Measuring Power - An Improved Tool for Cycling Fitness

Measuring Power - An Improved Tool for Cycling Fitness

Oct 14, 2011

New research from exercise scientists at the University of New Hampshire has found that effective cycling training regimens, which generally are created after expensive, time-consuming laboratory tests, can be developed from a relatively simple, do-it-yourself test.

Using two tools most competitive cyclists already own—a power meter, an increasingly common training device that mounts on a bicycle’s rear wheel, and a stationary bicycle trainer—graduate student Jay Francis ’09 modified a three-minute all-out cycling test and found that it is as effective as more lab-intensive measurements for determining exercise intensity.

The study, which was Francis’s master’s thesis, is published in the September 2010 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise, the premier journal in the field. Coauthors of the study were Francis' adviser, UNH Assistant Professor of Kinesiology Dain LaRoche, UNH exercise science professor Timothy Quinn and Markus Amann of the department of internal medicine at the University of Utah.

Dr. LaRoche says it’s unusual for a master’s-level student to have an article accepted in the prestigious Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise journal. More importantly, says LaRoche, Francis’s work can now have an impact on athletes. “There’s so much misinformation out there about how to train,” he says. “Jay is providing a real service for mid-range cyclists.”

 

Full article

Study abstract

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