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UNH Holds Information Session May 17 For Master’s In Nursing Program Open To Those With Non-Nursing Bachelor’s Degrees

Contact: Sharon Keeler
603-862-1566
UNH Media Relations

May 10, 2004



DURHAM, N.H. -- In response to the acute shortage of nurses in New Hampshire and nationwide, the Department of Nursing in the School of Health and Human Services at the University of New Hampshire has developed a direct entry master’s program for individuals who hold a non-nursing bachelor’s degree.

UNH will be holding a public information session on the program Monday, May 17, 2004 from 5 to 7 p.m. in Hewitt Hall on the Durham campus. For room location or additional information, contact Patty Jarema, at (603) 862-2395 or, pjarema@cisunix.unh.edu or visit www.unh.edu/nursing.

UNH’s direct entry master’s in nursing program is unique in New Hampshire, and joins a growing trend of similar programs across the nation. Accelerated programs in nursing have shown a significant increase in the last 10 years in response to both the need for nurses and the interest in nursing as a result of the downturn in the economy.

The two-and a-half year, full-time program prepares students to take the Nursing Licensure Exam (NCLEX) after the first year of courses, become a Registered Nurse, and graduate with a master’s degree in the clinical nursing leadership program. The master’s of science in clinical nursing leadership program focuses on the development of nurses at the advanced clinician level.

The UNH program will increase the number of master’s prepared nurses at patients’ bedsides which, according to a recent study by Dr. Linda Aiken and colleagues, published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), leads to better patient outcomes and more cost effective care. In addition, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing states, “Graduates of accelerated programs are prized by nurse employers who value the many layers of skill and education these graduates bring to the workplace.”

The need for nurses with master’s and doctoral degrees to fill faculty positions is also critical, as more students are applying to nursing programs, but not enough teachers are available to meet the need.

UNH's Department of Nursing is one of the oldest and largest departments within the School of Health and Human Services. As the only four-year public nursing program in New Hampshire, the department is committed to providing leadership in nursing education and practice in the state and region. The department is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.