UNH Welcomes 'Dean Of Death' To Discuss Schoolyard Terrorism April 19
Contact:  Lori Wright
603-862-0574
UNH Media Relations
April 12, 2007


DURHAM, N.H. -- The University of New Hampshire welcomes noted criminologist and “Dean of Death” James Alan Fox, who will discuss schoolyard terrorism at this year’s Holden Lecture.

“Schoolyard Terror: Easy solutions that won’t work and difficult ones that will,” takes place at 7 p.m., Thursday, April 19, 2007, in Richards Auditorium of Murkland Hall. The event is sponsored by the Holden Fund, Justice Studies Program and the Department of Sociology.

“Over the past decade, safety has eclipsed scholarship as the primary concern of countless students and their parents in schools across America. Regrettably, hype and hysteria precipitated by deadly shootings at Columbine High and elsewhere have prompted many ill-advised responses that in all likelihood will not address the fundamental problems of adolescent anger and alienation. Even worse, some violence prevention approaches may actually make matters worse and intensify the contagion of schoolyard bloodshed,” Fox says.

Fox’s presentation exposes many of the quick fixes that are destined to fail, including tightened security, student profiling and zero tolerance. He also will discuss strategies that promise to enhance the quality of life and learning for all students.

Fox is the Lipman Family Professor of Criminal Justice and former dean of the College of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. He has written 16 books, including his two newest, “The Will to Kill: Making Sense of Senseless Murder” and “Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder.” He has published dozens of journal and magazine articles and newspaper columns, primarily in the areas of multiple murder, juvenile crime, school violence, workplace violence, and capital punishment. He is the 2007 recipient of the Hugo Adam Bedau award for excellence in death penalty scholarship.

PHOTO: A high-resolution photo of Fox is available at http://unhinfo.unh.edu/news/img/fox.jpg.