Economics  

ECON 401 - Principles of Economics (Macro)
Credits: 4.00
Basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole; policies designed to affect its performance. Economic scarcity, supply and demand, the causes of unemployment and inflation, the nature of money and monetary policy, the impact of government taxation and spending, the federal debt, and international money matters. ECON 401A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 401H is open to students in the Honors Program. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 401A, ECON 401H, ECN 411, or equivalent.

ECON 401A - Principles of Economics (Macro) International
Credits: 4.00
Basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole; policies designed to affect its performance. Economic scarcity, supply and demand, the causes of unemployment and inflation, the nature of money and monetary policy, the impact of government taxation and spending, the federal debt, and international money matters. ECON 401A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 401H is open to students in the Honors Program. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 401, ECON 401H, ECN 411, or equivalent.

ECON 401H - Honors/Principles of Economics (Macro)
Credits: 4.00
Basic functions of the United States economy viewed as a whole; policies designed to affect its performance. Economic scarcity, supply and demand, the causes of unemployment and inflation, the nature of money and monetary policy, the impact of government taxation and spending, the federal debt, and international money matters. ECON 401A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 401H is open to students in the Honors Program. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 401, ECON 401A, ECN 411, or equivalent.

ECON 402 - Principles of Economics (Micro)
Credits: 4.00
Functions of component units of the economy and their interrelations. Units of analysis are the individual consumer, the firm, and the industry. Theory of consumer demand and elasticity, supply and costs of production, theory of the firm under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition, demand for and allocation of economic resources, general equillibrium, and basic principles and institutions of international trade. ECON 402A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 402H is open to students in the Honors Program. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 402A, ECON 402H, EREC 411, ECN 412, or equivalent.

ECON 402A - Principles of Economics (Micro) International
Credits: 4.00
Functions of component units of the economy and their interrelations. Units of analysis are the individual consumer, the firm, and the industry. Theory of consumer demand and elasticity, supply and costs of production, theory of the firm under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition, demand for and allocation of economic resources, general equillibrium, and basic principles and institutions of international trade. ECON 402A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 402H is open to students in the Honors Program. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 402, ECON 402H, EREC 411, ECN 412, or equivalent.

ECON 402H - Honors/Principles of Economics (Micro)
Credits: 4.00
Functions of component units of the economy and their interrelations. Units of analysis are the individual consumer, the firm, and the industry. Theory of consumer demand and elasticity, supply and costs of production, theory of the firm under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition, demand for and allocation of economic resources, general equillibrium, and basic principles and institutions of international trade. ECON 402A emphasizes applications to the international economy. ECON 402H is open to students in the Honors Program. Writing intensive. No credit for students who have received credit for ECON 402, ECON 402A, EREC 411, ECN 412, or equivalent.

ECON #444 - Life in a Small Town: The Economics of Local Politics
Credits: 4.00
Examines the economic implications of public policy decisions made at the local level. Explores questions such as: Why are property taxes so high in New Hampshire? Why does everyone pay to support education? How do local zoning regulations contribute to the high cost of housing in a town? Does local economic development improve or harm the quality of life? Students apply basic economic analysis to these and other questions.

ECON 501 - Business and Economic History
Credits: 4.00
This course studies the historical influence of business enterprises on the development of capitalist economies, with an emphasis on the United States. Topics include the rise of manufacturing, development of financial institutions and markets, innovation and new markets, the role of the entrepreneur, and the impact of government policy on business development. Because this is an Inquiry course, each student will pursue a major research project.

ECON 515 - Economic History of the United States
Credits: 4.00
This course studies the development of the U.S. economy from colonial times to the 21st century. The role that institutions, innovations and government policy play in economic development is a central theme of the course. Western settlement, slavery and abolition, the rise of manufacturing and the corporate business, emergence of affluence and consumer society, and the Great Depression are some of the topics addressed. Prereq: ECON 401 or 402;/or permission.

ECON 551 - Careers in Economics - Seminar
Credits: 2.00
This career seminar is designed to provide economics majors with an opportunity to learn more about potential careers in the field. Students take a number of self-assessments and are exposed to the full depth of career opportunities. Prereq: ECON 401, ECON 402. Cr/F.

ECON 552 - Careers in Economics - Field Experience
Credits: 2.00
This career seminar is the second course in the ECON 551/552 sequence. It is designed to give students an opportunity to observe real work environments and then share those experiences with other students enrolled in the course. Prereq: ECON 401, ECON 402, ECON 551. Cr/F.

ECON 605 - Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of supply and demand. Determination of prices, production, and the distribution of income in noncompetitive situations and in the purely competitive model. General equilibrium. Prereq: ECON 402.

ECON 605W - Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of supply and demand. Determination of prices, production, and the distribution of income in noncompetitive situations and in the purely competitive model. General equilibrium. Prereq: ECON 402. Writing intensive.

ECON 611 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
Credits: 4.00
Macroeconomic measurement, theory, and public policy determination. Prereq: ECON 401 and 402.

ECON 635 - Money and Banking
Credits: 4.00
Study of how the financial sectors of globally interconnected economies impact real economic actitvity. It includes interrelationships of interest rates, exchange rates, expectations, financial markets, financial institutions, central banks, systemic crises, the supply and demand for money and other financial instruments, and an introduction to monetary theory, policy and regulation. Prereq: ECON 401 and ECON 402.

ECON 641 - Public Economics
Credits: 4.00
Alternative prescriptions and explanations concerning the role of government in contemporary market economies. General principles of public expenditure analysis. Selected case studies of public spending programs, e.g., welfare, defense, education. Analysis of various federal, state, and local taxes. Prereq: ECON 401; 605;/ or permission.

ECON 642 - Health Economics
Credits: 4.00
Theoretical and empirical analysis of the U.S. health care delivery sector. While topics evolve from year-to-year, in recent years they included errors policy makers have made because they didn't understand basic demand and supply analyses, cost-effectiveness analyses of new medical technologies, overlooked causes of rising health care expenditures, and explanations of our highest -in-the-world prescription drug prices. Prereq: ECON 402. (Also listed as HMP 642).

ECON 645 - International Economics
Credits: 4.00
Covers both international trade theory and open-economy macroeconomics. Some of the major issues include whether free trade is always preferred to restricted trade, the controversy over industrial policy and how best to structure the international financial system. Students gain an understanding of topics including currency exchange rate movements, and trade policy, among others. Prereq: ECON 401 and 402.

ECON 651 - Governmental Regulation of Business
Credits: 4.00
Mergers, competition, monopoly, and the regulated industries. Prereq: ECON 402.

ECON 653 - Law and Economics
Credits: 4.00
Introduces the field of Law and Economics. Focuses on the legal system and the economic consequences of property, contract, tort, criminal law and mediation. Prereq: ECON 402. Writing intensive.

ECON 656 - Labor Economics
Credits: 4.00
Functioning of labor markets from theoretical and policy perspectives. Labor demand and supply, wages and employment. Welfare programs, human capital, discrimination in the labor market, unions, wage differentials. Prereq: ECON 401; ECON 402; ECON 605 recommended.

ECON 668 - Economic Development
Credits: 4.00
An exploration od the theorizing (ways of seeing) and resulting policies (ways of doing) in Third World development. How the 'West' constructed the 'Rest'. Theories of development and underdevelopment. Development as industrialization with its urban bias. A planet of slums? The ambivalent effects of technological change in the Third World. An examination of agriculture (famines, green revolution, case study of opium cultivation in Afganistan). International institutions' versus NGO's approaches to development. Grassroots development, participation and post-development. Prereq: ECON 401; ECON 402;/or permission. Writing intensive.

ECON 669 - Women and Economic Development
Credits: 4.00
Examines the position, roles, and contributions of women in economic development as interpreted though different discourses (feminisms, modernity, post modernity) and in theoretical conceptualizations (neoclassical integrationist, liberal feminism, class and gender, feminist ecology). Applied analyses on Africa, South Asia and Latin America. Prereq: permission. Writing intensive.

ECON 685 - Study Abroad
Credits: 1.00 to 16.00
Open to students studying abroad in the discipline as approved by the economics program director. Cr/F.

ECON 686 - Study Abroad
Credits: 1.00 to 16.00
Open to students studying abroad in the discipline as approved by the economics program director. Cr/F.

ECON 695 - Independent Study
Credits: 2.00 to 12.00
Individual research projects that are student designed. Initial sponsorship of an economics faculty member must be obtained, and approval of PAUL adviser and dean. For juniors and seniors in high standing.

ECON 695W - Independent Study
Credits: 2.00 to 12.00
Individual research projects that are student designed. Initial sponsorship of an economics faculty member must be obtained, and approval of PAUL adviser and dean. For juniors and seniors in high standing. Writing intensive.

ECON 696 - Supervised Student Teaching Experience
Credits: 1.00 to 8.00
Participants are expected to perform such functions as leading discussion groups, assisting faculty in undergraduate courses that they have successfully completed, or working as peer advisers in the advising center. Enrollment is limited to juniors and seniors who have above-average G.P.A.s. Reflective final paper is required. Prereq: permission of instructor, department chair, and director of undergraduate programs. No more than 4 credits may be earned as a teaching assistant in any one course. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 credits. Cr/F.

ECON 698 - Topics
Credits: 4.00
Special topics. May be repeated. Writing intensive.

ECON 706 - Economics of Climate Change
Credits: 4.00
Explores the economics and public policy of global climate change and develops the economic theory including the concepts of externalities, stock pullutant models, the social discount rate, and complicating factors such as information, uncertainty, technological progress, and risk. Students use economic analysis to compare different policy instruments such as administrative regulation, marketable permits, tax incentives, and direct subsidies. Also covers the political economy of international environmental agreements, including an analysis of the Kyoto Protocol. Prereq: ECON 401, ECON 605.

ECON 707 - Economic Growth and Environmental Quality
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of the interrelationships among economic growth, technological change, population increase, natural resource use, and environmental quality. Application of alternative theoretical approaches drawn from the social and natural sciences. Focus on specific environmental problems, e.g., affluence and waste disposal problems, and loss of biodiversity. Prereq: ECON 605; 611;/or permission.

ECON #715 - Marxian Economic Analysis
Credits: 4.00

ECON 726 - Introduction to Econometrics
Credits: 4.00
Introduces regression techniques as used in economics and management; estimation and statistical inference in the context of the general linear model; discussion of problems encountered and their solutions; extensions of the general linear model. Prereq: ADMN 420 or equivalent.

ECON 736 - Seminar in Monetary Theory and Policy
Credits: 4.00
Contemporary developments in monetary theory and the evaluation of policy measures. Prereq: ECON 635. Writing intensive.

ECON #746 - International Finance
Credits: 4.00
International monetary mechanism; balance of payments, international investment, exchange rates, adjustment systems, international liquidity, foreign aid, multinational corporations. Prereq: ECON 611; ECON 645. Writing intensive.

ECON 747 - Multinational Enterprises
Credits: 4.00
Internationalization of economies. Growth and implications of multinational corporations at the level of systems. Theories of imperialism, international unity/rivalry; theories of direct investment, exercise of influence and conflict, technology transfer, bargaining with host country; effects on U.S. economy. Prereq: permission. Writing intensive.

ECON 768 - Seminar in Economic Development
Credits: 4.00
Advanced reading seminar. Topics include methodologies underlying economic development theory, industrialization and post-import substitution, state capitalist development, stabilization policies, appropriate technologies, the capital goods sector, agricultural modernization schemes, and attempts at transition to socialism. Prereq: permission.

ECON 774 - Senior Economics Seminar
Credits: 4.00
Capstone experience for students enrolled in the Economics B.A. program. Topics and format of the class depends on the interests and expertise of the faculty member and students of the course. The course is organized around a "big" idea and focuses on an important topic that has broad interest and social consequences. Prereq: ECON 605, ECON 611. Writing intensive.

ECON 775 - Applied Research Skills for Economists
Credits: 4.00
Capstone course for students enrolled in B.S. in economics. Asks students to conduct economic research by bringing their understanding of economic theory and empirical/analytical skills to investigate contemporary economic problems, issues, and phenomena. The actual topics covered, including the emphasis on microeconomics vs. macroeconomics, and design of the course varies depending on the professor. Prereq: ECON 605, 611, 726; MATH 424A or equivalent. Writing intensive.

ECON 795 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 16.00
On-the-job skill development through fieldwork in an organization (business, industry, health, public service, etc.). Normally, supervision is provided by a qualified individual in the organization, with frequent consultation by a faculty sponsor. Written report required. Internships may be part or full time, with course credits assigned accordingly. May not be used as a major elective. Cr/F.

ECON 798 - Economic Problems
Credits: 2.00 or 4.00
Special topics; may be repeated. Prereq: permission of adviser and instructor. Writing intensive.

ECON 799 - Honors Thesis
Credits: 4.00 to 8.00
Supervised research leading to the completion of an honors thesis; required for graduation from the honors program in economics. Writing intensive.