UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space


 

UNH Faculty and Research Ranked among the Nation's Best

By Amy Seif
Communication and Information Coordinator
Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space
603-862-5369

December 17, 2002


DURHAM, N.H. University of New Hampshire scientists are among the nation's best in scientific research, according to a recent report from a national institute in Philadelphia that ranks high-impact U.S. universities.

The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), which ranks universities based on how frequently their work is cited by other researchers, rated UNH third in the geosciences and fourth in ecology/environmental science. In addition, UNH Professor John Aber was ranked 11th among the top scientists in the ecology/environmental science field.

ISI, which analyzes research performance and identifies significant trends in the sciences and social sciences, ranked the top 100 federally funded universities that published at least 100 papers in ISI-indexed journals from 1996 to 2000. Citations are important because they indicate cutting-edge scientific findings that lay the groundwork for advanced research, according to the institute's staff.

This ranking places UNH above Harvard University in the geosciences and Stanford University in ecology/environmental sciences. Other universities cited for excellence include the University of California-Irvine, Georgia Institute of Technology, Princeton University, Caltech, Tulane University, and the University of Chicago.

Aber, a professor in UNH's Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, and Department of Natural Resources, is noted by ISI as one of the top 20 most cited scientists in ecology and environmental sciences over the last decade. He is ranked 11th out of 1,975 scientists, having published 54 research papers that have been cited 1,765 times in articles by other scientists.

Aber, an expert in forest ecosystems, studies the nitrogen cycle and forest responses to acid rain, climate change, atmospheric carbon dioxide, and ozone. He serves as the associate editor for the journal Ecosystems and is co-chair of the Forest Sector of the U.S. National Environmental Assessment.

Aber chairs the university's new interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in natural resources and Earth systems science.

For more information on the ISI rankings, go to http://in-cites.com/research/sept_3_2001-1.html (geosciences), http://in-cites.com/research/2001/november_5_2001-1.html (ecology/environmental sciences), and http://in-cites.com/scientists/env-eco.html (scientists in ecology/environmental sciences).

Editors and journalists: Professor Aber can be reached at 603-862-3045. E-mail amy.seif@unh.edu to receive a copy of the Experts Guide for the UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space for more information on Aber, and other leading scientists including Karen Von Damm and Joseph Hollweg, who recently were distinguished as Fellows of the American Geophysical Union.

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