Institute for the Study of Earth-Oceans-Space

EOS Scientists Help Shape the Next Tools for Studying Earth Systems from Space

Oceanographer Joe Salisbury of the Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory and atmospheric scientist Carolyn Jordan of the Earth Systems Research Center are part of a large group of scientists from around the country working to define the science questions and the instrument/mission requirements for a new Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events satellite (GEO-CAPE).

Cosmic Rays Alter Chemistry of Lunar Ice

Space scientists from UNH, working as part of a multi-institutional team, have quantified levels of radiation on the moon’s surface from galactic cosmic ray (GCR) bombardment that over time causes chemical changes in water ice and can create complex carbon chains similar to those that help form the foundations of biological structures. In addition, the radiation process causes the lunar soil, or regolith, to darken over time, which is important in understanding the geologic history of the moon.

UNH Space Scientist Helps IBEX Team Present Mission Findings at NASA Press Conference

Investigators on NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission, including UNH space physicist Eberhard Möbius, David McComas of the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and Priscilla Frisch of the University of Chicago, as well as astronomer Seth Redfield of Wesleyan University, presented the mission findings at a press conference from NASA headquarters in Washington, DC on January 30, 2012 and broadcast via NASA TV at www.nasa.gov/sunearth.

UNH Scientists Receive NASA Funds to Measure Impact of Melting Mountain Glaciers for Next IPCC Assessment

Scientists in the Water Systems Analysis Group in the University of New Hampshire’s Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) have been funded by NASA to improve estimates of how melting mountain glaciers around the globe will contribute to sea level rise in the future. The data will be a critical new element in the next assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

UNH Will Provide Instruments for Upcoming ESA and JAXA Satellite Missions

Scientists and engineers from the UNH Space Science Center (SSC) have been selected to provide instruments for two upcoming satellite missions led by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

The successful proposals draw upon the long history of work done at UNH for other satellite missions, including NASA’s Solar-Terrestrial Observatory (STEREO) that was launched five years ago.

UNH Doctoral Student Wins 2011 Switzer Environmental Award

UNH graduate student Matthew Vadeboncoeur was recently awarded a 2011 Switzer Environmental Fellowship by the Robert and Patricia Switzer Foundation. The fellowship is one of just 20 awarded this year by the foundation for emerging environmental leaders who are pursuing graduate degrees and are dedicated to working towards positive environmental change in their career work. Fellows, chosen from universities in New England and California, each receive $15,000 to help them complete their degrees.

Space Plasma Physics Explained in Two Minutes

What's space plasma physics, and why is UNH so good at it? Watch this animated video to find out. As we say here in New England, you'll be wicked smaht.

UNH Balloon to Measure Gamma Rays and Test Equipment for Space Experiments

Beginning Sunday, September 18, 2011 at NASA’s launch facility in Fort Sumner, New Mexico, space scientists from the University of New Hampshire will attempt to send a balloon up to 130,000 feet with a one-ton instrument payload to measure gamma rays from the Crab Pulsar, the remains of a supernova explosion that lies 6,500 light years from Earth. The launch is highly dependent on weather and wind conditions, and the launch window closes at the end of next week.

UNH Receives NSF Grant to Study Changes in Climate, Population, and Land Use in Africa

The University of New Hampshire has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study changes in land use and conservation around national parks in Africa as part of a larger investigation of tropical deforestation and degradation, which are major causes of global climate change.

Read about Space, Ocean and Earth Systems Science Research and Education at UNH in Spheres Online - Summer 2011 edition

The Summer 2011 issue of Spheres Online is now available.  Spheres is the electronic newsletter of the University of New Hampshire Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space.

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