Humanities  

HUMA 401 - Introduction to the Humanities
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the humanities. Taking as its entry point a significant work, the course is organized by topics related to that work, selected and arranged to invoke lively intellectual debate among faculty and students alike. Group lectures by the three core humanities faculty members. The instructors teaching the course will provide material for smaller weekly discussion sections led by each of those faculty members. Requirements include lively discussions, papers, and examinations. Not repeatable.

HUMA 401W - Introduction to Humanities
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of the humanities. Taking as its entry point a significant work, the course is organized by topics related to that work, selected and arranged to invoke lively intellectual debate among faculty and students alike. Group lectures by the three core humanities faculty members. The instructors teaching the course will provide material for smaller weekly discussion sections led by each of those faculty members. Requirements include lively discussions, papers, and examinations. Writing intensive.

HUMA 411 - Humanities I
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to the humanities and Western culture through literature, history, philosophy, music, art, and architecture. Examination of selected historical periods from classical Greece through the Renaissance through readings, films, slides, and field trips. Special fee. Writing intensive.

HUMA 412 - Humanities II
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to the humanities and Western culture through literature, history, philosophy, music, art, and architecture. Examination of selected historical periods from the Enlightenment to the present through the use of readings, films, slides, and field trips. Writing intensive.

HUMA 444 - Idea of University
Credits: 4.00
An inquiry course that introduces first-year students to the history of the university and to the philosophical, artistic, and political crises it has undergone and continues to undergo today. HUMA 444 is an interdisciplinary course, team-taught by three professors from different fields. Writing intensive.

HUMA 444A - Everlasting Fame: The Hero in Literature, Film, and Popular Culture
Credits: 4.00
An interdisciplinary introductory seminar designed for first-year students. Course uses an inquiry-guided approach to examine the concept of the hero and the heroic life through a variety of media. How do we define a hero? What are the common characteristics inherent in the heroic life? How has the idea of the hero evolved over time? Do we share a common definition of the hero? What criteria are essential to the heroic life? What does it mean to be a hero today? Students will explore possible answers to these questions through an examination of primary texts from ancient Indo-European myths to Celtic sagas, articles from historical, anthropological, and literary sources, and popular culture.

HUMA #444B - Richard Wright's Native Son and the American 1930s and 1940s
Credits: 4.00
This inquiry course uses Richard Wright's groundbreaking novel, Native Son, to explore ways in which literature can reflect, interact with, and change the world out of which it arises. After a careful reading of the novel, we consider how a writer's comments on his art can help us understand the art, how a novel's composition and reception affect our understanding, how the historical context of a work can help us reflect upon the relationship of literature and history, how other media such as film versions of the novel interpret it, and how social and philosophical interpretations of experience are reflected in the narrative.

HUMA 444C - Mozart and the Enlightenment: Social Norms and Sexual Behavior in the Age of Reason
Credits: 4.00
An interdiciplinary introduction to the European Enlightenment (apporximately 1690-1790) as a cultural phenomenon, arising from developments in the natural sciences, that infused all areas of human endeavor with new ways of thinking and behaving, including social norms and sexual behavior, and how it was communicated and disseminated, not only through the written word but also through theater and music, especially in works of Mozart exploring the use and abuse of Human Reason in daily life. Writing intensive.

HUMA 500 - Critical Methods in the Humanities
Credits: 4.00
Critical analysis of works in the humanities. Focuses on major texts, evaluation of secondary literature, research writing, criticism. Required of all HUMA majors. Writing intensive.

HUMA 510A - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

HUMA 510B - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

HUMA 510C - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

HUMA 510D - Ancient World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is a human being? How should we explain or understand what happens to us? How ought we to live? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science of ancient Greece and Rome. Writing intensive.

HUMA 511A - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive

HUMA 511B - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive

HUMA 511C - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive

HUMA 511D - Medieval World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
What is the soul and how is its health related to temptation and also to specifically Christian virtues? How closely does the medieval definition of an eternal God determine good and evil in daily life? To what extent does the hope of immortality affect the practice of writing literature, making art, studying philosophy, and investigating science? This team-taught course examines these important questions by focusing on the literature, art, philosophy, and science from the collapse of the classical world to the rise of capitalism. Writing intensive

HUMA 512A - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

HUMA 512B - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

HUMA 512C - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

HUMA 512D - Renaissance and Early Modern: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the interrelationship of art, literature, philosophy, and science from the High Renaissance into the 18th century. Study of the works and ideas of such influential figures as Shakespeare and Milton, Raphael and Rembrandt, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. Writing intensive.

HUMA 513A - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

HUMA 513B - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

HUMA 513C - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

HUMA 513D - Modern World: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Explores the central paradoxes of our culture in the modern age. Is there such a thing as "progress" and if so what is its nature? What is the relation of conscious and unconscious? Is the contemporary world devoid of meaning? Questions such as these are examined in relation to works since the 18th century in the fields of literature, history of science, philosophy, and art. Writing intensive.

HUMA 514A - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

HUMA 514B - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

HUMA 514C - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

HUMA 514D - 20th Century, 1900-1945: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
This course examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science in the first half of the twentieth century. Topics include the rise of modernism in literature and the arts, the distinctive themes of 20th century philosophy, and crucial innovations in the sciences. Students study the works of such figures as Picasso, Woolf, Einstein, Freud, and Wittgenstern. Writing intensive.

HUMA 515A - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

HUMA 515B - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

HUMA 515C - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

HUMA 515D - 20th Century, 1945-1999: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
Credits: 4.00
Examines the relationships of literature, art, philosophy, and science since the middle of the twentieth century. Topics include the philosophical and literary implications of the Holocaust and nuclear weapons, movements in the arts and literature since World War II, the rise of the sciences of life and information, and postmodernism. Students study the works of such figures as Arendt, Turing, Beckett, and Pollock. Writing intensive.

HUMA 519 - Classical Greece
Credits: 4.00
Examination of the culture of classical Greece through the history, drama, philosophy, and art of the period. Open to all students. Recommended for students in the humanities major. Special fee.

HUMA 550 - Budapest Spring Semester: Special Studies in Comparative Ideas
Credits: 4.00
This course involves periodic offerings in literature, art, history, philosophy and political science designed to stimulate reflection on ideas and issues in Hungarian and Central European history and culture in a larger global context. Topics vary depending upon the expertise of the resident faculty. Special fee.

HUMA 551 - Budapest Spring Semester: Field Studies in Art and Culture
Credits: 6.00
This course is designed to provide students with first-hand experience of art, history, culture, folklore, and traditions of Hungary and Central Europe. The course combines preparatory readings with guided field trips to museums, historial sites, and culturally significant events and locations. Students maintain a weekly blog reflecting on field trip experiences.

HUMA 592 - Special Topics in the Humanities
Credits: 2.00 to 8.00
Special topics; offered occasionally. May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits.

HUMA 609 - Ethnicity in America: The Black Experience in the 20th Century
Credits: 4.00
Team-taught course investigating music, literature, and social history of black America in the period of the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, World War II, and in the 1960s. Special attention to the theme of accommodation with, and rejection of, dominant white culture. (Also offered as AMST 609, ENGL 609.) Writing Intensive.

HUMA #610 - Regional Studies in America: New England Culture in Changing Times
Credits: 4.00
Team-taught course investigating some of the major contributions New England has made to American life. Focusing on three periods: the Puritan era, 1620-90; the Transcendental period, 1830-60; and the period of emerging industrialism in the late 19th century. Prereq: second-semester sophomore. (Also offered as AMST 610, ARTS 610, ENGL 610, and HIST 610.) Not for art studio major credit. Writing intensive.

HUMA 622 - Studies of Freedom and Liberty
Credits: 4.00
Principles of freedom and liberty that helped to form Western culture from the Renaissance to the present. Topics include concepts of human nature, theories of government and society. Readings include Machiavelli, Locke, Paine, Mill, Marx, Freud, Sartre, and Marcuse.

HUMA 640 - Birth of Rock and Roll
Credits: 4.00
An interdisciplinary study of the cultural forces that brought the birth of rock and roll in the 1950's. This study of pre-rock music and culture will be further enriched by art, literature, and photography which focuses on the roots of rock and roll. Writing intensive.

HUMA 650 - Humanities and the Law: The Problem of Justice in Western Civilization
Credits: 4.00
Interdisciplinary modular course examines interpretations of the nature of justice, its origins, the role of the professional judiciary, and the relationship of law and ethics. Students take three successive five-week modules during the semester. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

HUMA 651 - Humanities and Science: The Nature of Scientific Creativity
Credits: 4.00
Interdisciplinary modular course examines the historical and intellectual foundations of the physical, biological, and human sciences. Students take three successive five-week modules during the semester. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

HUMA #680 - New England Culture: Roots and Branches
Credits: 4.00
Interdisciplinary examination of the richness, variety, and significance of selective periods of New England culture using literature, history, art and photographic images, music, artifacts, and oral histories. Subjects include Native American lore, European American contributions to regional culture, New England's literary tradition and influence on American culture.

HUMA 698 - Independent Study
Credits: 4.00
Independent study open only to highly qualified juniors and seniors who have completed at least four humanities courses above the 400 level. Requires original research and substantial writing projects under the direction of a member of the core faculty of the humanities. Prereq: HUMA junior or senior majors; four HUMA courses above the 400 level.

HUMA 700 - Seminar
Credits: 4.00
Provides an opportunity for in-depth reading, viewing, and/or listening to texts and artifacts. Emphasis on the multiple perspectives and methodologies that can be brought to bear upon these works from several humanistic disciplines. May be repeated for credit. Writing intensive.

HUMA 730 - Special Studies
Credits: 4.00
Selected topics not covered by existing courses, with subjects to vary. May be repeated for credit. Prereq: one 400- or 500-level HUMA course or junior standing. Writing intensive.

HUMA 795 - Study of Creativity
Credits: 4.00
A study of human creativity through representative lives and works of such figures as daVinci, Einstein, Kathe Kollwitz, Bach, Dickens, and Freud. Lectures, class discussions, films, and slides supplemented by gallery tours plays, and concerts. Open to students with a background in humanities or by permission of the instructor. Special fee. (Normally offered every other year.) Writing intensive.

HUMA 796 - Study of Contemporary Issues
Credits: 4.00
Current social and political issues with focus on recent developments in public policy, science, and business, and their impact of social values. Prereq: junior status or permission. (Normally offered every other year.) Writing intensive.

HUMA 798 - Research Seminar
Credits: 1.00
Provides a context within which students may discuss and receive direction in the course of completing a major research paper. At the end of the seminar, students present their research to the faculty and their fellow students. Prereq: HUMA 500; senior standing; permission. Writing intensive.

HUMA 799 - Research Seminar
Credits: 3.00
Provides a context within which students may discuss and receive direction in the course of completing a major research paper. At the end of the seminar, students present their research to the faculty and their fellow students. Restricted to majors. Prereq: HUMA 500; HUMA 798; senior standing; permission. Writing intensive.