Geography  

GEOG 401 - Regional Geography of the Western World
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the people, places, and problems of six Westernized regions of the world -- Europe, Russia, Latin America, the Caribbean, North America, and Australia and Oceania. The course emphasizesfive themes: environmental geography, population and settlement, cultural coherence and diversity, geopolitical framework, and economic and social development.

GEOG 401H - Honors/Regional Geography of the Western World
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the people, places, and problems of six Westernized regions of the world -- Europe, Russia, Latin America, the Caribbean, North America, and Australia and Oceania. The course emphasizesfive themes: environmental geography, population and settlement, cultural coherence and diversity, geopolitical framework, and economic and social development.

GEOG 402 - Regional Geography of the Non-Western World
Credits: 4.00
Major culture areas of the non-Western world and the unique interaction of human and physical phenomena that produces the distinctive character of these areas. Emphasizes the manner in which people of different cultures have made use of opportunities and solved problems existing in the major regions occupied by non-Western cultures: the Middle East and North Africa, Africa south of the Sahara, Oriental Asia and the Pacific Islands.

GEOG 402H - Honors/Regional Geography of the Non-Western World
Credits: 4.00
Major culture areas of the non-Western world and the unique interaction of human and physical phenomena that produces the distinctive character of these areas. Emphasizes the manner in which people of different cultures have made use of opportunities and solved problems existing in the major regions occupied by non-Western cultures: the Middle East and North Africa, Africa south of the Sahara, Oriental Asia and the Pacific Islands.

GEOG 473 - Elements of Weather
Credits: 4.00
Basic principles of weather phenomena and the physical processes underlying these phenomena. Emphasis on weather patterns of New England. Lab.

GEOG 510 - Geography of New England
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the physical and human geography of New England, including landforms, climate and vegetation, population and settlement, urban patterns, culture and identity, political geography, natural resources, and economic development.

GEOG 514 - Geography of the United States and Canada
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the physical and human geography of the United States and Canada, including landforms, climate and biogeography, environmental issues, population and settlement, culture and identity, political geography, urban patterns, natural resources and economic development. Course content alternates between topics that are large in scope and scale, and others that are more narrowly focused.

GEOG 540 - Geography of the Middle East
Credits: 4.00
Environmental, cultural, political-geographic, and ecological foundations of the Middle East. Selected regional problems and issues, e.g., geographical dimensions of the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil, urbanization, population growth, and nomadism. (Not offered every year.)

GEOG #541 - Geography of Japan
Credits: 4.00
Examination of Japan's environmental setting, historical geographic evolution, distinctive cultural geographic patterns, population and settlement characteristics, internal spatial differentiation, economic growth, political geographic structure, and global importance. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

GEOG 550 - Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa
Credits: 4.00
Overview of major physical features and human patterns, with an emphasis on the interaction between people and place and the dynamic issues and challenges facing contemporary African societies. Environmental and resource issues, historical impacts on development, culture and social characteristics, rural and urban organization, industrialization and trade, and prospects for the future.

GEOG 560 - Geography of Natural Hazards
Credits: 4.00
A survey of natural hazards with a focus on what makes them hazardous to humans and how humans respond to those risks. Hazards that are considered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunami, floods, hurricanes and other severe weather events. The geography of community vulnerability to natural hazards is also examined.

GEOG 572 - Geography of the Natural Environment
Credits: 4.00
Provides an introduction to geography of the natural environment, including landforms, weather and climate, water resources, and biogeography. Examines the processes that shape the different elements of the environment and the relationships between them.

GEOG #573 - Biogeography
Credits: 4.00
Explores the introductory concepts of plant geography and biogeography, two interconnected disciplines that document and explain the changing distributions of plants and animals from both a spatial and temporal context. Gives equal emphasis to ecology (biomes, climates, soils), evolution (migration, speciation, dispersal), and applied biogeography and plant geography.

GEOG 574 - Geography of Landforms
Credits: 4.00
Explores the geography of earth's major landforms and the geographic factors that influence their development, distribution, and morphology. Topics include moutain building, river systems, desert migration and expansion, glacial and periglacial environments, shoreline evolution, and how these processes interact to form surface features that are unique to their geographic environment. Students analyze geographic infromation in class and in the field using air photos, topographic maps, and spatial data.

GEOG 581 - Human Geography
Credits: 4.00
Differentiation of the world in terms of population, race, language, religion, political territory, and economic life. Collection and critical use of empirical data; emphasis on spatial and ecological analysis.

GEOG 582 - Economic Geography
Credits: 4.00
Investigates the manner in which resources and space have been organized for the production of goods and services: agriculture, the extractive industries, manufacturing, and the tertiary sector. Empirical studies, theories of location, and location models. Major contemporary problems and issues in agriculture and food supply, energy sources, industrial readjustment, and the global economy. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

GEOG 583 - Urban Geography
Credits: 4.00
Spatial structure of cities and the city system. Emphasizes the North American city and its problems: land use, transportation, political fragmentation, physical environment, and residential patterns. Trends in urbanization in the developed and developing worlds. Global cities. (Not offered every year.)

GEOG 584 - Political Geography
Credits: 4.00
Interactions between geographic and political phenomena at the sub-national, national, and international levels. Emphasis on geographical aspects of current political problems within and between states. (Not offered every year.) Writing intensive.

GEOG 588 - Geography of Food
Credits: 4.00
Explores the geography of what people eat around the world. Examines the factors that shape food traditions in particular places and regions, including geographical differences in the environment, population patterns, cultural characteristics, political processes, economic conditions, and history. Considers how diets are changing today in response to globalization and other forces. Emphasis will be on common, everyday foods eaten by regular people. Organized regionally. Special fee.

GEOG 595 - Statistics for Geographers
Credits: 4.00
Introduces statistics to geographers. Utilizes facts, such as population, vegetation patterns, and policy differences in terms of spatio-temporal focus. Students learn concepts from lectures and statistical tools for analysis during labs and homework assignments.

GEOG 650 - Field Methods in Geography
Credits: 4.00
a survey of selected geographical field methods and the application of these methods - both qualitative and quantitative. It is designed around a series of field techniques, research and lab exercises, and the classroom setting which will introduce students to techniques widely used in gathering and analyzing spatial data in the geographical context. Special fee.

GEOG 658 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the use of geographic information systems (GIS) for natural resources and related fields. Data models/structures, map projections, data input/output/storage, data analysis/modeling, interpolation, and data/quality standards. Hands-on using ArcView 3.x GIS software. Students are strongly encouraged to complete an introductory course in statistics before enrolling in course. Permission. (Also offered as NR 658.)

GEOG 670 - Climatology
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the study of the Earth's climate. Examines the influences on long-term global and regional average temperate and precipitation through climate data interpretation and analysis. Such analysis serves as the basis for climate classification and characterization of climate variability.

GEOG 671 - Advanced Weather Analysis
Credits: 4.00
Examines in depth, the physical processes that govern the development and movement of weather systems and the principles that drive the lowest layer of the atmosphere. Topics include the relationship between surface and upper-level, tropospheric air flow, vertical motion, mesoscale storm development, and techniques used in weather analysis and forecasting. Prereq: GEOG 473.

GEOG 673 - Issues in Environmental Geography
Credits: 4.00
Examines a sample of contemporary environmental issues from a geographic perspective. Emphasizes the importance of scale, human influences, and impacts on resources. Analyzes issues of regional, national, and global interest. Writing intensive.

GEOG 680 - Historical Geography
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to major themes, important scholars, and commonly used research techniques in historical geography. Course is reading and research oriented. Focus will be on North America. (Also listed as HIST 680.) Writing intensive.

GEOG 685 - Geography of Population and Development
Credits: 4.00
A regional approach to the study of population geography with concern for the interaction between the focus of economic growth and the components of population change and development. Considers the environmental impact of developing trends in the developed and developing worlds and the relationship of these trends to sustainable growth and population patterns. Writing intensive.

GEOG 690 - Geography of Third World Development
Credits: 4.00
Explores the geography of development in the Third World (Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Oceania). Addresses factors that affect development spatially and temporally. Emphasis on geographic scale (local, national, regional, and global). Students write and present critical thinking papers that address the interactions of development factors at different scales.

GEOG 695 - Internship
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
Internships provide an opportunity for on-the-job skill development and practical experience in a closely supervised work setting. The student must provide a written proposal to a supervising faculty member before an internship program is approved. At the end of the semester, the student must make a presentation, provide work samples, or submit a detailed report, log, or portfolio describing the internship experience. May be repeated for up to 8 hours of credit. Cr/F.

GEOG 757 - Remote Sensing of the Environment
Credits: 4.00
Practical and conceptual presentation of the use of remote sensing and other geospaital technologiesfor mapping the environment. The course begins with the use of aerial photographs (Photogrammetry and photo interpretation) and includes measures of photo scale and area, parallax and stereo viewing, object heights, flight planning, photo geometry, the elctromagnetic spectrum, camera image analysis, global positioning systems (GPS), and geographic information systems (GIS). Conceptual lectures are augmented with practical homework assignments and hands-on lab exercises. Prereq: Algebra. Special fee. Lab. (Also offered as NR 757).

GEOG 759 - Digital Image Processing for Natural Resources
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to digital remote sensing, including multispectral scanners (Landsat and SPOT), radar, and thermal imagery. Hands-on image processing including filtering, image display, ratios, classification, registration, and accuracy assessment. GIS as it applies to image processing. Discussion of practical applications. Use of ERDAS image-processing software. Knowledge of PCs required. Prereq: GEOG 757 or equivalent and permission. (Also offered as NR 759).

GEOG 760 - Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources
Credits: 4.00
Introduces the use of geographic information systems (GIS) for use with natural resources including data input, manipulation, storage, analysis, and display. Accuracy of spatial data and use of digital elevation models. Discussion of practical applications. Use of PC Arc/Info software. Prereq: permission. Lab. (Also listed as NR 760.)

GEOG 795 - Special Project
Credits: 2.00 or 4.00
Readings, library, archival, and fieldwork. Primarily for geography seniors. Prereq: permission. Writing intensive.

GEOG 796 - Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
Special Topics in Geography: A) Climatology, B) Environmental Geography, C) Urban Geography, D) Political Geography, E) Population Geography, F) Economic Geography, G) Cultural Geography. Prereq: permission

GEOG 797 - Seminar
Credits: 2.00
Exploration of geography as a research discipline. Definition and investigation of research problems. Primarily for geography seniors. May be repeated up to a maximum of 4 credits.

GEOG 799 - Honors Thesis
Credits: 4.00
Independent research project conducted under supervision of a faculty sponsor culminating in a written thesis. Students must also make a public presentation of their thesis. Required for all honors students. Open only to geography majors who are part of the honors program. Before registering for the course, students must secure a faculty sponsor, obtain approval for a thesis topic, and complete an honors thesis student/sponsor agreement.