Connections for Business

Soybeans and DNA: Two Important Supreme Court Decisions

The U.S. Supreme Court recently delivered two unanimous decisions, Bowman v. Monsanto (Bowman) and Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics (Myriad). One affirmed industry legal analysis, and the other upended it. In Bowman, the Court held that growing a patented plant and harvesting its seed is equivalent to making the patented seed.

Be a Part of the UNH-IOL at a Quarter Century!

In 2013, the UNH-IOL will enter its 25th year. In 1988, the needs of two competitive companies to work together to their mutual benefit helped form the InterOperability Laboratory. Since then, the thousands of companies partnering with the UNH-IOL all have benefited from this collaborative experiment between industry and academia.

Making History: The First Design Patent from the University of New Hampshire!

On March 19, 2013, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued UNH’s first Design Patent for the Tablet Pedestal/AT Pad Stand, a device developed by Dr. Therese Willkomm. Dr. Willkomm is the Director of ATinNH, the New Hampshire state-wide assistive technology program with the Institute on Disability, and also an assistant professor in the occupational therapy department.  

Navigating the Intersections of Intellectual Asset Management and Graduate Education

Should graduate students sign confidentiality agreements before joining a lab?

Some classes involve projects with outside companies who request that participating students sign a confidentiality agreement. Should the university be responsible for signing the confidentiality agreements? Does it matter whether the class is required for a degree?

A State-wide Infrastructure to Support Entrepreneurial Success

What happens when you have a round-table discussion among entrepreneurs and early stage companies in Durham’s incubator Idea Greenhouse, led by the Seacoast regional manager of the Small Business Development Center, with experts who know how to write a winning SBIR proposal, know how to reduce the roadblocks related to intellectual property and have state funding to seed research/business partnerships?  You have all the ingredients of a collaborative program that offers a pathway from innovation to commercialization and job creation for NH.

The Art of Copyrights: What You Need to Know About Your Legal Rights and the Art You Create

On vacation, you browse through a local art gallery and purchase a small painting as a memento of your trip. You hang the painting in your home, and find that you just love the painting and the ambience that it evokes. You decide that you would like to have note cards made of the painting – what a wonderful way to keep in touch with friends while sharing your love of the painting. And your friends respond about the vibrancy of the artwork, asking if you could sell them some of the notecards for their own use.

No problems, right?

Innovations in…Mobile Apps

The ORPC Innovation Catalyst Seminar Series is hosted monthly during the academic year. The Series allows for the discussion of issues and case studies, led by experienced speakers, that are of common interest and relevant to technology innovation and commercialization. In February, ORPC hosted a lively discussion on Innovations in Mobile Apps.

Our speakers presented different experiences and driving forces behind their own app development activities to a packed house of faculty, staff, students, and budding app developers from around New Hampshire.   

Authorship v. Inventorship: The Difference Between Journal Authors and Patent Inventors

Being an author on a peer reviewed article or an inventor on a patent are highly respected achievements. However, to some, the concept that you are not automatically an inventor on a patent even though you are an author of a paper on the same subject matter is a profound concept.

Generally speaking, to be an author of an article, a person can have performed the underlying research, supervised the research, or written the paper, among other criteria. This is much less stringent than the requirement to be an inventor, because inventorship has a legal definition.

Exhaustion of Rights: Copyright and the First Sale Doctrine

Exhaustion of Rights: Copyright and the First Sale Doctrine

The U.S. Copyright Act grants to a copyright holder the right to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies, perform, and display a copyrighted work. These rights of the copyright holder, however, are not unlimited. One controversial issue in the news recently has involved the first sale doctrine and the extent to which copyright holders can control a copyrighted work after the first sale of the article has transpired and the copyright holder is no longer the owner of the work.

The Art of Copyrights: What you need to know about your legal rights and the art you create

The ORPC and UNH Art and Art History Department are delighted to host Drs. Peter and Kate McGovern for a discussion on copyrights, art, and what artists should know about their rights.

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