has adopted a set of program educational outcomes that consists of statements describing what students are expected to know and be able to do by the time of graduation, the achievement of which indicates that the student is equipped to achieve the program objectives. The current electrical engineering program educational outcomes and computer engineering program educational outcomes are:

• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data;
• an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs;
• an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
• an ability to communicate effectively;
• an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
• the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context;
• a recognition of the need for, and ability to engage in, lifelong learning;
• a knowledge of contemporary issues;
• an ability to use techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Electrical and computer program educational outcomes were approved by the ECE faculty in March 2001 and again on October 27, 2009, approved by the ECE Student Advisory Board in October 2001, and ratified by the ECE Industrial Advisory Board in March 2002. The program educational outcomes were reaffirmed by the ECE Industrial Advisory Board on November 22, 2004 and on October 26, 2009.

Students contemplating a decision between the electrical engineering and computer engineering degree programs should consider both the similarities and differences of the two programs. The two curricula require the same foundational courses in mathematics, physics, analog and digital electronic circuits, and a capstone senior design project. The computer engineering degree program requires additional fluency in software development and advanced computer system and hardware design. The electrical engineering degree program requires advanced study in analog and mixed-signal electronic circuit and system analysis and design. Discovery Program requirements are identical for both degree programs.

Electrical Engineering Program

In addition to Discovery Program requirements, the department has a number of grade-point average and course requirements.

1.  Any electrical engineering major whose cumulative grade-point average in ECE courses is less than 2.0 during any three semesters will not be allowed to continue as an electrical engineering major.
2.  Electrical engineering majors must achieve a 2.0 grade-point average in ECE courses as a requirement for graduation.

To make an exception to any of these departmental requirements based on extenuating circumstances, students must petition the department’s undergraduate committee. Mindful of these rules, students, with their advisers’ assistance, should plan their programs based on the distribution of courses in the following chart.
 


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   401   Perspectives in Electrical & Computer Engineering   4   -  
MATH   425   Calculus I   4   -  
CS   410C   Introduction to Scientific Programming/C*   4   -  
ECON or EREC   402 or 411   Principles of Economics (Micro) or Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives   4   -  
PHYS   407   Physics I   -   4  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing   -   4  
MATH   426   Calculus II   -   4  
    Discovery Program Category*   -   4  
Total       16   16  

*Students who wish to preserve the option of transferring to the computer engineering major without incurring a delay in graduation should consult with their academic adviser before electing these courses. It is recommended that such students take CS 415, Introduction to Computer Science I, in the fall semester and CS 416, Introduction to Computer Science II, in the spring semester in place of the listed courses.

Students are required to take either ECON 402 or EREC 411 to fulfill the Social Science Category of the Discovery Program.

Fulfilling the EE Program curriculum automatically meets Discovery Category, "Environment, Technology and Society."
 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   541   Electrical Circuits   4   -  
ECE   543   Introduction to Digital Systems   4   -  
PHYS   408   Physics II   4   -  
MATH   527   Differential Equations with Linear Algebra   4   -  
ECE   548   Electronic Design I   -   4  
ECE   562   Computer Organization   -   4  
ME   523   Introduction to Statics and Dynamics   -   3  
    Discovery Program Category   -   4  
Total       16   15  


Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   602   Engineering Analysis   4   -  
ECE   617   Junior Lab I   4   -  
ECE   633   Signals and Systems I   3   -  
ECE   651   Electronic Design II   4   -  
CHEM   405   Chemical Principles for Engineers   4    
ECE   603   Electromagnetic Fields & Waves   -   4  
ECE   618   Junior Laboratory II   -   4  
ECE   634   Signals and Systems II   -   3  
ECE   647   Random Processes and Signals in Engineering   -   3  
ECE   694   Engineering Professional Principles     1  
Total       19   15  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
    Professional Elective**   4   -  
    Professional Elective**   4   -  
    Discovery Program Category   4   -  
    Discovery Program Category   4   -  
ECE   791   Senior Project I*   2   -  
    Professional Elective**   -   4  
    Professional Elective**   -   4  
    Discovery Program Category   -   4  
ECE   792   Senior Project II*   -   2  
Total       18   14  

*ECE 791 and 792 fulfill Discovery Program Capstone Experience.

**Four professional electives must be selected from the following categories of courses:

     At least two from: ECE 7XX not including ECE 795 and ECE 796

     No more than one from: ADMIN 640, DS 773, DS 774

     Any of these: ECE 649, ECE 795, ECE 796

Honors students who complete ECE 791H and ECE 792H satisfy one professional elective requirement as well as the requirements for ECE 791 and ECE 792.


 


 



Computer Engineering Program

In addition to Discovery Program requirements, the department has a number of grade-point average and course requirements:

1.    Any computer engineering major whose cumulative grade-point average in ECE and computer science courses is less than 2.0 during any three semesters will not be allowed to continue as a computer engineering major.
2.    Computer engineering majors must achieve a 2.0 grade-point average in ECE and CS courses as a requirement for graduation.

To make an exception to any of these departmental requirements based on extenuating circumstances, students must petition the department’s undergraduate committee. Mindful of these rules, students, with their advisers’ assistance, should plan their programs based on the distribution of courses in the chart below. 


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   401   Perspectives in Electrical & Computer Engineering   4   -  
MATH   425   Calculus I   4   -  
CS   415   Intro to Computer Science I   4   -  
ECON or EREC   402 or 411   Principles of Economics (Micro) or Environmental and Resource Economics Perspectives   4    
ECE   543   Intro to Digital Systems   -   4  
MATH   426   Calculus II   -   4  
CS   416   Intro to Computer Science II   -   4  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing   -   4  
Total       16   16  

Students are required to take either ECON 402 or EREC 411 to fulfill the Social Science Category of the Discovery Program.

Fulfilling the CE Program curriculum automatically meets Discovery Category, "Environment, Technology and Society."
 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   562   Computer Organization   4   -  
PHYS   407   Physics I   4   -  
MATH   527   Differential Equations with Linear Algebra   4   -  
CS   515   Data Structures   4   -  
ECE   583   Design with Programmable Logic   -   4  
PHYS   408   Physics II   -   4  
CS   520   Assembly Language Programming   -   4  
    Discovery Program Category   -   4  
Total       16   16  


Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   541   Electrical Circuits   4   -  
ECE   602   Engineering Analysis   4   -  
ECE   633   Signals and Systems I   3   -  
    Discovery Program Category   4   -  
ECE   548   Electronic Design I   -   4  
ECE   603   Electromagnetic Fields and Waves   -   4  
ECE   647   Random Processes & Signals in Engineering   -   3  
ECE   649   Embedded Microcomputer Based Design   -   4  
ECE   694   Engineering Professional Principles     1  
Total       15   16  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   714   Intro to Digital Signal Processing   4   -  
    Professional Elective**   4   -  
    Professional Elective**   4   -  
    Discovery Program Category   4   -  
ECE   791   Senior Project I*   2   -  
    Professional Elective**     4  
    Professional Elective**   -   4  
    Discovery Program Category   -   4  
    Discovery Program Category   -   4  
ECE   792   Senior Project II*   -   2  
Total       18   18  

*ECE 791 and 792 fulfill Discovery Program Capstone Experience.

** Four professional electives must be selected from the following categories of courses:

     At least two from: ECE 7XX not including ECE 795 and ECE 796

     No more than one from: ADMIN 640, DS 773, DS 774

     Any of these: ECE 634, ECE 651, ECE 795, ECE 796, CS 620, CS 645, CS 659, CS 671, CS 7XX.

Honors students who complete ECE 791H and ECE 792H satisfy one professional elective requirement as well as the requirements for ECE 791 and ECE 792.

 

 



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Environmental Engineering (ENE)

» http://www.unh.edu/environmental-engineering/

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Professor: M. Robin Collins, Kevin H. Gardner, Jennifer M. Jacobs, Nancy E. Kinner, James P. Malley Jr.
Associate Professor: Thomas P. Ballestero
Assistant Professor: Weiwei Mo
Research Assistant Professor: Alison W. Watts

The College of Engineering and Physical Sciences offers a bachelor of science degree in environmental engineering (ENE) and an interdisciplinary minor in environmental engineering.

The Environmental Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700, http://www.abet.org

Mission
The environmental engineering program offers an undergraduate degree in environmental engineering that prepares students for productive careers in the public and private sectors and for graduate studies. The program emphasizes fundamental principles in environmental engineering and design, built upon a strong base of chemistry, physics, mathematics, and engineering science. The program prepares students to work in multidisciplinary teams that analyze, formulate, and communicate sustainable solutions to complex environmental problems. The importance of developing sustainable solutions that provide economic, social, and environmental benefits to society is emphasized. The program instills in its students an appreciation for the responsibilities engineers have to society and teaches them the skills necessary to continue learning and improving their professional expertise throughout their careers.

The ENE degree program provides an opportunity for students to specialize in municipal processes. The curriculum prepares students to plan and design systems to minimize the impact of human activity on the environment and protect human health.

Educational Objectives

ENE program graduates will have the skills, experience, and knowledge to pursue successful careers as environmental engineers. They also will have demonstrated the ability to identify information needs; locate information resources and/or design laboratory or field experiments to attain required information; and evaluate and synthesize data with sound engineering principles, methodologies, and the latest technology into creative, sustainable, safe, and economical engineering solutions to environmental engineering problems. The solutions they develop will minimize the impact of human activities on the environment and protect human health. Program graduates will have a foundation for advanced studies in environmental engineering and oral and written communication skills that will enable them to clearly explain engineering options and recommend solutions to stakeholders. ENE program graduates will have demonstrated in-depth knowledge within environmental engineering and an awareness of potential social, economic, political, and environmental impacts of engineering practices. They will have an appreciation for the contribution of environmental engineers to the benefit of society and the responsibilities of a professional environmental engineer. They will work as part of multidisciplinary teams to arrive at solutions to environmental engineering problems. ENE program graduates will be prepared to obtain professional engineering licensure; have the capacity to continue learning and improving their professional expertise and skills by participating in professional associations, conferences, workshops and courses; and understand the importance of continued professional development.

At the end of the sophomore year, students are required to have a minimum overall grade-point average of 2.00 and a grade-point average of 2.00 in ENE 400, MATH 425, CHEM 405, PHYS 407, MATH 426, CIE 525, and ENE 520 to be permitted to enroll in junior-level courses. To qualify for graduation, an ENE major must: have satisfied the previously specified course requirements, have satisfied the University’s Academic Requirements, have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.00, and have a minimum grade-point average of 2.00 in engineering courses.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering

Environmental engineers graduating with a B.S. ENE degree will plan, design, and construct public and private facilities to minimize the impact of human activity on the environment and to protect human health. For example, environmental engineers design and build drinking water treatment systems, municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants, solid waste management facilities, contaminated ground water remediation systems, and hazardous waste remediation facilities. These facilities must meet regulatory requirements, be cost effective to build and maintain, be safe to operate, and have minimal environmental impact. ENE students can also focus on sustainable engineering with a required course (ENE 751) in junior year and two or three senior year electives, including design electives.

In ENE 400, students are introduced to the full spectrum of environmental engineering projects that they will subsequently explore in design teams during their degree program. As part of these experiences, students visit and tour field sites (ENE 520), and through junior and senior year classes and seminars (ASCE, EWRI, ERG), they interact with engineers who talk about engineering consulting and design practices applied to local projects. As part of these projects, students: (i) analyze treatment alternatives; (ii) recommend a system that meets regulatory operational needs, and is sustainable; and (iii) prepare an implementation schedule and project budget. Detailed design projects are performed in ENE 744 and two design electives. CIE/ENE 784 and 788 serve as a capstone design experience where students work on a multi-interdisciplinary environmental engineering project and apply skills learned in other courses while working with real-world clients. ENE students do not have to take a course in the Discovery Biological Science category since they satisfy this category with ENE 756, Environmental Engineering Microbiology.

The following schedule is a sample of a planned program for environmental engineering students completing the major.


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ENE   400   Environmental Engineering Lectures   3    
ENGL   401, 502   First-Year Writing   4   4  
MATH+   425, 426   Calculus I, II   4   4  
Discovery Electives*       4   4  
CHEM   405   General Chemistry   4   -  
PHYS   407   General Physics I   -   4  
Total       19   16  


+Students who are required to take MATH 418, Analysis and Applications of Functions, because they did not pass the placement examination as determined by the Mathematics Department prior to the fall semester, will enroll in MATH 425 during the spring semester. Subsequent MATH courses (426, 527, 644) will be taken one semester later than shown here.



Second Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
Discovery or Geospatial Science Course*         3-4  
ENE   520   Environmental Pollution and Protection   4   -  
CIE   525   Statics   3   -  
MATH   527, 644   Differential Equations with Linear Algebra, Statistics for Engineers and Scientists   4   4  
CIE   533   Project Engineering   -   3  
TECH   564   Fundamentals of CAD   3   -  
Public Health Elective         3-4  
Discovery Elective       4   4  
Total       18   17/19  

* GIS elective may also be taken in the third year with a second Discovery elective taken in second year.



Third Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ENE   751   Sustainable Engineering   3   -  
CIE   642   Fluid Mechanics   4   -  
ENE   645   Fundamental Aspects of Environmental Engineering   -   4  
ENE   756   Environmental Engineering Microbiology   -   4  
ENE   742   Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering   3   -  
ESCI   654   Fate, Transport in Environment   4    
Hydrology Elective*       -   3-4  
Discovery or Geospatial Science Course**         3-4  
Total       14   14/16  

*Approved lists of technical, hydrology, hydraulics, and ENE design and non-design electives are available from the ENE undergraduate coordinator, Nancy Kinner. Students must take a minimum of four 700-level ENE electives totaling at least 12 credits. Two ENE elective courses must be from the design category.

**Discovery elective or GIS elective can be taken here as appropriate.

 



Fourth Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
Hydraulics Elective**         3-4  
CIE/ENE Design Electives       3-4   3-4  
CIE/ENE Electives**       3-4   3-4  
Engineering Lab Elective       4    
ENE   744   Physicochemical Treatment Design   -   4  
ENE   749   Environmental Chemistry   4   -  
ENE   784   Intro to ENE 788   1    
ENE   788   Project Planning and Design   -   3  
Total       15/17   16/19  

*See Discovery Program requirements. The Discovery requirements for Writing, Quantitative Reasoning, and Physical Science are fulfilled by ENGL 401, MATH 425, and PHYS 407, respectively. ENE 520 fulfills the Environmental, Technology, and Society requirement. ENE 784 and 788 fulfill the Senior Capstone requirement. Environmental Engineering Microbiology fulfills the Biological Science requirement. Courses in the ENE curriculum designated Discovery Electives can be selected from the University’s approved Discovery Program courses in Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Historical Perspectives, World Cultures, and Social Science. One of these electives must have an Inquiry attribute.

**Approved lists of technical, hydrology, hydraulics, and ENE design and non-design electives are available from the ENE undergraduate coordinator, Nancy Kinner. Students must take a minimum of four 700-level ENE electives totaling at least 12 credits. Two ENE design electives  must be from the design category.

The ENE program requires a minimum of 129 total credits for graduation.

 



Environmental Engineering Minor

The environmental engineering minor is intended primarily for students in engineering and physical sciences who are not in the chemical, civil, or environmental engineering degree programs. Students contemplating such a minor should plan on a strong background in the sciences and mathematics (including differential equations).

The minor provides a comprehensive introduction to major areas of interest in environmental protection through the three required courses. Further breadth in environmental engineering or depth in specific areas can be attained through the choice of appropriate elective courses.

The minor requires a minimum of five courses, as follows: 1) The three required courses: ENE 645, Fundamental Aspects of Environmental Engineering; ENE 744, Physicochemical Treatment Design, or ENE 743, Environmental Sampling and Analysis; and ENE 751, Sustainable Engineering; and 2) a minimum of two elective ENE courses.

Choice of elective courses should be made in consultation with the minor area adviser, Nancy Kinner. Students normally start this program in the junior year and should declare their intention to enter the program as early as possible during the sophomore year. During the final semester, students must apply to the dean to have the minor appear on the transcript.


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Information Technology (IT)

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Integrated Applied Mathematics (IAM)

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International Affairs (dual major)

For program description, see Special University Programs.

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Materials Science (MS)

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Professor: Olof E. Echt, Todd S. Gross, Brad Lee Kinsey, James E. Krzanowski, Thomas M. Laue, Igor I. Tsukrov
Associate Professor: Carmela C. Amato-Wierda, Glen P. Miller, Karsten Pohl
Research Associate Professor: Yvon G. Durant, Weihua (Marshall) Ming
Assistant Professor: Jian-Ming Tang
Research Assistant Professor: John G. Tsavalas

 

Materials Science Minor

Materials Science Minor
Materials science is an interdisciplinary field that involves the research, development, and design of new materials. In the past century, materials scientists have enabled major technological advances in areas such as electronic materials for semiconductors, new metal alloys for aircraft and automotive applications, and new polymers for a host of medical and consumer applications. In order to prepare students for continuing growth and innovation in materials science, the materials science program offers this minor, which is open to all students as UNH. 

The minor offers a broad introduction to materials science, which reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the field. Students must complete at least 18 credits and a minimum of five courses, as described below, with C- or better and a minimum 2.0 grade-point average. No more than 8 credits used to satisfy the student's major requirements may be used toward the minor. Students interested in the minor should contact the director of the materials science program (Prof. James Krzanowski, james.krzanowski@unh.edu) as early as possible and preferably before the end of their sophomore year.

To complete the minor in materials science, students must take the following courses: ME 561; one course from group A below; one course from group B below; and two to three additional courses from either group A or B (as needed to reach the required 18 credits).

List of approved courses:

Required:
ME 561, Introduction to Materials Science, 4 cr. (It is strongly recommended that students take this course during their sophomore year).

Group A: Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Structure of Materials
CHEM 683/685, Physical Chemistry with lab, 5 cr.1
PHYS 508, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics, 4 cr.1,2.
ME 760, Physical Metallurgy, 4 cr. 
    or ME 795, Special Topics: Physical Metallurgy of Automotive and Aerospace Materials, 3 cr..
MS 762, Electronic Materials Science, 4 cr.
ME 761, Diffraction and Imaging Methods in Materials Science, 4 cr.

Group B: Materials Applications and Properties
CHEM 744/775, Inorganic Chemistry, 5 cr.
CHEM 545/546 or CHEM 547/549 or CHEM 651/653, Organic Chemistry I with lab, 5 cr.
PHYS 718, Condensed Matter Physics, 4 cr.
ME 731, Fracture and Fatigue Engineering Material, 4 cr.
ME 744, Corrosion, 4 cr. 
ME 763, Thin Film Science and Technology, 4 cr.
ME 786, Introduction to Finite Element Analysis, 4 cr.
ME 735, Mechanics of Composite Materials, 4 cr.
ME 795, Special Topics: Materials Processing, 4 cr.

1.Students cannot receive credit towards the minor for both PHYS 508 and CHEM 683/685.
2.Students cannot receive credit towards the minor for PHYS 508 if they have taken ME 503.

 



Mathematics and Statistics (MATH)

» http://www.math.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

Professor: Maria Basterra, Liming Ge, Karen J. Graham, Donald W. Hadwin, Rita A. Hibschweiler, A. Robb Jacoby, Ernst Linder, Sharon M. McCrone, Dmitri A. Nikshych, Samuel D. Shore, Kevin M. Short, Marianna A. Shubov, Yitang Zhang
Associate Professor: David V. Feldman, Edward K. Hinson, Linyuan Li, Mark Lyon, Junhao Shen
Assistant Professor: John F. Gibson, HaiYing Wang
Instructor: Philip J. Ramsey
Lecturer: Adam Boucher, Mehmet Orhon, Neil Portnoy

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers a variety of programs leading to five different degrees: B.A. degree: mathematics major; B.S. in mathematics degree; B.S. in applied mathematics degree; B.S. in mathematics education degree; and B.S. in statistics degree. These programs provide flexibility through elective choices and are designed to maximize educational and employment opportunities. Each student must enroll in one specific program; however, changes between programs usually can be accommodated.

The first two years of all programs are similar. In the first year, students are expected to take Calculus I (MATH 425) and Calculus II (MATH 426), as well as an introductory programming course (either MATH 445 or CS 410). A sophomore typically takes follow-up calculus courses in differential equations (MATH 527) and multidimensional calculus (MATH 528), an introductory statistics course (MATH 539), and a course in mathematical proof (MATH 531). The senior capstone experience is fulfilled by a variety of designated courses in each of the degree programs; specific details are given in each program's course listing below.

For more information about the department’s undergraduate programs, visit www.math.unh.edu.

Standards for Graduation

In all courses used to satisfy the requirements for its major programs, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics requires that a student earn a grade of C- or better and have an overall grade-point average of at least 2.00 in these courses.


Bachelor of Arts, Mathematics Major

The bachelor of arts degree with the mathematics major may offer a broader liberal arts program than the bachelor of science degree programs. By a careful selection of electives, students can shape this major into a preparation for graduate school, business, or industry.

Required MATH Courses
MATH 425, Calculus I,
  which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program 
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Applications with MATLAB
  or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
MATH 527*, Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
MATH 528*, Multidimensional Calculus
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 545, Introduction to Linear Algebra  
   or MATH 645*, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 761, Abstract Algebra
MATH 767, One-Dimensional Real Analysis

THREE approved MATH courses chosen in consultation with the major adviser

MATH 797**, Senior Seminar,
  or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis

* These requirements can be satisfied by MATH 525-526, Linearity I-II.
** This course satisfies the capstone experience requirement for the Discovery Program.

Foreign Language Requirement
Foreign language requirement as defined by the University for the B.A. degree


Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

This program offers the strongest concentration in mathematics, requiring courses that are intended to prepare the student for graduate work in mathematics. Through a judicious choice of electives, students may design stronger pre-graduate programs, a program in applied mathematics, or slant the program toward a career in business or industry.

Required MATH Courses
MATH 425, Calculus I
  which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program 
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Applications with MATLAB,
  or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
MATH 527*, Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
MATH 528*, Multidimensional Calculus
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 545, Introduction to Linear Algebra;
   or MATH 645*, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 761, Abstract Algebra
MATH 762, Linear Algebra
MATH 767, One-Dimensional Real Analysis
MATH 784, Topology
MATH 788, Complex Analysis

THREE approved MATH courses chosen in consultation with the major adviser, two of which are chosen from the following:

MATH 765, Algebraic Geometry
MATH 768, Real Analysis II
MATH 769, Introduction to Differential Geometry
MATH 770, Foundations of Number Theory
MATH 772, Combinatorics
MATH 797**, Senior Seminar; or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis

* These requirements can be satisfied by MATH 525-526, Linearity I-II.
**  This course satisfies the capstone experience requirement for the Discovery Program.

Other Required Courses
PHYS 407, General Physics I,
  which satisfies the PS  and Lab requirement for the Discovery Program 
PHYS 408, General Physics II


Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics

This degree program prepares students for employment and/or graduate study in a variety of fields and research specializations in which mathematics plays a critical role in the solution of important scientific and technological problems. Students pursuing this degree must choose one of the following options: 

Computation, Dynamics and Control, Economics, Fluid Dynamics, or Solid Mechanics and Vibrations.

Required Courses for All Options
MATH 425, Calculus I,
    which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Applications with MATLAB
    which satisfies the ETS requirement for the Discovery Program
MATH 527*, Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
MATH 528*, Multidimensional Calculus
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 645*, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 753, Introduction to Numerical Methods I
MATH 797**, Senior Seminar;
   MATH 798**, Senior Project:
   or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis
PHYS 407, General Physics I,
  which satisfies the PS and lab requirement for the Discovery Program 

* These requirements can be satisfied by MATH 525-526, Linearity I-II.
** This course satisfies the capstone experience for the Discovery Program.

Additional Option-specific Course Requirements

Computation Option
PHYS 408, General Physics II
MATH 647, Complex Analysis for Applications
MATH 745, Fundamentals of Applied Mathematics
CS 415, Introduction to Computer Science I
CS 416, Introduction to Computer Science II
CS 515, Data Structures
CS 659, Introduction to Theory of Computation
CS 758, Algorithms
IAM 751, Introduction to High-Performance Computing

Dynamics and Control Option
PHYS 408, General Physics II
MATH 647, Complex Analysis for Applications
MATH 747, Introduction to Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
ME 525, Statics
  or CIE 525, Statics for Civil Engineers
ME 627, Dynamics 
ME 629, Kinematics and Dynamics of Machines
ECE 633, Signals and Systems I
ECE 634, Signals and Systems II
ECE 772, Control Systems

Economics Option
MATH 739, Applied Regression Analysis
MATH 755, Probability with Applications
ONE approved MATH elective at the 700-level, chosen in consultation with the major adviser
ECON 401, Principles of Economics (Macro)
ECON 402, Principles of Economics (Micro)
ECON 605, Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
ECON 611, Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
ECON 726, Introduction to Econometrics
ONE approved ECON or DS elective

Fluid Dynamics Option
PHYS 408, General Physics II
MATH 647, Complex Analysis for Applications
MATH 745, Fundamentals of Applied Mathematics I
ME 503, Thermodynamics
ME 525, Statics
  or CIE 525, Statics for Civil Engineers
ME 608, Fluid Dynamics
ME 627, Dynamics 
TWO of the following:
    ME 707, Analytic Fluid Dynamics
    ME 709, Computational Fluid Dynamics
    ME 712, Waves in Fluids

Solid Mechanics and Vibrations Option
PHYS 408, General Physics II
MATH 647, Complex Analysis for Applications
MATH 745, Fundamentals of Applied Mathematics I
ME 525, Statics
  or CIE 525, Statics for Civil Engineers
ME 526, Mechanics of Materials
  or CIE 526, Strength of Materials
ME 561, Introduction to Materials Science
ME 627, Dynamics 
TWO of the following:   
   ME 724, Vibration Theory and Applications   
   ME 727, Advanced Mechanics of Solids   
   ME 730, Mechanical Behavior of Materials
   ME 731, Fracture and Fatigue Engineering Materials
 


Bachelor of Science in Statistics

This program prepares students for employment and/or graduate study in a variety of fields and research specializations in which statistical analysis and its applications play a critical role. In addition to its degree programs, the department has an active interest in the actuarial profession. Those interested in actuarial science should seek the advice of Professor Linyuan Li.

Required MATH Courses
MATH 425, Calculus I,
  which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program 
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Application with MATLAB,
  or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
MATH 527*, Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
MATH 528*, Multidimensional Calculus
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 645*, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 739, Applied Regression Analysis
MATH 755, Probability  with Applications
MATH 756, Principles of Statistical Inference
THREE MATH courses chosen from:    
    MATH 736, Statistical Methods for Research    
    MATH 737, Statistical Methods for Quality Improvement
    MATH 740, Design of Experiments I
    MATH 741, Survival Analysis
    MATH 743, Time Series Analysis
    MATH 744, Design of Experiments II
TWO approved MATH electives at least one of which is at the 700-level, chosen in consultation with the major adviser
MATH 797**, Senior Seminar,
  or MATH 798**, Senior Project
  or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis

* These requirements can be satisfied by MATH 525-526, Linearity I-II.
** This course satisfies the capstone experience requirement for the Discovery Program.


Bachelor of Science in Mathematics Education

This professional degree program prepares students for mathematics teaching at the elementary, middle/junior high, or secondary level. The program is coordinated with the education department’s teacher certification programs. For the elementary option, full certification requires the five-year program. Students may complete the degree requirements for middle/junior high or secondary option with full teacher certification in either four or five years. Students electing the four-year option must plan for one semester of student teaching (EDUC 694) in their senior year and must consult with the departmental adviser in order to accommodate the scheduling of required MATH courses. The five-year program requires a year-long teaching internship in the fifth year that can be coupled with other graduate work leading to a master’s degree. See Education, College of Liberal Arts.

Elementary School Option

Required MATH Courses
MATH 425, Calculus I,
  which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program 
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Applications with MATLAB,
  or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 545, Introduction to Linear Algebra, 
  or MATH 645, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 619, Historical Foundations of Mathematics
MATH 621, Number Systems for Teachers
MATH 622, Geometry for Teachers
MATH 623, Topics in Mathematics for Teachers
MATH 657, Geometry
MATH 700, Introduction to Mathematics Education
MATH 703, The Teaching of Mathematics, K-6
MATH 797**, Senior Seminar;
  or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis

**  This course satisfies the capstone experience requirement for the Discovery Program.

Other Required Courses
PHYS 406, Introduction to Modern Astronomy,
   which satisfies the PS and Lab requirement for the Discovery Program
EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching
EDUC 700, Educational Structure and Change
EDUC 701, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology
EDUC 705, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education
EDUC 706, Introduction to Reading Instruction in the Elementary Schools

Note: EDUC 703F, EDUC 703M, and EDUC 751A are requirements for certification that may be taken as an undergraduate.

Middle/Junior High School Option

Required MATH Courses
MATH 425, Calculus I,
  which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program 
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Applications with MATLAB,
  or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 545, Introduction to Linear Algebra, 
  or MATH 645, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 619, Historical Foundations of Mathematics
MATH 621, Number Systems for Teachers
MATH 622, Geometry for Teachers
MATH 623, Topics in Mathematics for Teachers
MATH 657, Geometry
MATH 700, Introduction to Mathematics Education
MATH 708, Teaching  Middle School Mathematics
ONE approved MATH course chosen in consultation with the academic adviser
MATH 797**, Senior Seminar,
  or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis

** This course satisfies the capstone experience requirement for the Discovery Program.

Other Required Courses
EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching
EDUC 700, Educational Structure and Change
EDUC 701, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology
EDUC 705, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education

Note: EDUC 751B is a requirement for certification that may be taken as an undergraduate.

Secondary School Option

Required MATH Courses
MATH 425, Calculus I,
  which satisfies the QR requirement for the Discovery Program
MATH 426, Calculus II
MATH 445, Mathematics and Applications with MATLAB,
  or CS 410, Introduction to Scientific Programming
MATH 527, Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
MATH 528, Multidimensional Calculus
MATH 531, Mathematical Proof
MATH 539, Introduction to Statistical Analysis
MATH 545, Introduction to Linear Algebra 
  or MATH 645, Linear Algebra for Applications
MATH 619, Historical Foundations of Mathematics
MATH 624, Analysis of Secondary School Mathematics
MATH 657, Geometry
MATH 700, Introduction to Mathematics Education
MATH 709, Teaching of Mathematics, 7-12
MATH 761, Abstract Algebra
MATH 797**, Senior Seminar,
  or MATH 799**, Senior Thesis

** This course satisfies the capstone experience requirement for the Discovery Program.

Other Required Courses
EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching
EDUC 700, Educational Structure and Change
EDUC 701, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology
EDUC 705, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education

Note: EDUC 751B is a requirement for certification that may be taken as an undergraduate.


Minoring in Mathematics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers three minor programs: mathematics, applied mathematics, and statistics. 

These programs, which are open to all students enrolled at the University, require a minimum of five MATH courses as detailed below. Students whose major program requires more than two courses required by the minor program must substitute additional courses from the list of elective courses to meet the five-course minimum.

Mathematics Minor
Required (3): MATH 528*, MATH 531, and either MATH 761 or MATH 767
Electives (2): Two courses chosen from: MATH 657, 658, 761, 762, 765, 767, 768, 769, 770, 772, 776, 783, 784, 788
* This requirement can be satisfied by MATH 526, Linearity II.

Applied Mathematics Minor
Required (4): MATH 528*, 645*, 745 and 753
Elective (1): One course chosen from: MATH 647, 746, 747, or 755
* These requirements can be satisfied by MATH 525-526, Linearity I-II.

Statistics Minor
Required (2): MATH 539 (or 644) and MATH 645
Electives (3): Three courses chosen from: MATH 736, 737, 739, 740, 741, 743, 744, 755, 756


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Mechanical Engineering (ME)

» http://www.unh.edu/mechanical-engineering/

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Chairperson: Brad Lee Kinsey
Professor: Kenneth C. Baldwin, Barbaros Celikkol, John Hughes Clarke, Diane L. Foster, Barry K. Fussell, Todd S. Gross, Joseph C. Klewicki, James E. Krzanowski, M. Robinson Swift, Igor I. Tsukrov
Associate Professor: Gregory P. Chini, Yannnis Korkolis, John Philip McHugh, May-Win L. Thein, Christopher M. White, Martin M. Wosnik
Assistant Professor: Marko Knezevic, Yaning Li, Thomas Weber

The Mechanical Engineering Program at UNH is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, (410) 347-7700.

Mission
In support of the University and college missions, the Department of Mechanical Engineering is dedicated to educating the highest quality engineering professionals and leaders. Graduates will be prepared to creatively solve engineering problems through the use of analysis, computation, and experimentation. Students completing the program should be well-informed citizens who have the ability to grow intellectually and are able to solve new, challenging problems with self-confidence. It is the department’s intent to maintain a general and flexible curriculum that prepares students for both industrial practice and graduate education.

Educational Objectives
The objective of the UNH Mechanical Engineering Program is to produce graduates who are ethical professionals and good citizens. As they progress in the first several years following graduation, they are expected to:

1. Use their engineering education and communication skills for success in:

a) Technical careers in industry, academia, government, or other organizations;

b) Graduate school in engineering or physical sciences;

c) Nontechnical careers or education in areas such as law, medicine, business, public policy,

    secondary education, service industries, etc.;

d) Careers involving management or entrepreneurship.

2. Exercise lifelong learning to:

a) Pursue professional development opportunities in their disciplines;

b) Develop new knowledge and skills;

c) Pursue new areas of expertise or careers.

3. Use their engineering background to:

a) Solve technical problems for societal benefit;

b) Develop new knowledge and products that will promote sustainable economic and

    environmental developments to improve the quality of life;

c) Promote the practice of engineering.

Mechanical engineering is a challenging profession and has two major emphases. The first is the general area of mechanical design, which involves all types of mechanical motion and the forces and energy that drive it. The other emphasis deals with energy generation and conversion and is grounded in the principles of the thermal and fluid sciences. Other subject areas, which support both emphases and are frequently part of designs and products, are the materials sciences, manufacturing, and control systems. All of these areas are included in the education and training of mechanical engineers. Ocean engineering is another focus area in our department which emphasizes solving engineering problems associated with the sustainable utilization of ocean resources and the scientific exploration and study of the ocean environment. Mechanical engineering requires significant study in mathematics, engineering computing, and basic sciences such as chemistry and physics, as well as basic engineering courses, before reaching the more specialized courses. Additional information can be found at the mechanical engineering website, http://ceps.unh.edu/mechanical-engineering/

The Program

The program begins with courses in physics, mathematics, chemistry, and computer-aided design. The department has a four-course mechanics sequence, a four-course thermal/fluid sciences sequence, and a two-course systems and controls sequence. Modern experimental methods are taught in a two-course sequence starting in the junior year. The two-semester senior design project requires students to utilize the skills they have learned in their courses and function in an engineering team. The five technical electives required in the program give the students the opportunity to focus on advanced technical areas of their choice.

With their advisers’ assistance, students should plan a program based on the following distribution of courses that totals not less than 128 credits. Note: mechanical engineering graduates typically exceed this requirement depending on what elective courses they select in the curriculum. The outline that follows is typical only in format. Within the constraints of satisfying all the requirements and having all the necessary prerequisites, schedules may vary because of scheduling needs or student preference. Some mechanical engineering elective courses may not be offered every year.

Of the five technical elective courses,  at least three of these courses must be taken in mechanical or ocean engineering, and these must be at least three credits and at the 600 or 700 level. At most, two may be selected from other 600- or 700-level courses in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (CEPS), which can include CS 410, ESCI 501, ECE 543, or a course approved by the department. Courses that cover nearly identical material to core mechanical and ocean engineering courses, but in another CEPS department, will not be accepted as technical electives, e.g., CHE 601, CHE 602, CHE 604, CIE 622, and CIE 642.

With departmental approval, the two technical electives outside of mechanical/ocean engineering can be used for studying a focused area/minor, with the restrictions that only one course can be at the 400 or 500 level and the focused area/minor must be in a bachelor degree program.

Students must satisfy the University’s Discovery Program requirements.  The following features are unique to students in the mechanical engineering program:

In order to graduate with a mechanical engineering B.S. degree, students must have at least a 2.0 grade-point average in all engineering and science courses, including required technical electives, normally taken as department requirements after the start of the junior year. 

Predictor courses:  To enter the sophomore year, students must achieve a greater than (but not equal to) 2.00 GPA in PHYS 407 and MATH 426 with no grade below a C. To enter the junior year, students must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.00 in ME 525, ME 526, and ME 503 with only one C- grade allowed and no grades below C-.  Students are allowed two repeats of these courses to achieve the predictor rule requirements.  This can be a single class repeated twice or two classes repeated once.  Students are removed from the program if they obtain a semester GPA <1.5 three times.  Students may petition to be reinstated after one year out of the program.  

Transfer in Policy for UNH Students into the Department of Mechanical Engineering:

CEPS Students: To transfer into the freshman or sophomore year, students must earn a combined GPA greater than (but not equal to) 2.00 in PHYS 407 and MATH 426 with no grade below a C in these two courses.

If students are enrolled in ME 525 (or CIE 525), ME 526 (or CIE 526), or ME 503, they must earn a combined GPA of 2.00 with no grade below a C- in two of these courses to transfer in and advance to the junior year. Note: A combined GPA greater than (but not equal to) 2.00 in PHYS 407 and MATH 426 with no grade below a C is also required.  

Non-CEPS Students: To transfer into the Department of Mechanical Engineering from another college at UNH, students have to satisfy the CEPS college transfer policy as well as the Department of Mechanical Engineering Transfer policies listed above according to status.

 


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
MATH   425   Calculus I   4   -  
*CHEM   405   General Chemistry   4   -  
**ME   441   Eng. Design and Solid Modeling   4   -  
Discovery Program Elective       4   -  
MATH   426   Calculus II   -   4  
PHYS   407   General Physics I   -   4  
Discovery Program Elective       -   4  
English   401     -   4  
Total       16   16  

*CHEM 403 and CHEM 404, General Chemistry, may be substituted for CHEM 405.

**ME 441 satisfies the Discovery Inquiry requirement.

**With permission, ME 477 may be substituted for ME 441 if student has had appropriate engineering design and CAD experience. An alternative Discovery Program Inquiry course or Inquiry Attribute course is required since student is not taking ME 441.

PHYS 407 or CHEM 405 satisfies the Discovery Physical Science (with lab) category.

MATH 425 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Quantitative Reasoning category.

ENGL 401 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Writing Skills category.

 



Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
Discovery Program Elective       4    
***MATH   528   Multidimensional Calculus   4   -  
PHYS   408   General Physics II   4   -  
ME   525   Statics   3   -  
IAM   550   Intro to Engineering Computing   4    
****MATH   527   Differential Equations   -   4  
ME   503   Thermodynamics   -   3  
ME   526   Mechanics of Materials   -   3  
ME   561   Introduction to Materials Science   -   4  
Total       19   14  

****MATH 525 and 526, Linearity, may be substituted for MATH 527 and 528, and a technical elective course typically completed in the senior year of the program.

 



Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
Discovery Program Elective       4   -  
ECE   537   Introduction to Electrical Engineering   4   -  
ME   608   Fluid Dynamics   3   -  
ME   627   Dynamics   3   -  
ME   705   Thermal System Analysis and Design   4    
ME   603   Heat Transfer   -   3  
ME   643   Machine Design     3  
ME   646   Experimental Measurement & Data Analysis   -   4  
ME   670   Systems Modeling, Simulation, & Control   -   4  
Total       18   14  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
Discovery Program Elective       4   -  
****ME   755   Senior Design Project I   2   -  
ME   747   Experimental Measurement & Modeling   4   -  
Technical Elective       3-4   -  
Technical Elective       3-4    
Discovery Program Elective       -   4  
****ME   756   Senior Design Project II   -   2  
Technical Elective       -   3-4  
Technical Elective         3-4  
Technical Elective         3-4  
Total       16-18   15-18  

****TECH 797, Undergraduate Ocean Research Project, may be substituted for ME 755 and ME 756. These courses satisfy the Discovery Senior Capstone Experience category. 
 



Mechanical Engineering Minor

The minor, administered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is open to all students of the University and offers a broad introduction to mechanical engineering.

Students must complete a minimum of six courses as follows: ME 441, ME 525, ME 526, ME 627, ME 503, and ME 608. Electrical and computer engineering majors should take the following courses: ME 477, ME 523, ME 526, ME 503, ME 608, and ME 561 (along with ECE 401, which is a required ECE course). Physics majors should take the following courses: ME 477, ME 525, ME 526, ME 608, and chose one of the following courses, ME 643, ME 670, or ME 705 (along with PHYS 508 and PHYS 616, which are required Physics courses). Interested students should contact the mechanical engineering chair, Professor Brad Kinsey, (603) 862-1811 and file an intent to minor form. During the last semester, students must complete a completion of minor form for it to appear on their transcript.  


 

 


 


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Ocean Engineering (OE)

» http://marine.unh.edu/oe

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Program Coordinator: Diane L. Foster
Professor: Kenneth C. Baldwin, Barbaros Celikkol, M. Robinson Swift, Igor I. Tsukrov
Associate Professor: May-Win L. Thein, Martin M. Wosnik
Assistant Professor: Thomas Weber

Ocean Engineering (OE)

 http://ceps.unh.edu/mechanical-engineering/ocean-engineering-bs

Mission
The department strives to prepare students for productive careers in industry or government as well as to provide a foundation for graduate studies. The program emphasizes ocean engineering fundamentals while offering interdisciplinary opportunities for focused study in civil, electrical, environmental, or mechanical engineering, as well as marine sciences.

Program Educational Objectives
The ocean engineering program seeks to provide an environment that enables students to pursue their goals in an innovative, rigorous, and challenging program with a diversity of offerings. The program has the following major educational objectives with the expectation that alumni will have successful careers in the many diverse areas of the ocean engineering profession. Within a few years of obtaining a bachelor’s degree in ocean engineering, we expect our graduates to have the following attributes:

Depth.  To be effective in applying ocean engineering principles in engineering practice or for advanced study in ocean engineering.

Breadth. To have a productive career in the many diverse fields of ocean engineering such as coastal engineering, ocean acoustics, offshore structures, and marine renewable energy, or in the pursuit of graduate education in disciplines that include marine science, engineering, medicine, law, or business.

Professionalism. To function effectively in the complex modern work environment with the ability to assume professional leadership roles.

The Program:
Ocean engineering is a field of study that seeks to solve engineering problems associated with the ocean, including those problems associated with the sustainable utilization of ocean resources and the scientific exploration and study of the ocean environment. Ocean engineering is an interdisciplinary field with roots in mechanical, electrical, civil, and environmental engineering, with strong ties to physical, chemical, biological, and geological oceanography. Students of ocean engineering are best served when they are formally trained inside a framework that fuses the expertise of these often-disparate fields.

The BSOE curriculum provides students with a solid engineering core and prepares students for professional engineering careers or for graduate study. The BSOE starts with foundational classes in math, physics, chemistry, and engineering computing, along with introductions to ocean engineering through seminars and oceanography coursework. Students develop their engineering acumen through coursework and laboratory studies that are focused on analysis, experimentation, and design. Students proceed to increasingly advanced coursework in ocean instrumentation, waves and tides, the design of ocean structures, coastal engineering, ocean measurements, and ocean acoustics. Opportunities exist for at least four technical electives, which help students gain further competence in an area of their choice. Students finish their curriculum with a two-semester senior capstone design project. Elective courses in the arts, humanities, and the social sciences are included to provide a well-rounded education.

Students work with an adviser to plan a program that is based on the courses shown in the ocean engineering course outline below that totals not less than 128 credits. The outline is considered a guideline and may be modified to suit student needs and desires within the constraints of meeting minimum credit hours, course pre-requisites, and non-major elective course requirements. Some ocean engineering elective courses may not be offered every year.

The ocean engineering program curriculum requires four technical electives that are CEPS 600-level or higher courses that have been approved by the OE undergraduate curriculum committee. Sequences have been identified that will provide students more in-depth opportunities in one of the ocean engineering sub-areas.

Students must satisfy the University’s Discovery Program requirements. The following features are unique to students in the ocean engineering program:

In order to graduate with an ocean engineering B.S. degree, students must have at least a 2.0 grade-point average in all engineering and science courses, including required technical electives, normally taken as department requirements after the start of the junior year. 

Predictor courses:  To enter the sophomore year, students must achieve a greater than (but not equal to) 2.00 GPA in PHYS 407 and MATH 426 with no grade below a C.  To enter the junior year, students must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.00 in ME 525, ME 526, and ME 503 with only one C- grade allowed and no grades below C-.  Students are allowed two repeats of these courses to achieve the predictor rule requirements.  This can be a single class repeated twice or two classes repeated once.  Students are removed from the program if they obtain a semester GPA <1.5 three times.  Students may petition to be reinstated after one year out of the program.  

Transfer in Policy for UNH Students into the Department of Mechanical Engineering:
CEPS Students:
To transfer into the freshman or sophomore year, students must earn a combined GPA greater than (but not equal to) 2.00 in PHYS 407 and MATH 426 with no grade below a C in these two courses.

If students are enrolled in ME 525 (or CIE 525), ME 526 (or CIE 526), or ME 503, they must earn a combined GPA of 2.00 with no grade below a C- in two of these courses to transfer in and advance to the junior year. Note: a combined GPA greater than (but not equal to) 2.00 in PHYS 407 and MATH 426 with no grade below a C is also required.  

Non-CEPS Students: To transfer into the Department of Mechanical Engineering from another college at UNH, students have to satisfy the CEPS college transfer policy as well as the Department of Mechanical Engineering transfer policies listed above according to status.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Freshman Year

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Fall

Spring

Dis. Prog. El.

4

MATH

425

Calculus I

4

ME

477

Solid Works Lab

1

CHEM

405 or 403 & 404

Chemistry

4

OE

400

OE Seminar

1

ENGL

401

Dis. Prog. El.

4

MATH

426

Calculus II

4

PHYS

407

Physics I

4

OE

401

Ocean Seminar

1

Dis. Prog. El.

4


Freshman Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
*CHEM   405   General Chemistry   4    
MATH   425   Calculus I   4    
ME   477   Introduction to Solid Modeling   1    
OE   400   OE Seminar I   1    
Disc. Prog. Elective     Discovery Program Elective   4    
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing     4  
MATH   426   Calculus II     4  
OE   401   OE Seminar II     1  
PHYS   407   Physics I     4  
Disc. Prog. Elective     Discovery Program Elective     4  

*Chem 403 and CHEM 404, General Chemistry I and II, may be substituted for CHEM 405.

PHYS 407 or CHEM 405 satisfies the Discovery Physical Science (with lab) category.

Math 425 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Quantitative Reasoning category.

ENGL 401 satisfies the Discovery Foundation Writing Skills category.

 

 

 



 


Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ESCI   501   Intro. to Oceanography   4    
IAM   550   Intro. to Engineering Computing   4    
**MATH   528   Multi-Dimensional Calculus   4    
ME   525   Statics   3    
PHYS   408   Physics II   4    
**MATH   527   Differential Equations     4  
ME   503   Thermodynamics     3  
ME   526   Mechanics of Materials     3  
OE   690   Introduction to Ocean Engineering     4  

**Math 525 and 526, Linearity, may be substituted for Math 527 and Math 528, and a technical elective course.

ESCI 501 satisfies the Discovery Inquiry requirement.



 


Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
ECE   537   Intro to Electrical Engineering   4    
ME   608   Fluid Dynamics   3    
ME   627   Dynamics   3    
OE   754   Ocean Waves and Tides   4    
Disc. Prog. Elective     Discovery Program Elective   4    
OE   610   Ocean Instrumentation Lab     4  
OE   758   Design of Ocean Structures     3  
OE   765   Ocean Acoustics     3  
Disc. Prog. Elective     Discovery Program Elective     4  


 


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
         
OE   710   Ocean Measurements Lab   4    
OE   757   Coastal Engineering & Processes   3    
TECH   797   Undergraduate Ocean Research Project   2    
Disc. Prog. Elective     Discovery Program Elective   4    
Tech. Elective     Technical Elective   3-4    
TECH   797   Undergraduate Ocean Research Project     2  
Disc. Prog. Elective     Discovery Program Elective     4  
***Tech. Elective     Technical Elective     4  
Tech Elective     Technical Elective     3-4  
Tech Elective     Technical Elective     3-4  

***At least one of the four required technical electives must be 4 credits



Ocean Engineering Minor

The ocean engineering minor allows undergraduate engineering students to acquire a nucleus of knowledge about engineering pertaining to the ocean and the coastal zone.

To meet the University minor requirement, students must satisfactorily complete a minimum of five courses from the following list: ESCI 501, Introduction to Oceanography; OE 690, Introduction to Ocean Engineering; ESCI 752, Chemical Oceanography; ESCI 758, Introductory Physical Oceanography; ESCI 759, Geological Oceanography; OE 710, Ocean Measurements Lab; OE 744, Corrosion; OE 754, Ocean Waves and Tides; OE 756, Principles of Naval Architecture and Model Testing; OE 757, Coastal Engineering and Processes; OE 765, Underwater Acoustics; OE 771, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping; OE 795, Special Topics in Ocean Engineering; ENE 747, Introduction to Marine Pollution and Control; and TECH 797, Undergraduate Ocean Research Program. Students typically take ESCI 501, TECH 797, and OE 690 plus two additional engineering courses from the above list to complete the minor.

Students wishing to take the ocean engineering minor should indicate their interest to the ocean engineering minor adviser, Kenneth C. Baldwin, (603) 862-1898 or Kenneth.Baldwin@unh.edu no later than the beginning of the junior year and file an intent to minor form. During the final semester, students must complete a completion of minor form for it to appear on their transcript.


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Physics (PHYS)

» http://www.physics.unh.edu/

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Chairperson: Mark L. McConnell
Professor: L. Christian Balling, Per Berglund, John R. Calarco, Benjamin D. Chandran, Olof E. Echt, F. William Hersman, Maurik Holtrop, Lynn M. Kistler, Martin A. Lee, Mark L. McConnell, Eberhard Möbius, Karsten Pohl, Joachim Raeder, James M. Ryan, Harlan E. Spence, Roy B. Torbert
Research Professor: Charles J. Farrugia, Antoinette B. Galvin, Philip A. Isenberg, Charles W. Smith III, Bernard J. Vasquez
Associate Professor: James Connell, Kai Germaschewski, Marc R. Lessard, Dawn C. Meredith, Nathan A. Schwadron, Karl Silfer
Research Associate Professor: Peter Forbes Bloser, Harald A. Kucharek, Clifford Lopate
Assistant Professor: David Mattingly, Patricia H. Solvignon
Research Assistant Professor: Ju-Chin Huang, Noé Lugaz

Physics is concerned with the properties of matter and the laws that describe its behavior. As a fundamental science, its discoveries and laws are basic to understanding in nearly all areas of science and technology. Advances in such diverse fields as medical instrumentation, solid state electronics, and space research have relied heavily on the application of basic physical laws and principles.

Students interested in the study of physics at the University of New Hampshire will find a strong interaction between research and academic programs. Undergraduates frequently participate in research studies ranging from nuclear scattering experiments at major particle accelerators to astrophysical studies of the solar system using space probes. These experiences have proven beneficial to engineering and physics students alike. The department is located in DeMeritt Hall (completed in 2008) and Morse Hall. Both buildings are equipped with state-of-the-art research facilities and laboratories. DeMeritt Hall also houses the physics library, classrooms, and a number of open and comfortable meeting areas, which provide an inviting atmosphere for study, interaction, and collaboration.

The suggested programs that follow are indicative of the flexibility available to students, whether they are preparing for graduate work in physics or astronomy, industrial opportunities, governmental research, secondary-level teaching, or a general education that might utilize the fundamental knowledge of physics.

Several undergraduate degree programs are offered through the department of physics. The B.S. degree is designed for students who wish to work as professional physicists or engineers; the interdisciplinary options in chemical physics, materials science, and astronomy allow students to combine physics with other disciplines. The B.A. degree is designed for students who want a strong background in physics but also want a broad liberal arts education. A minor in physics allows a student to combine an interest in physics with another major.

Physics-related degrees are also offered in other departments. For those students with strong interests in both math and physics, the Department of Mathematics offers a B.S. interdisciplinary option in physics. 

Interested students are encouraged to contact the department for further information. More detailed information is also on the physics department web page at www.physics.unh.edu.

Minor in Physics
The minor in physics consists of five courses in physics. All students must take PHYS 407, 408, and 505. Two other four-credit physics courses must be chosen in consultation with the student’s physics minor adviser.

Physics Major, Bachelor of Arts

This program provides an opportunity for a broad and liberal education, which in some cases may be sufficient for graduate work. This program can also be excellent preparation for middle and high school physics teachers, pre-med and pre-law students, and those wishing to pursue a technical career in industry. Because there are fewer required courses than for a B.S., you have time to pursue other academic interests. A judicious choice of electives may also prepare students for interdisciplinary programs that require proficiency in a specialized area of physics.

Requirements

  1. Satisfy the University Discovery Program requirements. Note that no physics course can satisfy these requirement for a physics major. The rationale behind this is that a course in physics does not broaden the education of a physics major.
  2. Satisfy bachelor of arts degree requirements.
  3. PHYS 400, 407-408, 505, 506, 508, 605, 615, 616, 701, 703, 705. Note that MATH 425, 426, and MATH 525, 526 or MATH 527, 528 are prerequisites for some of the courses.
  4. A capstone experience is required of all physics majors during their senior year. The Physics Department encourages students to write a senior thesis (PHYS 799) for their capstone experience. Other options include independent study research projects (PHYS795 or INCO 590) or a special project as part of senior lab (PHYS 705). All capstone experiences must be approved by the undergraduate committee during the student's penultimate semester.

In the following table, “electives” include Discovery courses, writing-intensive courses, language courses required for the B.A., and free-choice electives.

Suggested Curriculum for B.A. in Physics


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   400   Freshman Seminar   1   -  
PHYS   407, 408   General Physics I and II   4   4  
MATH   425, 426   Calculus I and II (QR)   4   4  
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing   -   4  
Elective       8   4  
Total       17   16  


Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   505-506   General Physics III and Lab   4   -  
PHYS   615   Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Physics I   -   4  
MATH   525   Linearity I      
or MATH   527   Differential Equations   6 or 4   -  
MATH   526   Linearity II      
or MATH   528   Multidimensional Calculus   -   6 or 4  
Elective       8   8  
Total       18 or 16   18 or 16  


Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   616   Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Physics II   4   -  
PHYS   701   Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I   4   -  
PHYS   703   Electricity and Magnetism   -   4  
PHYS   605   Experimental Physics I   -   5  
Electives       8   8  
Total       16   17  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   705   Experimental Physics II   4   -  
PHYS   508   Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics   4   -  
Elective       8   16  
Total       16   16  


Bachelor of Science in Physics

The bachelor of science degree in physics prepares students for professional work as physicists, and is the first step toward graduate work in physics. It is also excellent preparation for graduate programs in medicine, law, or engineering, as well as for technical jobs in industry. The required courses are those typically necessary for admission to graduate study in physics or astronomy. The interdisciplinary options require fewer physics courses combined with a concentration in another area (chemistry or materials science). The astronomy option emphasizes courses that help prepare a student for advanced studies in astronomy.

Requirements

  1. Satisfy the University Discovery requirements. Note that no physics course can satisfy these requirement for a physics major. The rationale behind this is that a course in physics does not broaden the education of a physics major.
  2. Satisfy University bachelor of science requirements.
  3. Minimum physics requirements: PHYS 400, 407, 408, 505, 506, 508, 605, 615-616, 701, 702, 703, 704, 705; two electives selected from 708, 710, 712, 718, 720, 764, MATH 747, MATH 753, and MATH 754.
  4. Chemistry: CHEM 403 or 405
  5. Mathematics: MATH 425-426, and 525-526. Instead of 525-526, students may take three courses: 528, 527, and either 545 or 645. (The Department generally recommends 645 over 545 for physics majors, but the best option, when possible, is 525-526.)
  6. Computer Programming: CS 410 or IAM 550
  7. By the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year, a student must have a minimum grade of C in each 400- or 500-level course specifically required for the B.S. degree and an overall grade-point average of at least 2.33 in these courses in order to continue in the B.S. program.
  8. A capstone experience is required of all physics majors during their senior year. The Physics Department encourages students to write a senior thesis (PHYS 799) for their capstone experience. Other options include independent study research projects (PHYS 795 or INCO 590) or a special project as part of senior lab (PHYS 705). All capstone experiences must be approved by the undergraduate committee during the student’s penultimate semester.

Physics Electives
In the following table, “electives” include Discovery courses, writing-intensive courses, physics electives, and free-choice electives. Note that physics electives can only be taken in the junior or senior year because of prerequisites, and are in general offered every other year.

Suggested Curriculum for B.S. in Physics


First Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
CS   410   Intro to Scientific Programming     4  
or IAM   550   Intro to Engineering Computing     4  
PHYS   400   Freshman Seminar   1   -  
PHYS   407, 408   General Physics I and II   4   4  
MATH   425, 426   Calculus I and II (QR)   4   4  
CHEM   403   General Chemistry (PS)   4   4  
or CHEM   405   Chem. Principles for Engineers (PS)   4    
ENGL   401   First-Year Writing (WS)   -   4  
Elective       4   (4 if no CHEM 404)  
Total       17   16  


Sophomore Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   505-506   General Physics III and Lab   4   -  
PHYS   508   Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics   4   -  
PHYS   615   Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Physics I   -   4  
PHYS   605   Experimental Physics I   -   5  
MATH   525   Linearity I      
or MATH   528   Multidimensional Calculus   6 or 4   -  
MATH   526   Linearity II      
or MATH   527, 645   Differential Equations, Linear Algebra   -   6 or 8  
Elective       -   4  
Total       18 or 16   18 or 20  


Junior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   616   Classical Mechanics and Mathematical Physics II   4   -  
PHYS   701   Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I   4   -  
PHYS   702   Introduction to Quantum Mechanics II   -   4  
PHYS   703   Electricity and Magnetism I   -   4  
Electives       8   8  
Total       17   16  


Senior Year

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   704   Electricity and Magnetism II   4   -  
PHYS   705   Experimental Physics II   4   -  
Elective       8   12  
Total       16   16  


Physics Electives

Abbreviation Course Number Title Fall Spring
PHYS   708   Optics   4 /even yrs    
PHYS   710   Astrophysics   4 /odd yrs    
PHYS   712   Physics of the Ionosphere   4 /even yrs    
PHYS   718   Condensed Matter Physics     4 /odd yrs  
PHYS   720   Nuclear & Particle Physics     4 /even yrs  
PHYS   764   General Relativity     4 /even yrs  
MATH   747   Nonlinear Dynamics & Chaos     4  
MATH   753   Numerical Methods I     4  
MATH   754   Numerical Methods II   4    


Chemical Physics Option, Bachelor of Science in Physics

  1. Satisfy the University Discovery requirements. Note that no physics course can satisfy these requirement for a physics major. The rationale behind this is that a course in physics does not broaden the education of a physics major.
  2. Satisfy University bachelor of science requirements.
  3. Physics requirements: PHYS 400, 407-408, 505-506, 508, 605, 615, 616, 701, 702, 703, 705
  4. Chemistry: CHEM 403, 683-686, 762, 763, 776
  5. Mathematics: MATH 425-426, and 525-526. Instead of 525-526, students may take three courses: 528, 527, and either 545 or 645. (The Department generally recommends 645 over 545 for physics majors, but the best option, when possible, is 525-526.)
  6. Computer Programming: CS 410 or IAM 550
  7. Electives in Option: Two courses selected from CHEM 547/9, MATH 646, PHYS 718, PHYS 795, PHYS 799
  8. By the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year, a student must have a minimum grade of C in each 400- or 500-level course specifically required for the B.S. degree and an overall grade-point average of at least 2.33 in these courses in order to continue in the B.S. program.


Materials Science Option, Bachelor of Science in Physics

This option combines courses from the Physics and other departments to provide training in physics and materials science, an area that has proven industrial demand. In addition to the core courses in classical and modern physics, the students will take six courses in which they will study materials synthesis and properties and get hands-on training in materials characterization techniques, such as diffraction, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy. Two semesters of thesis work in a research lab complement the training in the classroom. Students completing this program will have a wide variety of career opportunities to pursue, for example, in microelectronics, advanced materials synthesis and design, and thin film engineering. Alternatively, they are qualified for postgraduate programs in condensed matter physics or materials science.

Requirements

  1. Satisfy the University Discovery requirements. Note that no physics course can satisfy these requirements for a physics major. The rationale behind this is that a course in physics does not broaden the education of a physics major.
  2. Satisfy University bachelor of science requirements.
  3. Physics requirements: PHYS 400, 407-408, 505-506, 508, 605, 615-616, 701, 703, 705, 795 (4 credit hours), 799 (4 credit hours)
  4. Mechanical Engineering: ME 561, 730, 760
  5. Mathematics: MATH 425-426 and 525-526. Instead of 525-526, students may take three courses: 528, 527, and either 545 or 645. (The Department generally recommends 645 over 545 for physics majors, but the best option, when possible, is 525-526.)
  6. Computer Programming: CS 410 or IAM 550
  7. Electives in Option: three courses selected from MATH 646, ME 731, 761, 762, 763, 795, PHYS 718
  8. Chemistry: 403 or 405
  9. By the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year, a student must have a minimum grade of C in each 400- or 500-level course specifically required for the B.S. degree and an overall grade-point average of at least 2.33 in these courses in order to continue in the B.S. program.

 

 


Astronomy Option, Bachelor of Science in Physics

Requirements

  1. Satisfy the University Discovery requirements. Note that no physics course can satisfy these requirement for a physics major. The rationale behind this is that a course in physics does not broaden the education of a physics major.
  2. Satisfy University bachelor of science requirements.
  3. Physics requirements: PHYS 400, 406, 407-408, 505, 506, 508, 605, 615-616, 701, 702, 703, 704, 705, 710, 795 (4 credit hours), 799 (4 credit hours)
  4. Chemistry: CHEM 403 or CHEM 405
  5. Mathematics: MATH 425-426, and 525-526. Instead of 525-526, students may take three courses: 528, 527, and either 545 or 645. (The Department generally recommends 645 over 545 for Physics majors, but the best option, when possible, is 525-526.)
  6. Computer Programming: CS 410 or IAM 550
  7. Electives in Option: choose one course from PHYS 708, PHYS 712, PHYS 720, PHYS 764
  8. By the end of the spring semester of the sophomore year, a student must have a minimum grade of C in each 400- or 500-level course specifically required for the B.S. degree and an overall grade-point average of at least 2.33 in these courses in order to continue in the B.S. program.

 


Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics

The bachelor of science degree in engineering physics (BSEP) provides training for individuals who either seek employment in an engineering discipline that requires a deeper knowledge of physical principles or who intend to pursue a graduate degree in engineering. A BSEP degree differs from a traditional engineering degree in that the curriculum includes more of a focus on fundamental physics. At the same time, the UNH program is flexible in the sense that each student designs his or her program (with appropriate advising) within certain constraints, which include a core component and an electives component. The goal is to balance physics courses with appropriate selections from various engineering disciplines to prepare the student for his or her longer term goals, keeping a balance between depth and breadth that is appropriate for these goals.

Requirements

  1. Satisfy the requirements of the Discovery Program.
  2. Satisfy the Writing Requirements. This requirement includes four courses. A list of approved writing-intensive courses appears on the web.
  3. Satisfy the Bachelor of Science Requirements: a minimum of 128 credits at the 400-799 level and at a GPA of at least 2.00.
  4. Minimum Engineering Physics requirements:
    1. A minimum of six 3- or 4-credit physics courses (with at least one of these courses being at the 700 level), a minimum of six 3- or 4-credit engineering courses and two other electives, chosen from physics, engineering or math programs. The course selection must include a total of at least eight courses at the combined 600 and 700 levels.
    2. CHEM 403 or CHEM 405. (Note: to take CHEM 405, a student must have taken chemistry in high school.)
    3. Required math courses include Math 425, 426 (Calc 1, 2) and 527/528 (Diff Eq and Multi-D). Math 525/526 (Linearity I, II) may replace MATH 527/528.
    4. A computer programming course, such as CS 410 or IAM 550 or equivalent.
    5. A capstone experience is required of all BSEP students during their senior year. ABET accreditation requires that the capstone experience be a design experience. If a project involves research, it must also lead to a design effort.
  5. A student must have a minimum grade of C in each 400- or 500-level course in items 4a through 4d and an overall grade-point average of 2.33 in these courses in order to continue in the BSEP program.


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Technology (TECH)

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