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Graduate Course Catalog 2013-2014

Graduate School

» http://www.gradschool.unh.edu/


Development Policy and Practice (DPP)

» http://www.unh.edu/madpp/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Degree Offered: M.A.

The master of arts in development policy and practice (MADPP) is a program that prepares individuals for advanced policy- and practice-oriented work in sustainable development both in the United States and in developing countries. The program has two pathways to complete the master’s degree: a 14-month pathway and a 24-month pathway. The master's program offers an integrated conceptual framework guiding the coursework, high-level tools, and the best thinking in the field. Students are early- and mid-career adults working in a variety of development fields, and in particular those from public agencies and international and domestic non-profit and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Applicants to the program come from both international and domestic organizations and work in areas ranging from public policy, planning, economic development, sustainable development, environmental policy, public health, education, microenterprise, and more.

Objectives

  1. Educate development practitioners working in non-profit organizations, NGOs, community-based organizations, government agencies, and private corporations, using a peer-based learning framework
  2. Promote innovative approaches to development practice and policy development, identifying those that can increase the effectiveness of development practitioners
  3. Expose development practitioners to global trends in development work
  4. Using state-of-the-art communication technologies, connect practitioners to each other and to participants in similar programs across the globe

The degree program includes courses in the core disciplines of management, social sciences, health sciences, and natural sciences (including ecology, agriculture, natural resource management, and energy and climate studies).

UNH/Carsey is committed to teaching, supporting, and implementing sustainable development practices to overcome poverty and protect the environment.

Students in the MADPP program will:

  1. Develop interdisciplinary knowledge and skills through a combination of core courses designed to integrate theory, policy, as well as data collection and analysis
  2. Acquire an understanding of complex development issues and problems through a set of electives spanning engineering, natural sciences, public health, management, and social sciences
  3. Apply their learning to real-world situations, by carrying out a four-term field project in their home community

A unique feature of this program is that students can continue working while earning their degree. The 14-month pathway includes two intensive summer sessions of four to six weeks and three semesters of online work. The 24-month pathway is the same as the 14-month pathway, except for the addition of two online semesters. This meets the practical needs of both students and their employers, enabling participants to join an exciting advanced degree program that will enhance their performance and their commitment to work. Students will gain an array of skills that will help them more effectively meet the challenges in their development sectors. They will also develop a network of peers and advisors to continue to inform and inspire them.

Social change begins with strong leadership, and graduates of MADPP will have the tools, networks, and fresh insights to help improve the conditions and opportunities in the communities they serve.

 

 

 


Admission Requirements

Students are expected to have completed an undergraduate degree (B.A., B.S., or equivalent) from an accredited university before applying.

TOEFL scores are required if English is not your first language. GRE scores are accepted but not required.

All applicants must submit the following materials to be considered for admission: application form, letters of recommendation, resume, personal statement, and official transcripts. More specific information can be found on the MADPP website.

All application materials must be submitted electronically to the UNH Graduate School. Application materials as well as more specific details regarding the application process, including deadlines, are available at the UNH Graduate School website. Please note that the program has only one start date each year and that is in May.


Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

In order to earn the MADPP degree, students must complete thirteen courses (equivalent to 39 credits), including the four-term project requirement, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Ten of the thirteen courses are required courses, while the remaining three are elective courses.

 

Course of Study

The Master of Arts in Development Policy and Practice program is structured around four competency areas:

Successful practitioners must be able to perceive problems from multiple points of view and through a variety of cultural lenses, including traditional academic and policy perspectives, as well as those of the communities and individuals to be served. Viewed in this way, neither traditional approaches (which emphasize theory and disciplinary academic content) nor “pedagogical inversions” (which give primacy to engagement and practice while deemphasizing theory and policy) create well-rounded development practitioners. The MADPP program will examine each of the core disciplinary areas within the cross-cutting lenses of theory, policy, data collection and analysis, and practice.

Core Curriculum

The curriculum is a series of courses designed to help students develop and strengthen interdisciplinary breadth and communication and to build program identity and a sense of community. All courses are 3-credit courses. The ten required courses comprise 30 credits in total, and students need to complete three elective courses (9 credits).

The sequence by which students take the ten required and three elective courses depends on the amount of time that they plan to take to complete the degree. There are two options — a 14-month pathway and a 24-month pathway.

14-Month Pathway

Academic Term Courses
1st Summer Term (on-campus in Durham, N.H.)
 
Weeks 1 & 2
Weeks 3 & 4
Weeks 5 & 6
Fall Term (online) Late August - early December
Winter/J-Term (online) January (3 weeks)
  • Elective course*
Spring Term (online) Late January - early May
2nd Summer Term (on-campus in Durham, N.H.) Weeks 1 & 2
Weeks 3 & 4
Weeks 5 & 6

* Detailed discussion of elective courses is found at the end of this section.

** The SMDP certificate can be taken as an elective course; for details, visit http://carseyinstitute.unh.edu/smdp.

24-Month Pathway

Academic Term Courses
1st Summer Term (on-campus in Durham, N.H.)
 
Weeks 1 & 2
Weeks 3 & 4
Weeks 5 & 6
1st Fall Term (online) Late August - early December
Winter/J-Term (online) January (3 weeks)
  • Elective course*
1st Spring Term (online) Late January - early May
2nd Summer Term (on-campus in Durham, N.H.) Weeks 1 & 2
Weeks 3 & 4
Weeks 5 & 6
2nd Fall Term (online)
 
Late August - early December
 
2nd Spring Term (online) Late January - early May

* Detailed discussion of elective courses is found at the end of this section.

** The SMDP certificate can be taken as an elective course; for details, visit http://carseyinstitute.unh.edu/smdp.

As noted above, summer terms are offered on-campus in Durham, New Hampshire, while courses offered during the fall, winter/J, and spring terms (when students are in their home communities) are offered online.

The 14- and 24-month pathways have the same courses during the summer and winter/J terms. The only difference between the two pathways is that students opting for the 14-month pathway take two required courses each during the fall and spring terms, thereby allowing them to complete 39 credits in 14 months. On the other hand, students who choose the 24-month pathway take only one required course each during the fall and spring terms; thus they need two fall and spring terms to complete the 39-credit requirement.

Elective Courses

Students are required to take three elective courses. These courses are offered during the Summer term (on-campus in Durham) and the Winter/J-term (online for three weeks in January). At least three elective courses will be offered during each Summer term, and one elective course during the Winter/J-term. Below is a list of elective courses.