Philosophy  

PHIL 401 - General Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Depending upon the instructor, emphasizes basic philosophic problems, recurrent types of philosophies, or selected readings from the history of philosophy.

PHIL 401H - Honors/General Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Depending upon the instructor, emphasizes basic philosophic problems, recurrent types of philosophies, or selected readings from the history of philosophy. Writing intensive.

PHIL 401W - General Introduction to Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Depending upon the instructor, emphasizes basic philosophic problems, recurrent types of philosophies, or selected readings from the history of philosophy. Writing intensive.

PHIL 412 - Beginning Logic
Credits: 4.00
Principles of reasoning and development of symbolic techniques for evaluating deductive and inductive arguments

PHIL 412H - Honors/Beginning Logic
Credits: 4.00
Principles of reasoning and development of symbolic techniques for evaluating deductive and inductive arguments

PHIL 417 - Philosophical Reflections on Religion
Credits: 4.00
Introduces philosophy of religion to help students become critically aware of philosophical issues involved in various forms of religious belief and some of the persisting philosophical understandings of those issues.

PHIL 421 - Philosophy and the Arts
Credits: 4.00
Contemporary philosophic concerns and perspectives as reflected in one or more of the arts (literature, theatre, film, music, plastic art). Writing intensive.

PHIL 421H - Honors/Philosophy and the Arts
Credits: 4.00
Contemporary philosophic concerns and perspectives as reflected in one or more of the arts (literature, theatre, film, music, plastic art). Writing intensive.

PHIL 424 - Science, Technology, and Society
Credits: 4.00
Consideration of the scientific endeavor and its social import from a philosophical perspective.

PHIL 424H - Honors/Science, Technology and Society
Credits: 4.00

PHIL 430 - Ethics and Society
Credits: 4.00
Critical study of principles and arguments advanced in discussion of current moral and social issues. Possible topics: violence, rules of warfare, sexual morality, human rights, punishment, abortion.

PHIL 430H - Honors/Ethics and Society
Credits: 4.00
Critical study of principles and arguments advanced in discussion of current moral and social issues. Possible topics: violence, rules of warfare, sexual morality, human rights, punishment, abortion. Writing intensive.

PHIL 430W - Ethics and Society
Credits: 4.00
Critical study of principles and arguments advanced in discussion of current moral and social issues. Possible topics: violence, rules of warfare, sexual morality, human rights, punishment, abortion. Writing intensive.

PHIL 435 - Human Nature and Evolution
Credits: 4.00
Philosophy of biology and the evolutionary process. Readings of scientists and philosophers' commentary on scientists. Examination of the differences between scientific debate and philosophic debate. Philosophical study of scientific theory stressing humans' place in the natural world and the ethical implication of humans as natural beings in the evolutionary process.

PHIL 436 - Social and Political Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Examines social and political thought that may include texts from ancient through contemporary times, addressing topics such as natural rights, revolution, law, freedom, justice, power. Questions may include: What is a community, and how are individuals related to communities? Can any particular form of government be morally justified, and if so, what kind of government? Can anarchism work? Is there something wrong with a society in which there is private ownership of property? What is oppressive? What is freedom, and are we free? What roles should different forms of power play in a society? Could and should there be a genderless society? Is ethnic diversity valuable?

PHIL 436H - Honors/Social and Political Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Examines social and political thought that may include texts from ancient through contemporary times, addressing topics such as natural rights, revolution, law, freedom, justice, power. Questions may include: What is a community, and how are individuals related to communities? Can any particular form of government be morally justified, and if so, what kind of government? Can anarchism work? Is there something wrong with a society in which there is private ownership of property? What is oppressive? What is freedom, and are we free? What roles should different forms of power play in a society? Could and should there be a genderless society? Is ethnic diversity valuable? Writing intensive.

PHIL 436W - Social and Political Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Examines social and political thought that may include texts from ancient through contemporary times, addressing topics such as natural rights, revolution, law, freedom, justice, power. Questions may include: What is a community, and how are individuals related to communities? Can any particular form of government be morally justified, and if so, what kind of government? Can anarchism work? Is there something wrong with a society in which there is private ownership of property? What is oppressive? What is freedom, and are we free? What roles should different forms of power play in a society? Could and should there be a genderless society? Is ethnic diversity valuable? Writing intensive.

PHIL 437 - Social and Political Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
This course is the same as PHIL 436 Social and Political Philosophy but without the Inquiry designation. Examines social and political thought that may include texts from ancient through contemporary times, addressing topics such as natural rights, revolution, law, freedom, justice, power. Questions may include: What is a community, and how are individuals related to communities? Can any particular form of government be morally justified, and if so, what kind of government? Can anarchism work? Is there something wrong with a society in which there is private ownership of poverty? What is oppressive? What is freedom, and are we free? What roles should different forms of power play in a society? Could and should there be a genderless society? Is ethnic diversity valuable?

PHIL #444 - Remaking Nature/The Ethics and Politics of Genetic Engineering
Credits: 4.00
Examines the biological, ethical, social, and political issues raised by genetic engineering. Students, acting as an "Advisory Council on Bioethics," formulate policy recommendations about whether or not there should be a Federal ban on research involving cloning of human embryos and genetically modifying plants and animals for food. Writing intensive.

PHIL 444A - Concepts of Self
Credits: 4.00
An inquiry into the nature of the self and into the conditions under which it may best flourish. Is the self fundamentally biological, spiritual, or social?. Draws on a variety of perspectives in an attempt to answer these questions, including East Asian as well as Western philosophical ideas, feminist theory, Existentialism, and others. Writing intensive.

PHIL 447 - Computer Power and Human Reason
Credits: 4.00
The historical origins of the science of computation. The implications of the nature of information-processing for understanding the mind-body relation. Examines the possible social, economic, and educational consequences of the computer revolution.

PHIL 447H - Honors/Computer Power and Human Reason
Credits: 4.00
The historical origins of the science of computation. The implications of the nature of information-processing for understanding the mind-body relation. Examines the possible social, economic, and educational consequences of the computer revolution.

PHIL 450 - Ecology and Values
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on historical and contemporary philosophies of nature and their effects on human interaction with the environment. Issues include obligations to future generations and to animals, plants, and ecosystems; moral limits on consumption and reproduction; and the existence of objects of intrinsic value. Specific topics may include species loss and biological diversity, population growth, changes in the atmosphere, energy use, and sustainable development.

PHIL 450H - Honors/Ecology and Values
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on historical and contemporary philosophies of nature and their effects on human interaction with the environment. Issues include obligations to future generations and to animals, plants, and ecosystems; moral limits on consumption and reproduction; and the existence of objects of intrinsic value. Specific topics may include species loss and biological diversity, population growth, changes in the atmosphere, energy use, and sustainable development.

PHIL 495 - Tutorial Reading
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Basic introductory reading under faculty direction on topics of philosophical importance. Books offered for tutorial reading may be in any area the instructor chooses or on independent study basis up to a maximum of 8 credits. Prereq: permission.

PHIL 496 - Topics
Credits: 4.00
Introductory-level seminar in specific topics or problems considered from a philosophic point of view.

PHIL 500 - Workshop
Credits: 4.00
Introduces methods of studying philosophical texts. Emphasizes reading philosophical texts and arguments for comprehension, and on writing philosophically with accuracy and clarity. Open to PHIL majors only (PHIL minors may enroll if they receive permission). Writing intensive.

PHIL 510 - Philosophy and Feminism
Credits: 4.00
Focuses on the philosophical issues in feminism primarily through the work of historical and contemporary philosophers. Topics include the question of the nature of women, feminism as an ethical and political theory, feminism as an exploration and transformation of the self, feminism as a philosophical methodology, the institutions of marriage and motherhood. Writing intensive.

PHIL 520 - Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Major Eastern traditions of philosophy. Concentration on Indian, Chinese, and Japanese systems may vary from semester to semester.

PHIL 525 - Existentialism
Credits: 4.00
Readings from existential philosophy and literature. Selections may be drawn from the works of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir, Buber, Bultman, Merleau-Ponty, Tillich, Kafka, and others.

PHIL 525H - Honors/Existentialism
Credits: 4.00
Readings from existential philosophy and literature. Selections may be drawn from the works of Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir, Buber, Bultman, Merleau-Ponty, Tillich, Kafka, and others.

PHIL 530 - Ethics
Credits: 4.00
Critical examination of the development of philosophical thinking regarding human values, rights, and duties.

PHIL 550 - Symbolic Logic
Credits: 2.00
Principles and techniques of modern logic. Topics: propositional logic, truth tables, predicate logic, and, time permitting, basic meta-theorems. Prereq: PHIL 412.

PHIL 560 - Philosophy Through Literature
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical implications of representative literary works, read in tandem with philosophical works or articles. The content will vary. The literary works explored may be drawn from ancient times through modern times. For examples, the classic Greek tragedy "Antigone" might be explored for its implications regarding moral, political, and feminist philosophy, or the philosophical implications of an anti-utopian contemporary work like "Brave New World" might be explored, or short stories drawn from science fiction and other speculative fiction might be used to explore the possibility of time travel or of machines with mental lives. Writing intensive.

PHIL 565 - Philosophy Through Film
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical exploration of film as a medium for developing philosophical ideas and for stimulating philosophical thinking about various issues reflected in film, from traditional philosophical issues to the pressing social and cultural issues of our time. The content will vary. Philosophical texts are read in tandem with screenings of a range of movies from Hollywood blockbusters and art house films to films made for TV. Philosophical issues such as the nature of consciousness, appearance and reality, God and evil, the good life, and time and memory might be explored. Film might also be used to examine representations of race and gender or violence in society; and the power of movies to influence society might be explored through documentaries and propaganda films. Required evening film screenings in addition to regular class meetings. Writing intensive.

PHIL 570 - Ancient Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Development of Western philosophy from its beginnings in Greece to the Roman period, with particular emphasis on the thought of Plato and Aristotle.

PHIL 570H - Honors/Ancient Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Development of Western philosophy from its beginnings in Greece to the Roman period, with particular emphasis on the thought of Plato and Aristotle.

PHIL #571 - Medieval Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical thought of the Middle Ages from inception in the late Roman period with thinkers such as Plotinus and Augustine through the late medieval speculative mysticism of such figures as Meister Eckhart. Writings of Augustine and Thomas Aquinas.

PHIL 580 - Modern Philosophy from Descartes to Kant
Credits: 4.00
The birth and development of distinctively modern philosophy in the thought of such creative minds as Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Rousseau, Reid, Kant, and others. Prereq: PHIL 570 or permission.

PHIL 610 - Advanced Topics in History of Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
In-depth examination of a major figure or philosophical movement in the history of philosophy. Content will vary. Consult the Time and Room Schedule for topics. Course may be taken twice for credit (a third time with permission of the undergraduate program director) so long as the topic is different. May not be repeated to improve an earlier grade. Prereq: two courses in history of philosophy or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL #616 - 19th Century Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical movements or philosophers associated with philosophical movements, such as later German idealism, French positivism, utilitarianism, Marxism, existentialism, and vitalism. Content will vary. Consult the Time and Room Schedule for topics. Course may be taken twice for credit (a third time with permission of the undergraduate program director) so long as the topic is different. May not be repeated to improve grade without approval from director of philosophy undergraduate program. Prereq: PHIL 574 or 575;/or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL #618 - 20th Century Anglo-American Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Major figures in the analytic tradition in England and America. Content will vary. Consult the Time and Room Schedule for topics. Course may be taken twice for credit (a third time with permission of the undergraduate program director) so long as the topic is different. May not be repeated to improve grade without approval from director of philosophy undergraduate program. Prereq: two courses in history of philosophy (one of which may be concurrent);/or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 620 - 20th Century European Philosophy
Credits: 4.00
Major figures or philosophical movements such as phenomenology, existentialism, critical social theory, and post-modernism. Content will vary. Consult Time and Room Schedule for topics. Course may be taken twice for credit (a third time with permission of the undergraduate program director) so long as the topic is different. May not be repeated to improve grade without approval from director of philosophy undergraduate program. Prereq: two courses in history of philosophy (one of which may be concurrent);/or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 631 - Topics in the Philosophy of Science
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical problems raised by the physical, biological, and social sciences. Content will vary. Topics may include the nature of scientific explanation, the role of mathematics in science, the relations of science to common sense, the relation of theory to observation, the nature of historical changes in scientific world view, claim to objectivity in the natural and social sciences, the role of values in scientific research, the relation of the logic of science to the philosophy and history of science. Prereq: two courses in history of philosophy;/or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 635 - Philosophy of Law
Credits: 4.00
Systematic study of salient features of legal systems. Possible topics: nature of law; concept of legal validity; law and morality; individual liberty and the law; legal punishment; legal responsibility and related concepts (for example, legal cause, harm, mens rea, negligence, strict liability, legal insanity). Writing intensive.

PHIL 660 - Law, Medicine, and Ethics
Credits: 4.00
Critical examination of the diverse legal and moral issues facing the profession of health care. Variable topics. Possible topics: duty to provide care; nature of informed consent to treatment; problems of allocating limited health-care resources (e.g., withdrawal of life-support systems, quality-of-life decisions, etc.); patient's right to confidentiality. Problems relating to involuntary preventive care (e.g., involuntary sterilization, psycho-surgery, etc.). Writing intensive.

PHIL 701 - Topics in Value Theory
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical inquiry into the nature of value. Topics may include the grounds of right and wrong, various conceptions of morality, the nature of good and evil, theories about the meaning of life, the nature of the beautiful. Content will vary. Consult the Time and Room Schedule for topics. Course may be taken twice for credit (a third time with permission of the undergraduate program director) so long as the topic is different. May not be repeated to improve grade without approval from director of philosophy undergraduate program. Prereq: permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 702 - Topics in Metaphysics and Epistemology
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study in one or more of the following topics: nature of reality, relationship of thought and reality, nature of knowledge and perception, theories of truth. Content will vary. Consult the Time and Room Schedule for topics. Course may be taken twice for credit (a third time with permission of the undergraduate program director) so long as the topic is different. May not be repeated to improve grade without approval from director of philosophy undergraduate program. Prereq: two courses in history of philosophy;/or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 720 - Philosophical Psychology
Credits: 4.00
Philosophical perspectives and problems concerning human nature or the human condition; e.g., the nature of "self," human action, the body-mind problem, freedom of the will, the meaning of "person," the nature of behavior, etc. Prereq: PHIL 500 and either PHIL 570 or PHIL 580; or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 730 - Theories of Justice
Credits: 4.00
The idea of justice is central to social, political, and legal theory. Considerations of justice are appealed to in assessing the legitimacy of governments, and the fair distributions of goods, and opportunities both with nation-states and globally, and to address specific social concerns such as radical or gender discrimination or access to health care. Examine both historical sources and contemporary debates about the nature of justice. Prereq: PHIL 500, 530, or permission.

PHIL 740 - Advanced Topics in the Philosophy of Law
Credits: 4.00
Content variable. In-depth examination of special topics (constitutional law, crime and punishment, international human rights and gender, sexual orientation, race and class in the law) or a major figure in the philosophy of law (Dworkin, Habermas and Rawls). May be repeated up to maximum of 8 credits. Prereq: PHIL 635 or permission. Writing intensive.

PHIL 780 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study of special topics: a problem, figure, or movement in the history of philosophy; or selected issues, thinkers, or developments in contemporary philosophy. Prereq: PHIL 500 and one course in the history of philosophy; or permission. May be repeated for credit. Writing intensive.

PHIL 795 - Independent Study
Credits: 1.00 to 8.00
For students who are adequately prepared to do independent, advanced philosophical work; extensive reading and writing. Before registering, students must formulate a project and secure the consent of a department member who will supervise the work. Conferences and/or written work as required by the supervisor. May be repeated to a total of 8 credits. Writing intensive.

PHIL 798 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 4.00
Two-course sequence open only to senior philosophy majors in the University Honors Program, the philosophy department honors-in-major program, or by special permission from the department. All senior thesis candidates must have a proposal approved in the spring of their junior year and a thesis adviser assigned by the undergraduate program director before registering for 798. Students must orally defend their theses before the department. (See department guidelines for further details.) Prerequisite for 798: PHIL 500. Prerequisite for 799: B- or above in 798. Writing intensive.

PHIL 799 - Senior Thesis
Credits: 4.00
Two-course sequence open only to senior philosophy majors in the University Honors Program, the philosophy department honors-in-major program, or by special permission from the department. All senior thesis candidates must have a proposal approved in the spring of their junior year and a thesis adviser assigned by the undergraduate program director before registering for 798. Students must orally defend their theses before the department. (See department guidelines for further details.) Prerequisite for 798: PHIL 500. Prerequisite for 799: B- or above in 798. Writing intensive.