Classics  

CLAS 401 - Classical Mythology
Credits: 4.00
Survey of myths and sagas of ancient Greece and Rome. No classical preparation necessary. Background course for majors in English, the arts, music, history, modern languages, classics. Special fee.

CLAS 401H - Honors/Classical Mythology
Credits: 4.00
Survey of myths and sagas of ancient Greece and Rome. No classical preparation necessary. Background course for majors in English, the arts, music, history, modern languages, classics. Special fee. Writing intensive.

CLAS 405 - Introduction to Greek Civilization
Credits: 4.00
A broad historical exploration of Greek civilization. Topics include: architecture, art, law, literature, philosophy, poetry, politics, religion, society, warfare, and their legacy to the modern world. Open to all students. No prior knowledge of the ancient world assumed; all readings are in English. Ideal background for students of English, philosophy, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, modern languages. Special fee.

CLAS 406 - Introduction to Roman Civilization
Credits: 4.00
A broad historical exploration of Roman civilization. Topics include: architecture, art, law, literature, philosophy, poetry, politics, religion, society, warfare, and their legacy to the modern world. Open to all students. No prior knowledge of the ancient world assumed; all readings are in English. Ideal background for students of English, philosophy, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, modern languages. Special fee.

CLAS 411 - Elementary Hittite I
Credits: 4.00
Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS 412 - Elementary Hittite II
Credits: 4.00
Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS 413 - Elementary Sanskrit I
Credits: 4.00
Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS 414 - Elementary Sanskrit II
Credits: 4.00
Elements of grammar, reading of simple prose. Special fee.

CLAS 421 - Major Greek Authors in English
Credits: 4.00
Major classical authors such as Homer, the Tragedians of Athens, Herodotus, Thucydides, and Plato in the context of their civilization, from which so much of our contemporary culture derives. For students unprepared to read Greek. Background for majors in English, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, philosophy, modern languages. Open to all students. Special fee. Writing intensive.

CLAS #422 - Major Roman Authors in English
Credits: 4.00
Major classical authors such as Plautus, Terence, Cicero, Catallus, Vergil, Ovid, Seneca, Juvenal, and Tacitus in the context of their civilization, from which so much of our contemporary culture derives. For students unprepared to read Latin. Background for majors in English, philosophy, history, Latin, Greek, the arts, music, modern languages. Open to all students. Writing intensive.

CLAS 444C - Is Winning Everything? Competition in Ancient Sports
Credits: 4.00
An investigation of the competitive nature of Greek athletics and the Roman games. Focus is on how Greek and Roman views of the value of competition reflect the differences in their histories. Particular attention paid to the types of evidence and methods used by ancient historians. Open to all students. All readings in English.

CLAS 500 - Classical Mythology: Topics in World Literature
Credits: 4.00
Topics are chosen to introduce students to major themes and genres. (Also offered as FREN 500, GERM 500, ITAL 500, PORT 500, RUSS 500, SPAN 500.) May be repeated for credit. Writing intensive.

CLAS #506 - Introduction to Comparative and Historical Linguistics
Credits: 4.00
Major language families (primarily Indo-European) and the relationships among the languages within a family. Diachronic studies, methods of writing, linguistic change, glottochronology, etymological studies. Some language training and LING 505 desirable. (Also offered as LING 506.)

CLAS 510 - Building Rome
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the buildings and structures for which the Romans remain famous, such as the Pantheon, the Colosseum, and the aqueducts that allowed Rome to become a metropolis. A major focus is the connection between the changes in Roman society and the development of Roman architecture. Looks at both Rome and other important cities in the Roman Empire. All readings are in English. No prior knowledge of the ancient world required. Special fee.

CLAS 515 - Sustaining Ancient Rome: The Ecological Costs of Empire
Credits: 4.00
This course introduces students to the technological innovations of imperial Rome, examines the challenges involved in maintaining the city, and explores the effects of Roman technology and imperial growth on the Roman's themselves, the environment, and the people they conquered. A major focus is how Roman values affected Rome's ability to deal effectively with environmental, technological, and social problems. Topics include: over-hunting, deforestation, urban overpopulation, transporting food and water, disaster repsonse, and maintaining an army.

CLAS 520 - Greek and Roman Religion
Credits: 4.00
Exploration of the religious practices of the Greeks and Romans. Topics include: gods, sacrifice, rituals, sacred space, prayer, magic, curses, oracles, mystery religions, divination, and religious festivals. Particular attention paid to how religion intersected with daily life. Open to all students. All readings in English. Students who have previously taken CLAS 402 cannot receive credit for CLAS 410A, although they may receive credit for CLAS 410B and CLAS 410C. Special fee.

CLAS 525 - Greek and Latin Origins of Medical Terms
Credits: 4.00
Study of medical terminology. Exercises in etymology and the development of vocabulary in a context at once scientific, historical, and cultural. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Useful to premedical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary, nursing, medical technology, and other students in the biological and physical sciences. Open to all students. Special fee.

CLAS 530 - The Ancient Stage: Tragedy and Comedy
Credits: 4.00
Investigations into the dramatic works of the Greeks and Romans, the power of performance, and the cultural importance of stage productions. Readings include the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the comedies of Aristophanes, Menander, and Plautus. Ideal background for students of all theatrical and performance traditions. Open to all students. All readings in English. Students who have previously taken CLAS 402 cannot receive credit for CLAS 410A, although they may receive credit for CLAS 410B and CLAS 410C. Special fee.

CLAS 550 - Women in Antiquity
Credits: 4.00
The impact of women on society in Greece and Rome throughout Antiquity. The role of women in public, religious, and private life as well as their legal status through law codes. Men's views of women in different literary texts. Especially concentrating on the few existing texts written by women. All readings are in English. No prerequisite. Special fee. Writing intensive.

CLAS 560 - Sports, Spectacle, and Competition in the Ancient World
Credits: 4.00
This course treats the details of athletic training and competition, but it's primary focus is on investigating the importance of athletics to society and how athletics reflected the broader cultural values of the Greeks and Romans. Open to all students. All readings in English. Students who have previously taken CLAS 402 cannot receive credit for CLAS 410A, although they may receive credit for CLAS 410B and CLAS 410C. Special fee.

CLAS 595 - Topics
Credits: 4.00
Introduction and elementary study related to linguistic study of Latin and Greek or relevant to Greco-Roman culture and history. Primarily for students unprepared to read Latin and Greek. Topics: A) Byzantine Heritage; B) Grammar: Comparative Study of English and the Classical Languages; C) Greek and Latin Origins of Legal Terms; D) Greek and Latin Origins within the English Language; E) Classical Backgrounds of Modern Literature; F) Classical Archaeology.

CLAS 596 - Topics
Credits: 4.00
Introduction and elementary study related to linguistic study of Latin and Greek or relevant to Greco-Roman culture and history. Primarily for students unprepared to read Latin and Greek. Topics: A) Byzantine Heritage; B) Grammar: Comparative Study of English and the Classical Languages; C) Greek and Latin Origins of Legal Terms; D) Greek and Latin Origins within the English Language; E) Classical Backgrounds of Modern Literature; F) Classical Archaeology.

CLAS 604 - Golden Age of Rome
Credits: 4.00
A study of the early Roman Empire as created by Augustus and his immediate successors; glorified by Vergil, Horace, and the poets of the Golden Age; and described by Tacitus, Suetonius, and the prose writers of the Silver Age. Open to all students. Prereq: any CLAS course or permission of instructor. Writing intensive.

CLAS 694 - Supervised Practicum
Credits: 2.00 or 4.00
Participants earn credit for suitable pre-professional activities, including high school outreach, assisting in undergraduate courses and work with professional organizations, museum work. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors who are Classics, Latin, or Greek majors or minors and have above-average G.P.A.s. Writing assignments are required. Prereq: permission of instructor and program coordinator. Course does not count toward Classics, Latin, or Greek major or minor requirements. May be repeated up to a maximum of 8 credits. Special fee. Cr/F.

CLAS 695 - Special Studies
Credits: 2.00 or 4.00
Advanced work in classics. Research paper. Not open to freshmen and sophomores.

CLAS 696 - Special Studies
Credits: 2.00 or 4.00
Advanced work in classics. Research paper. Not open to freshmen and sophomores. Special fee.