NASA

Help create the next astrobiology road map

Be a part of the future of Astrobiology! It’s time to chart the future directions of astrobiology research and you can participate.

During the month of May, NASA will be hosting a series of on-line hangouts and discussions focusing on broad themes in astrobiology:

EOS Scientists Help Shape the Next Tools for Studying Earth Systems from Space

Oceanographer Joe Salisbury of the Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory and atmospheric scientist Carolyn Jordan of the Earth Systems Research Center are part of a large group of scientists from around the country working to define the science questions and the instrument/mission requirements for a new Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events satellite (GEO-CAPE).

NASA's Planetary Science Division Needs Reviewers -- Volunteer!

NASA's Planetary Science Division is currently seeking volunteer reviewers for 2 programs:

  • Outer Planets Research
  • Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration

A web form for volunteers can be found at http://science.nasa.gov/researchers/volunteer-review-panels/ where volunteers can indicate their interest and areas of expertise.

UNH Astrophysicists Create First Web-based Tool for Predicting Space Radiation Risks

Astrophysicists from UNH’s Space Science Center (SSC) have created the first online system for predicting and forecasting the radiation environment in near-Earth, lunar, and Martian space environments. The near real-time tool will provide critical information as preparations are made for potential future manned missions to the moon and Mars.

Associate professor of physics Nathan Schwadron of the UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS), which houses the SSC, is the lead developer of the new web-based tool known as PREDICCS.

UNH Researchers to Use Satellite Imagery in Study of Michigan Archaeological Sites

Researchers from UNH have received a grant from NASA’s Space Archaeology program to investigate the transition of indigenous hunter-gatherer cultures to agricultural-based communities in the U.S. Great Lakes region prior to European contact between AD 1200-1600.

The focus of the study will be to determine if “micrometeorological lake effects” around major inland lakes contributed to settlement and development of prehistoric agriculture by creating favorable conditions for an extended growing season.

NASA Seeking Reviewers for Remote Sensing Water Quality and Airborne Instrument Technology Transition Programs

NASA’s Science Mission Directorate would like to direct scientists' attention to its new volunteer reviewer web form at http://science.nasa.gov/researchers/volunteer-review-panels/.

In addition to some Space Science programs, the Directorate currently is seeking reviewers specifically for the review of proposals to the Remote Sensing Water Quality (RSWQ) and Airborne Instrument Technology Transition (AITT) ROSES programs.

Congress Restricts Collaborations Between NASA Grantees and China

Public Law 112-55, SEC. 539, the legislation addressing appropriations for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), contains a brief statement restricting the use of NASA funds. The bottom line is that NASA funds, including ROSES research grants, can no longer be used “…to participate, collaborate, or coordinate bilaterally in any way with China…”

NASA Rocket Carrying Instruments Built at UNH Launched Into Aurora

With the full sky shimmering in green aurora on Feb. 18, 2012, a team of scientists, including space physicist Marc Lessard and graduate students from UNH’s Space Science Center, launched an instrument-laden, two-stage sounding rocket from the Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska. The precision measurements from the rocket’s instruments will shed new light on the physical processes that create the northern lights and further our understanding of the complex sun-Earth connection.

UNH Space Scientist Helps IBEX Team Present Mission Findings at NASA Press Conference

Investigators on NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission, including UNH space physicist Eberhard Möbius, David McComas of the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Priscilla Frisch of the University of Chicago, as well as astronomer Seth Redfield of Wesleyan University, presented the mission findings at a press conference from NASA headquarters in Washington, DC on January 30, 2012 and broadcast via NASA TV at www.nasa.gov/sunearth.

UNH Scientists Receive NASA Funds to Measure Impact of Melting Mountain Glaciers for Next IPCC Assessment

Scientists in the Water Systems Analysis Group in the University of New Hampshire’s Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) have been funded by NASA to improve estimates of how melting mountain glaciers around the globe will contribute to sea level rise in the future. The data will be a critical new element in the next assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

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