Intellectual Property

“Excuse me, can you repeat that? What does that mean?” Part II

We are regularly reminded that acronyms and terms that are used at UNH and more specifically within UNHInnovation (UNHI) and in other technology transfer offices are not everyday phrases. Thus, the need arose for a continued discussion of these terms, as seen in UNHI’s December 10, 2013 blog post. The focus of this posting is to again look at some more general terms that are regularly used and more specifically, why they are used.

IP Matters in Every Deal

I attended the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Licensing Executive Society (LES), held in Philadelphia from September 22-25. As I’ve mentioned in an earlier blog post, LES is an international association of members with an interest in the transfer of technology, or licensing of intellectual property (IP) rights - from technical know-how and patented inventions to software, copyrights and trademarks.

Navigating the Intersections of Intellectual Asset Management and Graduate Education

Should graduate students sign confidentiality agreements before joining a lab?

Some classes involve projects with outside companies who request that participating students sign a confidentiality agreement. Should the university be responsible for signing the confidentiality agreements? Does it matter whether the class is required for a degree?

March 16, 2013: End of an Era

Since President Obama signed the America Invents Act (AIA) in September 2011, people with even a passing interest or remote connection to the patent system have had March 16, 2013 circled on their calendar.  The United States Patent System has been turned on its head, with some proclaiming victory. Common sentiments are that the law brings U.S.

Authorship v. Inventorship: The Difference Between Journal Authors and Patent Inventors

Being an author on a peer reviewed article or an inventor on a patent are highly respected achievements. However, to some, the concept that you are not automatically an inventor on a patent even though you are an author of a paper on the same subject matter is a profound concept.

Generally speaking, to be an author of an article, a person can have performed the underlying research, supervised the research, or written the paper, among other criteria. This is much less stringent than the requirement to be an inventor, because inventorship has a legal definition.

UNH’s Latest Startup Company Commercializes Anti-Fatigue Hydrogel

DURHAM, N.H. – Research from the University of New Hampshire’s chemistry department has resulted in an exclusive license agreement for an anti-fatigue hydrogel between the university and Wakup, Inc., UNH’s sixth startup company.

Low-Tech Solutions in a High-Tech World

On November 27, 2012, I attended the Christa McAuliffe Technology Conference in Manchester, New Hampshire to showcase Dr. Therese Willkomm’s assistive technologies. I have the pleasure of working with one of UNH’s most creative and inventive faculty members, who is regularly referred to as the MacGyver of Assistive Technology (AT). Dr. Willkomm literally travels the world lecturing on rehabilitative technologies and constructing extraordinary tools on site to help those with disabilities.

Bridging the Gap Between Concord and Durham:

How My Internship with the UNH Office for Research Partnerships and Commercialization has Benefitted Me and My Legal Education

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