Sociology  

SOC 400 - Introductory Sociology
Credits: 4.00
Overview of sociology as the scientific study of human social and cultural relationships. Social theory, methods and techniques of research, and current research findings on a wide range of social issues.

SOC 400H - Honors/Introductory Sociology
Credits: 4.00
Overview of sociology as the scientific study of human social and cultural relationships. Social theory, methods and techniques of research, and current research findings on a wide range of social issues. Writing intensive.

SOC 400W - Introductory Sociology
Credits: 4.00
Overview of sociology as the scientific study of human social and cultural relationships. Social theory, methods and techniques of research, and current research findings on a wide range of social issues. Writing intensive.

SOC 444A - Society in the Arctic
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to societies of the far North today, from Alaska and Canada through Greenland, Iceland, northern Scandinavia and Russia. Reviews interconnected issues of social change, environment, sustainable development, local control, and modernization vs. traditions. Arctic dilemmas highlight some basic questions facing all societies in the 21st century. Writing intensive.

SOC 502 - Statistics
Credits: 4.00
Elementary applied statistical techniques; tables, graphs, cross-classifications; central tendency and dispersion; correlation and linear regression; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. No credit for students who have completed ADM 430, BIOL 528, ADMN 420, EREC 525, HHS 540, MATH 439, MATH 539, MATH 644, PSYC 402, but petitions for acceptance of such courses to fulfill the sociology major requirement in statistics will be entertained.

SOC 502H - Honors/Statistics
Credits: 4.00
Elementary applied statistical techniques; tables, graphs, cross-classifications; central tendency and dispersion; correlation and linear regression; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. No credit for students who have completed ADM 430, BIOL 528, ADMN 420, EREC 525, HHS 540, MATH 439, MATH 539, MATH 644, PSYC 402, but petitions for acceptance of such courses to fulfill the sociology major requirement in statistics will be entertained.

SOC 515 - Introductory Criminology
Credits: 4.00
Introduces the scientific study of crime. Reviews the different forms of criminal behavior, theories of crime, and strategies of crime control.

SOC 520 - Family
Credits: 4.00
Sociological study of marriage and the family in American society. Following a life-cycle approach, topics include gender roles, communication and conflict, dating and mate selection, work and family economics, the transition to parenthood, middle- and late-life family, divorce, and remarriage.

SOC 520H - Honors/Family
Credits: 4.00
Sociological study of marriage and the family in American society. Following a life-cycle approach, topics include gender roles, communication and conflict, dating and mate selection, work and family economics, the transition to parenthood, middle- and late-life family, divorce, and remarriage.

SOC 525 - Juvenile Crime and Delinquency
Credits: 4.00
Crime, violence, and the criminal justice system as it affects children and youth in the role of both perpetrators and victims.

SOC 535 - Homicide
Credits: 4.00
Introduces to theory and research in homicide studies, including a review of the origins of and social responses to homicide.

SOC 540 - Private Troubles, Public Issues: Contemporary Social Problems
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to the study of major social problems in contemporary society, including poverty, discrimination, inequality, crime, violence, and environmental degradation. Explores how and why people come to view certain social conditions as problematic. Also explores the consequences of and possible solutions to contemporary social problems. This course fulfills the requirement in the Social Science category of UNH's Discovery Program.

SOC 540W - Social Problems
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to the study of major social problems in contemporary society, including poverty, discrimination, inequality, crime, violence, and environmental degradation. Explores how and why people come to view certain social conditions as problematic. Also explores the consequences of and possible solutions to contemporary social problems. This course fulfills the requirement in the Social Science category of UNH's Discovery Program. Writing intensive.

SOC 565 - Environment and Society
Credits: 4.00
Environmental and Society focuses on the complex interactions between human communities and the natural world. The course considers the interconnected ways that social systems, the built environment, and related techologies produce environmental changes, and in turn how shifts in resources, air, water quality, climate, biodiversity, and ecosystems force societies to adapt.

SOC 570 - Sexual Behavior
Credits: 4.00
A comparative approach to questions of the universality and variability of human sexual behavior. Topics include the changing expression of sexuality at various stages of the life cycle, patterns of arousal and response for each sex, the social control of sexuality, and sexual dysfunctions.

SOC 595 - Independent Reading and Research
Credits: 2.00 to 8.00
Independent study of advanced or specialized topics in sociology requiring extensive reading and writing. Before registering, students must develop a project in consultation with a faculty supervisor and submit a proposal to the undergraduate committee. Prereq: 12 sociology credits and permission.

SOC 597 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Occasional or experimental offerings. May be repeated for different topics.

SOC 599 - Sociological Analysis
Credits: 4.00
Basic skills essential to sociological study, including: development of critical reading skills; evaluation of theory construction and evidence; analysis of classic and contemporary works, research, writing, and use of library resources. To be taken by sociology majors no later than the junior year. Writing intensive.

SOC 601 - Methods of Social Research
Credits: 4.00
Overview of major research methods: survey analysis, personal interview, participant observation, content analysis, and experimental design. Each student designs and completes a research project. Prereq: SOC 502 or equivalent and SOC 599; juniors and seniors only. Writing intensive.

SOC 611 - Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of the origins and development of sociological theory. Includes the classical works of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim and their connections to the major strands of present day research. Writing intensive.

SOC 612 - Topics in Sociological Theory
Credits: 4.00
Major schools, concepts, and issues in present-day sociological theory. Functionalism, conflict theory, feminist theory, social constructionism, systems theory, critical theory, and hermeneutics are among the possible topics. Prereq: SOC 611. Writing intensive.

SOC 620 - Drugs and Society
Credits: 4.00
Provides students with an overview of drug using behavior as viewed from a sociological perspective. Highlights historical and current drug use trends, examines the social correlates of drug use, considers societal responses to drug use including treatment, prevention, and policy, and engages students in key controversial debates confronting U.S. citizens and policymakers. Provides a foundation for understanding of drugs and society.

SOC 625 - Mental Health and Society
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to sociological approaches for studying and understanding mental health and illness in society. With an Emphasis on the importance of social stress, we examine the distribution of mental illness in the United States and identify the factors that help to explain mental health differences across social roles and statuses.

SOC 630 - Sociology of Gender
Credits: 4.00
Gender examined as (1) socially constructed differences between the sexes, and (2) a system of social relations, which are part of the fabric of our social institutions. Topics include gender socialization, gender and education, gender and employment, and work-family intersections. Attention paid to the issue of gender inequalities and to the intersection of class, culture, race-ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation with gendered experience and gendered institutions. Focuses primarily on the contemporary United States.

SOC 635 - Medical Sociology
Credits: 4.00
Interrelationship of health, medicine, and society; the social construction of wellness, illness, and healing; age, sex, class, and ethnicity in medical care; institutional networks and the social control functions of medicine; roles and relations of physicians, patients, nurses, and other health workers; medicine in a cross-national context. Writing intensive.

SOC 645 - Class, Status and Power
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on the major dimensions of inequality, including class, gender, and race, by exploring the distribution of economic, political, and social resources within contemporary societies.

SOC 645W - Class, Status and Power
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on the major dimensions of inequality, including class, gender, and race, by exploring the distribution of economic, political, and social resources within contemporary societies. Writing Intensive.

SOC 655 - Sociology of Law and Justice
Credits: 4.00
Systematic study of how social factors, such as inequality, differentiation, culture, and organization, influence the justice process. Historical and cross-cultural focus on the behavior of the police, courts, and other legal institutions. Prereq: SOC 515 or permission; juniors and seniors only.

SOC 656 - Terrorism
Credits: 4.00
This course provides a global assessment of the definition and nature of terrorism, trends in terrorism over the course of the past several decades, perspectives concerning the degree to which cultural, economic, and political conflict contribute to terrorism, and alternative means for dealing with terrorism in the age of globalization.

SOC 660 - Urban Sociology
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on urban communities, urbanization, and urban social issues. Covers the historical development of cities; the differences between urban, suburban, and rural communities; urban life styles; and the significance of poverty and race for understanding contemporary American cities. Emphasizes American cities, with some consideration to world patterns of urbanization and the growth, development, and role of global cities. Writing intensive.

SOC 665 - Environmental Sociology
Credits: 4.00
Interactions between society and the physical environment, including environmental constraints, population and economic growth, social impacts of resource development, large-scale environmental change, and the social bases of environmental attitudes, behavior, and politics. Writing intensive.

SOC #670 - Sociology and Non-Fiction Film
Credits: 4.00
Examines nonfiction films as both a method of exploring social life and a cultural product that reflects its social environment. Among the topics to be addressed are the use of photographic images in social science research, the historical development of documentary film, and the critical analysis of visual images.

SOC 675 - Sociology of AIDS
Credits: 4.00
Seminar class addresses social, political, emotional, and bioethical dimensions of HIV infection and AIDS. Specific topics include the social epidemiology and etiology of AIDS, stigmatization and the social construction of disease, community action, AIDS prevention, and ethical issues in the health care of people with AIDS.

SOC 680 - Sociology of the Holocaust
Credits: 4.00
Examines the origins, realities, and consequences of the Holocaust as an all-embracing European phenomenon. Topics include the genocidal policies and procedures of the Nazis and Soviets with respect to indigenous populations as well as the role of collaborators. This course is normally offered only at UNH-Manchester.

SOC 680W - Sociology of the Holocaust
Credits: 4.00
Examines the origins, realities, and consequences of the Holocaust as an all-embracing European phenomenon. Topics include the genocidal policies and procedures of the Nazis and Soviets with respect to indigenous populations as well as the role of collaborators. This course is normally offered only at UNH-Manchester. Writing intensive.

SOC 695 - Research on Family Violence in World Perspective
Credits: 4.00
The nature, frequency, causes, and consequences of family violence, including physical, verbal, material, and sexual abuse of children; of partners in dating, cohabitating, and marital relationships; and of the elderly; and also neglect of children and the elderly. Includes data analysis projects to provide experience with cross-national comparative research to test theories about social causes of family violence and the effects of family violence on society as a whole. Prereq: SOC 502 (or equivalent), SOC 601

SOC 697 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Occasional or experimental offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Writing intensive.

SOC 699 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 4.00 or 8.00
Independent work in the library or field culminating in a written senior thesis. Recommended for, but not confined to, majors intending to pursue graduate studies. Students must arrange for supervision from two faculty members and submit a proposal to the Undergraduate Committee before registering. May be completed in one or two successive semesters during the senior year. Permission required. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits.

SOC 699H - Senior Honors Thesis
Credits: 4.00 or 8.00
Independent work in the library or field culminating in a written senior honors thesis and a formal research presentation. Recommended for, but not confined to, majors intending to pursue graduate studies. Required for students participating in the departmental honors program as part of their 16 honors credits. Students must arrange for supervision from two faculty members and submit a proposal to the Undergraduate Committee before registering. May be completed in one or two successive semesters during the senior year. Permission required. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits.

SOC 715 - Criminological Theory
Credits: 4.00
Introduces graduate students and advanced undergraduates to the major theoretical literature in crime and delinquency. Covers both classical and contemporary theory, with empirical assessments of theories, including macro- and micro-level control, strain, and learning theories, as well as recent developments in biosocial, deterrence, labeling, and critical/feminist theories. Permission required.

SOC 720 - Sociology of Drug Use
Credits: 4.00
Examines licit and illicit drug use from a sociological perspective. Draws primarily from the sociology of mental health and criminology to explore a variety of drug-related topics including historical and current U.S. drug trends, dominant theoretical approaches about the initiation into, and continued use of drugs, drug-related crime, therapeutic use of drugs, prevention and treatment of drug problems, and drug-related policies. Permission required.

SOC 725 - Social Demography
Credits: 4.00
Social demography examines the linkages between changes in the size, composition and distribution of the population and changes in social, environmental, economic and political factors. The course examines demographic methods and the materials and the analytical techniques used by demographers to analyze population redistribution, fertility, work, marriage, migration and mortality. The policy implications of demographic change will be examined with attention to the U.S. as well as the developed and developing world. Permission required.

SOC 730 - Communities and the Environment
Credits: 4.00
People and the natural environments in which they live fundamentally structure communities around the globe. Economic change, expanding development , and human migration are transforming social and environmental conditions in both rural and urban settings, altering the identities of many communities as well as their relationships with the natural world. The importance of these emerging social and environmental issues has made them a focus for social science inquiry. This course exposes students to a range of sociological concepts, theories, and research approaches related to the study of communities and environmental issues. Some of the substaintive themses that are covered include: population dynamnics and environmental change; social capital and social networks; political economy and comunity development; collective action and social movements; science, technology, and environmental risks; and environmental racism and justice. The principal assignment for the course will be a research project where students investigate a community or environmental issue of their own interest. Permission required.

SOC 735 - Sociology of Community
Credits: 4.00
This course analyzes "community" from a sociological perspective. Community is one of the fundamental concepts in the sociological literature; this course covers those aspects of the concept that are concerned with geographic communities: neighborhoods, communities, cities, etc. It considers how American communities have changed over time and what the current characteristics are, and how these characteristics are related to the "quality of life" in the communities. Students study theoretical and empirical approaches to studying communities, particularly but not exclusively American communities. Among specific areas of community research covered are: spatial inequality and concentrated poverty; what housing research shows about the importance of community to outcomes for families and children; the impact of community on health; and community development as a strategy for community change. Permission required.

SOC 740 - Sociology of Mental Health
Credits: 4.00
Introduces students to different sociological approaches for studying and understanding mental health and illness. Students examine the social distribution of mental illness in the United States and the social-structural factors that help to explain mental health variations. Also addresses issues surrounding mental health treatment, systems, and policies for the mentally ill. Permission required.

SOC #742 - Sociology and Social Policy
Credits: 4.00
Social policy and public policy defined: description of the policy making process. The political sociology of the policy-making process; who makes policy and who influences policy, under what conditions and with what effect. Definition of social policy research and the various roles social scientists can adopt for policy-relevant work. Students are responsible for critiquing the readings and for preparing a substantial research paper. Permission required.

SOC 745 - Race, Ethnicity, and Inequality
Credits: 4.00
Sociological perspectives on race and ethnic relations for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Topics include the creation of racial and ethnic identities, the nature and extent of segregation, education, employment, and wealth inequalities, and the effects of state policy. The course emphasizes both theoretical and empirical assessments. Permission required.

SOC 773 - Sociology of Childhood
Credits: 4.00
Exposes students to a variety of sociological perspectives about childhood in American society. Stimulates analysis about how social institutions, like the modern family, school, economic system, justice system and communications media affect children. Assumes prior understanding of important sociological concepts, critical thinking skills and social science writing ability. Permission required. Writing intensive.

SOC 776 - Family Violence Research Seminar
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of abusive relationships within the family, especially physical and sexual abuse of children and spouses. Each student designs and conducts and empirical study to test a theory purporting to explain intra-family violence, the consequences of violence for families and society, or a study of what might prevent family violence. Permission required.

SOC 780 - Social Conflict
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of the social conditions associated with the major forms of conflict management in human societies: discipline, rebellion, vengeance, negotiation, mediation, law, therapy, supernaturalism, and avoidance. Permission required. Writing intensive.

SOC 793 - Internship
Credits: 4.00
Provides upper level sociology majors with an opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to the real world. Students meet weekly to discuss assigned readings, internship progress and semester project. Project ideas are developed with faculty and internship site supervisor. Permission required.

SOC 794 - Evaluation of Social Programs
Credits: 4.00
Evaluation research defined: purposes of evaluation, design of evaluation studies, setting of programs, utilization of evaluation results. Examination of case studies of evaluations of social programs. Students are responsible for designing an evaluation study in their chosen substantive area. Permission required.

SOC 797 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Occasional or experimental offerings. May be repeated for different topics. Permission required. Writing intensive.