masthead for UNH Government relations Web site http://www.unh.edu/newsbrief

Opportunities for Entrepreneurs

Governor John Lynch and UNH President Mark W. Huddleston launch the Green Launching Pad

Founded in 2010, the Green Launching Pad is a strategic partnership of UNH and the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Green Launching Pad funds opportunities for New Hampshire entrepreneurs with new green business ideas in areas such as clean and renewable energy, energy efficiency, energy conservation, and emission reduction. In the second year of funding, the Green Launching Pad is expected to provide up to five projects with $100,000 in funding and accelerated business development assistance.
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President Mark Huddleston

Welcome to the first edition of the University of New Hampshire News Brief. Change is taking place quickly at New Hampshire's flagship public university as we develop new programs and initiatives that are enabling UNH to address the future needs of our state.

The purpose of this newsletter is to keep you, our valuable partners, up to speed on important developments at UNH that have a direct impact on the work you do as lawmakers, educators, business and civic leaders, and other decision-makers statewide.
Rather than publish on a set schedule, News Brief will reach you as new developments occur, providing timely information specially prepared by the University's Government Relations office.

Learn more about UNH by contacting our Government Relations Office.


Sincerely,
Mark W. Huddleston
President
University of New Hampshire

Did you know?

  • UNH contributes $1.3 billion to the state's economy every year.

  • The student athlete graduation rate is 97 percent (second highest in the nation for NCAA Div. I schools).

  • There are 13,300 undergraduate and 2,286 graduate students enrolled at UNH.

  • There are more than 46,000 UNH alumni living in N.H.

link to survey

 

Long-Term Care

Young hands cradle the hands of an elderly woman.

Two UNH institutes—the New Hampshire Institute on Health Policy and Practice (NHIHPP) and the Institute on Disability (IOD)—received $900,000 from the federal department of Health and Human Services for programs to better support seniors, individuals with disabilities, and caregivers as they navigate health and long-term care options. UNH works in concert with the Bureau of Elderly and Adult Services at New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services and the ServiceLink Resource Center (SLRC) Network to implement these projects. 
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Reducing Energy BillsLogo for the NE Carbon Challenge

The weather outside is frightful, and so are many homeowners' energy bills this time of year. Now, a Web site developed by UNH and Clean Air-Cool Planet can help homeowners develop a customized energy plan to reduce household energy consumption.
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Protecting the State's Forests

Michael Gagnon, teacher at Alvirne High School, received the 2010 Gary N. Lauten Award for outstanding service to the NH Forest Watch Program. Forest Watch originated with NH Space Grant and is celebrating more than 20 years of environmental monitoring with students.The University's Forest Watch program offers a unique way of conducting science research with the help of primary and secondary school students across New England who collect and process data relating to air pollution damage in forests near their schools. Since its inception, more than 350 schools have participated in the program.
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Reducing
Drop-Out RatesA hight school drop out, male sits with his head in his hands

Ten New Hampshire high schools that partnered with a project of the Institute on Disability (IOD) at UNH significantly reduced student dropout rates.
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State Population GrowthMap of New Hampshire with stick figures across it.

The first data from the 2010 Census shows that New England grew more slowly than the rest of the United States between 2000 and 2010, with New Hampshire the fastest-growing state in the region, according to Kenneth Johnson, professor of sociology at UNH and senior demographer at the University's Carsey Institute.
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