UNH Research Digest ‒ February 2014

UNH Research Digest ‒ February 2014

May 23, 2014

The UNH Research Digest collects research news stories from across the University and provides brief summaries that showcase the breadth and depth of our research, scholarly activity, and artistic endeavors.

Preview a few of February’s stories below. Find the rest of the February Digest articles at the UNH Research Office web site: http://www.unh.edu/research/unh-research-digest.

Good Listeners: UNH and Dover Team Facilitate Discussion on City's K-12 Future
http://cola.unh.edu/article/2014/02/good-listeners-unh-and-dover-team-facilitate-discussion-citys-k-12-future     
http://www.unh.edu/unhtoday/NH-Listens

A meeting held by Dover Listens in February exemplified the civic engagement that N.H. Listens, an initiative of the Carsey Institute at UNH, has been working to facilitate since 2011. A unique program nationwide, N.H. Listens provides an open and welcoming platform for community conversations about public issues. This particular event, Strong Communities, Strong Schools, was attended by K-12 students, parents, local police officers, and health care workers. It was the first of three sessions intended to facilitate a dialogue on the future of education in the Dover. Funded by the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation with additional support from local businesses, these meetings are tackling challenging local issues such as budget planning, accommodation for larger classes, and more support for school staff.

Michele Holt-Shannon, associate director of N.H. Listens, kicks off the discussion in Dover

Michele Holt-Shannon, associate director of N.H. Listens, kicks off the discussion in Dover.

Credit: N.H. Listens

Research: Biomedical Bleeding Affects Horseshoe Crab Behavior
http://www.unh.edu/news/releases/2014/02/bz24crabs.cfm    
http://www.unh.edu/campusjournal/2014/02/research-biomedical-bleeding-affects-horseshoe-crab-behavior

Horseshoe crabs are an essential component of the ecosystem, but their blood is an unrivaled component in life-saving pharmaceuticals. In an effort to ensure that the biomedical bleeding of horseshoe crabs is a sustainable practice, Win Watson, professor of zoology, is collaborating with other researchers to better understand the effects the process has on the crabs. In their N.H. Sea Grant-funded study titled Sublethal Behavioral and Physical Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the American Horseshoe Crab, Watson and his colleagues found that the collecting and bleeding process causes changes in the crabs’ behavior and physiology that could lead to a decline in the population. The research team hopes that their proposed solutions, such as delaying the blood harvest until after breeding season, will be adopted to help save these valuable creatures while still being able to take advantage of their irreplaceable blood.

Horseshoe crab fitted with an accelerometer to record its movements

A horseshoe crab fitted with an accelerometer to record its movements before and after the bleeding procedure.

Credit: Win Watson

Luna Tunes
http://www.unh.edu/unhtoday/veterans/Crater-radio

Marty Quinn, team member of the UNH-led Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation instrument on board NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, is making scientific data more accessible and meaningful to people who are blind or visually impaired by allowing them to hear what goes on in space. He has “sonified” the mission’s raw data into musical tones that represent radiation around the moon. Auditory explanations accompany the radiation “notes” that are represented by instruments such as piano, strings, and steel drums. The often soothing tunes change based on the calmness or intensity of current radiation conditions.

Marty Quinn, team member of the UNH-led Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation instrument on board NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Credit: UNH Institute for the
Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space

Tags: 
Bookmark and Share