Skip to Content Find it Fast

This browser does not support Cascading Style Sheets.

 

Graduate Course Catalog 2014-2015

Graduate School

» http://www.gradschool.unh.edu/


Accounting (ACFI)

» https://paulcollege.unh.edu/academics/graduate-programs

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The master of science in accounting offered by the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics develops students' competencies to become innovative problem solvers in public accounting firms as well as small businesses, non-profit organizations, and major corporations. Designed for students with undergraduate degrees in accounting, the graduate program can be completed in one year. Applicants without an undergraduate degree in accounting can still apply but will need additional undergraduate business and accounting courses prior to beginning the graduate program.

The program satisfies the 150-hour course load required by most U.S. state licensing boards including the state of New Hampshire. The Paul College is AACSB accredited. The M.S. in accounting program strives to ensure that students have range and depth in the field, and it emphasizes strong analytical and communication skills as well as fosters awareness of ethical issues. 


Admission Requirements

The primary admission period for the program is the fall. Admission requirements include a personal history that demonstrates high academic achievement, as well as the applicant's potential and desire for graduate study in accounting. Applicants are required to submit copies of prior academic records, current GMAT scores, three references, and a complete Graduate School application. A baccalaureate degree program must be completed prior to beginning the M.S. program. 

Admission to the program is highly selective and limited, so it is in the applicant's best interest to apply early.


Degree Requirements

Upon admission to the program, applicants are required to complete ten courses detailed in the following program outline. All admitted candidates are expected to have completed a series of prerequisite courses. ACFI 850 (Accounting Theory and Research) is the capstone course. If an applicant has not completed all the prerequisite courses, the admissions committee may offer provisional admission and require that the applicant take the prerequisite courses prior to moving into full degree candidacy.


Fall Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title
ACFI   820   Corporate Taxation  
ACFI   844   Topics in Advanced Accounting  
ACFI   895   Government and Non-Profit Accounting  
ADMN   898   Advanced Topics in Tax  
ACFI   840   Forensic Accounting and Fraud Examination  


Spring Semester

Abbreviation Course Number Title
ACFI   890   Accounting Information Systems  
ACFI   830   Advanced Auditing  
ACFI   860   Advanced Business Law  
ACFI   897   Ethics & Professional Practice  
ACFI   850   Accounting Theory and Research  


For students with non-accounting business degrees:

Prerequisites that must be completed at the undergraduate level are:

 


Students who do not possess an undergraduate degree in business must also complete:

In addition, students must choose two of the following three:



Animal and Nutritional Science (ANSC)

» http://mcbsgrad.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences offers the Ph.D. in animal and nutritional sciences in conjunction with the animal science program in the Department of Biological Sciences.

Information on the Ph.D. program is described below.  For information about the master of science programs in nutritional sciences (www.mcbsgrad.unh.edu) or animal science (www.biolsci.unh.edu), please visit their respective websites, including the course listings for molecular, cellular, and biological sciences (MCBS) and nutritional sciences (NUTR).

Degree Offered: Ph.D.

The Ph.D. degree in animal and nutritional sciences has as its primary research foci the study of biological and nutritional processes that promote animal and human health and disease, and in the case of animal health, its effect on production. Areas of research specialization include human nutrition, mammalian physiology and pathology, nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, and reproduction and endocrinology. Research activities utilize human, animal, and cell culture systems to investigate nutrient metabolism and a molecular-level understanding of life processes and diseases.


Admission Requirements

Students applying for the Ph.D. program will be expected to present recent (within five years) general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and possess a background in basic sciences appropriate for advanced study in the proposed area of specialization (for example, courses in biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics). Although not required for candidacy in the Ph.D. program, an M.S. degree is suggested for most students. The student's committee may require certain undergraduate courses as part of the graduate program if additional competencies would be beneficial to the student.


Degree Requirements

 


Ph.D. in Animal and Nutritional Sciences

The Ph.D. in animal and nutritional sciences trains students to gain advanced knowledge and develop research expertise in such areas as the cellular and molecular biology of various nutrients, nutritional physiology and biochemistry, vascular biology and cardiovascular disease, immunology and genetics, obesity and diabetes, dairy nutrition, human nutrition, reproductive physiology, and endocrinology. It prepares students for future careers in technical consulting, education, and research in academic, industrial, and government institutions. Students with appropriate academic training at the baccalaureate or master's degree level will design a program of study in conjunction with a faculty guidance committee. The student will advance to candidacy after successful completion of all relevant graduate courses and passing a qualifying examination conducted by the guidance committee, which will contain oral and/or written components at the discretion of the committee members. The "guidance" committee for doctoral students will consist of a minimum of five members, three of whom must be from within the Animal and Nutritional Sciences Program; at least one member must be from outside the program. After the student's advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, a doctoral committee (which can be different from the guidance committee) will be appointed to supervise and approve the dissertation.

The dissertation must be based on original hypothesis-driven research of publishable quality. A public presentation of the dissertation research findings will be followed by a final examination, which will be primarily an oral defense of the dissertation. The candidate will be required to serve as a teaching assistant for a minimum of two semesters or to teach a course for one semester. Skills in communicating scientific information will be fostered by presenting one seminar during each year of enrollment.  This requirement could include the dissertation defense seminar.


Courses

For a complete listing of courses, check animal science; molecular, cellular, and biological sciences; and nutritional science


» Click to view course offerings

^ back to top


Animal Science (ANSC)

» http://www.animalsci.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

The Department of Biological Sciences, www.biolsci.unh.edu, offers the master of science degree in animal science.

Degree Offered: M.S.

Areas of research specialization in the M.S degree in animal science include dairy cattle nutrition, mammalian physiology and pathology, reproduction, and endocrinology. Research activities utilize animal and cell culture systems to investigate nutrient metabolism and a molecular-level understanding of life processes and diseases.


Admission Requirements

Students applying for the M.S. program will be expected to present recent (within five years) general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and possess a background in basic sciences appropriate for advanced study in the proposed area of specialization (for example, courses in biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics).


Degree Requirements

 


M.S. in Animal Science

Animal science M.S. students must become actively engaged in a research project and gain a comprehensive understanding of animal sciences through coursework and research. This degree is for students with a strong background in basic biology, chemistry, and animal sciences who anticipate a professional career involving research or discovery. This path is appropriate for students who expect to pursue additional graduate studies or professional school after graduation.

The program of study must include a minimum of 30 graduate credits and completion of a master's thesis based on a research project. Six credits of thesis research (ANSC 899) are required. No more than 4 credits of investigations (ANSC 995) can apply. A thesis committee will be appointed early in the program and consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty; one of these will be the primary mentor. Students will design a program of study in consultation with the thesis committee. Candidates will be required to pass an oral examination based on graduate courses and completed thesis.


» Click to view course offerings

^ back to top


Biochemistry (BCHM)

» http://mcbsgrad.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences offers a five-year B.S./M.S., a master of science, and a doctor of philosophy degree in biochemistry. Research opportunities are available in the general areas of molecular biology, cellular biology, and biochemistry, with specific research programs in eukaryotic gene regulation; reproductive physiology; molecular population genetics; macromolecular interactions; cell signaling pathways in cancer and leukemia; evolution of eukaryotic genomes; glycobiology; protein kinases and phosphatases in plant signaling; structure/function relationships in macromolecules, proteomics, and epigenomics; DNA repair mechanisms; etiology of vascular disease; and sensory transduction. Opportunities also exist for interdisciplinary research in marine biochemistry, biochemical nutrition, and cell biology in adjunct facilities on campus.


Admission Requirements

An applicant is expected to have completed basic courses in chemistry, biological sciences, mathematics, and physics. Otherwise well-qualified applicants will be permitted to correct deficiencies in undergraduate education by enrollment in the appropriate courses or by independent study during the first year. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants from non-English-speaking countries must also provide TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores.


Degree Requirements

 


M.S. Degree Requirements

A student will meet the Graduate School's requirements for the master's degree (minimum 30 credits) and will be expected to develop a thesis (6-10 cr.) on a basic research problem or to prepare a report or publication based on original research in biochemistry or molecular biology. Demonstration of proficiency in physical chemistry and biochemistry will be assessed in the first year. A guidance committee meeting will be held soon after a thesis adviser is identified. All candidates for the M.S. degree will be required to pass an oral examination based on the thesis or project report and on the graduate courses completed in the degree program.


B.S./M.S. Degree Requirements

This accelerated five-year program leading to a combined bachelor's degree and master's degree in biochemistry is designed for highly motivated and qualified undergraduate UNH students seeking additional training to further their career goals as researchers in the life sciences. Admission to the combined degree program is highly competitive. Students wishing to pursue this program must have a grade point average greater than 3.2 at the time of application. A thesis adviser must be identified during the junior year, and the approval of the adviser must be obtained. Prior to the first semester of the senior year, the student must formally apply to the department through the Graduate School and receive early admission. The requirement for the Graduate Record Examination is waived for combined degree applicants. Thirty credits of graduate level (800-999) coursework (including dual-credit courses) must be completed. Six to 8 credits of graduate-level courses must be taken during the senior year and are applied to both the B.S. and M.S. requirements. All other requirements for the M.S. degree must be followed.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. in biochemistry requires the completion of significant, original independent research and preparation of a thesis for submission to the Graduate School. In most cases, it is expected that the Ph.D. degree will be completed within four to six years of admission to the graduate program.

Credits: Graduate credits are earned for courses numbered 800-999. A minimum of two semesters of Doctoral Research (BCHM 999) is required. Most Ph.D. candidates enroll in BCHM 851-852 during their first year of study, unless the diagnostic examinations indicate sufficient undergraduate preparation in general biochemistry.

Guidance Committee: During the second semester and after selecting a thesis adviser and a potential project, the student, in conjunction with the adviser, will choose a guidance committee. This committee consists of five faculty members: the adviser (as chairperson), two other members of the biochemistry faculty, and up to two faculty members from outside departments. However, only three members of the guidance committee are required for the second-year exam. The committee will meet soon after selection of a thesis project to determine the student's curriculum. Courses required by the guidance committee must be taken for credit and completed with a passing grade (at least a B-). Courses recommended by the committee may be audited or taken for credit, but in either case, the student is expected to be familiar with the subject matter of these courses. The guidance committee will meet each semester thereafter to assess the student's academic and research progress. The Supervisory Committee Nomination Form must be completed and submitted to the Graduate School by the end of the first year.

Doctoral Committee: The doctoral committee is composed of the faculty adviser (as chairperson), two other faculty members in the graduate program in biochemistry, and two faculty members from other departments. In most cases, the guidance committee will constitute the doctoral committee. The doctoral committee evaluates the dissertation and administers the final examination. The doctoral committee will meet annually to assess the progress toward completion of the Ph.D. requirements.

Written Thesis: The student is required to prepare a written doctoral dissertation for submission to the doctoral committee. The dissertation must represent significant and original research written in a clear, comprehensible style. A copy of the complete thesis must be made available to the committee at least two weeks before the date of the final examination. Publication of the dissertation by University Microfilms is required. All costs associated with the preparation and publication of the thesis are the responsibility of the student.

Candidacy: Candidacy is reached following 1) written and oral defense of research proposal during spring of second year and 2) written and oral qualifying/proposal examination. Further details can be found at http://mcbsgrad.unh.edu/diagnostic-exams.

Final Defense: An oral examination of the doctoral dissertation consists of two parts: an oral presentation of the research that is open to the public, and an oral defense of the dissertation conducted by the doctoral committee. Final approval of the doctoral dissertation will be determined by a majority vote of the doctoral committee. The final examination must be completed by the date listed in the Graduate School calendar.

 


Teaching Requirement

Teaching assignments in the laboratory, in lectures, or in an individual instruction format are an essential part of the graduate academic programs of the department and are designed to give graduate students practical teaching experience. Normally, one year of part-time teaching will be required of each Ph.D. student.



Biological Sciences (BIOL)

» Click to view course offerings

 


Business Administration (ADMN)

» https://paulcollege.unh.edu/academics/graduate-programs

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham and in Manchester through GSMC.

 

Degree Offered: M.B.A.

This program is offered in Durham, Portsmouth, Manchester, and online

The Peter T. Paul College's M.B.A. programs are all AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) accredited, the gold standard for business school accreditation. We are proud to be one of only two full-time M.B.A. programs with AACSB accreditation in the state of New Hampshire and the only executive, part-time, and online M.B.A. programs to hold the AACSB seal of accreditation in the state.

Our M.B.A .programs incorporate and rely on strong partnerships with the corporate community. Externally engaged and firmly focused, we create technologically proficient problem solvers, innovative and creative thinkers, effective communicators, and ethical business leaders.

The Paul College brings together students of great promise, faculty on the cutting edge of research, real-world business partners, and our network of successful alumni to create a vital new center for business education at the University of New Hampshire.

In 2012, the full-time M.B.A. program had a 95 percent job placement rate.


Admission Requirements

The Paul College welcomes applicants with an above-average academic record in any undergraduate specialty. The crucial requirement for admission into the M.B.A. program is a history that demonstrates that the applicant has the potential and desire for graduate study in business. Consequently, a portfolio approach to admissions is utilized in which an applicant's work and military experience, along with other indicators of maturity, motivation, and self-discipline, are considered in addition to the applicant's test scores and academic record. All applicants to the full-time, online, and part-time MBA programs are required to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) unless they hold a prior, relevant graduate-level degree (e.g., M.S., M.A., Ph.D., Ed.D, etc.). GMAT waivers may be requested and are possible based on professional experience. Please contact the department for more information.

Applicants are expected to have successfully completed one semester of calculus, statistics, or have demonstrated proficiency in quantitative reasoning. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact Joanne Stone, Admissions & Recruiting, Paul College, 10 Garrison Avenue, Durham, NH 03824, (603) 862-1367.

Each  M.B.A. program has a different pricing structure. For current rates and fees, please visit the business services website: http://www.unh.edu/business-services/tuitmba.html.


Full-time M.B.A.

The new and innovative curriculum was designed specifically to accelerate a student's progress through this highly-ranked AACSB-accredited M.B.A. program. The program does this by integrating courses, identifying key skills and concepts necessary for success in business, and then helping students master these skills and concepts through class discussions, cases, guest lectures, and projects. Throughout the program, students will be exposed to the knowledge that builds insight into complex organizations.

The program includes a New York residency, a corporate consulting project, and an international residency.

Students finish their coursework in early July and have a September 1 graduation date.

Degree Requirements
The curriculum for the one-year intensive full-time M.B.A. program begins with six weeks of required online foundation work during July and August. Students begin classes on campus at the end of August after a three-day orientation program and continue together as a cohort through the academic year. The 48-credit program is comprised of eleven required courses, three electives, a ten-day international residency, and culminates with a five-week, 6-credit corporate consulting project. Electives can be taken in such areas as marketing, finance, entrepreneurship, supply chain management, leadership, and general management. A specialization in entrepreneurship is available in the full-time MBA program and includes an additional Silicon Valley residency.

Students with less than two years of professional work experience must complete an internship that satisfies one elective course. 

Core courses will focus on the functional areas of business, how they interact, how they contribute to the goals and objectives of the organization, and how they can be managed effectively. Students will learn the behavioral and social skills that empower effective leaders in any organization, as well as the technical skills necessary to understand complex business processes, manage the development of technology projects, and utilize data for effective decision-making.

Foundation Work:
July-August

Term 1:
August -Sept.
(5 weeks)
Term 2:
October-December
(10 weeks)
Term 3:
January-
March
(10 weeks)
Term 4:
March-
May
(10 weeks)
Term 5:
May-
June
(5 weeks)

On-line Quantitative Methods Module

ADMN 919, Management Accounting

ADMN 970, Economics

ADMN 956, Managerial
Decision Making

ADMN 940, Technology & Operations Management

Corporate Consulting Project

On-Line Accounting Module

ADMN 912, Organizational Behavior

ADMN 960, Marketing Management

ADMN 952, Organizations,
Leadership, and
Environments

ADMN 982, Strategic Management: Decision Making

 
   

ADMN 926, Information Systems and Enterprise Integration
 

ADMN 840, International Business

Elective

 

ADMN 930, Financial Management

Elective*

Elective

 

* Students with fewer than two years of work experience take the M.B.A. Internship in lieu of an elective. The internship begins in October.

Core courses and electives build an understanding of the business environment, and the corporate consulting project (CCP) provides a first-rate opportunity to apply this knowledge to the real world of business. The class works closely with major companies such as Fidelity Investments and Liberty Mutual Life Insurance; the class is divided into small teams and each team is assigned a real-life problem. Teams work closely with the host company and faculty advisers. At the end of the projects, the class makes presentations to company sponsors.


Part-time and Online M.B.A.

Part-time M.B.A. Program
The master of business administration degree part-time option is an excellent choice for practitioners in the workforce who are seeking to advance their careers. The innovative program provides the opportunity for students to earn their degrees in less than two years. Courses are offered at the Durham and Manchester campuses.

The part-time evening M.B.A. program, instituted in 1996, has rapidly grown to become the Paul School’s most popular M.B.A. program. The part-time and full-time programs share the same faculty. This evening model is primarily designed for those who are highly motivated and capable of balancing a full-time work schedule with evening study. Classes meet from 5:30-9:15 p.m.

Highlights

Online M.B.A.
The online master of business administration degree is an excellent choice for practitioners in the workforce who are seeking to advance their careers. This innovative program provides students with the opportunity to earn their degrees in two to six years from anywhere in the world.

The online model is primarily designed for those who are highly motivated and capable of balancing a full-time work schedule with online study. Courses facilitate information sharing outside the constraints of time and place among a network of people.

The online M.B.A. program follows the same curriculum as the part-time M.B.A. allowing students to move within the two models if they choose.  Admission points are in late August and January.  The program is asynchronous and students can log on at anytime during the week, adding to the flexibility of the online option.    

Highlights

 

Part-Time and Online M.B.A. Requirements
Part-time (evening) and online students typically begin the program in the fall term, although January admission with a reduced course load may be possible. The degree is comprised of ten required core courses and six electives. ADMN 982 (Strategic Management) is the concluding experience. Students may petition to waive up to three core courses. A waiver is typically granted if the student possesses a major (five to six courses from an AACSB-accredited institution) in a core area earned within five years of matriculation, e.g., a student with a major in finance may petition to waive the M.B.A. core course in finance. The program is designed to permit students who begin in the fall to complete the degree in two years, although a reduced pace is also possible. 

Courses

Specializations are available in the following areas:

Marketing and Supply Chain Management
This specialization covers such topics as market research and analysis and new product and services development. A cross-functional approach is utilized to teach students how to manage fundamental value processes involved in the production and marketing of goods and services. The specialization is unique in its integrative emphasis on meeting customer and market needs in an effective and efficient manner given technological and operational constraints.

Entrepreneurial Venture Creation
This specialization is designed to promote an environment that produces an entrepreneurial culture and promotes learning through experiential, real-world, real-time learning. It provides a basis to learn about the high-growth entrepreneurial venture process of value creation through an application of technology in a dynamic environment and is appropriate for students who intend to start a high-growth business, work for a new venture, become involved in a new venture creation within an established organization, or are interested in the field of venture capital.

Financial Management
This specialization is designed for the student who wants to take a coherent set of finance courses offered within the general framework of the M.B.A. The study of finance provides students with opportunities in a wide variety of disciplines including banking, insurance, corporate finance, investment management, and risk management.

General Management
Students may elect to take the six electives in fields of their choice. Two of the electives may be completed as independent studies, which allow students to study a unique topic in-depth that is not offered as a traditional course. Additionally, students may petition for approval of  two graduate-level courses offered by departments other than the business school and may count them toward the degree.

Project Management
The specialization provides a comprehensive, integrative understanding of the project management process and methods to manage large and complex projects, including the management of innovation in a high-technology environment. As the complexity and technological sophistication of business today increases, the demand for individuals with the skills to plan, manage, and execute complex projects is also growing. By completing this specialization, students will learn how to contribute to the systematic management of projects, programs, portfolios, and businesses to achieve the organization’s operational and strategic goals, and balance project requirements and constraints as they relate to scope, schedule, budget, and quality. 

 

 


Executive M.B.A.

The Paul College Executive M.B.A. program is held at the Sheraton Harborside Hotel in historic Portsmouth, N.H. The only Executive M.B.A. program north of Boston, this fast-paced E.M.B.A. targets mid- to senior-level professionals with multiple years of work experience who are looking for a top-level business degree and to expand their network and learn from other professionals.

The program meets on alternating weekends (Friday and Saturday), giving busy professionals time to complete a degree while balancing work and family commitments.

Featuring small class sizes, top-level UNH professors, and peer teamwork, the E.M.B.A. encourages stimulating participation and networking opportunities. All students spend Friday nights at the Sheraton to work and study with their teams and attend occasional speaking events. E.M.B.A. students also participate in a 10-day off-campus spring residency abroad as part of the international management course.

The Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics is AACSB-accredited and is an active founding member of the Executive MBA Council—the organization that unites Executive MBA programs globally in their mission, direction, and quality.

Highlights

Requirements

The Executive M.B.A. curriculum is designed to meet the needs of individuals with full-time work experience at a highly professional level. The curriculum is comprised of seventeen courses emphasizing general management and provides broad-based exposure to the functional areas of finance and accounting, human resources, marketing, operations, international business, and strategic management. In the second year, all students take a track in International Business and choose between a second track in either Entrepreneurial Venture Creation or Managing Technological Innovation. The Integrative Management Seminar taken each term brings in regional business leaders to discuss current business topics and challenges in a globally networked and competitive world. ADMN 982 (Strategic Management) is the capstone course.

The program is offered off site at an executive conference facility in Portsmouth, N.H., and includes housing and meals to enrich the cohort experience.  The nineteen-month program begins in early September with two days in residence spent on orientation activities, team building, and networking, followed by two days of regular classes on Friday and Saturday. Thereafter, classes are held twice each month in all-day Friday and all-day Saturday sessions. In their second year, students spend two days on Wall Street as part of their required finance course, plus ten days in an international residency as part of the requirements of the international business course.


Registration Policies

M.B.A. courses are primarily intended for matriculated students who have been admitted to the M.B.A. program. Other degree-seeking students and M.B.A. alumni may request permission to register for courses on a space-available basis.

Audit: Required M.B.A. core courses cannot accommodate auditors. Other degree-seeking students and M.B.A. alumni may request permission from the instructor to audit M.B.A. electives.

 



Chemical Engineering (CHE)

» http://www.unh.edu/chemical-engineering/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers the M.Eng. degree, M.S. degree, and Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering. All levels include research opportunities in biofuels, biomedical engineering, biochemical engineering, electrochemical engineering, tissue engineering, advanced materials, reaction engineering, energy, and environmental engineering.


M.Eng. Admission Requirements

An applicant to the master of engineering program will have completed a baccalaureate degree in chemical engineering. Students with good undergraduate records but with deficiencies in certain areas may be admitted on condition that they complete specified courses without credit to make up for their deficiencies. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination. International students are required to submit TOEFL test scores. IELTS scores are accepted on a case-by-case basis, and students must have a minimum score of 6.5.


M.Eng. Degree Requirements

A master of engineering degree is a professional degree for chemical engineers. A minimum of 30 credits, which must include Advanced Fluid Mechanics (CHE 913), Heat Transfer (CHE 915), Diffusive Mass Transfer (CHE 916), Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (CHE 923), and Advanced Chemical Engineering Kinetics (CHE 932), is required for the master of engineering degree. An additional 12 credits of coursework are also required. These 12 credits can be made up of electives offered by the department or by the college. In addition, courses taken within the UNH School of Law and the Paul College of Business and Economics can apply with approval. The remaining 3 credits will be for faculty supervised projects.


M.S. Admission Requirements

An applicant is expected to have completed a baccalaureate degree in chemical engineering. Students with good undergraduate records but with deficiencies in certain areas may be admitted on condition that they complete specified courses without credit to make up for their deficiencies. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination. International students are required to submit TOEFL test scores. IELTS scores are accepted on a case-by-case basis, and students must have a minimum score of 6.5.


M.S. Degree Requirements

A minimum of 30 credits, which must include Advanced Fluid Mechanics (CHE 913), Heat Transfer (CHE 915), Diffusive Mass Transfer (CHE 916), Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (CHE 923), and Advanced Chemical Engineering Kinetics (CHE 932), is required for the master of science in chemical engineering. These five core courses constitute 15 credits. The remaining 9 course credits can be made up of electives offered by the department or by the college. Students take electives after consulting with their adviser. A 6-credit thesis (CHE 899) is required, unless the candidate is specifically exempted by the faculty because of previous research experience.


Ph.D. Admission Requirements

Students admitted to the Ph.D. program normally have a master's degree in chemical engineering. Exceptional students with a baccalaureate degree in chemical engineering are eligible for admission to the program. To be admitted, students must present evidence that they have a strong foundation in chemical engineering. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination. International students are required to submit TOEFL test scores. IELTS scores are accepted on a case-by-case basis, and students must have a minimum score of 6.5.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Following entrance into the program, the Ph.D. student's adviser assists the student in outlining his/her program and may specify individual coursework requirements in addition to the required core courses. The core courses are fluid dynamics, mass transfer, heat transfer, thermodynamics, and reaction kinetics. Each doctoral student must complete 39 course credit hours or eleven courses (whichever comes first) beyond the bachelor's degree with five of those courses specified as core at the 900 level. The remaining courses (totaling 24 credits) may be at the 800- or 900-level, and can be 3- or 4-credit courses. Students entering with a master's degree from another university will be required to take a minimum of 15 credits or five courses at the 800- or 900-level at UNH. These students may be required to take or repeat some or all of the required core courses depending upon their credentials and preparation. This will be determined by the department's Graduate Committee.

The graduate coordinator also conducts an annual in-depth review of the student's progress and, following completion of the student's coursework (the five core courses), administers the written qualifying examination in each of the core courses. All coursework, including electives, should normally be completed by the end of the second year of full-time graduate study and must be completed before the student can be advanced to candidacy.

The student must prepare a research proposal, which is different from his/her Ph.D. dissertation research, and defend the proposal in an oral examination before a committee. Upon the successful completion of the oral qualifying examination, the student is advanced to candidacy and, upon the recommendation of the graduate coordinator, a doctoral committee is appointed by the dean of the Graduate School. The doctoral committee conducts an annual review of the student's progress, supervises and approves the doctoral dissertation, and administers the final dissertation defense.

There is no language requirement.



Chemistry (CHEM)

» http://www.unh.edu/chemistry/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Assistant Professor: Leila Deravi

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the doctor of philosophy and the master of science degrees in the areas of organic, inorganic, physical, and analytical chemistry. The department also offers a Ph.D. in chemistry option in chemistry education.


Admission Requirements

Admission to the master of science and the doctor of philosophy degrees is based upon a strong undergraduate record and requires satisfactory work in the usual undergraduate courses in inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry, as well as the normal supporting courses in mathematics and physics. Applicants are to submit GRE scores as a part of their admission application. Entering graduate students are expected to take proficiency examinations in chemistry to ensure they begin their graduate work at the appropriate level. These examinations will be offered the week prior to the opening of the fall semester during the Department of Chemistry's graduate student orientation week. 


M.S. Degree Requirements

The master's degree requires completion of coursework appropriate to the student's field of study and the completion of a research problem presented in the form of a thesis (6-10 cr.). A minimum of 30 credit hours is required to earn the degree.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

This degree requires completion of coursework appropriate to the student's field of study and the completion of a research problem presented in the form of a dissertation. Students will also demonstrate to the guidance committee that they have a broad basic knowledge of the field of chemistry by completing certain fundamental graduate courses; by means of a series of examinations in the major field; and by presenting and defending an original research proposal before the end of the third year. Students who successfully complete these requirements will be advanced to candidacy. The dissertation will be based upon original research. When the dissertation is complete, the candidate will submit it to his/her doctoral committee. A public presentation of the dissertation will be followed by an oral defense of the work to the student's committee.

The Ph.D. degree program includes an option in chemistry education. Please contact the department for more information.


Interdisciplinary Programs in Chemistry

Graduate students in chemistry may elect to enter one of the interdisciplinary programs offered jointly with the chemistry department and other departments. In these programs, the graduate student, with the advice of the guidance committee, elects courses in chemistry and in the related disciplines, and writes the dissertation on a research problem appropriate to the interdisciplinary research. Students interested in these programs should contact the graduate coordinator for further information.


Preparing Future Faculty (PFF)

Students who desire a career in college-level teaching will follow their regular degree program in addition to meeting the university's PFF requirements.  Please see the PFF website for more information: http://www.gradschool.unh.edu/pff.php.

 


Teaching Requirement

All graduate students who are doctor of philosophy or master of science degree candidates will obtain some teaching experience during their tenure.



Civil Engineering (CIE)

» http://www.unh.edu/civil-engineering

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Civil Engineering offers the master of engineering degree in civil engineering, the master of science degree in civil engineering, and a Ph.D. degree in civil engineering with the following areas of specialization: structural, materials, geotechnical, water resources, and environmental engineering. Interested applicants are encouraged to visit the department website for information on current research in the department and to contact faculty members in their area of interest directly. The department website has information on program requirements and frequently asked questions. Applicants with questions not answered by the department or graduate school website should write to the graduate program coordinator for specific information. 


Admission Requirements

An applicant must have completed a baccalaureate science degree in engineering, mathematics, or science at an accredited college or university. If coursework or laboratory experience is deficient, an admitted student will be required to fulfill, without graduate credit, all undergraduate prerequisites for graduate courses. In some cases, the student's adviser may require additional undergraduate courses in order to achieve a well-integrated program of study. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the GRE, unless waived by the graduate coordinator (for current UNH undergraduate civil engineering [CIE] or environmental engineering: municipal processes [ENE:MP] majors only).


Degree Requirements

 


M.Eng. Degree Requirements

All master of engineering degree students must complete a minimum of 30 total credits. UNH bachelor’s degree students admitted to the Accelerated Master’s Degree program may register for a maximum of 8 credits of graduate-level courses prior to completing their bachelor's degree. Such courses may upon recommendation of the department and approval of the Graduate School count toward both a bachelor's and master's degree. M.Eng. students are required to complete one of the following options as a concluding experience:

The M.Eng. option is designed to facilitate completion of B.S./M.Eng. civil engineering degrees within five years. M.Eng degree students are not eligible for an assistantship. For graduation, a grade of B- or better in each course, an overall B average (3.00 GPA), and successful completion of one of the above concluding experiences must be achieved.

 


M.S. Degree Requirements

All master of science degree students must complete a minimum of 31 total credits that includes a minimum of 25 course credits and 6 thesis credits. UNH bachelor’s degree students admitted to the Accelerated Master’s Program may register for a maximum of 8 credits of graduate-level courses prior to completing their bachelor's degree. Such courses may upon recommendation of the department and approval of the Graduate School count toward both a bachelor's and master's degree.

A formal oral presentation/thesis defense is required. All M.S. degree students are eligible for teaching or research assistantships and are required to register for Master's Student Seminar (CIE 900) for one semester. Students are required to make two presentations during their programs of study. For graduation, a grade of B- or better in each course, an overall B average (3.00 GPA), and a successful thesis defense must be achieved.

 


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Following admission into the program, a guidance committee is appointed for the student by the dean of the Graduate School upon recommendation of the graduate coordinator. This committee assists in outlining the student's course of study and may specify individual coursework requirements.

Within 18 months after admission, the student must pass both written and oral qualifying exams. The student must successfully complete at least 24 course credit hours beyond a master's degree.

Minor Requirements: An identifiable group of courses (9 credits minimum) in an area outside of the civil engineering department and approved by the guidance committee must be successfully completed to provide a minor to the Ph.D. degree. A minor may be satisfied by courses taken toward a master's degree other than civil engineering, but the credits will not be applied against the 24 credit-hour minimum.

Language or Research Tool: Students are required to gain or prove proficiency in a language or research tool in an appropriate area, such as mathematics, statistics, or data analysis; laboratory analysis or procedures; instrumentation; computer programming; or a foreign language suitable to the area of concentration. The proposed language or research tool must be approved by the guidance committee and may be achieved through the successful completion of coursework, an examination, or both.

Teaching Experience: A minimum of one semester as a teaching assistant or comparable experience is required. The guidance committee will evaluate whether a student's past teaching assistantship satisfies this requirement.

Doctoral Candidates: Upon successful completion of the Ph.D. qualifying examinations and the language or research tool requirement, a doctoral student is advanced to the status of doctoral candidate. When a student achieves candidacy, a doctoral committee is established. The doctoral committee directs research, conducts a semi-annual review of the student's progress, supervises and approves the doctoral dissertation, and administers the final examination (also known as the dissertation defense).

Upon completion of the dissertation, and with the approval of the doctoral committee, the student schedules an oral defense in accordance with the requirements of the Graduate School. For graduation, a B average (3.00 GPA) and successful dissertation defense must be achieved.



College Teaching (GRAD)

» http://www.unh.edu/teaching-excellence/Academic_prog_in_coll_teach/index.html

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: Cognate in College Teaching

 


Certificate Offered: College Teaching

 


Application Requirements

Test Scores: None
New England Regional: No
 


The College Teaching Program prepares graduate students for academic teaching positions, and students are ready to teach in their field or discipline upon completion of program requirements. The transfer and relationship between theory and research and instructional practice is emphasized in all courses.

This is a University-wide program coordinated by the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School and involving the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning as well as faculty members from many fields and disciplines. Two academic programs are offered: the cognate in college teaching and the certificate in college teaching. 

 


Admission Requirements

Applicants to the cognate program must have completed one year in a doctoral program at UNH and have the support and recommendation of their doctoral program coordinator. Students in terminal master's degree programs at UNH may be eligible to enroll in the cognate program.


Degree Requirements

 


Cognate in College Teaching Requirements

The Cognate in College Teaching offers a series of core and elective courses to prepare individuals to teach at institutions of higher education.  The cognate is available to doctoral students and students in selected master’s degree programs at UNH.

Students must apply and be formally admitted to the program.  The cognate appears as a minor on the student’s transcript, and is awarded concurrently with the Ph.D. or master’s degree.

This program requires the satisfactory completion of 13 academic credits. Students elect, with the permission of their graduate coordinator, to add the cognate to their graduate degree. The cognate will be awarded at the time of the award of the qualifying graduate degree. Requirements include 8 credits in core courses and 4 credits in elective courses. Students must also create and submit an electronic teaching portfolio for 1 credit.

Core Courses, 8 credits
GRAD 950, Issues in College Teaching, 2 cr.
GRAD 951, Teaching with Writing, 2 cr.
GRAD 961, Cognition, Teaching, and Learning, 2 cr.
GRAD 965, Classroom Research and Assessment Methods, 2 cr.

Electives, minimum of 4 cr.
GRAD 930, Ethics in Research and Scholarship, 2 or 3 cr.
GRAD 963, College Students and the Undergraduate Culture, 2 cr.
GRAD 970, Special Topics in College Teaching: Teaching Online, 2 cr.
GRAD 971, Teaching and Learning in Science, 3 or 4 cr.
GRAD 995, Independent Study, 1 or 2 cr.

Integrative Experience, 1 credit
GRAD 998, College Teaching Portfolio, 1cr.

 


Graduate Certificate in College Teaching

This program requires the satisfactory completion of 12 academic credits. The certificate is available to anyone with a bachelor's degree and above who is interested in preparing for a college teaching career. Requirements include 8 credits in core courses and 4 credits in elective courses.

Core Courses, 8 credits
GRAD 950, Issues in College Teaching, 2 cr.
GRAD 951, Teaching with Writing, 2 cr.
GRAD 961, Cognition, Teaching, and Learning, 2 cr.
GRAD 965, Classroom Research and Assessment Methods, 2 cr.

Electives, minimum of 4 cr.
GRAD 930, Ethics in Research and Scholarship, 2 or 3 cr.
GRAD 963, College Students and the Undergraduate Culture, 2 cr.
GRAD 970, Special Topics in College Teaching: Teaching Online, 2 cr.
GRAD 971, Teaching and Learning in Science, 3 or 4 cr.
GRAD 995, Independent Study, 1 or 2 cr.

 



Communication Sciences and Disorders (COMM)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/csd/index

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Professor: Stephen N. Calculator
Associate Professor: Steven P. Bornstein, Penelope E. Webster
Assistant Professor: Dana Moser, Bryan M. Ness
Clinical Associate Professor: Jeanne H. O'Sullivan, Ruth E. Peaper, Amy S. Plante, Rae M. Sonnenmeier
Clinical Assistant Professor: Sheryl Gottwald, Mary Jane Sullivan

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The Department of Communications Sciences and Disorders offers a master of science degree. Students are prepared to practice in a variety of job settings within the field of speech-language pathology and to meet the academic and practicum requirements of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) for the certificate of clinical competence in speech-language pathology. The program is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of ASHA. 

The graduate program integrates an array of academic and clinical experiences to prepare students for a variety of careers in speech-language pathology. The program offers a master of science degree program in communications sciences and disorders. Students can elect to self-design their program, choosing from an array of required and elective courses that best suit their career objectives. This is referred to as the "no option" concentration. Three additional options, language/literacy disabilities, adult neurogenic communication disorders, and early childhood, are available to those students seeking particular expertise in one of these areas. Irrespective of which of the three options students select, the program of study will prepare them to treat the full range of communication disabilities across the life span.

Faculty and students are actively engaged in research activities. Their projects include examinations of the efficacy of language intervention for adults with aphasia, management of motor speech deficits, functional outcomes of augmentative and alternative communication, role of communication in fostering inclusive education, relationships between language and literacy, and ways of enhancing the process of clinical supervision.


Application Requirements

Deadlines: Applications must be completed by February 1st.

In lieu of the Graduate School personal statement, each applicant must respond to the following in no more than a total of two pages.

1. Describe yourself. We are interested in learning about you as a person.
2. Where do you see yourself professionally five years from now? Ten years from now?
3. What one issue in the field of communication sciences and disorders interests you most at this point your educational development?  Why? 

Applications are not acted upon by the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department until all required documents have been received by the Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to check with the Graduate School to ensure that all required documents have been received and the application is complete by the February 1st deadline.

For additional information regarding the application process, check the University of New Hampshire Graduate School.

 


Admission Requirements

Applicants for admission should possess a bachelor's degree in communication sciences and disorders or its equivalent. The following courses, or their equivalents, are undergraduate prerequisites for the master's program:

  • Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism
  • Language Acquisition
  • Clinical Phonetics
  • Basic Audiology
  • Speech-Hearing Science
  • Statistics

Students are also required to have completed coursework in typical human development, and both biological and physical sciences (chemistry or physics) in preparation for fulfillment of ASHA requirements.

Applicants with degrees in related fields may be admitted to the Graduate School as provisional students, with the expectation that they will complete the above prerequisites prior to, or concurrent with, graduate courses.

Acceptance to the communications sciences and disorders program is based primarily on grade-point average, GRE scores, and written statement. Applicants must submit current scores of the GRE revised General Test. Generally, students have earned a minimum grade-point average of 3.6 and GRE scores at the 50th percentile or better to be considered for admission. Letters of recommendation are considered for the awarding of scholarships, assistantships, and other sources of support.

 


M.S. Degree Requirements

 Four options are offered: "no option" or generalist option; option in language/literacy disorders; option in early childhood communication disorders; and option in adult neurogenic communication disorders. Regardless of the option selected, students will complete a combination of core, required, and elective courses to earn a minimum of 61 credits. See course descriptions for a list of all CSD graduate courses. 

The following core courses are required of all students:

COMM 876, Ethics/Professional Issues in Speech Language Pathology, 1 cr. 
COMM 880, Diagnosis of Speech and Language Disorders, 3 cr. 
COMM 890, Advanced Audiology for Speech Language Pathologists, 3 cr. 
COMM 903, Therapy Process, 2 cr. 
COMM 910, Practicum, 4 cr.   [1 credit each semester years one and two] 
COMM 911, Externship, 8 cr.  [4 cr. fall of year two, 4 cr. spring of year two] 
COMM 914 Augmentative and Alternative Communication
COMM 917, Research Methods, 3 cr. 
COMM 915, Counseling Clients and Families with Communication Disorders, 2 cr.

In addition to the academic and clinical requirements, the UNH Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders implemented an Essential Functions Policy on June 7, 2010. This policy identifies basic communication, motor, cognitive, sensory, and behavioral-social abilities that are necessary for completion of our master's program and professional practice. Some of these abilities should be in place when students begin the program, while others will be developed throughout the program. 

Early each fall, the Essential Functions Policy will be reviewed with new students beginning our program.  Students are expected to sign that they have reviewed and understand the policy and will follow the stated guidelines. For additional information about the graduate program, see the Handbook for Graduate Students and Practicum Manual.


No Option or Generalist Option

This option prepares students for professional practice as a generalist. Students design a course of study that matches their career goals. Practicum experiences in educational, rehabilitative, and private practice settings are available to enhance applied learning. Upon completion of coursework and clinical training, students are prepared to provide clinical services to individuals of all ages who face communication challenges.

In addition to the core courses, required courses for this option are:

COMM 900, Articulatory and Phonological Disorders in Children, 3 cr.
COMM 901, Dysphagia, 3 cr.
COMM 902, Stuttering, 3 cr.
COMM 905, Motor Speech Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 906, Voice Disorders, 2 cr.

Students will also select 6 elective courses from the following:

COMM 875, Advanced Language Acquisition, 3 cr.
COMM 904, Aphasia in Adults, 3 cr.
COMM 907, Advanced Seminar in Aural Rehabilitation, 3. cr.
COMM 908, Disorders of Language/Literacy I, 3 cr.
COMM 891 Neurology for Speech-Language Pathologists
COMM 909, Disorders of Language/Literacy II, 3 cr.
COMM 912, Language Disorders Birth to Five, 3 cr.
COMM 913, Cognitive Communication Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 916, Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 920, Graduate Seminar

Other approved courses outside the department.

 


Option in Language Literacy Disabilities

This option prepares students for professional practice in the diagnosis and treatment of language-based learning disorders in school age children. Students learn theory and practice in oral language as it relates to literacy acquisition and learning in the content areas. Practicum experiences in schools are available to enhance applied understanding. Upon graduating, students are equipped to meet the challenge of diagnosing and managing an array of language-based learning disabilities as team members alongside their professional colleagues in regular education, reading education, and learning disabilities. Those interested in obtaining dual certification in reading education and speech-language pathology are encouraged to contact the Education Department.

In addition to the core courses, required courses for this option are:

COMM 875, Advanced Language Acquisition, 3 cr.
COMM 900, Articulatory and Phonological Disorders in Children, 3 cr.
COMM 901, Dysphagia, 3 cr.
COMM 902, Stuttering, 3 cr.
COMM 905, Motor Speech Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 906, Voice Disorders, 2 cr.
COMM 908, Disorders of Language/Literacy I, 3 cr.
COMM 909, Disorders of Language/Literacy II, 3 cr.
COMM 912, Language Disorders Birth to Five, 3 cr.

Students will also take three elective courses from the following:

COMM 891, Neurology for Speech-Language Pathologists
COMM 904, Aphasia in Adults, 3 cr.
COMM 907, Advanced Seminar in Aural Rehabilitation, 3 cr.
EDUC 907, Foundations of Literacy Instruction, 4 cr.
COMM 913, Cognitive Communication, 3 to 4 cr.
COMM 916, Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 920, Graduate Seminar, 3 cr.

Other approved courses outside the department.
 

 


Option in Early Childhood Communication Disorders

This option prepares students for professional practice in the diagnosis and treatment of early childhood communication disorders in young children. Students learn theory and practice for a variety of speech-language-communication-swallowing disorders typically seen in babies through early elementary age children. An essential component of this option is supporting families of young children with communication disorders. Practicum experiences in educational and pediatric rehabilitative settings, early intervention centers, and private practice are available to enhance applied learning. Upon completion of coursework and clinical training, students are prepared to diagnose and treat a wide array of early childhood speech-language-communication-feeding disorders and collaborate with their professional colleagues in educational and rehabilitative teams.

In addition to the core courses, required courses for this option are:

COMM 900, Articulatory and Phonological Disorders in Children, 3 cr.
COMM 901, Dysphagia, 3 cr.
COMM 902, Stuttering, 3 cr.
COMM 905, Motor Speech Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 906, Voice Disorders, 2 cr.
COMM 908, Language/Literacy Disorders I, 3 cr.
COMM 912, Language Disorders Birth to Five, 3 cr.
COMM 916, Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3 cr.
EDUC  856, Supporting Families of Students with Special Needs, 4 cr.

Students will also take two elective courses from the following:

COMM 875, Advanced Language Acquisition, 3 cr.
COMM 904, Aphasia in Adults, 3 cr.
COMM 907, Advanced Seminar in Aural Rehabilitation, 3 cr. 
COMM 909, Language/Literacy Disorders II, 3 cr.
COMM 913, Cognitive Communication Disorders, 3 cr.
COMM 920, Graduate Seminar
EDUC 941, Diversity and Child Development, 4 cr.
HHS   898, Neurodevelopmental and Related Disorders, 1 to 8 cr.

Other approved courses outside the department.

 


Option in Adult Neurogenic Communication Disorders

This option prepares students for clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of neurogenic communication disorders in adults. Students receive extensive training in the theories and processes of brain dysfunction (e.g., stroke, acquired brain injury, dementia, and other progressive diseases) as well as the current practices in the application of neurorehabilitation management. Practicum placements in medical and rehabilitative facilities provide applied experience to enhance learning. Upon completion of the coursework and clinical training, students are prepared to provide speech-language pathology services for a wide array of neurogenic communication disorders (i.e., acquired impairment in language, speech, and cognition) and collaborate as a contributing member with other professionals in medical and rehabilitation teams. 

In addition to the core courses, required courses for this option are:

COMM 900, Articulatory and Phonological Disorders in Children, 3 cr. 
COMM 901, Dysphagia, 3 cr. 
COMM 902, Stuttering, 3 cr. 
COMM 904, Aphasia, 3 cr. 
COMM 905, Motor Speech Disorders, 3 cr.  
COMM 906, Voice Disorders, 3 cr.   
COMM 908 or 912, Disorders of Language/Literacy I or Language Disorders Birth to Five, 3 cr. 
COMM 913, Cognitive-Communication Disorders, 3 cr.

Students will also take three elective courses from the following:

COMM 875, Advanced Language Acquisition, 3 cr. 
COMM 891, Neurology for Speech-Language Pathologists
COMM 907, Advanced Aural Rehab, 3 cr. 
COMM 908, Language Literacy Disorders I, 3 cr. [if not chosen in required category]  
COMM 909, Disorders of Language/Literacy II, 3 cr.  
COMM 912, Language Disorders Birth to Five, 3 cr.  [if not chosen in required category]  
COMM 916, Autism Spectrum Disorders, 3 cr.  
COMM 920, Graduate Seminar [advanced medical options]  
PSYCH 914, Advanced Seminar in Cognition, 3 cr.  

Other approved courses outside the department.


Clinical Practicum

All students are required to complete four practicum rotations and two externships during their graduate studies. Practicum assignments take place at the UNH Speech-Language-Hearing Center (SLHC) and University-supervised satellite programs. Externships are available at a broad range of department-approved settings, including public and private schools, language-based preschool programs, early intervention programs, health care settings, and private practices. UNH requires students to have 15 documented observation hours prior to the start of clinical work.

During fall and spring semesters of year 1, students complete clinical work that directly and simultaneously corresponds to coursework. Clinical assignments are completed at the UNH SLHC as well as University-supervised satellite programs. During year 2, students complete two semesters of diagnostic clinic at the UNH SLHC along with two externships at two different settings. Students shall participate in at least one externship that corresponds to their selected option in order to develop clinical skills in their area of interest. Since the UNH CSD Graduate Program is a full-time program, we expect students to be available for clinical assignments when not in class.

Students are responsible for transportation to satellite programs, externships, and other community learning experiences. Practicum sites may require a physical, including a tuberculin test; proof of immunizations such as poliomyelitis, rubella and hepatitis; health insurance; and drug/urine testing. In addition, students are responsible for meeting the criminal record clearances established by the practicum site. Failure to pass required medical and other clearance checks could render a student ineligible for a practicum assignment and thus unable to complete program requirements.

To learn more about the available externships, see the CSD Externship Database.

 


Capstone Experience

The capstone experience is divided into two phases:

Phase I: Year-One Comprehensive Exam

Phase I is a comprehensive exam scheduled at the end of the first year of graduate study. For the year-one comprehensive exam, all students will write for two hours, answering two out of three integrated questions addressing content specific to the first year.

Phase II: Year-Two Comprehensive Exam or Thesis

Year-Two Comprehensive Exam (non-thesis)
All students except those writing a thesis must pass a year-two comprehensive exam designed to assess their mastery of the full two-year curriculum. Students will write for six hours, answering six out of eight integrated questions. Students who have selected either the Early Childhood Communication Disorders, Language/Literacy Disorders, or the Adult Neurogenic Communication Disorders options are required to respond to one question specific to their course of study during the year-two comprehensive exam.

Thesis
Students may choose to write a thesis in lieu of the year-two comprehensive exam. Upon completion of an original research project, students must defend the thesis in an oral examination and must gain approval of the thesis committee. In addition to required coursework, students must register for 6 credits of COMM 899.

 


Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
COMM 875 Advanced Language Acquisition 3
COMM 876 Ethical and Professional Issues in Communication Sciences and Disorders 1
COMM 880 Diagnosis of Speech and Language Disorders 3
COMM 890 Advanced Audiology for Speech-Language Pathologists 3
COMM 891 Neurology for Speech-Language Pathologists 3
COMM 895 Special Topics 1 to 3
COMM 899 Master's Thesis 1 to 6
COMM 900 Articulatory and Phonological Disorders in Children 3
COMM 901 Dysphagia 3
COMM 902 Stuttering 3
COMM 903 Therapy Process 2
COMM 904 Aphasia in Adults 3
COMM 905 Motor Speech Disorders 3
COMM 906 Voice Disorders 2
COMM 907 Advanced Seminar in Aural Rehabilitation 3
COMM 908 Disorders of Language and Literacy I 3
COMM 909 Disorders of Language and Literacy II 3
COMM 910 Practicum 1 per semester
COMM 911 Externship 4 per semester
COMM 912 Language Disorders Birth to Five 3
COMM 913 Cognitive Communication Disorders 3
COMM 914 Augmentative and Alternative Communication 3 to 4
COMM 915 Counseling Clients and Families with Communication Disorders 2
COMM 916 Autism Spectrum Disorders 3
COMM 917 Research Methods in Communication Sciences and Disorders 3
COMM 920 Graduate Seminar 1 to 6

 



Community Development Policy and Practice (DPP)

» http://www.unh.edu/madpp/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.A.

The master of arts in community development policy and practice is a program that prepares individuals for advanced policy- and practice-oriented sustainable development work within the United States and internationally. The program has two pathways to complete the master’s degree: a 14-month pathway and a 24-month pathway. The master's program offers an integrated conceptual framework guiding the coursework, high-level tools, and the best thinking in the field. Students are early- and mid-career adults working in a variety of development fields, and in particular those from public agencies and international and domestic non-profit and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Applicants to the program come from both international and domestic organizations and work in areas ranging from public policy, planning, economic development, sustainable development, environmental policy, public health, education, microenterprise, and more.

Objectives

  1. Educate community development practitioners working in non-profit organizations, NGOs, community-based organizations, government agencies, and private corporations, using a peer-based learning framework
  2. Promote innovative approaches to development policy and practice, identifying those that can increase the effectiveness of community development practitioners
  3. Expose community development practitioners to local and global trends
  4. Using state-of-the-art communication technologies, connect practitioners to each other and to participants in similar programs across the globe

The degree program includes courses in the core disciplines of management, social sciences, health sciences, and natural sciences (including ecology, agriculture, natural resource management, and energy and climate studies).

Students in the master of arts in community development policy and practice program will:

  1. Develop interdisciplinary knowledge and skills through a combination of core courses designed to integrate theory, policy, as well as data collection and analysis
  2. Acquire an understanding of complex development issues and problems through a set of electives spanning engineering, natural sciences, public health, management, and social sciences
  3. Apply their learning to real-world situations, by carrying out a four-term field project in their home community

A unique feature of this program is that students can continue working while earning their degree. The 14-month pathway includes two intensive summer terms with the balance of courses taken online between these sessions. The 24-month pathway is the same as the 14-month pathway followed by additional online terms. This meets the practical needs of both students and their employers, enabling participants to join an exciting advanced degree program that will enhance their performance and their commitment to work. Students will gain an array of skills that will help them more effectively meet the challenges in their development sectors. They will also develop a network of peers and advisers to continue to inform and inspire them.

Social change begins with strong leadership, and graduates of this program will have the tools, networks, and fresh insights to help improve the conditions and opportunities in the communities they serve.


Admission Requirements

The following chart summarizes what is required for application to the master of arts in community development policy and practice program.

Application Requirements

Description

Application Method

Must be submitted online

Application Deadline*

February 15

Application Fee

$65 USD

Letters of Reference

Three (3) academic or professional letters of reference are required (submitted online)

Resume

A current resume must be emailed to grad.docs@unh.edu.

Personal Statement

A short personal statement including relevant past experiences (academics, research, and/or work experience), areas of interest, and goals in pursuing a master's degree. Please email to grad.docs@unh.edu.

Undergraduate Degree

B.A., B.S., or equivalent is required from an accredited university.

Transcripts

One set of official transcripts should be sent directly to the UNH Graduate School from each college/university you attended (2 semesters+).

GRE

Not required. Can be submitted if you wish.

TOEFL

Only required if English is not your first language.

New Hampshire Residency Form

Only required if you are a New Hampshire resident and wish to take advantage of the in-state discounted tuition.

*While applications received after the deadline may be considered, to receive priority consideration for financial aid, please submit your application by the deadline. Please check with the UNH Graduate School for graduate financial aid deadlines.

 


Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements

In order to earn the master's degree, students must complete thirteen courses (equivalent to 39 credits), including the four-term project requirement, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Ten of the thirteen courses are required courses, while the remaining three are elective courses.

Course of Study

The master of arts in community development policy and practice program is structured around four competency areas:

Successful practitioners must be able to perceive problems from multiple points of view and through a variety of cultural lenses, including traditional academic and policy perspectives, as well as those of the communities and individuals to be served. Viewed in this way, neither traditional approaches (which emphasize theory and disciplinary academic content) nor “pedagogical inversions” (which give primacy to engagement and practice while deemphasizing theory and policy) create well-rounded community development practitioners. The program will examine each of the core disciplinary areas within the cross-cutting lenses of theory, policy, data collection and analysis, and practice.

Core Curriculum

The curriculum is a series of courses designed to help students develop and strengthen interdisciplinary breadth and communication and to build program identity and a sense of community. All courses are 3-credit courses. The ten required courses comprise 30 credits in total, and students need to complete three elective courses (9 credits).

The sequence by which students take the ten required and three elective courses depends on the amount of time that they plan to take to complete the degree. There are two options: a 14-month pathway and a 24-month pathway.

14-Month Pathway

Terms

Courses

1st Summer Term
(on-campus in Durham, N.H.)

Required Courses

Elective Courses

Fall Term
(online)

Required Courses

Optional Winter/J Term
(online)

Elective courses offered

Spring Term
(online)

Required Courses

2nd Summer Term
(on-campus in Durham, N.H.)

Required Courses

Elective Courses

*Detailed descriptions of elective courses can be found on the Course Description page.

**Note:

1.       The Community Development Finance elective course is also offered as a certificate course:  Certificate in Community Development Finance.

2.       The Current Issues in Microfinance and Microenterprise Development elective course is also offered as a certificate course:  Sustainable Microfinance and Development Program.

 

24-Month Pathway

 

Terms

Courses

1st Summer Term
(on-campus in Durham, N.H.)

Required Courses

Elective Courses

1st Fall Term
(online)

Required Course

Optional Winter/J Term
(online)

Elective courses offered

1st Spring Term
(online)

Required Course

2nd Summer Term
(on-campus in Durham, N.H.)

Required Courses

Elective Courses

2nd Fall Term
(online)

Required Course

Optional Winter/J Term
(online)

Elective courses offered

2nd Spring Term
(online)

Required Course

*Detailed descriptions of elective courses can be found on the Course Description page.

Note:

1.       The Community Development Finance elective course is also offered as a certificate course: Certificate in Community Development Finance.

2.       The Current Issues in Microfinance and Microenterprise Development elective course is also offered as a certificate course:  Sustainable Microfinance and Development Program.


 

As noted above, summer terms are offered on-campus in Durham, New Hampshire, while courses offered during the fall, winter/J, and spring terms (when students are in their home communities) are offered online.

The 14- and 24-month pathways have the same courses during the summer and winter/J terms. The only difference between the two pathways is that students opting for the 14-month pathway take two required courses each during the fall and spring terms, thereby allowing them to complete 39 credits in 14 months. On the other hand, students who choose the 24-month pathway take only one required course each during the fall and spring terms; thus they need two fall and spring terms to complete the 39-credit requirement.

Elective Courses

Students are required to take three elective courses. These courses are offered during the summer terms (on-campus in Durham) and the winter/J term (online for three weeks in January). At least three elective courses will be offered during each summer term, and one elective course during the winter/J term. Below is a list of elective courses.



Computer Science (CS)

» http://www.cs.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D., Software Systems Engineering certificate

The Department of Computer Science offers both the M.S. and the Ph.D. in computer science. 

The M.S. program is designed to help students increase the breadth and depth of their computer science knowledge, strengthen their software development skills, and build their research skills. Professionally-oriented students often complete industry internships, and the program has an outstanding job placement record for its graduates. Research-oriented students complete an M.S. thesis under the guidance of a faculty mentor, which usually leads to publication and provides clear evidence of the developed research skills useful for obtaining a leadership position in industry or to go on to do a Ph.D.  Applications are welcomed from students whose undergraduate degree is not in computer science. In this case, a well-defined set of undergraduate prerequisites must be completed as part of the M.S. program of study.

The Ph.D. program is designed to develop a student's ability to carry out advanced research, as well as ensure the breadth and depth of computer science knowledge required to obtain a faculty position in academia or a research position in industry or at a national laboratory. Students first work to obtain breadth knowledge and a faculty research mentor. Then, working with their mentor, they carry out advanced work that results in original research publications and a doctoral dissertation.


Certificate Offered: Software Systems Engineering

The department also offers a graduate certificate in software systems engineering.  This certificate is designed to help software developers with 3 to 5 years of experience transition to the higher value position of software systems engineer, also known as software architect, chief engineer, or technical lead. Individuals in this position help their organizations make the tough decisions concerning architecture, performance, availability, security, and safety. To obtain the certificate, students must complete four courses: one required course that provides an overview of the entire software systems engineering process, plus three elective courses, which focus on a particular area, such as requirements engineering, security, architecture, or testing.


Admission Requirements

The computer science graduate program is designed for students with a B.S. degree in computer science. However, applications from students whose undergraduate degree is not in computer science are also welcome. In this case, a well-defined set of undergraduate prerequisites must be completed as part of the M.S. program of study. The prerequisites include an introduction to computer science, object-oriented programming, data structures, machine organization, operating systems, and computer science theory.

These prerequisites can be satisfied at UNH by the following undergraduate courses:

CS 415, Introduction to Computer Science I
CS 416, Introduction to Computer Science II
CS 515, Data Structures
CS 520, Assembly Language Programming and Machine Organization
CS 620, Operating System Fundamentals
CS 659, Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Some students may need to take additional mathematics classes.

Students without a B.S. or M.S. in computer science are not normally admitted directly into the Ph.D. program, but it is possible to transfer from the M.S. program to the Ph.D. program.

Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) for the general test of the GRE.  Students who have taken computer science courses at UNH can request a waiver of this requirement.


Degree Requirements


M.S. Degree Requirements

The M.S. program has three options: thesis, project, and exam.


M.S. Thesis Option

1. CS 900, Computer Science Seminar.

2. Eight CS graduate courses of at least 3 credits each.

a. Two must be implementation intensive (see list below).
b. Three courses must be chosen from three different breadth groups (see list below).
c. At least two courses must be above 900.

3. Thesis (6 credits). The student must complete a thesis under the supervision of a thesis adviser and a thesis committee of at least three members.


M.S. Project Option

1. CS 900, Computer Science Seminar.

2. Ten CS graduate courses of at least 3 credits each.

a. Two must be implementation intensive (see list below).
b. Four courses must be chosen from four different breadth groups (see list below).
c. At least three courses must be above 900; one of these must be related to the project area.

3. Project (3 credits). The student must complete a project under the supervision of a faculty adviser.


M.S. Exam Option

1. CS 900, Computer Science Seminar.

2. Ten CS graduate courses of at least 3 credits each.

a. Two must be implementation intensive (see list below).
b. Four courses must be chosen from four different breadth groups (see list below).
c. At least three courses must be above 900.

3. Comprehensive exam that includes four different examination topics (see list below).

One topic must be selected from one of the topics in the Theory breadth group (see list below); the other three topics must be selected from three different breadth groups (which can include a second theory topic).


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

1. CS 900, Computer Science Seminar.

2. Seven CS graduate courses (3 credits or more) beyond the M.S. or fifteen CS graduate courses beyond the B.S.

a. Two must be implementation intensive (see list below).
b. All students must take CS 845, Formal Specification and Verification of Software Systems. 

3.  Breadth requirement. Courses must be taken from at least four breadth groups (see list below), with one of the groups being the Theory group. Students must obtain a 3.4 GPA in the four breadth courses. The student designates which four courses are used to compute the GPA.

4. Research tool. A research tool represents knowledge and skills in another discipline that can help the student carry out his or her research plan. This is typically satisfied by taking a non-computer-science graduate level course.

5. Depth requirement. Under the direction of a depth adviser and a depth committee, the student carries out some preliminary research that is likely to lead to a dissertation topic. The student must produce two written reports (a literature survey and a research report) and make a presentation as part of an oral examination on the material.

6. Dissertation. The student must complete original research and present and defend a dissertation describing that research. The research is carried out under the supervision of a faculty member dissertation adviser and a dissertation committee of at least five members, including one from outside the department.


Implementation Intensive Courses

Implementation intensive courses include: CS 812, 820, 830, 835, and 870.


Examination Topic Groups

The list below identifies the seven topic groups used for the M.S. comprehensive exam.

Group: Exam Topics

1. Theory: Formal Specification and Verification, Algorithms

2. Operating Systems: Advanced Operating Systems

3. Compiler and Language: Compilers

4. Database: Database

5. Artificial Intelligence: Artificial Intelligence

6. Interactive Systems: Graphics

7. Computer Networks: Computer Networks


Breadth Course Groups

The list below identifies the eight breadth course groups and introductory (800-level) graduate courses in each group. It is also acceptable to satisfy a group requirement by taking an advanced course (900-level) in the specified area. (Note that there are courses in the curriculum that are not in any of the identified groups.)

Group: Introductory Course

1. Theory: CS 845, 858

2. Systems: CS 820, 821, 823

3. Compiler and Language: CS 812, 835, 871

4. Database: CS 875

5. Artificial Intelligence: CS 830

6. Interactive Systems: CS 860, 867, 870

7. Software Engineering: CS 818, 819, 851, 852, 853

8. Networks: CS 825



Earth Sciences (ESCI)

» http://www.unh.edu/esci/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Earth Sciences offers the master of science degree in Earth sciences with options in geology, ocean mapping, and a specialization in geochemical systems. The department also offers the master of science degree in hydrology, and a master of science and a Ph.D. in oceanography. A Ph.D. in earth and environmental sciences is offered through the Natural Resources and Earth System Science Program. Graduate students in the department may conduct research through the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space and the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping.

The geology option is intended for students with interests in petrology, mineralogy, structural geology, tectonics, geophysics, sedimentation, glacial geology, paleoclimate, glaciology, hydrogeology, stratigraphy, paleontology, low- or high-temperature geochemistry, and isotope geochemistry.

The ocean mapping option is intended for students with interests in hydrography and hydrographic survey technology.

The geochemical systems specialization is intended for students with interests in all aspects of geochemistry: bedrock, sediment, water, ice, and air with particular emphasis on interpreting and modeling the interaction of these media (e.g., biogeochemistry, air quality, and climate change).

The hydrology degree is intended for students with interests in fluvial processes, global-scale hydrology, groundwater hydrology, hydroclimatology, surface-water hydrology, water quality, and quantitative hydrology.

 


Admission Requirements

An applicant to the M.S. program is expected to have completed one year of calculus and at least four semesters of college chemistry, physics, and/or biology; and to have an undergraduate degree or equivalent in geology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering, or the biological sciences. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the GRE. Students lacking some background in a particular area may be admitted provided they are prepared to complete courses, without graduate credit, in which they may be deficient. The program of study a student wishes to follow and the student's undergraduate major determine the level of preparation necessary. The preparation of each student is determined before the beginning of the first semester in residence in order to plan the course of study. Each entering student is assigned an academic adviser to assist in planning a program of study.


Degree Requirements

Students in the M.S. programs are required to complete the core curriculum for their respective areas. Students in the thesis option must satisfactorily complete at least 30 credits, which include the credits accumulated in the core curriculum. Students in this option must complete a master's thesis (6 credits) and give an oral presentation of the results. 

Students in the non-thesis option must satisfactorily complete at least 34 credits, which includes the core curriculum, a 2-credit directed research project (ESCI 898), and a written and oral presentation of that research.

Geology
The core curriculum for the option in geology normally includes at least three courses from 825, Igneous Petrology; 826, Metamorphic Petrology; 834, Geophysics; 841, Geochemistry; 845, Isotope Geochemistry; 854, Sedimentology; 859, Geological Oceanography; and 862, Glacial Geology. Students are also required to take 997, Seminar in Earth Sciences (1 cr. first year), and 998, Proposal Development (1 cr. first year).

Ocean Mapping
The core curriculum for the option in ocean mapping normally includes 858, Introductory Physical Oceanography; 859, Geological Oceanography; 871, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping; 872, Research Tools for Ocean Mapping; 874, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping I; 875, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping II; Math 831, Math for Geodesy; 972, Hydrographic Field Course; 997, Seminar in Earth Sciences (1 cr. first year); and 998, Proposal Development (1 cr. first year). For this option, a total of 36 credits, including thesis or directed research project, is normally required.

Students may fulfill the Category A (professional) International Federation of Surveyors/International Hydrographic Organization/International Cartographic Association (FIG/IHO) Standards of Competence for Hydrographic Surveyors by completing some additional specialized requirements. For more information, please visit the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping website, www.ccom.unh.edu.

Geochemical Systems
The core curriculum for the specialization in geochemical systems normally includes three courses from 841, Geochemistry; 846, Analytical Geochemistry; 847, Aqueous Geochemistry; 852, Chemical Oceanography; 864, Data Analysis in Earth System Science; EOS/NR 844, Biogeochemistry; ESCI/EOS 815, Global Atmospheric Chemistry; ESCI 845, Isotope Geochemistry. Students are also required to take 997, Seminar in Earth Sciences (1 cr. first year); and 998, Proposal Development (1 cr. first year).

Hydrology
The core curriculum for the major in hydrology normally includes 805, Principles of Hydrology; 810, Groundwater Hydrology; 997, Seminar in Earth Sciences (1 cr. first year); and 998, Proposal Development (1 cr. first year).

In each of the options listed above, additional electives are to be selected from 800- and 900-level courses in the department and/or from courses numbered 700 and above in related disciplines outside of the department (e.g., natural resources, civil engineering, chemistry, zoology). More detailed information is available from the department.

Certificate in Ocean Mapping
The program goal is to provide advanced graduate training to working professionals in the area of ocean mapping.  These professionals will come from a variety of backgrounds ranging from Earth science, geology, and biology to engineering.  The graduate certificate in ocean mapping is awarded for completion of the core courses and associated practicum. The graduate certificate program fulfills the Category A International Federation of Surveyors/International Hydrographic Organization/International Cartographic Association (FIG/IHO/ICA) Standards of Competence for Hydrographic Surveyors.

For more information, please visit the ocean mapping website (www.ccomjhc.unh.edu/index.php?p_&page=education.php#certificate) or e-mail info@ccom.unh.edu at the Center of Coastal and Ocean Mapping Joint Hydrographic Center.

Applying
Please visit the Graduate School PBACC site (www.gradschool.unh.edu/pbacc.html) for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements
ESCI/OE 871, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping (4 cr)
ESCI/OE 872, Research Tools for Ocean Mapping (3 cr)
MATH 831, Math for Geodesy (3 cr)
ESCI/OE 874, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping I (4 cr)
ESCI/OE 875, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping II (4 cr)
ESCI/OE 972, Hydrographic Field Course (4 cr)
OE 677, Seamanship & Marine Weather (P/F)
ESCI 896, Coastal Remote Sensing (3 cr) for the optional Remote Sensing specialty

 



Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS)

» http://www.eos.sr.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

The Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space offers students the opportunity for interdisciplinary study and research. Certain graduate degree programs in Earth sciences, physics, natural resources, and zoology may be accessed through the institute as follows: all the M.S. programs in Earth sciences, the specialization in space physics and astrophysics (M.S. and Ph.D.), and departmental (M.S.) or interdepartmental (Ph.D.) program in natural resources and Earth systems sciences. Admission and degree requirements are set by the respective departments and program. See the graduate program descriptions in Earth sciences, physics, zoology, natural resources, and the natural resources and Earth systems sciences program (NRESS) for admission and degree requirements.

» Click to view course offerings

^ back to top


Economics (ECON)

» https://paulcollege.unh.edu/academics/graduate-programs

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.A., Ph.D.

Admission to the Ph.D. in Economics has been suspended effective Fall 2014.

 

Programs are offered through the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics.

Students seek graduate training in economics for several reasons. Some pursue the M.A. as a terminal degree and become professional economists employed in a variety of business and government settings, including banking, investment, insurance, consulting, the Federal Reserve, and international organizations such as the World Bank and the World Health Organization. Other students may wish to become professional economists who advance to the very highest levels of management in business, government, or academia. Students with these career goals continue their graduate studies by earning the Ph.D. degree.

The graduate programs in economics at UNH are some of the most distinctive in the country. The M.A. program is based on a fast-track, ten-month calendar that provides rigorous training in economic theory and applied statistics. It also allows students to pursue applied coursework in international finance, environmental and resource economics, health economics, data analysis and information management, and international business. The doctoral program at UNH is one of only a few with a dual emphasis on training first-rate economists and outstanding college teachers. Students learn economic theory and econometrics at the highest level and can pursue coursework and receive supervised training in the teaching of economics. Beyond its strengths in the fields of international economics, health economics, and environmental economics, the department is known for its emphasis on the history of economic thought and methodology.  The Department of Economics maintains an active and high-quality weekly research seminar, which attracts leading economists and researchers from around the country.


Admission Requirements

In addition to requirements established by the Graduate School, applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). The graduate programs seek students whose undergraduate experiences provide evidence of superior ability and that indicate the promise of independent scholarship. At a minimum, undergraduate preparation should include courses in economics at the intermediate level, as well as courses in calculus and statistics. Coursework in econometrics is strongly encouraged. Because the first year of the M.A. and Ph.D. programs overlap to a large extent, students who wish to pursue a Ph.D. degree are usually considered initially for admissions into the M.A. program. The doctoral program requires a master's degree in economics from a U.S. institution.


Master of Arts in Economics

The M.A. program in economics builds on the core economic theory and econometrics classes from the Ph.D. program. This coursework is considerably more rigorous than what might be found at a standalone M.A. program. Consequently, master's students are exceptionally well trained.

The fast-track, ten-month program is based on four terms: one five-week term (Term 1) and three ten-week terms (Terms 2-4), running from the end of August through the end of May. It consists of three components: the foundation (Term 1: mathematical economics), the core (Term 2: theory and foundational skills), and concentrations (Term 3 and 4: specialized fields and independent research). As part of the requirements, students participate in weekly research seminars where they are exposed to cutting-edge research presented by UNH faculty and by scholars from around the country. The culminating experience for the program is a master's paper written during Term 4, which affords students the opportunity to work closely with faculty members while conducting original research in their chosen concentration.


Requirements

Students must earn 36 credits to graduate, usually consisting of ten, 3-credit courses, plus 6 hours of graduate economics seminar.

I. The Foundation (3 credits)

ECON 825, Mathematical Economics

The course is typically offered in the five-week Term 1. Class meets four days a week and students earn 3 credits, the same as in the other terms.

II. The Core (9 credits)

ECON 976, Microeconomics I
ECON 972, Macroeconomics I
ECON 926, Econometrics I

These courses enable students to advance to specialized areas in the third and fourth terms with a strong background in theory and econometrics.

III. Electives (15 credits)

ECON 927, Econometrics II or an approved skills course
Field/elective courses

Students may take a variety of economic electives or choose to specialize in an area such as international finance, environmental and resource economics, health economics, data analysis and information management, and international business. Up to two electives as substitutes for economics electives may be taken in courses offered outside of the department, subject to approval by the department. All elective courses must be at the 800 level or higher.

IV. Graduate Economics Seminar (6 credits)

Students are required to register and participate in the Graduate Economics Seminar (ECON 988) in Terms 2, 3, and 4. No more than 6 credits can be counted toward the degree.

V. Master's Paper (3 credits)

Students are required to take the Research Skills course (ECON 979) in preparation to write a master's research paper.  The master's research paper is the capstone experience of the master of arts in economics. Students do research under the direct supervision of a faculty member and present their work at the end of Term 4. 


Ph.D. in Economics

Students demonstrating exceptional promise in economics (usually after completing the master's program) and who are interested in teaching and research find the doctoral program a unique challenge. The doctoral program in economics has four key elements: (1) a broad education in economics; (2) an integrative research experience; (3) a dual emphasis on training first-rate economists and outstanding college teachers; and (4) specialized training in environmental economics, health economics, and international economics.

Nationally, doctoral study in economics has increasingly involved quantitative rigor. UNH's program has responded to this trend, but not at the expense of providing a broad background in economics. Beyond the core theory and econometrics classes, students study methodology and the history of economic thought.

The doctoral program encourages students to develop their research skills early on through an integrative research experience. The cornerstone of this experience is the department's weekly research seminar. Students participate in the seminar by writing critical reviews and referee reports of the papers presented, acting as discussants, and presenting their own research.

A distinctive feature of UNH's doctoral program is its dual emphasis on training economists and college teachers. The Department of Economics, in conjunction with the Teaching Excellence Program in the Graduate School, has developed a nationally known program that provides training in pedagogy for students whose career goals include teaching at the college level. This program, called the Cognate in College Teaching, is an option that Ph.D. students may pursue in addition to the requirements of the Ph.D. degree.


Requirements

The degree requirements include: nine core courses, comprehensive exams, two fields of concentration (a major field and a minor field), field and research workshops, a major field exam, doctoral dissertation proposal defense and final defense, and proficiency in one foreign language if deemed necessary by the student's dissertation chair. Candidacy is reached following successful completion of (1) comprehensive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics; (2) exam in major field (health economics, environmental economics or international economics).

I. Core courses

ECON 976, 977, Microeconomics I and II
ECON 972, 973, Macroeconomics I and II
ECON 970, Advanced Economic Theory
ECON 926, 927, Econometrics I and II
ECON 957, History of Economic Thought
ECON 958, Topics in Economic Thought and Methodology

II. Comprehensive Examinations in Microeconomics and Macroeconomics: 

Written evidence of proficiency in economic theory is demonstrated by passing comprehensive examinations in microeconomics and macroeconomics. These examinations will be given twice a year, after term III and at the end of June.  Students should sit for both of their theory examinations after the third term of their second year of study.  The Coordinator of the Graduate Studies conveys information regarding performance in writing. Departmental policy restricts the number of attempts at the comprehensive examinations to two per examination. If a student fails a theory comprehensive exam for the second time, then the student may, in the case of extenuating circumstances, petition for a third attempt.  Such petition must be submitted within 4 weeks of the date that the department notifies the student of his or her grade.  A student who does not show up on the test date will have the examination counted as one of his or her attempts.

III. Fields of Concentration

Students must complete the requirements for one major field and one minor field.  A student designates his or her major field during Field Workshop (Econ 992) and must have departmental approval to change the major field thereafter.

Environmental Economics

Requirements for a Major Field
1. ECON 908, Environmental Economics: Theory and Policy
2. ECON 909, Environmental Valuation
3. RECO 911, Natural & Environmental Resource Management or other approved course
4. ECON 992, Field Workshop

Requirements for a Minor Field
1. Two of the following: ECON 908, ECON 909, or RECO 911

Health Economics

Requirements for a Major Field
1. ECON 941, Survey of Health Economics
2. ECON 942, Selected Topics in Health Economics
3. One of the following: PHP 901, Epidemiology; PHP 907, Public Health Policy; PHP 922, Public Health Economics; or other approved course
4. ECON 992, Field Workshop

Requirements for a Minor Field
1. ECON 941 and ECON 942

International Economics

Requirements for Major Field
1. ECON 945, International Trade
2. ECON 946, International Finance
3. One of the following: ADMN 846, International Financial Management; ECON 846, Multinational Enterprises; ECON 807, Economics of Sustainable Development; ECON 868, Seminar in Economic Development; ADMN 841, International Management; or other approved course
4. ECON 992, Field Workshop

Requirements for a Minor Field
1. ECON 945 and ECON 946

IV. Examination in Major Field: 

Comprehensive field examinations will be given twice a year, in January and June.  Students are to take their major field examination immediately following the completion of the Field Workshop (Econ 992).  To sit for their field examination, students must have passed both of their theory comprehensive examinations.  Students are permitted two attempts to pass their field examination. Petitions for a third attempt must be submitted within 4 weeks of the date that the department notifies the student of his or her grade.  Such petitions are granted only in the case of extenuating circumstances.  A student who does not show up on the test date will have the examination counted as one of his or her attempts.

V. Elective Course

Beyond the core theory courses and field requirements, students must take one additional graduate course from the department or an approved 800-level class from another department.

VI. Graduate Economics Seminar

The doctoral program entails an integrative research experience that encourages students to develop research skills early on. The cornerstone of this experience is the department's weekly research seminar, which brings scholars from around the country to present cutting-edge research. In their first two years of study, students are required to sign up for the Graduate Economics Seminar (ECON 988) in Terms 2, 3, and 4, and write critical reviews of papers presented.

VII. Research Workshop

Beyond their second year of study, students continue to participate in the department's weekly seminar by enrolling in two terms of Research Workshop (ECON 996). Research Workshop students present their own research in the research seminar series. They may also serve as discussants for outside speakers and write referee reports for the papers presented. Students must secure a dissertation adviser prior to signing up for their first term of Research Workshop. The research-workshop requirement should be completed by the end of the fourth year of study.

VIII. Foreign Language Requirement

Students may need to demonstrate reading knowledge of one foreign language if it is determined to be essential to the student's area of research by his or her dissertation chair.

IX. Dissertation Proposal Defense

Prior to defending his/her proposal, a student must find a dissertation chair and form a dissertation committee. The dissertation proposal may be defended as part of the Research Workshop or separately from the Workshop.

X. Final Dissertation Defense


Cognate in College Teaching

The Ph.D. degree in economics from UNH is a research degree that provides students with a deep understanding of economic theory, institutions, and empirical analysis. Most graduates of the program move into faculty positions at other institutions of higher learning where teaching is an important component of their responsibilities.

In conjunction with the Teaching Excellence Program in the Graduate School, the department has developed a track in its doctoral program that provides formal training in pedagogy for students whose career goals include teaching at the college level. This track, called the Cognate in College Teaching, is an option that Ph.D. students may select in addition to the requirements of the doctoral degree (discussed above). The Cognate is a 13-credit program and is awarded, upon satisfaction of all requirements, concurrently with the Ph.D.  The Cognate can only be awarded in conjunction with the Ph.D. and none of the course requirements of the Cognate can be substituted for those of the Ph.D.

To enter the program, a student must formally apply to the Graduate Dean after at least one year of full-time graduate studies in economics. Admission to the Cognate will be decided by the graduate dean, based upon recommendations of the Economics Graduate Program Coordinator and the Teaching Excellence Program Director.


Requirements of the Cognate

Cognate in College Teaching Requirements

The Cognate in College Teaching offers a series of core and elective courses to prepare individuals to teach at institutions of higher education. The Cognate is available to doctoral students and students in selected master’s degree programs at UNH.

Students must apply and be formally admitted to the program.  The Cognate appears as a minor on the student’s transcript, and is awarded concurrently with the Ph.D. or Master’s degree.

This program requires the satisfactory completion of 13 academic credits. Students elect, with the permission of their graduate coordinator, to add the cognate to their graduate degree. The cognate will be awarded at the time of the award of the qualifying graduate degree. Requirements include 12 credits toward developing core competencies and the submission of anelectronic teaching portfolio for 1 credit.  For more information please visit the Teaching Excellence web site: http://www.unh.edu/teaching-excellence/Academic_prog_in_coll_teach/index.html



Education (EDUC)

» http://www.unh.edu/education/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham and in Manchester through GSMC.

 

Degrees Offered: M.A., M.Ed., M.A.T., Ed.S., Ph.D.

 


Certificates Offered: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Curriculum and Instructional Leadership, Mentoring Teachers, Special Education Administration

 


Note:  The Department of Education has suspended admission, effective Spring 2012, to the Master of Education degree in Administration and Master of Education degree in Reading.

The Department of Education offers a variety of programs leading to the master's degree, the doctor of philosophy degree, and the education specialist degree.  The department also offers graduate certificate programs in autism spectrum disorder and mentoring teachers.

The master of arts in teaching is offered in secondary education. The master of education is offered in counseling, early childhood education (including an option in special needs), elementary education, secondary education, special education, and teacher leadership. Special education certification is also available to those who complete the M.Ed. programs in elementary or secondary education or who complete the M.A.T program in secondary education.

The education specialist degree is offered in educational administration and supervision. The doctor of philosophy is offered in education.

The master of science for teachers is offered through the departments of chemistry, English, and mathematics. (See those departments for information.) Most programs are available to part-time admitted graduate students.


Admission Requirements

In addition to the materials required by the Graduate School, each application must include recent (within five years) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores and a thoughtful, well-written statement of purpose for undertaking graduate study in a particular program.

Individual programs within the department may have additional admissions requirements. Applicants should refer to specific program descriptions. Consultation with a program faculty member is recommended. In all cases, the applicant's relevant experience, references, and professional goals will be considered in the admission process.

Action on applications to Department of Education programs varies by individual program. Applicants to this program must refer to the online Programs of Study listing for additional application instructions. This can be done by referring to the Graduate School's Admissions web page and then Application Requirements. The additional application instructions can be found under Requirements and Supplemental Documents.


Doctor of Philosophy

Program information: Please contact education department.

 

The program of Education offers a Ph.D. in education with specialization in fields related to the areas of (1) teacher education; (2) curriculum and instruction; (3) educational leadership and policy studies; (3) experiential/outdoor education; and (4) children and youth in communities. The doctoral program is designed to engender a broad understanding of the field of education by encouraging focused scholarly inquiry grounded in the reality of educational practice across varied formal and informal settings. Professors and students work to place educational issues in philosophical, socio-cultural, and policy-related contexts.  The program enrolls full- and part-time students.

An individual program of study is planned by the student and her or his guidance committee. Each student's program includes a set of common core courses, specialized study, a number of selected electives from across areas of inquiry, and required research preparation. Students must meet specific University, department, and program requirements. Within this framework, individual programs can vary widely from student to student depending upon the student's own interests and goals.

The Ph.D. in education provides students with preparation for research, teaching, and leadership in a variety of settings. Graduates hold positions at all levels of schooling, from colleges and universities to K-12 schools. Former students are also involved in work as policy makers, community agency directors, consultants, and research analysts.


Admission

Students admitted to the program must have completed a master's degree in education or a related field and will normally have worked full time as an educator at the elementary, secondary, or college level. Entering students are expected to have completed some graduate-level coursework in educational psychology, curriculum and instruction, educational structure and change, and the philosophical and social foundations of education. Exceptional candidates who do not meet all of these course prerequisites will be considered. To apply, candidates must submit a Graduate School application, transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate coursework, and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores.

In addition to the personal statement required on the Graduate School application, candidates must submit an essay on an educational issue. This essay should discuss one issue in the field of education that is of interest to the candidate. It should explore the opportunities and challenges this issue poses and explain why the applicant finds it personally compelling (1,000 to 1,500 words in length).

Prior to completing and submitting the application, it is highly recommended that the candidate arrange for an on-campus interview with the director of doctoral studies or with an appropriate department faculty member. Applicants from distant locations may interview by phone. Contact the Department of Education by phone: (603) 862-2310 or e-mail: education.department@unh.edu.


Degree Requirements

Candidates for the degree must meet admission requirements, develop and complete an approved program of study in consultation with their guidance committee, complete required coursework, undergo an annual assessment review by the Doctoral Advisory Committee (for first- and second-year students), pass a qualifying examination to advance to candidacy, establish a dissertation committee, develop an approved dissertation proposal, write and present the dissertation, and pass the final oral examination.


Program of Studies

Upon acceptance to the program, students are assigned an adviser. During the first year of study, students identify, either in consultation with their adviser or with the director of doctoral studies, faculty members to serve as their guidance committee. Programs for the doctoral degree in education are planned individually by students and their guidance committees. The program of study consists of four major elements: common core courses, specialization specific to the student's scholarly interests, a number of selected electives from across areas of inquiry, and research preparation, including specific advanced research modules. At least five common core courses are required of all students: Proseminar in Doctoral Studies: Critical Inquiry in Education; Normative Inquiry in Education; Qualitative Inquiry in Education; Introduction to Statistics: Inquiry, Analysis, and Decision Making; Applied Regression Analysis for Educational Research; and Quantitative Inquiry: Methods and Techniques of Educational Research. Typically students complete 52 to 64 hours in graduate coursework following their matriculation. These hours do not include doctoral research (EDUC 999).


Qualifying Examination

To be advanced to Ph.D. candidacy, students must satisfactorily complete qualifying examinations as well as other program requirements. After completing at least two-thirds of their coursework, students may take the qualifying examination. The examination is a written exam to be developed, supervised, and evaluated by the student's guidance committee. The qualifying examination is used to evaluate the student's general knowledge in relevant areas of inquiry, and his or her fitness for engaging in research, particularly in the subject proposed for the dissertation.


Dissertation

To complete the degree, the student must present and defend a dissertation of original research and publishable quality.


Administration and Supervision

Program information: Todd DeMitchell, Virginia Garland

The Department of Education offers the degrees of master of education and education specialist in Educational Administration and Supervision.


Master of Education

Note:  The Department of Education has suspended admission, effective Spring 2012, to the Master of Education degree in Administration.

The program is designed for the experienced teacher who wishes to become qualified in the broad area of supervision and administration, grades K-12. Emphasis is on the elementary and secondary school principalship. This program leads to certification in New Hampshire as a principal.

Core requirements (28 credits): 953, Seminar in Curriculum Study; 961, Public School Administration; 962, Educational Finance and Business Management; 965, Educational Supervision; 967, School Law; 969, Practicum in Educational Administration; and 972, Educational Program Evaluation.

Electives (8 credits): Electives are elected in consultation with the program adviser. 

Concluding experience: A degree candidate must successfully complete one of the following: a comprehensive oral examination based on a set of theses statements prepared by the candidate, or a major research study related to school administration, curricula, or educational supervision.


Education Specialist (Ed.S.)

This program, formerly the C.A.G.S. degree program, is designed for those who possess a master's degree in school administration or a master's degree in a related educational field. This program offers advanced preparation for those educators who desire careers as school superintendents, assistant superintendents, state department of education personnel, vocational education coordinators, curriculum coordinators, or educational personnel in private organizations. This program leads to certification as a superintendent in New Hampshire. It is possible to also receive certification as a principal under special circumstances.

Core requirements (20 credits): Ed.S. students will take the following five core courses: 964, Human Resources in Education; 968, Collective Bargaining in Public Education; 971, School Facilities Management; 973, Policy, Politics, and planning in Education; and 977, Leadership: The District Level Administrator.

Electives (8 credits): Electives are selected in consultation with the program adviser. A student who does not hold a master's degree in administration may be required to take specific courses as electives.

Concluding experience (8 credits): A student must complete a field internship and a significant field project in an approved administrative setting.

 


Counseling Program

Program information: Loan Phan, Janet Thompson

The Graduate Program in Counseling prepares counselors to function in a variety of institutions, agencies, and schools dedicated to the educational, social, vocational, and psychological development of the person. Graduates are typically involved in team delivery of services and work in collaboration with other human services professionals. Students are encouraged to develop a fundamental psychotherapeutic approach that can be applied to diverse client populations. Students may also individualize their program of study to serve the needs of a particular clientele. This can be accomplished through selected readings and projects in required courses, internship experiences, elective courses, and independent study or research projects. The program meets educational requirements for certification in school counseling (M.Ed.). 


Master of Education (48 credit hours)

Core requirements (44 credits): 919, Counseling Practicum: Professional and Ethical Orientation; 920, Counseling Theory and Practice; 921, Psychology of Career and Personal Development; 922, Assessment in Counseling; 923, Group Counseling; 924, Psychological Disorders: Variations in Human Development; 925, Counseling Internship I; 926, Counseling Internship; 932, Society and Culture: Contemporary Issues in Counseling; 933, Developmental Models of Comprehensive School Guidance; 851c, Teaching Exceptional Learners: Related Services.

Electives (4 credits): Selected in consultation with the student's adviser, electives may be chosen from graduate-level courses on campus, or may be completed through an approved independent study.

Concluding experience: Degree candidates must complete a comprehensive essay examination.


Early Childhood Education

Program information: Eun Kyeong Cho

The Department of Education offers the master of education degree in early childhood education and an option in special needs. When completed in conjunction with a degree, certification is available as an early childhood teacher (PreK - 3rd).  Certification requirements are additional to the master's degree but may be completed as electives for the degree. This program is an advanced course of study designed for teachers, administrators, and other early childhood practitioners who wish to improve their professional competence and broaden their career opportunities. The program emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and competencies in child development (birth through eight years), learning environments, developmentally appropriate curriculum, developmental and cultural diversity, and professional leadership. The coursework culminates in extensive field-based experience.

Admission requirements: All admitted students are expected to have had at least one course in child development at the upper-division level and at least 200 hours of supervised classroom experience with children from birth through eight years of age, or the equivalent.

Core requirements (26 credits): 861, Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children; 941, Diversity and Child Development; 942, Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning; 948, Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education; one course selected from the special needs option courses offering (EDUC 856, 860, or 862); and two semesters (6 credits) of internship in EDUC 900B and 901B.

Electives (10 credits): Selected in consultation with the program adviser.

Concluding experience: Degree requirements 36 credits. All degree candidates must successfully complete two concluding experiences: (1) one of the following: comprehensive written and oral examination, or a research thesis, (2) and a graduation portfolio.


Special Needs Option

Program information: Eun Kyeong Cho

The Department of Education offers the master of education degree in early childhood education with an option in special needs. When completed in conjunction with a degree, certification is available as an early childhood special education teacher (birth through eight years). Certification requirements are additional to the master's degree but may be completed as electives for the degree.

This program is an advanced course of study designed for teachers, administrators, and other early childhood practitioners who wish to improve their professional competence and broaden their career opportunities. The program emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and competencies in child development (birth through eight years), learning environments, developmentally appropriate curriculum, developmental and cultural diversity, and professional leadership. The coursework culminates in extensive field-based experience.

Admission requirements: All admitted students are expected to have had at least one course in child development at the upper-division level and at least 200 hours of supervised classroom experience with children from birth through eight years of age, or the equivalent.

In addition to the early childhood core requirements described above, students choosing this option will concentrate on young children who are at risk for, or have, developmental difficulties and special needs. Coursework emphasizes an understanding of the role of the family, community, and social policy in early development and intervention. The program is non categorical in its approach to assessment and educational planning.

Core requirements (34 credits):  The core requirements of the early childhood program with the addition of three courses.

EC core requirements: 861, Inclusive Curriculum for Young Children; 941, Diversity and Child Development; 942, Sociocultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning; 948, Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education; and two semesters (6 credits) of internship in EDUC 900B and 901B.

Additional Special Needs core requirements: 860, Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs; 862, Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs: Evaluation and Program Design; and 856, Supporting Parents of Students with Special Needs.

Electives (8 credits): Selected in consultation with the program adviser.

Concluding experience: Degree requirements 42 credits. A degree candidate must successfully complete two concluding experiences: (1) one of the following: a comprehensive written and oral examination, or a research thesis,  (2) and a graduation portfolio.

 

 


Reading

Note:  The Department of Education has suspended admission, effective Spring 2012, to the Master of Education degree in Reading.

Program information: Paula Salvio, Ruth Wharton-McDonald

The graduate program in reading prepares literacy specialists and teachers to provide leadership and instruction in literacy in a variety of educational contexts. The instructional sequence integrates theory, research, and instructional practice, and incorporates field-based and clinical components. Particular emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of reading and writing. Graduates of the program provide direct instruction in literacy and offer leadership in organizing, managing, and evaluating literacy programs.

Core requirements (24 credits): 907, Foundations of Literacy Instruction; 908-909, Clinical Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties and Disabilities; 910, Reading and Writing Methods in the Middle/Secondary School; 913, Field Practicum in Reading; 914, Seminar in Reading Research.

Electives (12 credits): Selected in consultation with the program adviser; a student using the research thesis option as a concluding experience will use 8 credits for EDUC 899, Master's Thesis.

Concluding experience: A degree candidate will successfully complete either a written examination or a research thesis.


Special Education

Program information: Vincent Connelly, Georgia Kerns,  William Wansart

The special education program prepares highly qualified educators who possess the knowledge, disposition, and skills necessary to take the lead in establishing effective teaching and learning environments for a diverse population of learners, who are capable of collaborating with classroom teachers as team leaders or consultants, and who utilize these skills within their school communities, and within the profession itself. The program meets current certification requirements in the state of New Hampshire in General Special Education, Learning Disabilities, intellectual and developmental disabilities , and Special Education Administration.

Degree Requirements

Prerequisites for General Special Education Certification:

1. All candidates are required to complete a course in mathematics teaching methods and a course in reading teaching methods. At UNH, courses that meet the reading requirement are EDUC 806, Introduction to Reading Instruction and EDUC 907, Foundations of Reading Instruction. Courses that meet the mathematics requirement are MATH 701, Exploring Math for Teachers I and MATH 702, Exploring Math for Teachers II. Equivalent courses taken at another college or university may be substituted.

2. All students are required to complete EDUC 850, Introduction to Exceptionality and EDUC 851, Educating Exceptional Learners. Equivalent courses taken at another college or university may be substituted.

3. Credits for prerequisite courses will not count toward those needed for the M.Ed. degree.

Core Courses (32 credit hours)
Required courses for all students:

EDUC 756/856, Supporting Families of Individuals with Exceptionalities 4 cr.
EDUC 900C, Internship and Seminar in Special Education 6 cr.
EDUC 901C, Internship and Seminar in Special Education 6 cr.
EDUC 938, Advanced Seminar in Special Education 4 cr.
EDUC 939, Assessment of Children with Learning Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 940, Teaching Children with Learning Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 981, Methods and Techniques of Educational Research 4 cr. or an equivalent educational research course

Elective Courses (12 credit hours minimum)
EDUC 852, Contemporary Issues in Learning Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 853, Contemporary Issues in Behavior Disorders 4 cr.
EDUC 854, Contemporary Issues in Developmental Disabilities 4 cr.
EDUC 855, Fostering Social Relationships for Students Who Experience Severe Disabilities 2 cr.
EDUC 860, Introduction to Young Children with Special Needs 4 cr.
EDUC 876, Reading for Children with Special Needs 4 cr.
EDUC 908/909, Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Difficulties 4 cr.
EDUC 947, Curriculum for Young Children with Special Needs: Evaluation and Program Design 4 cr.

EDUC 951, Laws and Regulations Affecting the Education of Individuals with Disabilities 4 cr.

EDUC 952, Inclusive Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction and Communication Supports 4 cr.

EDUC 956, Positive Behavioral Supports 4 cr. Students will select elective courses in consultation with their adviser. At most, 4 credit hours of EDUC 899, Thesis may count as elective work.

Other courses may be included on recommendation from the adviser.

Core Courses for certification in learning disabilities in addition to those necessary for certification in General Special Education:

EDUC 852, Contemporary Issues in Learning Disabilities 4 cr.
EDUC 908/909, Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities 4 cr./4 cr.
EDUC 910, Reading and Writing Methods in the Middle/Secondary School 4 cr.

Core Courses for certification in intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) in addition to those necessary for certification in General Special Education:

EDUC 854, Contemporary Issues in Developmental Disabilities 4 cr.
EDUC 855, Fostering Social Relationships for Students who Experience Severe Disabilities 2 cr.
EDUC 876, Reading for Children with Special Needs 4 cr.
EDUC 952, Inclusive Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction and Communication Supports 4 cr.
.

EDUC 938, Advanced Seminar in Special Education 4 cr.
EDUC 956, Positive Behavioral Supports 4 cr.
COMM 914, Seminar in Alternative and Augmentative Communication 3 cr.

Core Courses for Special Education Administration in addition to those necessary for certification in General Special Education:

EDUC 951, Laws and Regulations in Special Education 4 cr.
EDUC 956, Learning to Listen: Positive Behavioral Supports 4 cr.
EDUC 961, Public School Administration 4 cr.
EDUC 962, Educational Finance and Business Management 4 cr.
EDUC 964, Human Resources in Education 4 cr.
EDUC 974, Administrative Internship 6 cr.

Concluding Experiences
All students will have the option of one of two concluding experiences:

1. Research project with a defense, or

2. A research thesis that meets the requirements of the Graduate School and the Education department (6-10 credits).

Requirements for the thesis are explained in the Graduate School publication entitled Thesis and Dissertation Manual. Which can be found at www.gradschool.unh.edu.   Requirements for the project may be obtained from the adviser or on the program website.

Grades and Credit Hours
The M.Ed. degree requires a minimum of 44 hours of graduate-level credits. The exact number of credit hours will depend on the student's background, competencies, and professional goals, and will be determined by the adviser.

 


Teacher Education Program

Program information: Tom Schram, Cindy Glidden

The Teacher Education Program prepares teachers who possess the knowledge, disposition, and skills necessary to take the lead in establishing effective teaching and learning environments within their own classrooms and school communities.

The Department of Education offers the master of arts in teaching degree in secondary education and the master of education degree in elementary and secondary education for those seeking initial teacher licensing. The master of education degree in teacher leadership is available for experienced teachers.

Applicants to teacher education programs are evaluated on the following criteria: undergraduate academic record, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores, personal statement, and letters of recommendation regarding academic ability, motivation, interpersonal skills, and potential for success as a teacher. Those seeking admission to programs leading to teacher licensing should also have a positive recommendation from EDUC 500, Exploring Teaching, or equivalent experience.

In the admissions process, we seek evidence that students have the following knowledge, abilities, and dispositions: motives to teach that include a strong social commitment to contribute to society through education; a disposition to care for their students; an ability to interact positively with children and adults; a capacity to win the respect of peers and be effective in group interaction, showing openness to the needs and views of others; well-developed communication skills, including speaking, writing, and listening skills, as well as an ability to engage others in both the giving and receiving of information and feelings; perceptiveness or the ability to identify and process the relevant details in their environment, especially in the context of a classroom; the ability to make reasonable judgments in a context of complex situations that change from moment to moment; the capacity for clear thinking and an ability to translate thoughts into simple and clear explanations; superior academic skills, extensive knowledge of at least one major discipline, intellectual curiosity, the ability to be open to the unknown, and the willingness to tolerate uncertainty in the face of enormous pressure to deny it; a disposition to take charge of their own learning, which includes the active pursuit of feedback and the willingness to take thoughtful risks.

Any course taken in the Department of Education that will be used to fulfill a teacher licensure requirement must be completed with a grade of B- or better.


Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Education Programs for Those Seeking Teacher Licensure

These programs are designed for two types of students: UNH undergraduates who anticipate completing the Five-Year Teacher Preparation Program at UNH, and students who completed an undergraduate degree either at UNH or elsewhere with little or no coursework in education. The programs lead to teaching licensure at the elementary and secondary levels. Admission to these programs is competitive.

Licensure requirements that must be met prior to or as part of the master's degree program include completion of 4 credits or an equivalent in each of the following: 500/935, Exploring Teaching; 800, Educational Structure and Change; 801, Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology; 803, Alternative Teaching Models; 805, Alternative Perspectives on the Nature of Education; 851A or B, Educating Exceptional Learners; 900A, 901A, Internship and Seminar/Teaching (6 credits each, must be taken as part of the program).

Elementary teacher licensure requirements include two additional courses: 806, Introduction to Reading Instruction in the Elementary Schools; and a mathematics course: EDUC 741/841, MATH 701, Exploring Mathematics I, or MATH 702, Exploring Mathematics II (4 credits each), or the equivalent.

Students pursuing teacher licensure in art, biology, chemistry, Earth sciences, general science, physics, or social studies must also complete EDUC 807, Teaching Reading through the Content Areas (2 credits).

Preparation for licensure in general special education is available to those who complete the M.A.T. or M.Ed. programs in either elementary or secondary education. This licensure allows recipients to serve as general special education teachers. In order to qualify for licensure in general special education, students must complete 22 credits (18 of which may be used toward the M.Ed. degree, or 6 toward the M.A.T. degree); a reading methods course; a mathematics methods course; 850, Introduction to Exceptionality; 851, Educating Exceptional Learners; 939-940, Assessment and Teaching of Children with Learning Difficulties; 900C, 901C, Internship and Seminar (3 credits each).

Dual licensure in early childhood education and elementary education is available to those who are enrolled in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education. This dual licensure allows recipients to serve as early childhood and/or elementary teachers. The early childhood/elementary education dual-certification program option is intended for students who have majored in family studies with an option in child studies or young child/P-3 program, or the equivalent. Dual licensure requires three graduate courses in early childhood education to be selected in consultation with an adviser from the early childhood program. The three early childhood courses will count as a graduate concentration in the M.Ed. elementary program. Students will complete a full-year internship at the K-3 level under the auspices of the teacher education program.


Master of Arts in Teaching (Secondary)

Students complete an Internship (12 credits) and an additional 20 credits. Of the 20 additional credits at the graduate level, three courses totaling 9 to 12 credits must be taken from a subject field outside education. The remaining 8-11 credits can be in education or in another department.

In consultation with his/her adviser, a graduate student in this program is strongly encouraged to develop a subject-area concentration consisting of at least 3 courses.

Concluding experience: A degree candidate must successfully complete a teacher education program portfolio and colloquium in conjunction with the internship.


Master of Education (Elementary and Secondary)

Students complete an Internship (12 credits) and an additional 20 credits. Of the 20 additional credits at the graduate level, 10 must be in education and 10 can be in either education or in another department.

Concluding experience: A degree candidate must successfully complete a teacher education program portfolio and colloquium in conjunction with the internship.


Master of Education in Educational Studies

The Master of Education in Educational Studies is a master’s degree program that can be completed fully or partially online. It is designed for educators who wish to expand their knowledge of education, improve their educational practice, and positively impact public and private schools. The M.Ed. is also intended to provide a foundation in educational studies for individuals broadly interested in education in a variety of settings, including business, educational and research centers, and national and state agencies. The program provides a context in which participants can develop tools of inquiry to investigate questions about teaching, mentoring, learning and school reform, and to inspire others to work toward educational change. This program does not lead to a teaching or administrative credential.

The 30 – 32 credit program is structured around a knowledge and application core (12 credits) that includes a course on contemporary issues in education, a course on the analysis of teaching, mentoring and learning, and a course on educational research methods. Program participants will also complete four electives (14 - 16 credits), designed to provide depth or breadth to their course of study. Finally, program participants will complete an inquiry project course in which they develop a literature review on an educational issue of their choice, conduct research, and present their findings in the context of the course (4 credits). The program includes flexible options for study, including a fully online option.

Applying:  Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the program.

Core required courses (12 credits): Issues in Education; Analysis of Teaching and Learning; Research Methods in Education and the Social Sciences.  

Elective courses (14-16 credits): Program participants choose a set of four elective courses in consultation with their advisor, reflecting their personal, professional, and academic interests, needs, and goals.  The electives are intended to provide breadth and depth to each participant’s course of study. At least two electives must be courses in the Education Department at UNH (8 credits). The other two elective courses may be taken in education, another department at UNH, or another approved institution with the appropriate permission and consistent with Graduate School transfer credit policies (6 – 8 credits, depending on school / department). Electives can be online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. 

Concluding experience course (4 credits):  Educators as Researchers


Graduate Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorder

This program will serve the professional development needs of a wide variety of individuals, including: (1) parents of children with ASD; (2) special and general education teachers and administrators; speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, behavioral consultants, recreation therapists; and (3) graduate students in other University majors such as sociology or psychology.  For more information please visit the Autism Spectrum Disorder website.

 

Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

 

Certificate Requirements

The coursework for the graduate certificate consists of 19-23 credits from the following required and elective course offerings. Highly qualified individuals may petition for permission to waive a required course. Applicants are urged to schedule an appointment with the program coordinators to develop their individualized course of study.  Applications for graduate certificates are available through the Graduate School website.

Required Courses 

EDUC 857A, Contemporary Issues in ASD

COMM 916, Autism Spectrum Disorders

Elective Courses (two from among the following choices based on individual advising [other electives may be added in the future]

EDUC 853 Contemporary Issues in Behavior Disorders

EDUC 855, Social Relationships and Students with Disabilities

EDUC 857C, Contemporary Issues in ASD

EDUC 952, Assessment, Curriculum, Instruction, and Supports for Students with Disabilities

EDUC 956, Positive Behavior Supports

OT courses in Assistive Technology

COMM 914, Augmentative and Alternative Communication

 


Graduate Certificate in Curriculum and Instructional Leadership

This program provides the skills and knowledge for educators to understand curriculum and instruction and to lead educational programs at the school and district office level. It is comprised of curriculum, supervision, instruction, and data analysis components.

Applying

Applicants must have a minimum of five years of successful teaching experience or administrative experience. Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Required courses

A minimum of five courses (20 credits) is required for this Graduate Certificate; 16 credits must be completed after admission to the program. All students are required to complete EDUC 953 Seminar in Curriculum Study or an equivalent course.  In addition, students must complete one course from each of four strands:  curriculum, supervision, instruction, and data analysis.  With the approval of their advisor and the Division, students may make modifications to the Graduate Certificate’s course of study.

 

Strand courses:

1.     Curriculum: EDUC 907 Foundations of Literacy, EDUC 960 Curriculum Development, EDUC 991 Curriculum Theory I, EDUC 992 Curriculum Theory II

2.     Supervision of Instruction:  EDUC 965 Educational Supervision and Evaluation, EDUC 957 Collaborative Models of Supervision

3.     Instruction:  EDUC 958 Analysis of Teaching

4.     Data Analysis:  EDUC 881 Introduction to Statistics, EDUC 885 Educational Assessment, EDUC 972 Program Evaluation


Graduate Certificate in Mentoring Teachers

The Teacher Education Program works with approximately 150 “cooperating teachers” and more than 25 supervisors each year in its full-year internship program. Mentoring is a crucial element in the preparation of effective teachers, as well as in the transition from teacher preparation programs to the first years of teaching. The N.H. Department of Education has also recognized the need for mentoring early-career public school teachers in its “Induction Through Mentoring Projects.” The UNH Department of Education proposes to offer a graduate certificate program in mentoring teachers to help advance the preparation of professionals in the field.  For more information please visit the Mentoring Teachers website

This certificate is designed to serve:

 

Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements

The program of study required for the certificate consists of four required courses and a total of 16 credit hours. The program focuses on the development of mentoring skills that draw upon: (1) models of adult development; (2) approaches to effective teaching; (3) an understanding of teacher supervision and assessment; and (4) strategies for problem solving, conflict resolution, and communication.

EDUC 957, Collaborative Supervision (4 cr.) OR EDUC 965, Educational Supervision (4 cr.)
EDUC 958, Analysis of Teaching (4 cr.)
EDUC 990, Developmental Perspectives on Adulthood (4 cr.)
EDUC 897, Teacher as Researcher [note: course number will change in 05-06]
(Under special circumstances and with the approval of their adviser, students may substitute an elective for EDUC 897)

 


Graduate Certificate in Special Education Administration

The Graduate Certificate in Special Education Administration (SEA) is part of the department's strong academic offerings in special education, which include a master of education in special education and state certification in general special education, learning disabilities, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. This certificate is designed for experienced educators and prepares administrators who manage and lead special education programs.

Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Required courses

In order to receive the Graduate Certificate for Special Education Administrator, the matriculated student must pass a minimum of 12 credits, including transfer credits, from the courses below, or electives if appropriate, taken after admission to the Graduate Certificate program, and must complete all requirements for state certification as a special education administrator.

Special Education Courses:  EDUC 801 Human Development and Learning: Educational Psychology, EDUC 850 Introduction to Exceptionality, EDUC 938 Assessment and Teaching of Children with Learning Difficulties, EDUC 856 Supporting Families of Individuals with Disabilities, EDUC 951 Laws and Regulations Affecting the Education of Students with Disabilities, EDUC 956 Positive Behavior Supports.

Administration Courses:  EDUC 961 Public School Administration, EDUC 962 Educational Finance and Business Management , EDUC 964 Human Resources in Education, EDUC 974 Administrative Internship.



Electrical Engineering (ECE)

» http://www.ece.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers three paths to obtaining a master's degree. It offers both a thesis and non-thesis masters of science degree (MSEE) and a master of engineering degree (M.Eng.). The non-thesis MSEE substitutes additional coursework in place of the research and writing associated with completing a thesis. The M.Eng. program is also a non-thesis program, and it differs from the non-thesis MSEE option in that it allows for coursework in business and law.  While the non-thesis degree programs do not require a formal thesis, students choosing thesis options will be required to give two technical presentations and to submit a technical paper. 

In addition to the master of science, a Ph.D. program is also offered in electrical engineering.


Opportunities

Advanced degrees in electrical engineering open the door to a wider variety of job opportunities, particularly with regard to consulting, research and development, and positions in academia. Within the department, opportunities for formal study, research, and individual or team projects are available in the following areas: biomedical engineering; communication systems; digital signal processing; computer engineering, computer networks, digital systems, and logical synthesis; robotics and neural networks; image processing and pattern analysis; control systems; fiber optics; electromagnetics; pervasive computing; ocean engineering; and instrumentation.


Admission Requirements

An applicant should have completed a baccalaureate degree in electrical engineering or have comparable training, which includes courses in mathematics and physical science, network theory, digital systems, fields and waves, electronics, and electrical circuits, with appropriate laboratory experiences. Students with a baccalaureate degree from a non-U.S. university must take and submit current (within five years) general scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).


Degree Requirements

Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)
The graduation requirement for the ECE M.Eng. degree is based on course credits and concluding experiences. Specifically, students must complete at least 30 credit hours of coursework, with at least 24 credits being earned in the ECE department or related technical disciplines (those disciplines will be determined by the student in conjunction with his/her adviser); of those 24 credit hours in the ECE department, at least 12 must be at the 900 level. Courses outside of the ECE department can be related to management and/or law (courses in financial management, organizational behavior, economics, accounting, intellectual property, etc.). The concluding experiences will be in the form of a technical paper suitable for conference publication and two technical presentation.

Students enrolled in the ECE M.Eng. program are not eligible to serve as teaching assistants (TAs) or research assistants (RAs) except by special permission from the ECE Graduate Committee. All transfers into the ECE M.Eng. program from any of the other three ECE graduate programs will require approval by the ECE Graduate Committee through the existing petition process. If a student holding a TA or RA position in the ECE Department transfers into the ECE M.Eng. program, they are required to relinquish that position.

Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering (MSEE)
Master of science in electrical engineering (M.S.E.E.) degree students must take a minimum of 34 graduate credits including:

Thesis Option:

Non-Thesis Option:

Up to 12 credits earned in non-ECE courses numbered 700-799 may be taken for graduate credit by ECE M.S. degree students provided the courses are petitioned and approved by the dean of the Graduate School. A student may petition that a maximum of 12 graduate credits taken prior to admission in the UNH ECE master of science degree program be applied to fulfill the degree requirements.

Under certain circumstances it may be desirable to take courses outside the ECE department to attain the goals outlined in the student's program of study. In these cases, up to two non-ECE 900-level courses are allowed without petition, provided that they are approved by the student's academic adviser and that the student take at least two 900-level courses (neither of which may be independent studies) within the department. A student wishing to take more than two courses (either 800 or 900 level) outside the department must petition the ECE Graduate Committee.

Declaration of Thesis or Non-Thesis M.S. Degree
M.S. degree students must declare in writing whether or not they are choosing the thesis option or the non-thesis option by the end of their second semester of graduate study.  A form for such declaration is available on the ECE Graduate Student website. When choosing the thesis option, the student is responsible to seek out a qualified faculty adviser. The faculty adviser must agree to being the thesis adviser prior to submitting the declaration form. The selection form must be signed by both the faculty adviser and the student and is then to be submitted to the ECE graduate coordinator. When choosing the non-thesis option, the form must be signed by the student and the student’s assigned academic adviser and then is to be submitted to the ECE graduate coordinator. If a student fails to submit a signed form by the end of their second semester of study, they may be in jeopardy of being dismissed from the M.S. degree program. Once a choice for the M.S. thesis option has been made, the student cannot revert to the non-thesis option without petitioning the ECE Graduate Committee.

Technical Presentation and Paper Requirement for the Non-Thesis Option
Students in the non-thesis option are required to submit a technical paper and to deliver two technical presentations as part of their program. Many of the courses in the ECE graduate program require technical reports and presentations, and some of these may be appropriate for satisfying the technical requirement for students in the non-thesis option. However, there are other approaches for satisfying this requirement as indicated below.

The objective in requiring a technical paper is to ensure that the student has some facility in documenting technical information. The evaluation of that paper is to be performed by the ECE Graduate Committee, and the evaluation will result in either acceptance or rejection of the work submitted. The criterion for technical papers to be considered acceptable is that they describe a contemporary technical concept or development with a degree of depth and clarity evident in conference papers. The student must be the sole author on the technical paper, and it is to be submitted to the chair of the ECE Graduate Committee electronically before the last day of classes. As noted above, technical papers associated with regular ECE graduate courses or independent studies may be used to satisfy the requirement, as are papers prepared for technical conferences or publications. Papers accepted for presentation at refereed conferences or for publication in refereed journals will automatically satisfy the technical paper requirement.

The objective in requiring the two technical presentations is primarily to ensure that students have the opportunity to present in front of a group. Presentations that fulfill one of the criteria below will be considered acceptable for this requirement:

  1. Presentation of a technical lecture (20 minutes or longer) as part of the requirements for a course in which the student is enrolled.
  2. Presentation of a technical lecture in a course as a "stand in" for the faculty member in charge.
  3. Presentation of a technical seminar at UNH (for example, presenting a seminar for ECE 900) or to a public group or industry.
  4. Presentation of a technical paper as part of a professional job function.
  5. Presentation of a paper at a professional technical conference.

It is the responsibility of the student to satisfy this requirement before graduation. Students must get approval from their adviser for any activity that is intended to be used as a technical presentation experience. The two presentations required must be different; giving the same seminar twice does not count as two presentations. If the activity does not fall into one of the five categories listed, prior approval of the ECE Graduate Committee must also be obtained. The student should write a brief letter for each of the two required experiences, stating the nature of the experience and the date on which it was satisfied. This letter is to be signed by the student, signed and approved by the student's adviser, and, if applicable, by the faculty member in charge of the related course. This letter should be placed in the student's departmental file.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The degree of doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in electrical and computer engineering is conferred on qualified candidates who have passed written and oral examinations on the subject matter of their field of study, who have completed an original investigation in this field and have embodied the results in an acceptable dissertation, and who have passed an oral examination in defense of the dissertation. The degree of Ph.D. is essentially a research degree. It is not given merely for the completion of course credits. Detailed information can be found on the ECE departmental website.

 



English (ENGL)

» http://www.unh.edu/english

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S.T., M.A., M.F.A., Ph.D.

The Department of English offers four advanced degrees: master of arts with options in literature or English language and linguistics; master of science for teachers; master of fine arts in writing; and doctor of philosophy.


Admission Requirements

All applicants must submit writing samples in accordance with guidelines available from the English department graduate office. All applicants (except those for the M.F.A. and M.S.T.) must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the GRE. Applicants for the doctor of philosophy degree program in literature must also submit scores for the subject test of literature in English. Applicants for the degree of master of science for teachers (M.S.T.) must have completed education courses sufficient for certification, or have three years teaching experience, or currently hold a full-time teaching position. A student admitted to the Ph.D. program must hold an M.A. degree or be in the final stage of completing requirements for the degree.

All applicants who wish to be considered for teaching assistantships or tuition scholarships must complete an application form, available from the English department graduate office or from the website listed above, or from the graduate school forms page (see the Graduate Aid section).


Degree Requirements

 


M.A. Degree Requirements

Literature Option
An M.A. candidate must complete 36 credit hours at the 800 or 900 level, including three seminar courses and a fourth seminar in literature or ENGL 998, Master's Paper. At least six courses must be literature courses offered by the English department (as distinct from courses in critical theory, linguistics, writing, or teaching methods); there are additional distribution requirements. If a student chooses the Master's Paper option, the six-course requirement is reduced to five literature courses. Each M.A. candidate must also pass ENGL 925, The Graduate Study of Literature, and one course in literary theory. The literary theory requirement would normally be met by successful completion of ENGL 813, 814, or 926. As a general rule, all courses counting toward the M.A. degree should be taken in the English department, but two courses may be taken in other departments with approval. No more than two literature courses should be taken in a combined 700/800 (split) level course.

M.A. candidates must pass a reading examination in a foreign language or demonstrate that they have passed a fourth-semester college-level language course with a grade of B or better. Students whose native language is not English may be exempt from this requirement.

English Language and Linguistics Option
Students who wish to specialize in any of the various areas of English language and linguistics may design an M.A. program to meet their interests. Specialties include applied linguistics and the teaching of English as a second language as well as the traditional subfields of linguistics. Psycholinguistics courses are offered through the psychology department.

To earn the M.A. degree, students must complete at least 32 credit hours at the 800 or 900 levels, including one seminar course, and 4 credits of ENGL 998, in which they are to produce a substantial scholarly paper. Unless the student already has a strong background in linguistic theory, the program of study must include one course in phonetics and phonology (ENGL 893) and one in syntax and semantics (ENGL 894). Reading knowledge of one foreign language is required. This may be demonstrated by passing a departmental examination or by receiving a grade of B or better in a fourth-semester college-level language course. Students whose native language is not English may be exempt from this requirement. The student's course of study must be approved by the program adviser.


M.S.T. Degree Requirements

The master of science for teachers is designed for  practicing  elementary, middle, and high school teachers. It is not appropriate for  individuals seeking state certification. No foreign language is required, and the GRE is not required in the application. The student must complete 32 credit hours at the 800 or 900 levels. At least 24 of these credits must be in the Department of English. Courses taken outside the department must be approved by the student's adviser. Students must complete a capstone experience (creative writing option, teacher inquiry option, or curricular option).

The department offers special summer programs, which can be taken to fulfill some or all of the course requirements for the M.S.T. degree. The New Hampshire Literacy Institutes offer summer courses  that focus on the teaching of writing and reading in grades K-12. Summer institutes emphasize writing workshops in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry and may include courses in literature and composition theory and research.

 


Master of Fine Arts in Writing Requirements

In the fall of 2007, UNH launched a master of fine arts in writing, creating a three-year, 48-credit program that aims to provide students with the intensive training in their craft that they'll need to start their lives as professional writers. Students concentrate in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry and are taught by a faculty of nine working writers, each of whom specializes in one of these fields. Students learn in small workshops and in individual conferences with their teachers. Conference teaching is a cornerstone of the UNH graduate writing program.

Students are required to take four workshops in their major genre. In addition, students take one form and theory course in their major genre, five elective courses that may include additional writing courses or courses from the English department's offerings in other fields (such as literature, linguistics, or composition studies), and 8 credit hours of the M.F.A. thesis. Teaching assistants are required to take English 910, Practicum in Teaching College Composition, as one of their electives. There is no foreign language requirement.

The M.F.A. thesis is a book-length, publishable manuscript. For fiction writers, the thesis could be a collection of short stories, a story cycle (linked stories), or a novel. For nonfiction writers, the thesis could be a collection of themed essays and/or magazine articles or a book of creative nonfiction. For poets, the thesis would be a book-length collection of poems. The minimum length of the thesis is 150 pages for fiction and nonfiction writers and 45 pages for poets. Students will work closely with a thesis adviser as they write and pass an oral defense of the thesis, a defense conducted by a three-member thesis committee of writing faculty. Students will also conduct a public reading of their thesis in an event organized by the writing faculty.

In addition, the M.F.A. program offers students opportunities to publish in an online journal called Barnstorm, as well as intern at publishing houses and magazines and teach in the community at prisons, senior centers, and schools. A select number of students are chosen to teach UNH undergraduate writing courses and to work in the University's Writing Center.

The program admits an average of 15 new students a year, which creates a writing community of 45 student writers.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. program combines the essential guidance and discipline of coursework with the equally essential freedom of independent study and research. To be admitted to the doctoral program, a student must hold an M.A. degree. Students choose between two areas: literature and composition studies. Students choosing either area or program must demonstrate basic proficiency in two languages or advanced proficiency in one. Basic proficiency may be demonstrated by passing a departmental examination or by receiving a grade of B or better in a fourth-semester college-level language course. Advanced proficiency is demonstrated by passing a rigorous departmental examination.

The doctoral program in literature is designed to train students to be teachers and scholars in the fields of literature and language. Students in this program will complete nine graduate courses of which four must be seminars. The other courses must be at the 800 or 900 levels and must include the Practicum in Teaching College Composition (ENGL 910), the Seminar in Literary Theory (ENGL 926), and the ungraded 2-credit course in Dissertation and Profession (ENGL 924). In addition, students must pass a general examination in English and American literature, a more specialized qualifying examination, and the final oral defense of their dissertation. The program in composition studies is designed to train experts who are qualified to teach general courses in literature or linguistics in the teaching of composition. Students in composition studies will complete 10 graduate-level courses of which four must be seminars. The other courses must be at the 800 or 900 levels and include a Practicum in Teaching College Composition (ENGL 910) and Research Methods in Composition (ENGL 918). Students will take a combined general and qualifying examination that focuses both on the theory of composition and rhetoric, and on a secondary area of specialization. Their dissertation work will be on a topic in composition.

Ph.D. students normally hold assistantships and teach under supervision; such teaching is considered a vital part of the student's professional training.



Environmental Education (ENED)

» http://www.unh.edu/education/index.cfm

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.A.

Admissions to this program has been SUSPENDED effective Spring 2014

The department offers a part- or full-time master of arts degree with a major in environmental education. An innovative and collaborative effort of the Department of Education and the Department of Natural Resources, the program is dedicated to preparing educators who can effectively promote awareness, knowledge, and constructive participation in deliberation over the important environmental questions that we face. The program has flexible requirements and gives students the opportunity to work closely with an adviser to create an individualized course of study that meets their interests, reflects their prior experiences, and focuses on their professional goals. Students apply during the fall or spring terms and begin the program with an intensive four-week Summer Institute. The program also includes a field-based Practicum where students are given the opportunity to hone their teaching at one of a variety of local environmental and educational organizations.


Admission Requirements

Applicants to the M.A. program in environmental education must possess a baccalaureate degree from an approved institution with a GPA of 2.7 or higher and have successfully completed a minimum of five life science or physical science courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Applicants are required to submit the following materials for consideration: official transcripts from all relevant educational institutions; an essay outlining relevant interests, prior experience, and educational goals; and three letters of recommendation from individuals who possess detailed knowledge of the applicant's ability to engage in graduate study. Documentation of other experiences or abilities as an educator is also welcome. Admissions decisions are made on a rolling basis by the executive committee of the program. The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is optional. Promising students who fail to meet one or more of the preceding criteria may be admitted provisionally, with a plan appropriate to their specific needs.


Degree Requirements

A total of 32 credits is required to complete the degree. The program includes:

Students will also produce a Program Portfolio.

The M.A. program in environmental education helps prepare educators who are able to integrate and put into practice the three focus areas that constitute the program's academic core:

1. Environmental Science: understanding the physical and biological processes and relationships that constitute ecosystems.

2. Curriculum and Pedagogy: an understanding of teaching as a critical, self-reflective, and inquiry-based activity, collaboratively undertaken in diverse communities.

3. Environmental Values, Policy, and Planning: an understanding of the social (e.g., economic, political, and institutional) and ethical dimensions of environmental policy. 

The Summer Institute (8 credits): Students enter the program by enrolling in an intensive Summer Institute that is coordinated and taught by an interdisciplinary team of UNH faculty. The curriculum involves a case study approach, integrating the three focus areas in an experiential setting. This experience gives students a foundation for creating a rigorous, coherent, and challenging program of study, which they begin (on a part- or full-time basis) during the following year.

Individualized Program of Study (20 credits): The three focus areas of the program provide the structure within which students include at least one graduate-level course in each area and integrate the courses. With the guidance of an adviser, students select a group of courses that balances depth and breadth. All individualized programs of study are approved by the program's executive committee.

Practicum (4 credits): The field-based Practicum is taken as the final course in the program. Students teach at an internship site demonstrating their ability to put into practice a thoughtful and effective vision of environmental education. In the seminar that accompanies the internship, students create and present a portfolio that reflects what they have achieved in the program. Completion of the program portfolio marks the fulfillment of the requirements for the master's degree.



Genetics (GEN)

» http://mcbsgrad.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The interdepartmental genetics program offers graduate work leading to the degrees of master of science and doctor of philosophy. Faculty members are housed in the Departments of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences; Biological Sciences; and Natural Resources and the Environment. The genetics graduate program integrates disciplines ranging from molecular and cellular biology to environmental and evolutionary genetics and genomics, in microbial, plant, and animal systems. 


Admission Requirements

Qualified applicants are admitted with the approval of the genetics graduate faculty. Undergraduate preparation should include mathematics, including calculus; chemistry, including organic; physics; microbial, animal, or plant biology courses with laboratories; and at least one course in genetics. A course in statistics is also desirable. Admitted students with deficiencies in background courses may be required to complete necessary coursework without graduate credit. 

Applicants must submit a personal statement, current scores (within five years) from the general GRE test, and three letters of recommendation. If possible, the personal statement should specify the applicant's research interests and potential faculty mentors. International applicants living outside the U.S. should initially complete a free online pre-application. If approved for a full application, applicants must submit current TOEFL scores in addition to the items listed above.  


Degree Requirements


M.S. Degree Requirements

The coursework for the master of science degree is formulated with input from the student's guidance committee. Students admitted to the M.S. program are required to conduct a research project under the guidance of a faculty adviser, write and submit a thesis based on this research, and pass an oral examination covering graduate courses and thesis. Students must take a minimum of 30 credits, including at least three genetics courses (minimum of 10 credits), preferably covering breadth in genetics, attend MCBS 997, Seminar, each semester, present one seminar per year, and write and defend a thesis before their guidance committee.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The coordinator of the genetics graduate program, with the concurrence of the student's thesis adviser, nominates the student's guidance and doctoral committees, which administer the qualifying and final examinations, respectively. Doctoral students are expected to have a broad exposure to genetics courses, exceeding that required of master's degree students. Specific course requirements are developed by the student and the guidance committee. Students must attend MCBS 997, Seminar, each semester and present one seminar per year. Upon completion of coursework, the student must pass written and oral qualifying examinations conducted by the guidance committee in order to advance to candidacy. Doctoral students must complete a dissertation on original research in genetics, give a public seminar, and orally defend their dissertation before the doctoral committee.


Courses

In addition to courses in genetics, all graduate students are required to attend MCBS 997, Seminar , every semester as well as any other courses approved by the graduate coordinator



Geospatial Science

» http://gss.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

 

Certificate Offered: Geospatial Science

To help meet the growing need to use geospatially referenced data to study and model scientific phenomena, the University of New Hampshire now offers a graduate certificate in geospatial science. This certificate focuses on the increased use of spatial thinking with relevant skills in methods and technologies that develop, analyze, and visualize geospatial data and will prepare students and professionals for work within this exciting multidisciplinary field of study.


Admission Requirements

Students must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. Four 4-credit courses totaling 16 credit hours (listed below) are required. Courses taken at other institutions are not eligible to be transferred into the program. 


Certificate Requirements

The program of study required for the certificate consists of five courses and a total of 16 credit hours.

Course offerings and requirements are as follows: 


Elements of Geospatial Science (Core requirement)

Abbreviation Course Number Title
GSS   800   Elements of Geospacial Science  


Geographic Information Systems (One of the following)

Abbreviation Course Number Title
CIE   896   GIS in Water Resources  
GSS   805   Applied GIS for Research  
NR   858   GIS for Community Mapping  
NR   860 *   GIS for Natural Resources  


Data Analysis (One of the following)

Abbreviation Course Number Title
BIOL   811   Applied Biostatistics II  
EOS   864 **   Data Analysis for Earth Systems Science  
MATH   836   Advanced Statistical Methods for Research  
MATH   839   Applied Regression Analysis  
MATH   944 **   Spatial Statistics  
SOC   901   Intermediate Social Statistics  


Electives (Two of the following)

Abbreviation Course Number Title
ESCI   895   Time Series Analysis  
EOS   864 **   Data Analysis for Earth Systems Science  
EOS   896   Remote Sensing for Earth Systems Research  
MATH   885   Mathematics for Geodesy  
MATH   944 **   Spatial Statistics  
NR   857   Remote Sensing of the Environment  
NR   859 **   Digital Image Processing  
NR   882   Monitoring Forest Health  
NR   912   Sampling Techniques  
OE/ ESCI   871   Geodesy and Positioning  
OE/ ESCI   885   Coastal Remote Sensing  
SOC   897   Sociological Methods – Survey Research  


Please note the following when selecting a course: 
       *    = Prerequisite needed   
       ** =  Math 944 or EOS 864 may be taken as an elective if not used to fulfill the Data Analysis Core  requirement.


Applying

Please visit the UNH Graduate School site for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program. 


Courses



Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
GSS   800   Elements of Geospatial Science   4  
GSS   805   Applied Geographic Information Systems for Research   4  



Health and Human Services (HHS)

» http://www.shhs.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

 


Health Management and Policy (HMP)

» http://chhs.unh.edu/hmp/index

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham and in Manchester through GSMC.

 


History (HIST)

» http://www.unh.edu/history

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.A., Ph.D.

The Department of History offers the master of arts and doctor of philosophy degrees. The master of arts is offered in many fields. A formal option in museum studies is available. Doctoral dissertations may be written on the history of the United States or on topics comparing the United States with other societies or areas.


Admission Requirements

The department usually requires evidence of substantial preparation in history at the undergraduate level, together with some preparation in other areas of humanities and social sciences.

Applicants for admission to any graduate program in history should have a minimum of a B average in history, allied humanities, and social sciences. In addition, applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The department assesses the student's entire application, including letters of recommendation and writing sample, in making its decision on admission. Deficiencies in an undergraduate program may be rectified by coursework as a special student, but such coursework cannot be used to satisfy requirements for an advanced degree. The department also recommends that a beginning graduate student have some training in a foreign language. Students in seminar or reading courses in other than American history may be required to have a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language appropriate to the particular course. Applicants should include with their applications a personal statement indicating their reason for undertaking graduate study at the University of New Hampshire. Normally, an entering student intending to be a candidate for the doctorate will complete an M.A. program as a prerequisite. However, students with the M.A. from another institution, or with exceptionally strong preparation at the undergraduate level, can begin the doctoral program immediately. In addition, a student in residence can, with the consent of the department, omit the M.A. and proceed directly toward the Ph.D.


Degree Requirements


M.A. Degree Requirements

A master's student designs a specific program to meet one of three plans. Plan A allows substantial training and research in a single subfield of history but within a foundation of broader coursework. Plan B allows substantial breadth over at least two subfields. The subfields in history include the following: the ancient world, medieval Europe, early modern Europe, modern Europe, European intellectual history, medieval England, early modern England, modern England, early modern France, modern France, early modern Germany, modern Germany, Iberia, Russia, early U.S., modern U.S., colonial Latin America, modern Latin America, the Far East, the Near East, sub-Saharan Africa, and the history of science. Plan C allows students who enter the doctoral program without an M.A. to pursue the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees simultaneously.

Plan A requires at least eight courses in history numbered 800 or above, including at least one research seminar, and a 6-credit thesis in a single subfield (equivalent to two courses).

Plan B requires at least 10 courses in history numbered 800 or above, including at least one research seminar, and an oral examination demonstrating competence in two subfields of history.

Plan C requires at least 30 credits of coursework during preparation for the Ph.D. qualifying examinations, as described below; submission of a seminar or other research paper as a demonstration of competence in basic research techniques; and passing Ph.D. qualifying examinations.


Museum Studies Option

Students who are seeking or considering careers in the museum world, rather than in teaching and/or research, may pursue the option in museum studies. Students basically follow the History M.A. Plan B. Of the 10 required courses, students must take History 871, Museum Studies; History 872, Studies in Regional Material Culture; one research seminar; and two internships (taken for credit) in nearby museums or other historical institutions. The final requirement is either a one-hour oral exam or the completion of a major project related to the student's work in museum studies.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

A doctoral student's program, which must be approved by the graduate committee of the department, shall include each of the following requirements: two research seminars, one in early U.S. history and one in modern U.S. history; two reading seminars, one in early U.S. history and one in modern U.S. history; a course in historical methods; correction of any deficiencies in the student's previous program; proficiency in one foreign language; History 970, Graduate Seminar in Teaching History (applies to all doctoral candidates awarded teaching assistantships); preparation through reading and coursework in the entirety of U.S. history, with emphasis upon either early or modern U.S.; preparation through reading and coursework of two subfields outside of U.S. history, one of which may be a cognate field outside of history entirely; qualifying exams; dissertation proposal; and dissertation and successful defense.

Candidacy is reached after successful completion of the following: 1) complete research seminars in early and modern U.S. history, reading seminars in early and modern U.S. history, a course in Historical Methods, History 970 (teaching assistants only), and courses to prepare fields or correct any deficiencies in the student's previous preparation; 2) demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language; 3) pass written and oral qualifying exams.

Note: In the definition of fields above, United States and U.S. are understood to mean the United States and its colonial antecedents.


Apprenticeship and Degree Regulations

The department considers that graduate work in history, and particularly doctoral work, is professional training. The department recognizes the dual concerns of the historian's life: teaching and research. When feasible, all doctoral students are expected to undertake teaching in the department during a part of their residence. Participation in proseminar and in teaching constitutes an apprenticeship in conjunction with formal study. Doctoral students may choose to pursue the Cognate in College Teaching offered through the Graduate School. All graduate students are reviewed annually by the faculty of the department. A student accumulating two course failures is automatically barred from continuing in any degree program in history, but the department reserves the right to exclude others whose overall performance does not give reasonable assurance of a successful program completion. Students are allowed no more than three attempts to meet any language requirement.



Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/hdfs

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Assistant Professor: Tyler Jamison

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

Certificates Offered:  Adolescent Development, Child Advocacy, and Family Policy

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies offers two programs of study leading to a master of science degree in human development and family studies: the Core Areas of Study Program and the Marriage and Family Therapy Program.

The goal of both programs is to provide students with an understanding of theory and methods relevant to human development and family studies and to prepare them to work with families in therapeutic, educational, and community or corporate settings. The Core Areas of Study program has three foci: Adolescent Development, Child Advocacy and Family Policy, and Child Development. Students may elect a thesis or comprehensive exam. The Marriage and Family Therapy Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education and requires a minimum of two years of full-time study, including two summers.

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies also offers a one-year, 14- to 15-credit, multidisciplinary program of study leading to a graduate certificate in Adolescent Development or Child Advocacy and Family Policy (CAFP).  The certificate program is intended for individuals who are working in the field but who lack specific knowledge about adolescence or child advocacy and family policy, as well as those who are changing careers or who are already working in related fields and need to meet continuing education requirements or desire additional academic preparation. 


Admission Requirements

Students in good standing with undergraduate degrees in any field and a specific interest in working with individuals and families are encouraged to apply.

Candidates for the master’s degree program must have completed an introductory statistics course or the equivalent as part of their undergraduate program.  If their undergraduate program did not include such a course, students who are accepted into the M.S. program must successfully complete an introductory statistics course before they graduate. (Note:  Students in the Core Area of Study program must also complete a graduate statistics course; see “Program Requirements” for the Core Area of Study.)   

In lieu of the standard UNH Graduate School personal statement, applicants to the MFT program must answer the questions listed on the department's MFT admissions website. Responses to the MFT questions should be submitted in numbered format, and should address each question separately and explicitly. Answers to the MFT questions should be submitted with the application (either online or in hard copy).  

Individuals applying to the Core Areas of Study and Certificate programs should submit a standard personal statement with their applications.

 


M.S. Degree: Core Areas of Study Program

Adolescent Development: This core area of study is designed to develop general competence in understanding and applying theory and research regarding adolescents within the context of their families and communities. Students are expected to participate in projects involving adolescents and to complete a practicum in a program that serves adolescents.

Child Advocacy and Family Policy: This core area of study is designed to develop general competence in understanding theory and research regarding advocacy and policy issues impacting children and families. Those accepted into the program for this core area of study are expected to complete two practica with selected state, national, and international agencies as child advocacy and family policy interns, develop expertise on at least one advocacy/policy issue, and conduct research on an advocacy/policy related topic.

Child Development: This core area of study is designed to develop an understanding of theory and research regarding children from infancy through the early school years and to prepare students to work in a variety of social science positions focused on children's family and school experiences. Students are expected to complete a practicum in a child-focused setting.


M.S. Degree: Marriage and Family Therapy Program

The Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) Program is a 72-credit program designed so students may achieve a master of science in a minimum of two years and two summers. The program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE).  MFT students must:  1) satisfactorily complete an established array of courses; 2) accrue 500 hours of client contact through teaming, through the Marriage and Family Therapy Center, and (for the majority of students) through an external internship; and 3) satisfactorily complete an integrative paper and presentation.  The clinical training emphasizes treating individuals, couples, and families in relationship to larger systems that influence them. Supervised practica continue throughout the program.

MFT program graduates function as competent and ethical marriage and family therapy professionals and have a solid knowledge base of marriage and family therapy theory and research as well as clinical practice principles. The MFT Program successfully prepares graduates for employment as marriage and family therapists in community agencies.


Certificate Program

The certificate in adolescent development builds general competence in understanding and applying theory and research regarding adolescent development, with particular emphasis on the influences of families and communities. The program is grounded in an ecological approach that focuses on supporting the health and well-being of all adolescents, with special attention to using a developmental perspective to develop programs, policies, and other interventions that address contemporary risk and protective factors.

The certificate in child advocacy and family policy (CAFP) develops general competence in understanding theory and research regarding advocacy and policy issues impacting children and families. CAFP certificate students will develop competency in planning for, implementing, and evaluating family policies, as well as identifying barriers to effective advocacy and policy-making.


M.S. Degree Requirements: Core Areas of Study Program

Program requirements for the Core Areas of Study include:

1. Completion of the 12-credit core curriculum that includes HDFS 991, Professional Issues for Family Specialists; HDFS 993, Theoretical Approaches to Family Studies; and HDFS 994, Research Seminar;

2. Twenty-two (22) hours of coursework including four (4) semester hours of practicum or internship (HDFS 911), and a graduate-level statistics course; and

3. Successful completion of a research thesis (6-10 credits in HDFS 899), OR a comprehensive written examination, plus eight (8) credits of approved electives in place of HDFS 899. 

Students in the Child Advocacy and Family Policy core area of study must complete an additional four (4) hours of practicum/internship, for a total of eight (8) hours.

Thesis Option: Students electing to complete a research thesis must write and defend a thesis based on original research. Students must earn a minimum of 6 credits of HDFS 899 (Master's Thesis).

Comprehensive Examination: Students electing to complete a comprehensive examination must take an additional 8 credits of approved electives in place of thesis credits. The comprehensive examination consists of a timed, three-hour closed-book portion and a one-week take-home exam.

A graduate student who fails a course must immediately attend a mandatory meeting with the instructor of the course, the human development and family studies graduate coordinator, and, if desired, the student's adviser. If a graduate student receives grades below "B-" in two or more courses, the human development and  family studies graduate coordinator will make a recommendation to the Graduate School that the student be dismissed from the human development and family studies graduate program.

M.S. Degree: Core Areas of Study Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
HDFS   807   Practicum   1 TO 6  
HDFS   808   Child and Family Center Internship   1 TO 6  
HDFS   809   Child Study and Development Center Internship   1 TO 6  
HDFS   833   Supervising Programs for Young Children   4  
HDFS   834   Curriculum for Young Children   4  
HDFS   843   Families, Schools, and Community   4  
HDFS   846   Human Sexuality   4  
HDFS   857   Race, Class, Gender, and Families   4  
HDFS   860   Family Programs and Policies   4  
HDFS   871   Observation and Assessment of Young Children   4  
HDFS   872   International Approaches to Child Advocacy   4  
HDFS   873   International Perspectives on Children and Families   4  
HDFS   876   Children, Adolescents and the Law   4  
HDFS   894   Families and the Law   4  
HDFS   897   Special Topics   1 TO 4  
HDFS   899   Master's Thesis   1 TO 6  
HDFS   911   Graduate Internship   2 TO 8  
HDFS   930   Child Development in Context   4  
HDFS   950   Contemporary Issues in Adolescent Development   4  
HDFS   991   Professional Issues for Family Specialists   4  
HDFS   993   Theoretical Approaches to Family Studies   4  
HDFS   994   Research Seminar   4  

 


M.S. Degree Requirements: Marriage and Family Therapy Program

Program requirements include:

1. The 12-credit core curriculum (HDFS 991, Professional Issues for Family Specialists; HDFS 993, Theoretical Approaches to Family Studies; and HDFS 994, Research Seminar);

2. Thirty-five to thirty-six (35-36) semester hours of coursework, including HDFS 841, Marital and Family Therapy; HDFS 930, Child Development in Context (or an approved elective); HDFS 942, Advanced Systems of Marital and Family Therapy; HDFS 945, Family Therapy Practice I; HDFS 946, Critical Problems in Family Life; HDFS 947, Family Therapy Practice II; HDFS 952, Clinical Interventions in Couples Therapy; and HDFS 954, Human Sexuality, the Treatment of Sexual Problems, and the Clinical Applications of Sexual Therapy; and one 3-4 credit elective approved by the student's adviser.

3. Successful completion of 24 credits of HDFS 898, Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum (500 hours of supervised clinical practice); and

4. Successful completion and presentation of an integrative paper and video representing the student's theory of change.

A graduate student who fails a course must immediately attend a mandatory meeting with the instructor of the course, the human development and family studies graduate coordinator, and, if desired, the student's adviser. If a graduate student receives grades below "B-" in two or more courses, the human development and family studies graduate coordinator will make a recommendation to the Graduate School that the student be dismissed from the human development and family studies graduate program.

M.S. Degree: MFT Program Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
HDFS   841   Marital and Family Therapy   4  
HDFS   897   Special Topics   1 TO 4  
HDFS   898   Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum   1 TO 8  
HDFS   930   Child Development in Context   4  
HDFS   942   Advanced Systems of Marital and Family Therapy   4  
HDFS   945   Family Therapy Practice I   4  
HDFS   946   Critical Problems in Family Life   4  
HDFS   947   Family Therapy Practice II   4  
HDFS   952   Clinical Interventions in Couples Therapy   4  
HDFS   954   Human Sexuality, The Treatment of Sexual Problems, and the Clinical Applications of Sexual Therapy   4  
HDFS   991   Professional Issues for Family Specialists   4  
HDFS   993   Theoretical Approaches to Family Studies   4  
HDFS   994   Research Seminar   4  

 


Certificate Requirements: Adolescent Development

A certificate in adolescent development is awarded upon completion of: (1) a 2-course core curriculum; and (2) an additional two elective courses, one of which must be a human development and family studies course.

Core Curriculum Courses

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Credits

HDFS  

950 

Contemporary Issues in Adolescent Development

4

HDFS  

995  

Seminar & Special Problems - Human Development

3  

 

Human Development and Family Studies Electives (choose at least one)

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Credits

HDFS

846

Human Sexuality

4

HDFS

860

Family Programs and Policies

4

HDFS

857

Race, Class, Gender, and Families

4

HDFS

876

Children, Adolescents, and the Law

4

HDFS

897

Special Topics (prior approval required)

4

HDFS

991

Professional Issues for Family Specialists

4

HDFS

993

Theoretical Approaches to Family Studies

4

 

Multidisciplinary Electives

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Credits

EDUC

810C

Youth Organizations

4

EDUC

817

Growing Up Male in America

4

RMP

805

Management and Policy in Therapeutic Recreation

3

RMP

830

Camp Administration and Leadership

3

RMP

860

Community Sports Organizations:  Administration and Leadership

3

SOC

815

Criminological Theory

4

SOC

820

Sociology of Drug Use

4

SOC

840

Sociology of Mental Health

4

SOC

876

Family Violence Research Seminar

4

SOC

975

Sociology of the Family

4

SW

805

Child and Adolescent Risks and Resiliency: Program, Policy and Practice

3

SW

815

Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender People

3

 

Other human development and family studies or multidisciplinary electives may be selected with adviser approval.


Certificate Requirements: Child Advocacy and Family Policy

A certificate in Adolescent Development is awarded upon completion of: (1) a 2-course core curriculum; and (2) an additional two elective courses, one of which must be a human development and family studies course.

Core Curriculum Courses

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Credits

HDFS   860 Family Programs and Policies 4
HDFS   995   Seminar & Special Problems - Human Development 3  

 

Human Development and Family Studies Electives (choose at least one)

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Credits

HDFS 857 Race, Class, Gender, and Families 4
HDFS 872 International Approaches to Child Advocacy 4
HDFS 873 International Perspectives on Children and Families  
HDFS 876 Children, Adolescents, and the Law 4
HDFS 894 Families and the Law 4
HDFS 897 Special Topics – Families in Poverty 4
HDFS 991 Professional Issues for Family Specialists 4
HDFS 993 Theoretical Approaches to Family Studies 4

 

Multidisciplinary Electives

Abbreviation

Course Number

Title

Credits

RMP 912 Non-Profit Administration and Leadership 3
RMP 924 Grantwriting and Fund Development 3
SOC 820 Sociology of Drug Use 4
SOC 842 Sociology and Social Policy 4
SW 805 Child and Adolescent Risks and Resiliency: Program, Policy and Practice 3
SW 815 Practice with Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender People 3

 

Other human development and family studies or multidisciplinary electives may be selected with adviser approval.



Information Technology (IT)

» http://manchester.unh.edu/msit

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Manchester through GSMC.

Associate Professor: Mihaela Sabin
Assistant Professor: Michael Jonas

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The Computing Technology program in the Division of Science and Technology at UNH Manchester offers a master of science in information technology (M.S. IT). The program prepares students for a professional IT or computing-related career and for advanced studies in a computing discipline.

The program is designed for a broad and diverse audience of

The learning environment of the M.S. IT program uses a blended learning model, which combines in-class and online educational activities, emphasizes collaboration and communication among peers, and integrates practice with computing technologies and authentic project experiences.

The M.S. IT program has 33 credits (11 courses). All courses are offered in the evening, in fall, spring, and summer terms. If enrolled part-time and taking, on average, two courses per term, students can complete the program’s coursework in two years.

The program’s educational objectives for graduating students are:
 

  1. Proficiency in applying knowledge and skills in core and advanced information technologies to help organizations achieve their goals.
  2. Proficiency in identifying, analyzing, and making plans to meet the IT needs of a large spectrum of users, from end users of information systems to managers of enterprise applications and developers of IT solutions.  
  3. Proficiency in developing, applying, integrating, administering, and evaluating IT systems and services.


Admission Requirements

Applicants must meet the admission standards of the UNH Graduate School and have a bachelor’s degree in a computing discipline: computer science, information technology, computer information systems, information sciences, computer engineering, or software engineering. 

Students with undergraduate degrees in other fields are invited to apply and required to schedule an interview with the program coordinator. The minimal formal coursework required of students without a B.S. degree in computing includes: introduction to programming, operating systems, networking, databases, and college mathematics above college algebra (such as finite mathematics, discrete mathematics, or statistics).

Students can satisfy the program’s prerequisites by taking the following undergraduate courses at UNH Manchester and getting a minimum grade of B:


Degree Requirements

The M.S. IT program has two options: thesis and project.

Both options require completion of 33 credits (11 courses), including:

In addition,

Core IT Courses
COMP 805, Web Application Development
COMP 815, Information Security
COMP 820, Database Systems and Technologies
COMP 830, Object-Oriented Software Development
COMP 835, Networking Technologies

IT Integration Courses
COMP 851, System Integration and Architecture
COMP 852, Computing Infrastructures

Elective Courses
COMP 880, Topics
COMP 890, Internship
COMP 895, Independent Study
COMP 905, Advanced Web Systems and Services
COMP 915, System and Network Security
COMP 920, Advanced Database Systems
COMP 930, Open Source Software Development
COMP 932, Design Patterns
COMP 935, Server Technologies and Applications

Elective courses can also be selected from the curriculum of the graduate certificate in Software System Engineering (SSE) that is offered by the CS Department in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences. SSE courses are taught in Manchester:

CS 818, Software Systems Engineering Process
CS 823, Performance Evaluation and Computer Systems
CS 851, System Requirements Engineering
CS 852, Software Architecture Concepts
CS 853, Software Project Management
CS 854, System/Software Test and Evaluation

Other options are courses in the part-time MBA program.

Project Course
COMP 898, Master’s Project
The project course typically deals with an authentic project or problem to solve, which is integrative in nature and requires IT research.

Master’s Thesis
COMP 899, Master’s Thesis (6 credits)



Integrated Applied Mathematics (IAM)

» http://math.unh.edu/graduate-study

» Click to view course offerings

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Integrated Applied Mathematics program offers both the master of science in mathematics with an option in applied mathematics, and the doctor of philosophy program in applied mathematics. Both programs are housed in the Department of Mathematics, and additional information is available here.

The essence of modern applied mathematics is the interplay between mathematical analysis, numerical computation and scientific/engineering specialization. Thus, the IAM curriculum is designed to provide applied mathematics graduate students with advanced training in these three broad, inter-related topics: (1) Mathematical Methods, (2) Scientific Computing, and (3) a Scientific or Engineering Area of Specialization.


M.S. Degree Requirements (Applied Mathematics Option)

This program requires 30 credit hours, consisting of the courses MATH 931, IAM 933, an approved two-course sequence in applied mathematics (such as MATH 967/977). In addition to these courses, the student chooses either a thesis or project option. The thesis option consists of 6 credits of Master's Thesis (MATH 899) and four elective courses. The project option consists of 3 credits of Master's Project (MATH 898) and five elective courses. The elective courses need not be in mathematics, but must be at the 800 level or higher, and at least one must be a technical course in statistics or some other department. The broad elective flexibility allows the student's application interests to have a substantial role in the content of the program. The student's full program plan must be proposed in writing to the applied mathematics faculty and approved prior to the student's second semester of study. There is no comprehensive examination in this option.


Ph.D. Requirements

The following are the requirements of completing the Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics program:

Candidacy

Students are advanced to candidacy after meeting the following requirements:

1. Must take 9 courses totaling 27 credits from the following list: PHYS 931, IAM 830, IAM 851, IAM 932, IAM 933, IAM 961, IAM 962. One of the following two-course sequences can also apply: MATH 847/IAM 950, ME 807/ME 909, or PHYS 953/PHYS 951.

2. In addition, must take a minimum of three technical electives totaling 9 credits from the following list: IAM 940, ME 812, ME 911, and other approved courses.

3. Pass a three-part Ph.D. qualifying exam:

*Comprehensive exam in mathematical methods
*Comprehensive exam in numerical analysis and high-performance computing
*Oral or written exam in specialization area

4. Seminar presentation of thesis proposal to dissertation committee.

Dissertation

Each Ph.D. student must submit a dissertation that includes original results in integrated applied mathematics.



Justice Studies (JUST)

» http://www.unh.edu/justice-studies/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.A.

The goal of the master of arts degree program in justice studies is to produce graduates who have a high level of knowledge about law and justice in American society and worldwide. Upon completion, graduates will be able to enhance their careers in the justice system, enter new careers in the justice system, or continue their graduate training in law, social sciences, or humanities.

The program addresses issues of justice that are not necessarily criminal in nature. It will familiarize students with legal and justice ideas, legal institutions, and the legal process. It will provide tools for a reasoned appraisal of how the law works and of the policies that underlie it. The courses address a wide variety of subjects, including philosophy of law, American legal history, psychological aspects of the law, social control, criminology, juvenile delinquency, law and literature, and family law. Courses are taught by faculty with backgrounds in both the social sciences and humanities.


Special Note on Tuition:

The justice studies masters of arts degree program has a different pricing structure. You can find the most current pricing for this program on the business services website.


Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general Graduate School requirements, applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the GRE or the LSAT.

Students are admitted for the summer term.  Classes for this program begin during the last week in July. The application deadline to be considered for financial assistance is March 1st.  The deadline for consideration without financial assistance is April 1st.

 

 


Degree Requirements

The master of arts in justice studies requires that students complete a minimum of nine courses (36 credit hours) in justice studies from the following list:

Required courses:
JUST 830, Theories of Justice
JUST 901, Proseminar
JUST 905, Quantitative Research Methods
JUST 907, Applied Research Methods

One of the three listed below:
SOC 815, Criminological Theory
SOC 880, Social Conflict
SOC 921, Crime and Conflict

Concluding Experience:

JUST 897, Culminating Project (4 credits), and
JUST 950/951, Internship (4 credits)

or

JUST 899, Masters Thesis (8 credits)

Electives:
From the following list, choose two courses if taking JUST 899 or two courses plus JUST 950/951 if taking JUST 897 (no more than one from any department other than justice studies):

EDUC 867, Students, Teachers, and the Law
EDUC 897, Higher Education and the Law
EDUC 951, Laws and Regulations Affecting the Education of Students with Disabilities
EDUC 967, School Law
EDUC 968, Collective Bargaining in Public Education
FS 872, International Approach to Child Advocacy
FS 876, Children, Adolescents, and the Law
FS 894, Families and the Law
HMP 940, Legal Strategies in Health Care
HIST 809, United States Legal History Special Topics
HIST 845, 19th Century European Great Powers-Diplomacy and Int'l Law
HIST 949, Colloquium  on Law and Society in American History
JUST 950, Internship
JUST 965, Special Topics
JUST 995, Reading and Research
POLT 801, Courts and Public Policy
POLT 803, Urban and Metropolitan Politics
POLT 808, Administrative Law
POLT 897C, The Drug Wars:  Views from the South and North
POLT 897F, Homeland Security
POLT 898B, Sem/Security Intelligence Study
PSYC 954, Advanced Seminar in Social Psychology
SW 897, Special Topics: Domestic Violence
SW 979, Social Work and the Law
SOC 815, Criminological Theory
SOC 820, Sociology of Drug Use
SOC 876, Family Violence Research Seminar
SOC 880, Social Conflict
SOC 921, Crime and Conflict
SOC 976, Violence in the Family



Kinesiology (KIN)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/kin/index

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.


Certificate Offered: Adapted Physical Education


Master of Science Degree

The Department of Kinesiology offers a master of science degree with the following areas of concentration: exercise science, outdoor education, and sport studies. In addition, the Departments of Kinesiology and Social Work offer a dual degree program, which consists of a master of science in kinesiology with a concentration in outdoor education, as well as a master in social work (M.S.W.).

Additionally, a graduate certificate in adapted physical education is offered.

 


Admission Requirements

Admission is based on undergraduate preparation, academic record, Graduate Record Examination general test scores (current scores, within the last five years), and letters of recommendation. Applicants must be above-average students and show adequate preparation in the basic support courses of the selected concentration area. Applicants who have not met specific course prerequisites should expect to take additional undergraduate work without receiving graduate credit.

Students applying for the dual degree program must meet both the admission requirements for kinesiology and for social work and be admitted to both programs (applications to each program required). See social work for their admission requirements.


Degree Requirements

Students may follow either the thesis, the non-thesis, or the advanced research plan. All degree candidates will be required to take KIN 901, Analysis of Professional Literature; the designated concentration core; and electives as required.

Exercise science core: A graduate statistics course (PSYC 702, SW 962, EDUC 881, or equivalent), KIN 804, Electrocardiography; KIN 805, Topics in Applied Physiology; KIN 824, Metabolic Adaptations to Exercise; KIN 836, Fitness and Graded Exercise Test and Prescription; and two semesters of KIN 902, Colloquium.

Sport studies core: A graduate statistics course (PSYC 702, SW 962, EDUC 881, or equivalent), KIN 880, Psychological Factors in Sport; one adviser-approved KIN elective at the 800 or 900 levels; and KIN 840, Athletic Administration or KIN 843, Sport Marketing.

Outdoor education core:
KIN OE Concentration: EDUC 881, Statistics; KIN 883, Psychological Aspects of Adventure Education; KIN 884, Foundations of Adventure Education; KIN 885, Program Models and Evaluation in Outdoor Education; KIN 886, Organization and Administration of Outdoor Education Programs; KIN 887, Theory of Adventure Education; KIN 901, Analysis of Professional Literature.

Integrated M.S.W./M.S. Dual Degree Program: The UNH Departments of Social Work and Kinesiology offer an Integrated M.S.W./M.S. Dual Graduate Degree Program. This program is the first of its kind in the nation. It organizes a significant number of existing resources and assets at UNH in a way that empowers participating students for a career in adventure therapy.

The use of adventure experiences as a therapeutic or socio-educational intervention for clients with mental health needs is well documented. Prospective graduate students in the SW/OE Integrated Dual-Degree program apply and need to be accepted into each separate graduate program. Upon acceptance in both programs, students progress through the integrated curriculum, graduating from both programs at the end of their third year. The exception to this would be an Advanced Standing student in social work, who could graduate from both programs in two years. In order to graduate with the dual degrees, the student completes a 24-hour per week social work/adventure therapy-related field internship in their third year as well as an Outdoor Education Thesis or Advanced Studies Project in their last semester. Contact Dr. Michael Gass for additional information.

Any remaining coursework in each concentration should be taken within the Department of Kinesiology; however, approval may be granted to take relevant courses outside the department.

Thesis plan: A minimum of 30 approved graduate credits, including a thesis (24 graduate course credits plus 6 thesis credits), as well as an oral defense of the thesis, are required in the thesis plan.

Non-thesis plan: A minimum of eight approved graduate courses (with a minimum of 30 credits) are required in the non-thesis plan. Four credits of KIN 895, Advanced Studies, are required. A student may take KIN 895 only after completing at least three approved graduate courses including KIN 901.

Advanced research plan: Exercise science students who elect this plan must take 6 credits of KIN 896, Advanced Research in Exercise Science. Outdoor education students who elect this plan must take 6 credits of KIN 897, Advanced Research in Outdoor Education. In addition, exercise science and outdoor education students must orally defend their research.

Dual degree students take classes simultaneously over the course of three years in both kinesiology: outdoor education and social work and complete a minimum of 77 credits for graduation. This includes two internships, one during their first year of study and a second specialized internship during the third year, which concentrates on the utilization and application of adventure therapy in an agency setting.


Certificate in Adapted Physical Education

The Department of Kinesiology at the University of New Hampshire now offers a graduate certificate in adapted physical education. The intent of this certificate is to better prepare teachers to enhance their overall knowledge of students with disabilities in general adapted physical education and recreation settings. For more information, please contact Michelle Grenier at (603) 862-1835 or email grenier@unh.edu.

Certificate Requirements
Students must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and have a valid New Hampshire physical education teaching license or be enrolled in the master in education program at the University of New Hampshire and complete 15 credit hours of specified coursework. A minimum of 15 graduate credits are required for the certificate. Required courses: KIN 831, Inclusive Teaching Through Sport; KIN 742/842, PE Practicum for Students with Disabilities; KIN 895, Advanced Studies.

Applying
Please visit the Graduate School website for information about applying to the certificate program.



Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (LLC)

» http://www.unh.edu/languages/

» Click to view course offerings

 


Liberal Studies (LS)

» http://www.unh.edu/mals

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.A.L.S.

The program offers a master of arts in liberal studies (M.A.L.S.) degree. The master of arts in liberal studies is an innovative, interdisciplinary graduate program. Housed within the College of Liberal Arts but drawing its courses and instructors from across the University, the program makes available a diverse spectrum of offerings and a wealth of faculty expertise and resources.

The liberal studies curriculum is intended to promote broad intellectual comprehension and enrichment rather than vocational or professional training within a single field or discipline. Designed to address the particular interests of students who seek to deepen their knowledge, the program offers a challenging but flexible program of cross-disciplinary learning.


Admission Requirements

Admission to the master of arts in liberal studies is selective. A bachelor's degree is required for admission. Students will be asked to provide relevant transcripts of their educational experience, a resume, and letters of recommendation. They will also be asked to submit a brief essay describing why they are particularly interested in this program and indicating the sort of interdisciplinary focus or area of learning in which they might like to concentrate their study. The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is not required but is helpful.


Degree Requirements

The program consists of seven courses (30 credits) divided into three parts: a core seminar specifically designed for and required of every student, to be taken within one year of entrance to the program; a concentration made up of five elective courses chosen from various disciplines across the liberal arts that centers on an interdisciplinary theme or topic; and a master's thesis or project, which is intended to act as an integrating capstone experience for liberal studies students.

Core seminar LS 800 (4 credits): Each liberal studies student is required to take one core seminar as an introduction to the program as a whole. The seminar must be taken within the first year of a student's matriculation in the program, preferably in the first semester. Although all core seminars focus on interdisciplinary issues and themes, each is meant to introduce students to different topics and divergent disciplines from across the liberal arts such as literature, the arts, philosophy, history, women's studies, political science, and sociology.

Concentration (20 credits): Students will work with the director of the program and a concentration and thesis adviser to develop an interdisciplinary concentration program of study, which focuses on a significant topic, issue, perspective, or cultural development, and is made up of five graduate-level elective courses offered in various departments throughout the college and University. A concentration should constitute a sustained thematic exploration and may be selected from a menu of suggested concentrations or may be self-designed by each student with the help of his or her adviser. The five courses are to be selected from 700-900-level courses regularly offered within departments and colleges across the University, including up to three independent study courses carried out as a tutorial with particular faculty members (with permission). It is expected that a student's concentration will culminate in a concluding final project or thesis.

The following are typical examples of cross-disciplinary concentration programs of study: American studies, the humanities, ecology and values, justice studies, labor studies, religious studies, urban studies, and women's studies.

LS 898, Project, or LS 899, Thesis (6 credits): With the support of their concentration and thesis adviser, students prepare a final project consistent with their concentration and interests. A capstone experience, the project can be a scholarly thesis or equivalent creative endeavor, which integrates the student's learning in a particular concentration. The director of the program will meet periodically with those students enrolled for thesis credit in order to provide a forum for discussing their research and writing.



Life Sciences and Agriculture (LSA)

» http://www.colsa.unh.edu/academics/

» Click to view course offerings

 


Management of Technology (MOT)

» http://paulcollege.unh.edu/graduate-programs

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Manchester through GSMC.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The Peter T. Paul College of Business & Economics has suspended admission, effective January 2013, to the Master of Management of Technology degree. 

Certificates Offered: Business Fundamentals for Technical Managers, Advanced Concepts for Technical Managers, Advanced Management of Technology

The Paul College offers a master of science in the management of technology (M.S. MOT). The degree comprises 36 credits (12 courses) and is divided into three certificate modules: Business Fundamentals for Technical Managers, Advanced Concepts for Technical Managers, and Advanced Management of Technology.

The MOT program is a flexible evening-based program for professionals in technical fields or working adults seeking a career change. Depending on the starting term, the degree can be completed in roughly 18 months if choosing the full-time option. Part-time configurations allow for life- and work-interruptions without severe penalty to program continuity.

M.S. MOT graduates have demonstrated successful career advancement in industries challenged by rapid technological innovation and organizations that emphasize project-based work. Applications are accepted for the fall and spring semesters with start dates in late August and early January, respectively.

Please contact the Paul College Graduate Programs Office for details.


Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and meet the admissions standards of the University of New Hampshire Graduate School.  A candidate should have significant (about five years or more) work experience. While the GMAT exam is not required, applicants may be asked to take the GMAT if the initial review of their transcripts reveals specific areas of concern or question.

Applicants are required to submit copies of prior academic records, three letters of recommendation, a resume, and a complete Graduate School application.

Please contact the Paul College Graduate Programs Office for details.


Degree Requirements

Please contact the Paul College Graduate Programs Office for details.



Materials Science (MS)

» http://www.unh.edu/materials-science/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Assistant Professor: Leila Deravi

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The materials science program offers the master of science degree in materials science and doctor of philosophy degree in materials science and engineering. The program offers research opportunities over a broad range of areas including synthesis and characterization of thin films, fullerenes and nanotubes, molecular templates, self-organizing nanostructures, polymers and polymer nanoparticles, using scanning probe microscopy, physical and chemical vapor deposition methods, micromechanics, molecular beam mass spectrometry, and computational methods.


Admission Requirements

Admission to the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees is based upon a strong undergraduate record. A minimum GPA of 3.0 is required, but undergraduate students with exceptional experience or other mitigating factors will be considered. Except under special circumstances, applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Since materials science is an interdisciplinary field, students from mechanical engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and other engineering- and science-related disciplines will be considered. A suitable undergraduate program should contain: multivariable calculus and differential equations, two semesters of university (calculus-based) physics, one semester of thermodynamics or physical chemistry, one semester of computer programming, one semester each of fluid mechanics and heat transfer or two semesters of solid mechanics, and one semester of materials science. Members of the faculty are available to evaluate each student’s undergraduate curriculum. A series of appropriate courses will be required for those students with deficiencies in their undergraduate program.

Qualified physics students at the University of New Hampshire may be admitted to an accelerated program leading to a combined bachelor of science degree in physics and a master's degree in materials science within a total of five years. Please consult the materials science website for details.


Degree Requirements


M.S. Degree Requirements

A student will meet the Graduate School’s requirements for the master’s degree (30 credits) and will complete either a thesis option and a project option. In both options, the student is required to take MS 860, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials I; MS 961, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials II; one course each satisfying the areas of synthesis and processing, characterization, and structure-property relationships, and two semesters of MS 900, Materials Science Seminar. 

For the thesis option, the student will take one additional course (24 course credits) in addition to 6 credits of MS 899, Master’s Thesis. 

For the project option, the student will take two additional courses (27 course credits) in addition to 3 credits of MS 898, Master’s Project. 

All students are expected to take at least 6 course credits at the 900 level. Students who have done graduate work at other schools that included courses similar to those in the Materials Science Program may petition for waivers of UNH degree requirements.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Students must complete 39 postbaccalaureate course credits. The student is expected to take MS 860, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials I; MS 961, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials II; one course each satisfying the areas of synthesis and processing, characterization, and structure-property relationships, and two semesters of MS 900, Materials Science Seminar. In addition, the student must take five additional courses with at least 12 total credits at the 900 level (including those courses taken at the master’s level). Students who have done graduate work at other schools that included courses similar to those in the Materials Science Program may petition for waivers of UNH degree requirements.

The student will be advanced to candidacy after he or she has completed an M.S. degree or 24 credits of graduate courses with at least 6 credits at the 900 level and the qualifying examination. The qualifying exam shall consist of two parts. The student must present a written proposal adhering to NSF guidelines, followed by an oral defense of that proposal. In addition, the student must submit a substantive review paper and an oral presentation on that paper. A materials science program faculty committee will determine the subject of the paper. A substantive record of publication in conjunction with an oral presentation at a conference may substitute for the review paper. A materials science program faculty committee will decide whether the previous publication record is substantive. The committee will evaluate the paper, the proposal, and the two oral presentations to determine whether the student is suitably prepared for graduate research at the Ph.D. level. The proposal and paper for the qualifying exam should normally be completed within six months of completing 24 credits of coursework.

Upon the successful completion of the qualifying examination, the student is advanced to candidacy and, upon the recommendation of the graduate coordinator, a doctoral committee is appointed by the dean of the Graduate School. The doctoral committee conducts an annual review of the student’s progress, supervises and approves the doctoral dissertation, and administers the final dissertation defense.


Courses

The link to course offerings below shows courses with a M.S. designation. Several other courses that count as electives in the Materials Science Program are taught by faculty in chemistry, mechanical engineering, physics, and other departments. For a complete list of these courses, please see the Graduate Student Handbook on the materials science website.



Mathematics and Statistics (MATH)

» http://www.math.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., M.S.T., Ph.D.


Certificate Offered: Industrial Statistics


The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers programs leading to a master of science for teachers (M.S.T.) in mathematics, master of science in mathematics, master of science in mathematics with an option in applied mathematics, and a master of science in mathematics with an option in statistics. Students in the master of science in applied mathematics option may choose to study for the integrated applied mathematics (IAM) program. Click here for additional information.  

The department also offers doctor of philosophy programs in mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics, and mathematics education. Students in the doctor of philosophy in applied mathematics programs pursue the degree requirements of the integrated applied mathematics program (click here for additional information). 

In general, the master's degree programs offer the student a high level of preparation for professional employment as well as appropriate preparation for programs leading to the Ph.D. The Ph.D. programs prepare the student primarily for a career in university teaching and research.

The graduate programs have limited enrollment, allowing students to work closely with faculty members in their areas of expertise. Research within the department is currently being conducted in many areas of the mathematical sciences, including: operator theory, Hilbert spaces, geometric function theory, complex analysis,  ring theory,  commutative algebra, homological algebra, quantum groups, tensor categories, combinatorics, topology, algebraic topology, category theory, nonlinear dynamics and chaos, data compression, chaotic prediction and control, spectral analysis, asymptotic analysis, mathematical control theory, environmental statistics, spatial and spatio-temporal statistics, Bayesian and computational statistics, wavelets in statistics, teaching and learning of mathematics, teaching and learning of probability and statistics, mathematics curriculum and teacher education, calculus learning, and undergraduate mathematics education.

Additionally, a graduate certificate in industrial statistics is offered.


Admission Requirements

Applicants for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees must have completed significant undergraduate coursework in mathematics, preferably in algebra, analysis, and topology. Applicants for the M.S. with applied mathematics option must have completed significant coursework in analysis or applied analysis. Applicants for the M.S. with statistics option will typically have an undergraduate degree in the mathematical, physical, biological, or social sciences or in engineering; must have completed mathematical coursework at least through multivariate calculus; and must have knowledge of basic statistics and basic linear algebra at the undergraduate level. Applicants for the degree of master of science for teachers (M.S.T.) usually possess a background equivalent to at least a minor in mathematics and must have completed education courses sufficient for certification, or have three years teaching experience, or currently hold a full-time teaching position.


Degree Requirements


M.S. Degree Requirements

Pure Mathematics Option
This program requires 30 credit hours, consisting of at least 10 semester courses approved by the department and chosen from courses in MATH 801-899, MATH 931-978  and IAM courses 830-962. The following stipulations apply:

As a concluding experience, the student will take an oral exam before a committee of three faculty members. The committee membership is suggested by the student and is approved by the graduate program committee.

Applied Mathematics Option
This program requires 30 credit hours, consisting of the courses MATH 931, IAM 933, an approved two-course sequence in applied mathematics (such as MATH 967/977). In addition to these courses, the student chooses either a thesis or project option. The thesis option consists of 6 credits of Master's Thesis (MATH 899) and four elective courses. The project option consists of 3 credits of Master's Project (MATH 898) and five elective courses. The elective courses need not be in mathematics, but must be at the 800 level or higher, and at least one must be a technical course in statistics or some other department. The broad elective flexibility allows the student's application interests to have a substantial role in the content of the program. The student's full program plan must be proposed in writing to the applied mathematics faculty and approved prior to the student's second semester of study. There is no comprehensive examination in this option.

Statistics Option
This program requires 30 credit hours, consisting of at least ten semester courses approved by the department, which includes completion of a project (MATH 898) consisting of a substantial application of statistical methodology to a real problem. Most of the courses will be taken from the department's statistics courses in the range MATH 837-979 and must include all of MATH 839, 840, 855, and 856, unless some of these or equivalent courses were taken prior to enrollment in the program. At most, three of the required ten courses may also be taken from the department's approved nonstatistics courses (in the range MATH 837-979) and/or approved courses offered in other departments. MATH 898, the Master's Project, is conducted under the supervision of a faculty adviser and concludes with a written report and a public oral presentation. MATH 898 may be taken for 3 to 6 credits, depending on the level of substantial research and methodological development required for project completion; the appropriate number of credits is determined by the statistics faculty. A master's committee of at least two statistics faculty members oversees the student's progress and determines credit for the project. There is no comprehensive examination in this option.

M.S.T. Degree Requirements
The program requires 30 credit hours of coursework, which must include MATH  900, 905, 906, 909, 913, 915, 918 and 925.  In addition to the 22 credit hours from the required courses, at least eight additional credit hours must be taken from courses numbered MATH 900-929. A concluding experience consisting of a mathematics portfolio and a comprehensive problem set is required. The program courses will be a combination of regular summer courses and academic-year online courses; a typical student in the program might expect to take as many as four program courses online. .


Ph.D. Requirements

The following are the requirements for completing the Ph.D. programs.

Candidacy

Students are advanced to candidacy after meeting the following requirements:

Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics

1. All of the courses MATH 951, 952, 953, 954, 955.

2. Mathematics Ph.D. students must pass written comprehensive examinations in algebra, analysis, topology and an elective subject. Elective subjects include functional analysis, algebraic topology, applied mathematics, statistics, advanced algebra, advanced complex analysis, advanced mathematics education, et al.

3. Advanced coursework in a minor field (usually within mathematics, but possibly in another area of the mathematical sciences), and a major field (that of the student's intended dissertation work) followed by successfully completion of oral examinations in their minor and major areas.

4. Experience in teaching equivalent to at least half-time for one year

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Statistics 

1. All of the courses MATH 836, 839, 840, 855, 856..

2. Successful completion of written qualifying examinations in theory of statistics and in applied statistics 

3. Advanced coursework in statistics: all of the courses MATH 941, 945, 946; three elective courses from among MATH 837, 841, 843, 844, 942, 944, 969, 979 (MATH 969 and 979 are topics courses and may be taken more than once)

4. Minor coursework: one course in analysis (either MATH 867 or MATH 953) and two ocurses in a focused minor area to be selected in consultation with the program advisor

5. Participation in the one-credit statistics seminar during at least three semesters

6. Successful completion of a dissertation proposal defense in the major field of statistics

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education

1. All of the courses MATH 951, 952, 953, 954, 955.

2. Successful completion of written comprehensive examinations in algebra, analysis, mathematics education and an elective subject.

3. Advanced coursework in the major field (mathematics education), including MATH 958, 968A, and 968B, and at least two semesters of MATH 978, and in a minor field (usually a related one, such as educational psychology or research methodology, but possibly in an area of mathematics) followed by qualifying examinations in each.

4. Successful completion of a dissertation proposal defense in the major field of mathematics education and a presentation in the minor field.

5. Experience in teaching equivalent to at least half-time for one year

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Mathematics

1. Must take nine courses totaling 27 credits from the following list: PHYS 931, IAM  830, IAM 851, IAM 932, IAM 933, IAM 961, IAM 962. One of the following 2-course sequences can also apply: MATH 847/IAM 950, ME 807/ME 909 or PHYS 953/PHYS 951.

2. In addition, must take a minimum of three technical electives totaling 9 credits from the following list: IAM 940, ME 812, ME 911, and other approved courses.

3. Pass a three-part Ph.D. qualifying exam:
   *Comprehensive exam in mathematical methods
   *Comprehensive exam in numerical analysis and HPC 
   *Oral or written exam in specialization area

4. Seminar presentation of thesis proposal to dissertation committee.

 

Dissertation

Each Ph.D. student must submit a dissertation as follows:

Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics: A dissertation that includes original results in mathematics.

Doctor of Philosophy in Statistics: A dissertation that includes original results in statistics.

Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics Education: A dissertation that includes original results in mathematics education.

Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Mathematics: A dissertation that includes original results in Integrated Applied Mathematics.

 


Certificate in Industrial Statistics

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers a graduate certificate in the area of industrial statistics. For more information please visit the mathematics and#38; statistics website.

Admissions Requirement

Individuals holding a bachelor's degree are eligible to apply for admission to a graduate certificate program. 


Applying

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements

A graduate certificate in industrial statistics is awarded for completion of four courses as follows:
**Note that all of these have as a prerequisite an introductory statistics course, such as MATH 835, Statistical Methods for Research.


Three required courses chosen from:

Abbreviation Course Number Title
MATH   836   Advanced Statistical Methods for Research  
MATH   837   Statistical Quality Improvement (SQI)  
MATH   839   Applied Regression Analysis  
MATH   840   Design of Experiments I  
    Note that all of these have as a prerequisite an introductory statistics course, such as MATH 835, Statistical Methods for Research.  


One elective course chosen from the remaining course of the

Abbreviation Course Number Title
MATH   841   Biostatistics and Life Testing  
MATH   843   Time Series Analysis  
MATH   844   Design of Experiments II (DOE II)  
MATH   855   Probability and Stochastic Processes  
MATH   941   Bayesian and Computational Statistics  
MATH   942   Beyond ANOVA: Generalized Linear & Semi-parametric Smoothing Methods  
MATH   944   Spatial Statistics  
    or any other approved special topics course in the area of industrial statistics Other special topics courses are occasionally offered and may be added to the list of elective courses.  



Mechanical Engineering (ME)

» http://www.unh.edu/mechanical-engineering/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.Eng., M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers degree programs at both the master's and doctoral levels. The department offers studies leading to specialization in the following six concentrations: fluid and thermal science, mechanics, materials science, design and manufacturing, dynamic systems and control, and ocean engineering. 


Admission Requirements

A bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering is normally required for admission to the graduate program in mechanical engineering. Students from other disciplines may also be admitted to the program. However, in order to be properly prepared for graduate-level coursework, these students must have taken the equivalent of the UNH mechanical engineering undergraduate core courses listed below. Students who are deficient in three or fewer courses may be admitted to the department on a provisional basis. Students who are deficient in more than three courses must apply and enroll as an undergraduate student until they meet the core course requirement. It is department policy that engineering courses taken as part of an engineering technology program are generally not considered equivalent to any of the courses listed below. The decision on equivalence for any courses taken at an institution other than UNH is at the discretion of the Graduate Committee of the Mechanical Engineering Department.

Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Core courses required for admission to the M.S. in mechanical engineering degree program:

Mathematics and Physics Courses:
MATH 425, Calculus I; MATH 426, Calculus II; MATH 527, Differential Equations; MATH 528, Multi-Dimensional Calculus; PHYS 407, General Physics; PHYS 408, General Physics II

Mechanics Courses:
ME 525, Mechanics I; ME 526, Mechanics II; ME 627, Mechanics III; ME 643, Elements of Design

Thermal Sciences:
ME 503, Thermodynamics; ME 608, Fluid Mechanics; ME 603, Heat Transfer

Other Courses:
ME 561, Materials Science; ME 670, Systems Modeling and Controls; EE 537, Circuits and Signals


Degree Requirements

Master of Science
Each candidate must complete 24 credit hours of coursework, 8 credit hours of ME 899, Master's Thesis, and defend the thesis. The coursework must include at least two 900-level courses of 3 or more credits each. A “B” average (3.00 GPA) with no grade below “B-” is required in all the coursework. No more than 12 credit hours from UNH graduate courses (8 credit hours from non-UNH graduate courses) taken prior to admission to the Graduate School may be applied to the master's degree. Note: an oral examination (thesis defense) covering the candidate's graduate work is conducted and a thesis is prepared in accordance with the Graduate School rules.

All full-time graduate students are required to attend a weekly Mechanical Engineering Graduate Seminar and make one presentation per year.

Master of Engineering
Each candidate must complete 28 credit hours of coursework, 4 credit hours of ME 992, Master's Project, and present a project. Two 900-level courses of at least 3 credits each must be taken in addition to ME 992. Individuals who can demonstrate accomplishments from professional engineering experience comparable to that expected from a master's project may petition the department to substitute an additional 900-level course for the ME 992, Master's Project, requirement. A “B” average (3.00 GPA) with no grade below “B-” is required in all the coursework. No more than 12 credit hours from UNH graduate courses (8 credit hours from non-UNH graduate courses) taken prior to admission to the Graduate School may be applied to the master's degree. A written report and an oral presentation of the project are required. The format of the project report is determined by the candidate’s research adviser. Master of engineering students are usually not eligible for a research or teaching assistantship.

All full-time graduate students are required to attend a weekly M.E. Graduate Seminar and make one presentation per year.

Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering
Following admission into the program, a temporary research adviser and a guidance committee consisting of three professors including the research adviser are appointed for the student by the graduate coordinator. The student's research adviser assists in outlining the student's course of study and may specify individual coursework requirements.

A student entering with a B.S. degree must successfully complete at least twelve 3- or 4-credit courses with five at the 900 level. Students entering with an M.S. degree in engineering are required to take a minimum of five 3- or 4-credit courses with three at the 900 level. This course requirement represents the department's minimum for any Ph.D. student. Students normally take more than the required number. Further course requirements are identified by the student's area of concentration and by the guidance committee. The guidance committee also administers the qualifying examination. Upon successful completion of required coursework and the qualifying examination, the student may advance to candidacy. A doctoral committee may be appointed once candidacy has been attained. The committee will have at least five members.

Each Ph.D. candidate must conduct research of sufficient originality and significance to warrant the awarding of the Ph.D. degree. The final examination (oral defense) is the defense of the student's dissertation. This will be scheduled in accordance with the Graduate School rules. The candidate will be informed of the results of the defense by the dissertation chair.

All full-time graduate students are required to attend a weekly M.E. Graduate Seminar and make one presentation per year.



Microbiology (MICR)

» http://mcbsgrad.unh.edu/microbiology

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Please view as well, the course listings for molecular, cellular, and biological sciences (MCBS).

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Science (MCBS) offers the master of science and the doctor of philosophy degrees in microbiology. Research opportunities are available in a broad range of areas, including plant-microbe interactions, signal transduction, microbial development, host-microbe interactions, environmental microbiology, environmental and molecular virology, microbial ecology, microbial evolution, microbial genetics and genomics, molecular microbiology, and biotechnology.


Admission Requirements

Applicants are expected to have had adequate preparation in the biological and physical sciences. This typically includes general and organic chemistry, physics, one semester of calculus, a year of general biology, a semester or more of biochemistry, and general microbiology. Formal courses in quantitative analysis and statistics are recommended. Applicants with deficiencies in these background courses who are admitted to the program may be required to complete appropriate coursework without graduate credit. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Each applicant to the graduate program must be sponsored by a faculty member in the program. The sponsor's decision is usually based on the Statement of Interest section of the student's application to the Graduate School. Laboratory rotations are available to identify a faculty sponsor, but a mutual decision must be made before the start of the next semester. Persons planning to apply to the program should contact the microbiology graduate program coordinator to obtain information on the department.


Degree Requirements

 


M.S. Degree Requirements

Students admitted to the M.S. program are required to conduct an independent research project in conjunction with a faculty adviser and must submit a thesis based on this research to a graduate committee, which determines its acceptability. Specific coursework is determined in conjunction with the graduate committee. A minimum of 30 credits, including 6-10 MICR 899 thesis credits, is required. All M.S. students are required to attend all seminars and present one seminar each year. A master's thesis and a formal defense are also required.  In addition, the student must submit at least one manuscript for publication to a peer-reviewed journal.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Students with appropriate academic training at the baccalaureate or master's level may be considered for admission to the doctoral program. Advancement to candidacy requires the successful completion of the following:

1. All courses required by the graduate committee 
2. A written qualifying exam administered by the graduate program coordinator and graduate faculty
3. An independent research proposal developed in conjunction with a faculty adviser
4. An oral defense of the research proposal

Students enrolled in the doctoral program are required to complete one semester of teaching and successfully complete and defend a dissertation based on their research proposal. The acceptance of the dissertation is contingent on its approval by the doctoral committee and evidence that at least two manuscripts based on the thesis research have been submitted to a peer-reviewed journal appropriate to the topic.

All graduates are expected to enroll in MCBS 997, Seminar, each semester and present one seminar each year.


Courses

For a complete listing of courses, check microbiology and molecular, cellular, and biological sciences.


» Click to view course offerings

^ back to top


Molecular and Evolutionary Systems Biology

» http://www.mcbs.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: Ph.D.

The Molecular, Cellular and Biomedical Sciences department now offers a Ph.D. in molecular and evolutionary systems biology.  The overarching goal of the MESB graduate program is to train a new generation of interdisciplinary researchers with expertise that spans molecular to evolutionary biology.  For more information about this program, including specific requirements, please contact Vaughn Cooper at vaughn.cooper@unh.edu


Admission Requirements

Students applying for the Ph.D. program will be expected to present recent (within five years) general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and possess a background in basic sciences appropriate for advanced study in the proposed area of specialization (for example, courses in biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics). The student's committee may require certain undergraduate courses as part of the graduate program if additional competencies would be beneficial to the student.


Degree Requirements

Degree requirements for the MESB Ph.D. degree include a series of core courses in scientific communications, applied bioinformatics, and ethical, legal, and social implications of modern biotechnology, as well as a research proposal, qualifying examinations, and the completion of a dissertation.

Research proposal: No later than at the conclusion of the second full semester of dissertation research (typically the third semester if rotating), students prepare a three-to-four-page, single-spaced, succinct synopsis of their thesis project, with citations. The synopsis includes:
 

1) Background: a summary of problem and general knowledge in the field
2) Hypotheses, questions, and relevance: articulates specific hypotheses, questions to be addressed, and importance of research
3) Approach: a general description of approaches with caveats, possible problems, alternative approaches, and resources of expertise
4) Timeline: a general timeline for completion of the work
5) Communication: potential audiences for the work (meetings, publications) 

Students submit this proposal to their guidance committee who will read it and provide input in a committee meeting, which should take place no later than the end of their third semester.

Qualifying examination: A qualifying examination has both a written and an oral section and is designed to test depth and breadth of knowledge in both the primary disciplinary area of study as well as in the student’s area of research beyond the primary specialization. The exam also tests the student’s ability to identify and describe significant and transformative research. Finally, it examines the student’s ability to develop and defend an original research plan. 

In order to prepare, students are encouraged to meet and discuss with their committee members the general topics likely to be covered during the oral exam. The written exam will be administered by the guidance committee in year three of study. The student will identify two current primary research papers (only one of which may be closely related to their dissertation research) that make a significant contributions to their respective fields. The committee will evaluate the student’s choices, and either select one of the papers, require the student to select additional papers, or provide a paper of their choice as the subject of the written exam. The written exam consists of i) a short review of the article indicating why the work is significant (~1 page), and ii) a synopsis proposal of what the next steps are in the research, following the format of an NSF pre-proposal or a letter of intent (four-page limit). The proposed research must be original and unpublished. Exactly three weeks are given for the written exam. If the committee agrees the student has passed the written exam, the oral exam will be scheduled. If a student doesn’t pass the written exam, guidance will be given to the student on what improvements must be made before scheduling a second attempt on the exam.

An oral defense of the review, synopsis proposal, and questions of general knowledge using the synopsis proposal as a vehicle will be conducted by the committee. Questions may also address the thesis project (which was presented to the committee the previous year). If desired, the student may provide a brief (10-minute maximum) update on their research at the beginning of the oral exam. The qualifying exam will be graded as Pass, Conditional Pass, or Not Pass. Students who conditionally pass likely had weaknesses identified by the committee, which can be remedied by additional work. Students who do not pass their exam showed insufficient mastery of material and will be required to repeat the oral exam at a later date.

Advancement to candidacy: The student is advanced to candidacy after the qualifying examination has been successfully passed, coursework and other requirements have been fulfilled, and the proposed subject of the dissertation declared.



Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences (MCBS)

» http://microbiology.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

Assistant Professor: Jeffrey T. Foster, David C. Plachetzki

 


Music (MUSI)

» http://www.unh.edu/music

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Please view as well, the course listings for music education (MUED).

Degree Offered: M.A.

The Department of Music offers programs leading to the degree of master of arts with options in composition, conducting, and musicology. Each program emphasizes a specific core curriculum that is complemented by a range of supportive courses that foster a broad knowledge of music. There is also enough room for electives (nearly a third of the degree) so that each student may tailor coursework to fit his or her personal interests and needs. Graduates have established successful careers in performance, conducting, public school teaching, college teaching, and research. The program also serves as excellent preparation for doctoral study.


Admission Requirements

For each option, a bachelor's degree in music or its equivalent from an accredited institution is required for admission. Graduate Record Exams are not required. Additional requirements for all applicants include:

Other admission requirements specific to the three degree areas include:

Composition

Conducting

Musicology

 


Degree Requirements

Music: Composition. Master of Arts**

The master of arts in composition option offers the opportunity for in-depth study of music composition. Some graduates of the program will go on to earn a doctoral degree in composition or music theory, while others will seek careers as film and theater composers, sound designers, teachers, and freelance writers. The program is responsive to the individual ambitions of its students to prepare them for their professional careers in the best way possible.

Completion of the program requires a final project in an area of interest. Projects can take several forms (for example, a composition, a composition recital, a lecture recital, a research paper, etc.) and are usually proposed and developed in concert with the graduate studies coordinator and a faculty member who serves as the project adviser. A final oral examination assesses the candidate's ability to apply compositional skills, and/or to describe advanced independent work of particular interest.

**Plan approval and accreditation for degree program pending from the National Association of Schools of Music.

Music: Conducting, Master of Arts

The master of arts in conducting option offers the opportunity for in-depth study of either instrumental or choral conducting. The program is intended for those who wish to improve their skills and knowledge for use in the school classroom or to prepare for doctoral programs in conducting.

Completion of the program requires a conducting recital and/or significant performances with one of the major university ensembles. A comprehensive oral examination will include discussion of the recital music, appropriate score identification, and questions focused on music history, theory, or education, to be determined in consultation with the members of the candidate's oral examination committee.

Music: Musicology, Master of Arts

The master of arts in musicology offers the opportunity for in-depth study of music history, theory, and criticism. The option is valuable to students who wish to augment undergraduate degrees in performance and/or music education with more intensive academic studies. The Department of Music has maintained a long history of excellence in music historical study and performance. Many graduates have gone on to pursue Ph.D.s and D.M.A.s in music. The M.A. in musicology offers enough electives so that students may also pursue advanced study in performance of an instrument or voice if qualified and accepted by an instructor upon a successful audition.

Completion of the program requires a written research project of substantive nature on a topic of the candidate's special interest. An alternative for some students will be a lecture-recital and written essay. Students emphasizing performance are encouraged to present public recitals in addition to the above. A final oral examination assesses the ability to apply critical thinking to music literature and to describe personal advanced independent work of particular interest.


Courses

For a complete listing of courses, check both music and music education.


» Click to view course offerings

^ back to top


Music Education (MUED)

» http://www.unh.edu/music

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 


Natural Resources (NR)

» http://www.naturalresources.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment offers a master of science in natural resources in the following options.

Natural Resources: Environmental Conservation
Areas of interest include natural resource policy, conservation biology, sustainability, ecological ethics and values, international environmental affairs, and spatial data analysis (remote sensing and GIS).

Natural Resources: Environmental Economics
Areas of interest include agricultural economics, community and regional economics, land economics, water economics, and environmental economics.

Natural Resources: Forestry
Areas of interest include forest resource economics and management, biometrics, genetics, forest ecosystem dynamics, and spatial data analysis (remote sensing and GIS).

Natural Resources: General
This program is designed for students whose work crosses disciplinary boundaries within the natural resources and does not easily fit within one of the existing options. Students can later choose to specify one of the six options if their research interests change or if they become specific to one individual area.

Natural Resources: Soil and Water Resource Management 
Areas of interest include wetlands, land-water interactions, groundwater chemistry, and biogeochemistry.

Natural Resources: TIDES (Integrated Coastal Ecosystem Science, Policy, and Management)
Areas of interest include ecosystem science, coastal resource management, natural resources and environmental policy, and marine resource education.

Natural Resources: Wildlife and Conservation Biology
Areas of interest include field and laboratory aspects of wildlife energetics, wildlife use of managed and unmanaged forest systems, habitat management and fragmentation, conservation biology, wetland wildlife ecology, and population dynamics.


Admission Requirements

Applicants are expected to have completed either an undergraduate degree in the field in which they plan to specialize or show adequate preparation in the basic support courses of the field. Students with good undergraduate records who lack a background in a particular field may be admitted to a program, provided they are prepared to correct any deficiencies. All entering students must have taken at least one statistics course or to do so at the graduate level. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Students entering the forestry option may elect to develop concentrations within any of the above-listed areas. Applicants are expected to have backgrounds in forestry or related biological sciences. Students interested in soil and water resource management are required to have adequate preparation in chemistry and mathematics as well as biological or Earth sciences. Students interested in wildlife and conservation biology are expected to have adequate preparation in biological sciences, chemistry, and mathematics. Students interested in environmental conservation should have a background appropriate for their area of interest. Since environmental conservation covers such a broad area, applicants are always reviewed carefully on an individual basis. Students interested in environmental economics should have a background in both economics and the environment. Four or more undergraduate courses in economics or environmental economics, including intermediate microeconomics and intermediate macroeconomics, are required as well as calculus and statistics. Students interested in the TIDES (Integrated Coastal Ecosystem Science, Policy, and Management) option are required to have adequate preparation in ecology, social sciences, and statistics.

Prior to submitting an application, applicants should contact one or more graduate faculty advisers to discuss programs and funding, and secure a commitment of a faculty member to serve as graduate adviser.


Degree Requirements

An M.S. degree is conferred upon successful completion of a program of not less than 30 credits for natural resources options: forestry, environmental conservation, environmental economics, general, soil and water resource management, and wildlife and conservation biology.  

Course requirements or equivalents:
NR 903, Approach to Research (2 credits) and
One additional research methods class:
     NR 904, Survey Research Methods (2 credits) or
     NR 905, Grant Writing (2 credits) or
     LSA 950, Scientific Communication (2 credits)
NR 993, Seminar or NR 947, Current Issues in Ecosystem Ecology
NR 996, Natural Resource Education
Quantitative methods course
NR 899 (6-10 credits), Master’s Thesis and a formal presentation of the thesis or 
NR 998, Directed Research and directed research results

Environmental Conservation Option Requirements:
     One course in Ecology

Environmental Economics Option Requirements:
     ECON 926, Econometrics I 
     ECON 976, Microeconomics I

Natural Resources: TIDES option requires a minimum of 36 credits. 

NR: TIDES course requirements or equivalents:

NR 915, Seminar: Coastal Challenges for Science-Policy Collaborations
NR 916, Linking Decision-making and Coastal Ecosystem Science
NR 917, Coastal Ecosystem Science Policy and Management Internship
NR 824, Resolving Environmental Conflicts
An approved research methods course
Quantitative methods course
One ecology course
One resource management course
NR 998, Directed Research and directed research results
 

*   The thesis option will provide a research-based thesis that is the foundation for a peer-reviewed publication.

** The directed research option shall consist of a project, designed and conducted by the student, culminating in a scholarly paper or report that is suitable for publication in the respective field of scholarship.

Approved program of study plan during the first semester.

A Cooperative Doctoral Program
The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment participates in the Natural Resources and Earth System Science Ph.D. Program (NRESS), an interdepartmental degree offered at UNH. For further details on this program, please visit the NRESS program page.



Natural Resources and Earth Systems Science (NRES)

» http://www.unh.edu/nressphd/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Affiliate Assistant Professor: Mark B Green

 

Degree Offered: Ph.D.

The graduate program in Natural Resources and Earth Systems Science (NRESS) is an interdepartmental program offering the Ph.D. degree for interdisciplinary work in areas related to the understanding and management of the environment in the broadest context. Areas of study include, but are not limited to, ecosystem science, biogeochemical cycling, geochemical systems, atmospheric science, environmental philosophy, forestry, geologic science, hydrology, marine science, oceanography, social science, environmental policy and ethics, environmental education, and multidisciplinary natural resources management.

The NRESS Ph.D. program offers two degrees:

Students in NRES focus on problems dealing with the allocation and distribution of natural resources, policies at the local to global scale, and ethical and societal factors that affect resource management.  Students receiving the Ph.D. degree in NRES will typically have a bachelor's and/or master’s degree in economics, environmental conservation, philosophy, political science, or sociology.

Students in EES focus on problems dealing with the physical, chemical, and/or biological processes that affect earth and environmental systems. Students receiving the Ph.D. degree in EES will typically have a bachelor's and/or master’s degree in biology, ecology, environmental science, geology, hydrology, or microbiology.

 


Admission Requirements

Applicants to the NRESS Program come from a wide range of undergraduate majors and master's degree concentrations. Individuals are admitted based on the quality of their previous work and its relevance to the particular area of study they propose to pursue.

Students are expected to have completed a master's degree before entering the program, although this is not a requirement. 

All applicants must identify an adviser before being admitted, and this faculty member must agree to serve as the applicant's adviser. Certain applicants may be admitted with deficiencies identified by their adviser and/or by the executive committee. These deficiencies normally must be corrected in the first year of the program. All applicants must submit GRE scores. Please see the program website for details on applying to the program.


Degree Requirements

The requirements of the doctoral program are flexible to accommodate the diverse interests and needs of students. All students in the NRESS program must meet the requirements listed below.

Committees and Coursework
The Ph.D. guidance and dissertation committees must consist of at least five members. The chair must be a member of the NRESS faculty. Three of the five members (including the chair) must be NRESS faculty, and committee members must be from more than one academic department. Students are strongly encouraged to include at least one off-campus member. Off-campus committee members must hold a doctoral degree and be approved by the student's adviser, the NRESS Program, and the Graduate School dean. Students should select the guidance committee in a timely manner, within one year for full-time students and two years for part-time students.

Core Area Course Requirements
All students will take one course in each of four core areas while enrolled in the program: natural sciences, ethics/policy/law, methods, and seminar. Students are also required to take NRES 997, Interdisciplinary Research in Natural Resources and Earth and Environmental Sciences, preferably within the first year of enrollment. Any course used to satisfy the natural sciences, ethics/policy/law, and methods core areas must be a classroom course of at least 3 credits. The seminar course must be interactive and must be at least 1 credit. Independent study courses may not be used to satisfy core requirements. Students must complete a Preliminary Coursework Approval Form, which lists the student's planned coursework, within one year for full-time students and two years for part-time students. A Final Course Approval Form, with signatures from the adviser, committee members, and the NRESS program chair is submitted once the coursework is completed.

Students Entering the Program without a Master's Degree
Students entering the program without a master's degree are expected to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours. There is not a specific credit requirement beyond the required four core courses and NRES 997 for students who have completed a M.S. or M.A. degree in a related field. Students enter the NRESS program with diverse backgrounds and preparation in their particular area of study. Therefore, final credit requirements are determined by the guidance committee and may include additional coursework necessary to enhance the student's selected field of study and/or correct any deficiencies in the student's previous program. Students may apply a maximum of 12 credits of independent study and/or seminar courses to their total course requirement.

Transfer Credits
Graduate-level courses taken prior to admission may be transferred into the program and applied to the total only if they were not taken while matriculated in another degree program, as per Graduate School policy. These courses may not be used to meet the core course requirements. Transfer of credits must be approved by the adviser, the guidance committee, and the Graduate School.

Language Proficiency
Language proficiency may be required at the discretion of the student's adviser/committee. If required, a student will need to show proficiency in one foreign language or one computer language.

Examinations
Each student is required to pass three examinations, each of which has both a written and oral component. Additional preliminary examinations may be administered before the three required exams as the committee deems necessary. Performance on such an exam will determine areas where the student needs additional coursework or could result in the student's removal from the program.

Comprehensive exam: The student must prepare an extensive written answer to one question from each committee member that covers the concepts and factual material deemed essential for the student's program. Three weeks are allowed for completion of the exam, after which the student gives an oral presentation to the committee. This exam is taken within three years of initiation of graduate study in the program. The committee may require a student to repeat part or all of the comprehensive exam if the student's performance is deemed unsatisfactory.

Proposal exam: The student must present to the committee a written proposal on the dissertation research topic. Once the proposal is written, the student will complete a public oral presentation of the proposed research, followed by an oral examination by the committee.

Final exam: The student must complete a written Ph.D. dissertation prior to the final exam. Once written, the student is required to complete an oral defense of the dissertation, which will include both a public presentation and oral examination by the committee.

A student may be required to take additional courses following either the comprehensive or proposal exam, or may be removed from the program following failure of any of the required exams. Students are advanced to candidacy after successfully completing the comprehensive exam, proposal exam, and all coursework required by the guidance committee as summarized on the Coursework Approval Form.
 



Nursing (NURS)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/nursing/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., DNP

The Department of Nursing offers the master of science degree in nursing under two programs: Graduate Program in Nursing and Direct Entry Master’s in Nursing.  We also offer the post-master's family nurse practitioner certificate program and doctor of nursing practice degree program.


Graduate Program in Nursing

The graduate program in nursing currently offers three clinical practice tracks: clinical nurse leader (CNLsm), evidence-based nursing (EBN), and family nurse practitioner (FNP). Within the evidence-based nursing track, students can complete a program of study in clinical nursing education.  Depending on track, programs are designed to be completed in three to four semesters of full-time study including one summer. Individual plans of study are available for those wishing to pursue part-time study. Although no guarantees are given, the department will try and accommodate student requests to the fullest extent possible. All tracks prepare nurses for evidence-based practice through critical inquiry using a variety of instructional modalities.


Admission Requirements

All applicants who are not native English speakers are required to demonstrate a sufficient level of proficiency in the English language to meet the admission requirement of the Graduate School.  Proficiency can be demonstrated by the receipt of a bachelor's or advanced degree from an accredited institution of higher education in the United States or from a university in another country where English is the primary language of instruction.  All other non-native speakers must achieve a minimum score of 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 80 (Internet-based) on the Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and Miller Analogies Test (MAT) are not required.  Individuals apply to the University of New Hampshire Graduate School.

Graduate Program in Nursing Admission Requirements:  Registered nurses (RNs) who have successfully passed the NCLEX-RN, currently hold an unencumbered active RN license in the United States, and who hold a baccalaureate degree in either nursing or another field can be considered for admission. Applicants are required to have a good academic record and completion of coursework in statistics and research. 

RNs whose baccalaureate degree is in a discipline other than nursing may apply to the evidence-based nursing track. Once the master of science degree in nursing (M.S.) is conferred, the student may apply to the Post-Master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate Program, if desired.

Letters of recommendation should be substantial, with at least one academic reference from your nursing program and two references from current nursing professionals with graduate education background.  Letters of recommendation from family or friends are not acceptable.   The application deadline for fall admission is April 1st. The deadline for spring admission is November 1st.  An interview may be requested.

The Student Affairs Council in the Department of Nursing reviews completed applications September through May (rolling admission).


Post-Master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate Program Admission Requirements:  In addition to the standard graduate school requirements, the nursing department requires: 

 

1.  Applicant must hold unencumbered, active RN license in the United States and have a master's degree in nursing.

2.  Applicant should submit two letters of reference. References should be substantial with one academic, if available, and one current professional with graduate education background.  Letters of recommendation from family or friends are not acceptable.

3.  A course description should be submitted for any course you request waived.


Direct Entry Master’s in Nursing Admission Requirements:  A grade point average of 3.0 or better is suggested. Previous coursework and professional experience is taken into consideration. Prerequisite courses must be complete at the time the application is reviewed.  These include Human Anatomy & Physiology I and II with lab, Microbiology at the cellular level, and Statistics with a grade of B or better. 

Knowledge of the basic processes and methods of research is necessary for students entering the DEMN program. While many undergraduate programs include a research methods course, not all programs do so. If a student does not have a background in research, he or she should enroll in an introductory research course or self-study this content prior to matriculation in the DEMN program. The following are introductory nursing research textbooks that may be used for self-study:

Letters of recommendation should be substantial with at least one academic reference and two references from current professionals with graduate education background.  Letters of recommendation from family or friends are not acceptable.  The completed application deadline is April 1st with staggered admissions. 

Doctor of Nursing Practice Admission Requirements:


 


Accelerated Master's Program for Current UNH Senior Students

Graduate Program in Nursing Accelerated Master's:

Qualified senior students at the University of New Hampshire may be admitted to the Graduate School provided they have followed normal application procedures; they must have been admitted for the semester in which they wish to enroll in courses for graduate credit. A 3.2 cumulative grade-point average is normally required to be considered for the accelerated master’s program. Such seniors are normally admitted prior to the start of their last undergraduate semester. Seniors who have been admitted under accelerated master’s program may register for a maximum of three courses for up to 12 graduate credits. 

When seniors admitted to the accelerated master's program have registered for graduate courses, they must maintain a grade-point average of 3.20, complete their undergraduate degree as planned, and pass graduate courses taken for credit with a grade of B- or better. If these conditions are not met, admission is withdrawn.

Students accepted under accelerated master’s follow the clinical nurse leader or evidence-based nursing track. Undergraduate students accepted as graduate nursing students under accelerated master’s guidelines, are admitted with the stipulation that their RN license must be obtained prior to beginning any clinical course. Stipulation is removed upon verification of the RN license provided to the department of nursing.

Apply to the accelerated master’s program through the Graduate School by April 1 of your junior year if you wish to begin summer after your junior year, by July 1 after your junior year if you wish to begin fall of your senior year. Apply November 1 of your senior year if you wish to begin spring of your senior year. Admission is provisional: must have RN license before registering for NURS 952 or NURS 955.

Direct Entry Master's in Nursing Accelerated Master's:

The Direct Entry Master's in Nursing Program provides an opportunity for accelerated admission to the graduate program for full time undergraduate UNH students who meet admission criteria.  To be considered, undergraduate students must have completed all major requirements by the fall of their senior year.  A grade point average of 3.4 or better is suggested.  Previous course work is taken into consideration.  Pre-requisite courses must be complete at the time the application is reviewed.  These include human anatomy and physiology I and II with labs, microbiology at the cellular level, and statistics with a grade of B or better.

The curriculum begins in January and includes two summer sessions.  Students graduate as an advanced generalist with a master of science (M.S.) degree in nursing and upon passing certification examination, as a clinical nurse leader (CNL). Direct entry courses taken during the spring of the senior year of undergraduate program will fulfill elective credits to complete B.A./B.S. degree requirements at UNH.  This accelerated, full-time program is a five-semester, 67-credit course of study.

Students are admitted with the stipulation that they must submit final transcript with degree conferred prior to enrolling in fall semester courses and pass NCLEX-RN prior to completing the program.  The stipulation is met once the final  transcript and RN license are received.  Students are eligible to taken the NCLEX-RN after completing a total of 59 credits of accelerated study (including summer).  Students take the CNL certification examination in their final semester.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to meet with the graduate program in nursing coordinator and their discipline-specific adviser early on in their undergraduate program to plan this course of study. 

Students may apply during the second semester of their junior year in major by April 1 with staggered admissions until the class is filled.  Applications are reviewed through May then review resumes in September.
 


Degree Requirements

 


Clinical Nurse Leader Track, 32 Credits

Students graduate as an advanced generalist as a clinical nurse leader (CNL) with a master of science degree. Graduates are eligible to sit for the clinical nurse leader national certification examination. The CNL is a role in the field of nursing designed to provide master's-prepared, point-of-care nurse leaders with the ability to manage and solve complex patient problems within a systems framework.


Fall

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   908   Advanced Pathophysiology   3  
NURS   951   Clinical Epidemiology & Decision Analysis   3  
NURS   953   Promoting Quality Management   3  


Spring

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   925   Health Care Systems & Leadership   3  
NURS   952   Clinical Nursing Leadership   2  
NURS   952C   Clinical Nursing Leadership Clinical   6  
NURS   968   Nursing Science and Evidence Based Practice   3  


Summer

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   901   Health Policy   3  
NURS   958   Clinical Nurse Leader Capstone   6  


Evidence-Based Nursing Track, 30 Credits

The evidence-based nursing track focuses on developing advanced generalist nursing practice in a focused area of study, promoting interdisciplinary collaboration, fostering life-long learning, and preparing students for the leading edge of health care knowledge and delivery. Students strengthen knowledge and skills in clinical decision making, the application of nursing interventions, and their ability to critique and appropriately use evidence as a foundation for practice. In this graduate track, students study nursing as an applied discipline, advancing their knowledge of theoretical perspectives for clinical practice, with an emphasis on leadership; the cultural, social, and political context of health and illness; and quality improvement methodologies. Students are mentored in the enactment of leadership strategies to improve quality care in nursing practice through an intensive clinical practicum. In NURS 956, the capstone course for the evidence-based nursing track, the student will be required to complete a scholarly project under the direction of a faculty member in collaboration with agency preceptor. A formal presentation is required.


Fall I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   908   Advanced Pathophysiology   3  
NURS   944   Population Health Promotion and Risk Reduction   3  
NURS   951   Clinical Epidemiology & Decision Analysis   3  
NURS   953   Promoting Quality Management   3  


Spring

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   925   Health Care Systems & Leadership   3  
NURS   968   Nursing Science and Evidence Based Practice   3  


Summer

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   901   Health Policy   3  


Fall II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   909   Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning   3  
NURS   955   Practicum in Advanced Nursing Practice   3  
NURS   956   Capstone Project Seminar   3  


Family Nurse Practitioner Track, 45 Credits

This program prepares family nurse practitioners (FNPs) with specialized knowledge and clinical competency to practice as licensed independent practitioners across the life span. FNPs practice in ambulatory, acute, and long-term care as primary and/or specialty providers to individuals, families, and groups. The UNH program prepares these advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) to diagnose and manage acute episodic and chronic illnesses across the life span and simple-to-complex continuum. Health promotion, disease prevention, teaching, counseling, and coaching are emphasized. The capstone course, NURS 939, is the final integrated clinical practicum.  At the completion of the program, students are eligible to sit for national certification as a family nurse practitioner. Students are also prepared to enter doctoral study. Upon licensure, FNPs may practice autonomously as well as in collaboration with other health professionals.

 


Fall I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   908   Advanced Pathophysiology   3  
NURS   909   Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning   3  
NURS   951   Clinical Epidemiology & Decision Analysis   3  


Spring I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   907   Advanced Pharmacology   3  
NURS   935   Primary Care of Families I   3  
NURS   936   Practicum in the Primary Care of Families I   3  
NURS   968   Nursing Science and Evidence Based Practice   3  


Summer

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   901   Health Policy   3  
NURS   925   Health Care Systems & Leadership   3  


Fall II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   937   Primary Care of Families II   3  
NURS   938   Practicum in the Primary Care of Families II   3  
NURS   944   Population Health Promotion & Risk Reduction   3  


Spring II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   810   Families in Health & Illness   3  
NURS   939   Seminar & Practicum in Primary Care of Families III   6  


Post-Master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate, 12-39 Credits

The Department of Nursing offers the Post-Master's Family Nurse Practitioner Certificate Program for students who completed a master of science degree in nursing. The certificate of advanced practice is designed for those individuals with a master's degree in nursing who wish to expand their practice into the role of a family nurse practitioner. The PM-FNP specialty area prepares nurses to provide comprehensive care that includes health promotion, maintenance and restoration for persons across the life span.

Depending on educational background and previous coursework in master's program, students accepted into the PM-FNP certificate program are required to take as few as three and as many as 12 courses or 12-39 credits. Successful completion of the required curriculum qualifies the RN to sit for the Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Examination.


Fall I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   908   Advanced Pathophysiology   3  
NURS   909   Advanced Health Assessment & Diagnostic Reasoning   3  
NURS   951   Clinical Epidemiology & Decision Analysis   3  


Spring I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   907   Advanced Pharmacology   3  
NURS   935   Primary Care of Families I   3  
NURS   936   Practicum in the Primary Care of Families I   3  


Summer

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   925   Health Care Systems & Leadership   3  


Fall II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   937   Primary Care of Families II   3  
NURS   938   Practicum in the Primary Care of Families II   3  
NURS   944   Population Health Promotion & Risk Reduction   3  


Spring II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   810   Families in Health & Illness   3  
NURS   939   Seminar & Practicum in Primary Care of Families III   6  


Direct Entry Master's in Nursing, 67 Credits

The Direct Entry Master’s in Nursing Program is an accelerated, full-time, five-semester, 67-credit course of study designed for non-RN students who hold a B.S. or B.A. or higher degree in a field other than nursing. Students are admitted with the stipulation that they must pass NCLEX-RN prior to completion of the program. The stipulation is met once the RN license is received. Students are eligible to take the NCLEX-RN after completing a total of 58 credits of accelerated study (including summer). The curriculum begins in January and includes two summer sessions. Students graduate as an advanced generalist with a master of science (MS) degree in nursing and upon passing certification examination, as a clinical nurse leader (CNL).  Students take the CNL certification examination in their final semester. The CNL is a role in the field of nursing designed to provide master's-prepared, point-of-care nurse leaders with the ability to manage and solve complex patient problems within a systems framework.  As part of the CNL curriculum, students study master's level research in health promotion and illness management.  Students complete a clinical immersion experience of approximately 300 clinical hours.  Students conclude their CNL master's preparation in a clinical nurse leader capstone, NURS 958, Clinical Nurse Leader Capstone.


Spring I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   806   Clinical Inquiry   4  
NURS   807   Pathophysiology and Pharmacology   4  
NURS   813   Health Assessment and Clinical Nursing Theory   3  
NURS   813C   Health Assessment and Clinical Nursing   2  
NURS   825   Collaborative Care I: Care of Older Adult   3  
Total       16  


Summer I

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   826   Caring for People with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness   2  
NURS   826C   Caring for People with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness Clinical   2  
NURS   830   Collaborative Care II: Childbearing & Childrearing Families   4  
NURS   830C   Collaborative Care II: Childbearing & Childrearing Families Clinical   2  
NURS   951   Clinical Epidemiology and Decision Analysis   3  
Total       13  


Fall

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   827   Collaborative Care III: Managing Acute & Complex Care of Individuals   3  
NURS   827C   Collaborative Care III: Managing Acute & Complex Care of Individuals Clinical   3  
NURS   828   Public Health Nursing   3  
NURS   908   Advanced Pathophysiology   3  
NURS   953   Promoting Quality Management   3  
Total       15  


Spring II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   925   Health Care Systems & Leadership   3  
NURS   952   Clinical Nursing Leadership   2  
NURS   952C   Clinical Nursing Leadership Clinical   6  
NURS   968   Nursing Science and Evidence Based Practice   3  
Total       14  

Eligible for NCLEX-RN



Summer II

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   901   Health Policy   3  
NURS   958   Clinical Nurse Leader Capstone   6  
Total       9  


Capstone Experience for All Master's Nursing Tracks

For clinical nurse leader (CNL), the capstone course, NURS 958, Clinical  Nurse Leader Capstone, requires students to complete 112 clinical hours plus a scholarly project, which synthesizes advanced practice knowledge and skills to address substantive nursing practice issues. For evidenced-based nursing (EBN), the capstone course, NURS 956, Capstone Project Seminar, requires students to complete a scholarly project. CNL and FNP students may elect to complete Master's Thesis, NURS 899 (6 credits). EBN students may elect to complete a thesis and register for 6 credits of NURS 899 as the capstone in place of NURS 956. If a student opts to do a thesis, the student should discuss this option with a faculty adviser early in the program of study. For family nurse practitioner (FNP and PM-FNP), the capstone course, NURS 939, Primary Care of Families III, is the final integrated clinical practicum.


Doctor of Nursing Practice

The DNP program prepares nurses for the highest level of specialized nursing practice. DNP graduates are prepared to translate evidence into practice, improve systems of care, and measure health outcomes in diverse settings. Graduates of the DNP program are prepared for culturally competent, evidence-based, system-based care, interprofessional collaboration and leadership. DNP graduates are distinguished by their abilities to:

The DNP program requires 36 credit hours to be completed in 2.5 years. Courses are offered in hybrid or online formats. All on-campus seminars are offered in Durham on a weekday evening.  Admitted students may transfer two courses or 6 credits into the UNH DNP program from outside UNH.

The UNH DNP program builds upon the experience and education of advanced practice, master's-prepared nurses. Nurses who have obtained an M.S. in nursing and hold advanced nursing certification are welcome to apply (NP, CRNA, CNMW, CNL, CNS, Nurse Executive, Health Systems Management, Nursing Informatics). Qualified students may take up to three courses as a non-matriculated student.

 


DNP Curriculum

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
NURS   961   Evolution of the DNP   1  
NURS   962   Science of Advanced Nursing Practice   3  
NURS   963   Advanced Epidemiology   3  
NURS   964   Technology and Health Care   3  
NURS   965   Organizational Leadership and Health Policy   3  
NURS   967   Evidence Synthesis   3  
NURS   971   Data Analysis I: Qualitative Methods   1  
NURS   972   Data Analysis II: Quantitative Methods   3  
NURS   973   Health Care Quality   3  
NURS   974   Organizational Behavior   3  
NURS   980   Doctoral Seminar I   3  
NURS   981   Doctoral Seminar II   3  
NURS   982   Doctoral Seminar III   1  
NURS   983   Doctoral Seminar IV   3  


Research and Scholarly Activities

The graduate faculty of the University’s nursing program believe learning is a creative process wherein students are active participants in their education, growth, and development. Faculty members are facilitators and mentors to students within a supportive scholarly environment. Students are prepared to be skilled, knowledgeable, and reflective leaders in health care who practice as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse leaders, or clinical educators.

The generation, dissemination, and application of evidenced-based nursing knowledge and practice are a central mission for the nursing department. Health care of vulnerable populations is the research focus among the faculty. Faculty engage in scholarly inquiry across diverse topics such as care-giving, acute symptom management, clinical decision-making, adolescent pregnancy, elder care-giving, and cultural diversity. Faculty publications, research, public policy initiatives, and other consultative/professional activities may be viewed at the department’s website.



Nutritional Sciences (NUTR)

» http://mcbsgrad.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

The Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Biomedical Sciences (MCBS) offers the master of science degree in nutritional science, and in conjunction with animal science faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences, a Ph.D. in animal and nutritional sciences. MCBS also offers a postgraduate internship in dietetics. 

Information on these programs is described below and at the website listed above. Please view as well, the course listings for animal sciences (ANSC) and molecular, cellular, and biological sciences (MCBS).

Degree Programs Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The graduate program includes the M.S. degree in nutritional science and Ph.D. degree in animal and nutritional sciences. Areas of research specialization include human nutrition, mammalian physiology and pathology, nutritional biochemistry and metabolism, and reproduction and endocrinology. Research activities utilize human, animal, and cell culture systems to investigate nutrient metabolism and a molecular-level understanding of life processes and diseases.


Dietetic Internship Program

In addition to degree-granting programs, the UNH Nutrition Program offers an American Dietetic Association-approved dietetic internship program. The emphasis of the internship is on "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention." In addition to more than 1,200 hours of practicum work, students earn 12 graduate-level credits as part of the internship. These credits may be applied to a master's degree if the candidate is accepted into the graduate program at UNH.


Admission Requirements

Students applying for the M.S. or Ph.D. program will be expected to present recent scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and possess a background in basic sciences appropriate for advanced study in the proposed area of specialization (for example, courses in biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physics). Although not required for candidacy in the Ph.D. program, an M.S. degree is suggested for most students. The student's committee may require certain undergraduate courses as part of the graduate program if additional competencies would be beneficial to the student. Students interested in preparing themselves for admittance to a dietetic internship while pursuing the graduate degree should contact Clinical Associate Professor Ruth Reilly in advance of applying at (603) 862-2164, ruth.reilly@unh.edu) in order to determine the best course of action. 


Degree Requirements

 


M.S. in Nutritional Sciences

In this program students become actively engaged in a research project related to the nutritional sciences and gain a comprehensive understanding of nutritional science through their coursework. Emphasis is placed on active participation in original hypothesis-driven research of publishable quality. The program is for students who anticipate a professional career involving research or discovery, with a strong background in the basic biology and chemistry of nutrition. This degree may be most appropriate for students who expect to pursue further advanced study, e.g., additional graduate studies or professional school, after graduation.

The program of study must include a minimum of 30 graduate credits as well as completion of a Master's Thesis based on a research project. Six credits of thesis research (NUTR 899) are required. No more than 4 credits of investigations (NUTR 995) can apply toward the total credit count. Each candidate must present at least two seminars (exclusive of the thesis defense) and must serve as a teaching assistant for at least one semester. A thesis committee will be appointed early in the program and will consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty; one of these will be the primary mentor. Students will design a program of study in close consultation with their thesis committee, including their academic courses and scientific research project. Candidates will be required to pass an oral examination based on their graduate courses and completed thesis. Skills in communicating scientific information will be fostered by presenting one seminar during each year of enrollment. This requirement could include the master's thesis defense seminar.

 


Ph.D. in Animal and Nutritional Sciences

Coursework for the Ph.D. in animal and nutritional science is determined by the student's committee.

Students must complete a dissertation based on original hypothesis-driven research of publishable quality. A public presentation of the dissertation research findings will be followed by a final examination, which will be primarily an oral defense of the dissertation. The candidate will be required to serve as a teaching assistant for a minimum of two semesters or to teach a course for one semester. Aptitude in scientific communication will be developed by presentation of one seminar during each year of enrollment, not including the dissertation defense.

For a more detailed description and list of courses offered, please visit www.mcbsgrad.unh.edu.


Courses

For a complete listing of courses, check animal science and nutritional science. All graduate students are required to take MCBS 997, Seminar.


» Click to view course offerings

^ back to top


Occupational Therapy (OT)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/ot/index

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

 


Occupational therapy



The Department of Occupational Therapy offers the master of science degree in occupational therapy and a graduate certificate in assistive technology.


Admission Requirements

Occupational therapy enables people to participate sucessfully in their choice of daily life activities including leisure, play, work, self-care, and home management. The master’s degree prepares students for entry-level occupational therapy practice. Students gain the knowledge and skills to work with people of all ages to enable their participation within their natural environments. 

The Occupational Therapy Program at the University of New Hampshire is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20824-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number is (301) 652-AOTA and its website is www.acoteonline.org.

Graduates of the program are eligible to sit for the Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapist, administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an occupational therapist, registered (OTR). In addition, most states require licensure in order to practice. State licenses are based on the successful results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT Certification Examination or attain state licensure. 

Professional Master's Program in Occupational Therapy
(This admissions process applies to candidates with completed undergraduate degree(s) and UNH seniors who are not in the B.S./M.S. Occupational Science/Occupational Therapy program.)

Applicants need a minimum overall grade point of 3.0 in undergraduate coursework and the following prerequisite courses: 

Applicants must complete and submit the Prerequisite Verification Form. Priority for admission will be given to applicants with all prerequisite courses completed.  Prerequisites must be completed prior to entry into the professional master's program. 

Three letters of reference must accompany the application. Two of these must address the applicant’s educational abilities/performance. One letter must address the applicant’s interpersonal/communication skills as observed in a volunteer or paid-employment setting.  

Applications are accepted beginning in the fall of the year before a candidate will begin the program. Applications close on January 15th.  However, candidates are encouraged to submit their applications to the Graduate School by the end of December to ensure that all applications are complete in time for review. Once submitted, applicants should periodically review their application status on the Graduate School website and contact the Graduate School about missing items. Admission to the occupational therapy program is a competitive process and not all qualified students are admitted.

UNH B.S./M.S. Students (Advanced-standing) Applying to the Entry-Level Professional Master’s Degree Program 
Students who are completing a baccalaureate degree in occupational science at UNH use this application process to enter the entry-level master's in occupational therapy degree program.  These students take the first year of the two-and-a-half year (five semesters) entry-level master’s program as part of their senior year baccalaureate in occupational science degree requirements.

Students in the combined B.S./M.S. program must apply for admission to the Graduate School to enter into the professional master’s degree program, meet Graduate School requirements for entry into the graduate portion of their program, and be officially admitted by the Graduate School. This process occurs in the spring semester of the senior year. The application period opens on February 1st and closes on March 31st. An overall minimum grade point of 3.0 and a grade of B- or better in all senior-level OT coursework are required for admission.

Three letters of references must accompany the application for B.S./M.S. students: one from the chair of the occupational therapy program; one from the student's undergraduate academic adviser; and one that addresses the student's interpersonal and communication skills, work ethic, and integrity as observed in a volunteer or work setting.

B.S./M.S. students planning to also complete a graduate certificate may apply into the accelerated cohort. Accelerated admission enables B.S./M.S. students to take graduate certificate courses at the 800 level in the J term and spring semester of their senior year in the B.S. program (see detailed instructions below).

UNH B.S./M.S. Students Applying to the Professional Master’s Degree Program for Early Admission (Accelerated Master's)ALL students who are completing a baccalaureate degree in occupational science at UNH complete the application process for the professional master's degree.  These students take the first year of the two-and-a-half year (five semesters) professional master’s program as part of their senior year B.S. in occupational science degree requirements. Students in the combined B.S./M.S. program must apply for admission to the Graduate School to enter into the professional master’s degree program, meet Graduate School requirements for entry into the graduate portion of their program, and be officially admitted by the Graduate School. This process occurs in the spring semester of the senior year.  

Students applying into the accelerated cohort are those students in the B.S./M.S. program who plan to complete graduate certificates, such as the graduate Certificate in Assistive Technology. Accelerated admission enables students to take graduate certificate courses at the 800-level in the J term  and spring semester of their senior year in the B.S. program.

Applications for admission as an accelerated master's candidate must be completed by November 1st. An overall minimum grade point of 3.2 and a grade of B- or better in all senior-level OT coursework is required for admission.

Three letters of references must accompany the application for B.S./M.S. students: one from the chair of the occupational therapy program; one from the student's undergraduate academic adviser; and one that addresses the student's interpersonal and communication skills, work ethic, and integrity as observed in a volunteer or work setting.

Students in the accelerated master's professional program can ONLY register in the graduate certificate-related courses at the 800 level; all other senior OT courses must be taken at the 700 level.


Degree Requirements

Professional Occupational Therapy Program M.S. Requirements for Advanced-Standing B.S./M.S. Students
The program is two-and-a-half years (five semesters) of coursework, including fieldwork experiences. Students enroll in a 1-credit January term (J term) Level 1 fieldwork course in between the first and second semesters of the first year of the professional program. There are no summer course requirements.

Advanced-standing students complete the first year of the professional program as part of their B.S. degree in occupational science. 

Course requirements are listed below by year:

First Year: OT 710, OT 741, OT 751, OT 752, OT 752L, OT 792 (J term), OT 771 with OT 771L or OT 730 with OT 730L, OT 785, OT 760 with OT 760L, OT 745.

Second Year: OT 862 with OT 862L, OT 863 with OT 863L,  OT 871 with OT 871L or OT 830 with OT 830L (whichever was not taken in year one), OT 854, OT 855, OT 856. The spring semester of the second year is an extended semester of fieldwork. Students' Level II fieldwork is completed the third week of June. 

Third Year: OT 865, OT 875, OT 886. Students also take at least 3 credits of graduate-level elective course(s).

Course requirements for OT 865, Occupational Therapy Practice and Professional Reasoning, include a capstone experience in which students synthesize knowledge from academic coursework and fieldwork experiences to develop an innovative occupational therapy program that addresses the needs of a specific population or program. 

Advanced-standing students are required to have 44 graduate credits, which includes 16 to 18 credits of fieldwork, in addition to 36 credits, which includes 1 to 3 credits of fieldwork, taken as part of the occupational science degree. 

Professional OT Program MS Requirements for Entering Graduate Students
The program is two-and-a-half years (five semesters) of coursework, including fieldwork experiences. Students enroll in a 1-credit January term (J term) Level 1 fieldwork course in between the first and second semesters of the first year of the professional program. There are no summer course requirements.

Required OT courses include: 

First Year:  OT 810, OT 841, OT 851, OT 852, OT 852L, OT 892 (J term),  OT 871 with OT 871/L or OT 830 with OT 830L, OT 885, OT 860 with OT 860L, OT 845.

Second Year: OT 862 with OT 862L, OT 863 with OT 863L, OT 846, OT 871 with OT 871/L or OT 830 with OT 830L (whichever was not taken in year one), OT 854, OT 855, OT 856. 

Third Year: OT 865, OT 875, OT 886. Students also take 3 credits of graduate-level elective course(s), which are typically taken in this third year, and final semester. 

The professional master’s degree track requires the completion of 74 graduate-level credits, which includes 19 credits of fieldwork.

Course requirements for OT 865, Occupational Therapy Practice and Professional Reasoning, include a capstone experience in which students synthesize knowledge from academic coursework and fieldwork experiences to develop an innovative occupational therapy program that addresses the needs of a specific population or program. 

 


Academic Standards and Policies

In order to be awarded an M.S. in occupational therapy from UNH, students must earn a minimum of B- in all required occupational therapy courses and receive a passing criterion score on the American Occupational Therapy Association Fieldwork Evaluation for the Occupational Therapist in both 12-week Level II fieldwork experiences. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 and meet professional behavioral standards, which are explained in detail in the OT Department Policy and Procedure Manual

Because curriculum review and revision is undertaken annually, occupational therapy faculty work closely with students during academic advising sessions and share information about any policy and requirement changes during registration periods as well as throughout the academic year. Students are expected to take an active role in verifying expectations and requirements and should check with their departmental advisers each September for updated policies and requirements. Program requirements and policies for retention in the major are posted annually in the OT Department Policy and Procedure Manual, which is available on the OT department’s organization site on Blackboard; students are provided a hard copy or a digital copy of the manual when they enter the program.

Students will participate in a variety of off-campus and fieldwork experiences throughout the course of study. Students are responsible for transportation to fieldwork sites and other off-campus learning experiences and are covered with basic personal liability insurance through UNH for all practical components of the curriculum. Students are responsible for meeting the health and criminal record clearances established by their fieldwork sites and off-campus learning experiences. Proof of immunization such as poliomyelitis, rubella, H1N1, and hepatitis B may also be required. For Level II fieldwork, health insurance and a physical examination, including a tuberculin test, are required. All fieldwork experiences are scheduled in centers approved by the Department of Occupational Therapy and with whom active Memoranda of Understanding with UNH exist. 

After successfully completing all Level II fieldwork requirements and academic work, students are awarded a master of science degree in occupational therapy. They are then eligible to sit for the National Board Certification Examination in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). Consistent with NBCOT expectations, students must sit for the certification examination within two years of completion of coursework and fieldwork. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination and/or obtain licensure.

Curriculum and schedule: Most classes will be scheduled during weekdays during the day and into early evening. Some courses require experiential, off-campus learning: Level I and II fieldwork experiences are two- and twelve-weeks, respectively. These full-time experiences are planned collaboratively with the fieldwork coordinators.


Graduate Certificate in Assistive Technology

The graduate certificate in assistive technology is a 15-credit program, available to students who have completed a bachelor’s degree or higher, designed to provide practical, hands-on training in the application of AT for individuals of all ages who experience physical, sensory, or cognitive impairments that affect participation at home, school, or work. Coursework includes basic principles of assessment, selection, fabrication, and training in the use of AT. Graduates of the program are prepared to provide a wide variety of AT services including: conducting AT evaluations and consultations; designing, fabricating, modifying, customizing, and maintaining devices; and AT service coordination. Graduates of the program are prepared to work in collaborative teams and to become leaders in assistive technology. This certificate program is appropriate for individuals pursuing or engaged in the following careers: occupational, physical, speech, or recreation therapy; rehabilitation counseling; engineering; education; special education; or nursing. A weekend format accommodates those who are employed full-time.

Certificate Requirements

OT 822, Introduction to Assistive Technology (4 credits)

Or

*OT 830, Enhancing Occupational Performance through Assistive Technology (3credits) with co-requisite Lab, OT 830 (2 credits)

And

OT 826, Assistive Technology and Sensory, Communicative, and Cognitive Disabilities (4 credits)

And one of:

OT 824, Assistive Technology and Physical Disabilities (4 credits)
COMM 914 02, Augmentative and Alternative Communication (4 credits) 
COMM 920 02, AAC Seminar (4 credits)
EDUC 820, Introduction to Computer Applications for Education (4 credits)

And one of the following electives:

Any course not selected above, or any course below

EDUC 850, Introduction to Exceptionality (4 credits)
*OT 852 with 852 L, Human Movement and Environmental Effects on Everyday Occupations (4 credits)
OT 895, Readings and Research in Occupational Therapy (4 credits – Variable credits)
SW 812, Social Work and Developmental Disabilities (3 credits)
SW 992, Special Projects and Independent Study (3 credits)
COMM 895, Special Topics (3 credits)
EDUC 851C, Educating Exceptional Learners: Related Services (4 credits)
EDUC 854, Contemporary Issues of Developmental Disabilities (4 credits)

Note:

*Courses restricted to OT majors only.

 


Required and Elective Courses

 


Elective Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
OT   887   Upper Extremity Rehabilitation and Splinting   4  
OT   890   Occupational Therapy and Sensory Integration   4  
OT   891   Ergonomics and Occupational Therapy   4  
OT   822   Introduction to Assistive Technology   4  
OT   824   Assistive Technology and Physical Disabilities   4  
OT   826   Assistive Technology and Sensory, Communicative, and Cognitive Disabilities   4  
OT   893   Special Topics: AMPS - Assessment of Motor and Process Skills Training   4  
OT   895   Readings and Research in Occupational Therapy   1 TO 6  

Post-professional OT Program is closed to new admissions.



Required Professional OT Program Courses

Abbreviation Course Number Title Credits
OT   841   Human Occupation   4  
OT   851   Mind Body Systems/Neurologically-based Function and Dysfunction   3  
OT   852   Human Movement and Environmental Effects on Everyday Occupations   3  
OT   852L   Human Movement and Environmental Effects on Everyday Occupations Lab   1  
OT   810   Occupational Therapy Practice and Professional Roles   3  
OT   885   Research Methods and Application to Practice   3  
OT   845   Administration and Management for Occupational Therapy Practice   3  
OT   860   Occupational Therapy Psychosocial Evaluation and Intervention   3  
OT   860L   Occupational Therapy Psychosocial Evaluation and Intervention Lab   1  
OT   871   Enabling Participation in Community Groups   3  
OT   871L   Enabling Participation in Community Groups Lab   2  
OT   830   Enhancing Occupational Performance Through Assistive Technology   3  
OT   830L   Enhancing Occupational Performance Through Assistive Technology Lab   2  
OT   892-J Term   Level 1 Fieldwork   1  
OT   862   Occupational Therapy Evaluation and Intervention for Children   3  
OT   862L   Occupational Therapy Evaluation and Intervention for Children Lab   1  
OT   863   Occupational Therapy Evaluation and Intervention for Adults   3  
OT   863L   Occupational Therapy Evaluation and Intervention for Adults Lab   1  
OT   846   Transitions: Student to Professional   2  
OT   854   Level II Fieldwork, I   8  
OT   855   Level II Fieldwork, Online Discussion   1  
OT   856   Level II Fieldwork, II   8  
OT   865   Occupational Therapy Practice and Professional Reasoning   3  
OT   875   Leadership in Occupational Therapy Systems of Practice   3  
OT   886   Engagement in Research   3  



Ocean Engineering (OE)

» http://www.unh.edu/oe

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D., Certificate in Ocean Mapping

 


Ocean engineering (OE) offers programs leading to the master of science and doctor of philosophy degree in ocean engineering. Programs in OE are by definition interdisciplinary and require students to interact with the ocean science community, as well as the traditional engineering disciplines. Students are exposed to the broad-based issues of working engineering problems in the ocean environment, as well as discipline specifics. In these programs they will be trained to develop responsible solutions to problems that will lead to sustainable activity and life in the ocean.

A master of science in ocean engineering with an option in ocean mapping is also available. There is a more structured path through this program, which is approved by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) and incorporates all aspects of hydrography as required by the IHO. Focus is on the engineering aspects of hydrography. The general purpose of these programs is to prepare engineering students for professional careers in ocean-related fields.

Additionally, a graduate certificate in ocean mapping is offered.

 

 


Admission Requirements

Applicants should have completed a baccalaureate degree in either chemical, civil, electrical, or mechanical engineering, or have an equivalent background.


M.S. Degree Requirements

Each student is required to take one oceanography course: ESCI 858, Introductory Physical Oceanography; ESCI 859, Geological Oceanography; or ZOOL 850, Biological Oceanography; as well as OE 990, 991, Ocean Engineering Seminar I, II. 

In addition, each student must select three of the following core courses: OE 810, Ocean Measurements Laboratory; OE 854, Ocean Waves and Tides; OE 871, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping; OE 874, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping I and OE 875, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping II; or OE 865 Underwater Acoustics. Students are also required to take a minimum of 12 credits of additional coursework and complete a master's thesis for 6 credits (OE 899).


Ocean Mapping Option

This option is offered in conjunction with the Joint Hydrographic Center/Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping. Each student is required to take these core courses: OE 810, Ocean Measurements Lab; OE 865, Underwater Acoustics; OE 871, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping; OE 874, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping I; OE 875, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping II; OE 972, Hydrographic Field Course; OE 990, Ocean Seminars I; and OE 991, Ocean Seminars II.

In addition, each student must select at least four additional approved credits, including one course from these electives: OE 854, Waves and Tides; OE 857, Coastal Engineering; OE 895, Time Series Analysis; or ESCI 858, Physical Oceanography.

Students are also required to complete a master's thesis for 6 credits (OE 899).

Students may fulfill the Category A (professional) International Federation of Surveyors/International Hydrographic Organization/International Cartographic Association (FIG/IHO) Standards of Competence for Hydrographic Surveyors by completing, in addition to the core courses, some additional specialized requirements. For more information, please visit the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping website.

 


Ph.D. Requirements

Students admitted to this Ph.D. program come from traditional engineering degree programs including physics, mathematics, computer science, and in some cases, marine science programs. Those entering the Ph.D. program with a B.S. degree from an engineering program should be prepared to begin the Ph.D. program directly. Those coming from a B.S. in physics, mathematics, or computer science will have their transcripts more carefully reviewed on an individual basis, as additional courses may be required.

A student in the ocean engineering Ph.D. program will be expected to take a minimum of 12 courses (exclusive of dissertation research) beyond those required for a B.S. degree.


Required Courses

One course in oceanography or ocean science: ESCI/ZOOL 850, Biological Oceanography; ESCI 858, Introductory Physical Oceanography; or ESCI 859, Geological Oceanography

Three core courses in ocean engineering: OE 810, Ocean Measurements Lab; OE 844, Corrosion; OE 854, Ocean Waves and Tides; OE 856, Principles of Naval Architecture and Model Testing; OE 857, Coastal Engineering and Processes; OE 865, Underwater Acoustics; OE 871, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping; OE  874, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping I; or OE 875, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping II. 

Two courses in advanced OE topics (two at 900 level): OE 937, Advanced Hydrodynamics; OE 956, Dynamics of Moored Systems; OE 965, Advanced Underwater Acoustics; OE 972, Hydrographic Field Course; OE 973, Seafloor Characterization; OE 995, Coastal Sediment Transport

Two courses from the following (one at the 800 level; one at the 900 level): MATH 845, MATH 846, Foundations of Applied Mathematics; MATH 853, Introduction to Numerical Methods; MATH 856, Principles of Statistical Inference; MATH 888, Complex Analysis; MATH 896, Mathematics for Mapping; MATH 931, MATH 932, Mathematical Physics; ME 886, Introduction to Finite Element Analysis; or ME 986 Advanced Finite Element Analysis

Four electives (two at 800 level; two at 900 level): ME 807, Analytical Fluid Dynamics; ME 886, Introduction to Finite Element Analysis; ME 906, Convection Heat Transfer; ME 909, Viscous Flow; ME 910, Turbulence; ME 827, Advanced Mechanics of Solids; ME 824, Vibration Theory & Applications; ME 877, Computer Aided Engineering; ME 927, Theory of Plasticity; CIE 860, Foundation Design I; CIE 861, Foundation  Design II; CIE 862, Introduction to Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering; CIE 866, Geo-Environmental Engineering; CIE 946, Advanced Bioenvironmental Engineering Design; ECE 814, Introduction to Digital Signal Processing;  ECE 857, Fundamentals of Communication; ECE 860, Introduction to Fiber Optics; ECE 939, Statistical Communication Theory; ECE 940, Information Theory; ECE 941, Digital Signal Processing

The general progress of a student through this program is expected to follow the time frame listed:

Year 1: Coursework, qualifier at the end of the year
Year 2: More coursework, thesis proposal presentation at the end of the year
Year 3: Research
Year 4: Research/thesis defense
Year 5: Research/thesis defense

The course selection and sequencing will be established in consultation with the student's guidance committee. There will be a qualifying examination on the student's specific area of interest after the first year, but no later than the end of the second year. The goal of this exam is to test the breadth of a student's knowledge in topic areas essential to ocean engineering and the student's area of interest. For each student there will be a list of must-know topics; e.g., physical oceanography, underwater acoustics, fluid dynamics, mathematics. A formal Ph.D. proposal will then be written and presented in a seminar, which constitutes an oral exam. After successful completion, the student will be advanced to candidacy and work on the dissertation. The dissertation will be defended in a public forum when completed.


Certificate in Ocean Mapping

The program goal is to provide advanced graduate training to working professionals in the area of ocean mapping. These professionals will come from a variety of backgrounds ranging from earth science, geology, and biology to engineering. The graduate certificate in ocean mapping is awarded for completion of the core courses and associated practicum. The graduate certificate program fulfills the Category A International Federation of Surveyors/International Hydrographic Organization/International Cartographic Association (FIG/IHO/ICA) Standards of Competence for Hydrographic Surveyors.

For more information, please visit the ocean mapping website or contact the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center at info@ccom.unh.ed.

Applying
Please visit the Graduate School website for instructions about applying to the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements 
ESCI/OE 871, Geodesy and Positioning for Ocean Mapping (4 cr.)
ESCI 872, Research Tools for Ocean Mapping (3 cr.)
MATH 896, Math for Mapping (3 cr.)
ESCI/OE 874, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping I (4 cr.)
ESCI/OE 875, Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping II (4 cr.)
ESCI/OE 972, Hydrographic Field Course (4 cr.)
OE 677, Seamanship & Marine Weather (P/F)
ESCI 896, Coastal Remote Sensing (3 cr.) for the optional Remote Sensing specialty

 

 



Oceanography (OCE)

» http://www.unh.edu/oce/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Earth Sciences (ESCI) in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (CEPS) offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in oceanography that include the study of biological oceanography, chemical oceanography, marine geology and geophysics, and physical oceanography. The OCE program also supports focused research in coastal and estuarine processes.


Admission Requirements

Applicants should have completed an undergraduate major related to one of the oceanography disciplines, including biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, physics, or mathematics, or an appropriate array of science and engineering courses within their major field. Applicants are expected to have completed one year each of calculus and chemistry and two semesters of physics and/or biology. It is not necessary to have had previous coursework in oceanography. Applicants must submit scores (within the last 5 years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).


M.S. Degree Requirements


Ph.D. Requirements

Students plan a program of study in conjunction with a faculty guidance committee (FGC). Students entering the program without a master's degree are expected to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours. Students with an M.S. degree in oceanography or related field in physical science from UNH or another university should first demonstrate (through accredited transcript or the qualifying examination) acceptable mastery in the basic core areas. Those deficient in any discipline will be required to complete the respective course. 

All students must complete at least one course from each of the following categories: natural sciences, methods, ethics/policy/law, and seminar. Please see below for a list of courses that meet these specifications. Additional credit hours are determined by the FGC (typically 15 credit hours). Foreign language requirement is determined by the FGC. Students must complete a Coursework Approval Form, which summarizes all courses to be taken, and obtain signatures from their adviser, committee members, and the OCE program coordinator once the coursework is completed.

Students wishing to be admitted to doctoral candidacy will undergo a qualifying examination by the guidance committee designed to test the student’s in-depth knowledge in their major field and their ability to conduct independent and original research in oceanography. Qualifying students will present to the guidance committee a research proposal in which the soundness, originality, and feasibility of the investigation are clearly stated, and which when approved based on a proposal examination by the committee, will form the basis for the doctoral dissertation.  

Students are advanced to candidacy after successfully completing the comprehensive exam, proposal exam, and all coursework required by the guidance committee. Students must complete a dissertation, present their results at a public seminar, and pass an oral examination by the thesis committee.

Although not a strict requirement, all graduate students are encouraged to obtain teaching experience, preferably as a teaching assistant.

All students are required to spend time in the field, even if their research project and interests are primarily based on analytical research, modeling studies, or laboratory experiments. The field requirement could include extended time at sea onboard one of the UNH, UNOLS, NOAA, or similar oceanographic research vessels, or include field experiments at locations in New Hampshire, the U.S., or around the globe, and includes possible nearshore studies, Antarctic expeditions, or other land-based studies related to oceanography. Successful completion of the field requirement will be determined by the guidance committee.

Research and Facilities 
The oceanography graduate program within the Department of Earth Sciences and the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering (SMSOE)  is enhanced by the ocean engineering and zoology graduate programs, and by other departments and institutes at UNH, including the civil and mechanical engineering and zoology departments; the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS); the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM); and the Ocean Processes Laboratory (OPAL). Other related programs include the N.H. Sea Grant Program, the Center for Collaborative Science, and the Center of Excellence in Coastal Ocean Observation and Analysis (COOA). Oceanographic laboratories at UNH include the Shoals Marine Laboratory (SML) on Appledore Island, the Coastal Marine Laboratory (CML) in Newcastle, the Jackson Estuarine Laboratory (JEL) at Adams Point on the Great Bay, and the Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory (COEL) on the main UNH campus. Additional laboratories for the oceanography faculty are located on campus in James, Morse, Rudman, and Spaulding Halls. The UNH Marine Program operates a marine support facility and two UNH research vessels moored in Portsmouth Harbor at the UNH pier, the R/V Gulf Challenger and the R/V Coastal Surveyor, as well as a number of small boats.  The Marine Program also supports the UNH Diving Program and oversees a shared-use Instrumentation Pool for student and faculty use.

Natural Sciences

ESCI 850 Biological Oceanography 4 cr.
ESCI 852 Chemical Oceanography 3 cr.
ESCI 858 Intro to Physical Oceanography 3 cr.
ESCI 859 Geological Oceanography 4 cr.

 

Methods                                   

CHEM 862 Intro. to Ocean Remote Sensing 3 cr.
EOS 895 Model & Anal. Biogeochem cycles 4 cr.
ESCI 864 Data Anal. in Earth Sys. Science 4 cr.
ESCI 870 Fundamentals of Ocean Mapping 4 cr.
ESCI 871 Geodesy & Positioning Ocean Map 4 cr.
ESCI 972 Hydrographic Field Course 4 cr.
ESCI 896 Time Series Analysis 4 cr.
IAM 940 Asymptotic & Perturbation Meth. 3 cr.
ME 807 Analytical Fluid Dynamics 3 cr.
MATH 835 Statistical Methods for Research 3 cr.
MATH 839 Applied Regression Analysis 3 cr.
MATH 845 Foundations of Applied Math 3 cr.
MATH 853 Intro. to Numerical Methods 3 cr.
OE 810 Ocean Measurements Lab 4 cr.

 

Ethics, Policy, and Law

ECON 908 Environ. Econ: Theory & Policy 3 cr.
NR 801 Ecological Sustainability & Values 4 cr.
NR 818 Law Natural Resources & Environ. 3 cr.
NR 820 Intern. Environ. Politic & Policies 4 cr.
NR 824 Resolving Environmental Conflicts 4 cr.
NR 902 Ecological Ethics and Values 4 cr.
NR 915 Coastal Challenges Science Policy 2 cr.
NR 916 Link Decision & Coastal Ecosys. Sci 4 cr.
GRAD 930 Ethics in Research and Scholarship Var. cr.
POLT 880 Intern. Environ. Politics 3 cr.

 

Seminar and Proposal Development

OE 990 Ocean Seminars I 1 cr.
OE 991 Ocean Seminars II 1 cr.
ESCI 997 Seminar 1 cr.
ESCI 998 Proposal Development 1 cr.

 

Other Relevant Graduate Courses

CIE 847 Intro. to Mar. Pollution & Control 3 cr.
EOS 824 Intro. to Ocean Remote Sensing 3 cr.
EOS 831 Sys. Approach to Bio. Ocean Sci. 3 cr.
EOS 896 Bio-Optics & Primary Production 4 cr.
EOS 896 Dyn. of Global Marine Ecosystems 3 cr.
EOS 844 Biogeochemistry 4 cr.
EOS 895 Climate & Fisheries 4 cr.
ESCI 834 Geophysics 3 cr.
ESCI 841 Geochemistry 4 cr.
ESCI 845 Isotope Geochemistry 4 cr.
ESCI 847 Aqueous Geochemistry 4 cr.
ESCI 854 Sedimentology 4 cr.
ESCI 856 Geotectonics 3 cr.
ESCI 865 Paleoclimatology 3 cr.
ESCI 895 Paleoceanography 3 cr.
ESCI 896 Nearshore Processes 4 cr.
ESCI 952 Adv. Chemical Oceanography 4 cr.
ESCI 994 Advanced Ocean Seminar 1 cr.
ESCI 995 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 3 cr.
ME 807 Analytical Fluid Dynamics 4 cr.
ME 812 Waves in Fluid 3 cr.
ME 909 Viscous Flow 3 cr.
ME 995 Turbulence 3 cr.
MICR 807 Marine Microbiology 5 cr.
MICR 817 Microbial Physiology 5 cr.
OE 844 Environment Acoustics I 4 cr.
OE 853 Ocean Hydrodynamics 3 cr.
OE 854 Ocean Waves & Tides I 4 cr.
OE 885 Environment Acoustics II 4 cr.
OE 895 Underwater Acoustics 4 cr.
OE 954 Ocean Waves & Tides II 4 cr.
OE 995 Coastal Sediment Transport 3 cr.
ZOOL 810 Ichthyology 4 cr.
ZOOL 811 Zooplankton Ecology 4 cr.
ZOOL 825 Marine Ecology 4 cr.
ZOOL 872 Fisheries Biology 3 cr.

 



Painting (ARTS)

» http://www.arts.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.F.A.


Admission Requirements

A bachelor of fine arts degree in painting or the equivalent in undergraduate coursework (minimally this means 60 credit hours in studio art and 8 credit hours in art history) is required for admission to this program. Additionally, a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.6 is required. Prospective students must submit 20 images on a CD of recent work to be reviewed by the graduate faculty of the Department of Art and Art History.


Degree Requirements

Each student in the master of fine arts degree in painting program shall complete 60 credit hours of work. Twenty-six credits of work will be in the area of concentration (painting) leading toward a thesis exhibition. Eighteen credits will be in graduate-level drawing. Eight credits will be in graduate-level art history and the final eight credits will be in art electives to be chosen from drawing, printmaking, painting, or art history. In addition to the thesis exhibition, degree candidates will be required to submit a two-page written artist statement focusing on aesthetic, technical, and historical issues related to their work. Also required is participation in two major critiques per year. The graduate student will present their work with a verbal or written rationale to the entire graduate painting faculty, invited guests, and student peers.



Physics (PHYS)

» http://www.physics.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Physics offers the degrees of master of science and the doctor of philosophy. Areas of specialization are space physics and astrophysics, experimental nuclear physics, biomedical imaging, theoretical nuclear and high-energy physics, experimental physics of solids and nano-materials, and string theory.


Admission Requirements

Applicants to the master of science and doctor of philosophy programs are expected to have a bachelor's degree in science, with at least 24 credits in physics and closely allied fields. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).


Degree Requirements

 


M.S. Degree Requirements

The courses required for the master of science in physics are PHYS 805, 931, 939, 941, and 943. Students are also expected to take PHYS 900 and PHYS 901. Students in the M.S. program are not required to take the Ph.D. comprehensive examination. Students may select one of the following plans:

 


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The courses required for a doctor of philosophy degree in physics are PHYS 805, 931, 935, 939, 941-942, and 943-944.  Four additional electives must be taken (excluding 999). Students are also expected to take two semesters of PHYS 806.

For students doing Ph.D. research in astrophysics or space physics, three of their four elective courses must be PHYS 951 and PHYS 953, and one of PHYS 954 or PHYS 987.

Admission to candidacy for the degree is based primarily on demonstrated ability in formal coursework; experience in teaching, equivalent to at least half time for one year; passing a written comprehensive examination; and passing an oral defense of a proposed thesis topic. The comprehensive examination is normally taken during the first year and must be passed by the middle of the second year. Upon completion of a dissertation, doctoral candidates will take an oral examination based on the area of their research.


Interdisciplinary Research

The department encourages research in areas related to physics or applied physics. If students desire to do research in a field related to physics, special provisions may be made. Contact the department chairperson or graduate adviser for details.



Plant Biology (PBIO)

» http://www.plant.unh.edu

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Biological Sciences offers the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees in plant biology. Research opportunities are available in basic and applied areas of plant biology, including breeding and genetics, cell biology, cell and tissue culture, ecology, molecular biology, genetic engineering, marine and freshwater biology, morphology and anatomy, pathology, phycology, physiology, systematic botany, crop production, and environmental horticulture.


Admission Requirements

Applicants are expected to have adequate preparation in plant biology and in the fundamentals of physical and biological sciences. They must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).


M.S. Degree Requirements

Students will meet the Graduate School's requirements for the degree (minimum of 30 credits). Students will be required to write and defend a thesis (6-10 credits) based on field or laboratory research.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Students will complete a program of study as determined by their guidance committee. Students will be advanced to candidacy after successfully completing comprehensive written and oral qualifying examinations covering a broad basic knowledge of their major and minor fields and their ability to design and carry out basic research in plant biology. Candidates must successfully defend a dissertation based on original research in plant biology. 


Teaching Requirements

Teaching experience is required of all M.S. and Ph.D. degree students. The requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a supervised teaching course, by serving as a teaching assistant, or by having previous professional teaching experience.



Political Science (POLT)

» http://www.unh.edu/political-science/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.A., M.P.A.

 


Certificate Offered: Sustainability Politics and Policy


About the Department of Political Science Graduate Programs

The Department of Political Science at UNH offers two graduate degrees: the master of arts in political science and the master of public administration. Both provide advanced study in political science, public policy, and public administration for students interested in professions in the fields of government, public service, nonprofit management, electoral politics, education and research, or as preparation for Ph.D. programs. These degree programs give students the flexibility to tailor their coursework to individual interests within a curriculum that ensures a strong foundation in research methodology, management, and other needed skills in the professions. Faculty engage in teaching and research activities encompassing the fields of American politics, political thought, comparative/international politics, and public administration.

Both programs are offered to full- and part-time students. The M.A. program is offered in Durham. The M.P.A. program offers evening courses for working professionals at Durham and Manchester.

Additionally, a graduate certificate in sustainability politics and policy is offered.

Please see the Public Administration entry for more information about the M.P.A. degree.


Admission Requirements

Applicants are expected to have majored in political science or a related field, or have worked in government or the nonprofit sector, and must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. Where undergraduate preparation has been insufficient, applicants may be admitted provided that they follow a program of study approved by the graduate committee. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test is required for the M.A. program. M.P.A. applicants are strongly encouraged to include GRE test results with their application, but it is required only for those M.P.A. applicants requesting consideration for graduate assistant or tuition assistance awards. M.P.A. applicants may be asked to interview either in person or by conference call with the director of the M.P.A. program and the graduate program coordinator.


Degree Requirements

 


M.A. with Thesis Option Degree

Master's degree students must complete a minimum of 30 credits for the degree: eight courses and a 6-credit master's thesis (POLT 899). Of the eight courses, two are required seminars, Pro Seminar (POLT 900) and Introduction to Statistical Analysis (POLT 905), and are to be taken during the student's first  year. Students are also required to take electives totaling 9 credits. This must include two courses in the student's major subfield (Comparative Politics, International Politics, Political Thought/Theory, and American Politics/Public Administration).

Nine credits must be completed at the 800 or 900 level from political science courses or related discipline courses. The M.A. program director must provide approval if the course selected is a not a political science course.

Successful completion and defense of a 6-credit master's thesis is required.

 


M.A. Non-Thesis Option Degree

Master's degree students must complete ten courses totaling a minimum of 30 credits for the degree.  Students must also pass a comprehensive exam. Of the ten courses, two are required, Pro Seminar (POLT 900) and Introduction to Statistical Analysis (POLT 905), and are to be taken during the student's first  year. Students are also required to take electives totaling 9 credits. This must include two courses in the student's major subfield (Comparative Politics, International Politics, Political Thought/Theory, and American Politics/Public Administration). One course in a minor subfield is also required for this degree option.

Fifteen credits must be completed at the 800 or 900 level from political science courses or a related discipline. The M.A. program director must provide approval if the course selected is a not a political science course.

The comprehensive examination must be successfully completed in the student's final semester.

 


M.P.A. Degree Requirements

Master of public administration students must complete a minimum of 36 or 39 credits for the degree. 

Required courses include:

The capstone internship or project is the culmination of the student’s graduate work, applying academic knowledge with practical experience. Students without prior public or nonprofit sector professional experience are required to complete the internship component of the capstone.


Certificate in Sustainability Politics and Policy

The graduate certificate in sustainability politics and policy is administered by the Department of Political Science Graduate Program, though it can include coursework from a number of other graduate programs. The certificate is designed to give current graduate students, alumni, and others in the community training and analysis on issues connecting environmental and social sustainability, politics, and policy making initiatives. Such training is increasingly valuable for careers in the public sector, in nonprofit organizations, and in the private sector for both small and large companies. For more information, please visit the Sustainability Politics and Policy website. Students interested in this certificate are encouraged to contact Professor Jeannie Sowers at (603) 862-1752.

Applying
In accordance with Graduate School requirements, the graduate certificate in sustainability politics and policy requires:

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the graduate certificate program.

Certificate Requirements
The course requirements focus the debates, in both the global North and the global South, on exactly what sustainability politics should (and/or should not) include. The goal is to connect global sustainability policy debates to those occurring at the local and national levels in New England, the United States, and other countries.

This graduate certificate program requires 13 total credits.

Required courses:

Electives (any two of the courses listed below) (6 credits):
Students will be advised by the certificate program director and other participating faculty members about which electives might be most appropriate and consistent with their interests and career goals. The list of approved electives affords students opportunities to focus on particular areas of environmental or social policy, or to seek to acquire additional methodological skills and disciplinary approaches in areas such as policy analysis or economics. Other electives offered by University of New Hampshire graduate programs may be approved by the sustainability certificate program director.

 



Psychology (PSYC)

» http://www.unh.edu/psychology/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: Ph.D.

Department of Psychology offers a four- or five-year program of study leading to the doctor of philosophy degree. The basic goal of the program is the development of behavioral scientists who have a broad knowledge of psychology, can teach and communicate effectively, and can carry out sound research in an area of specialization. Although some students seek employment outside academia, the program is oriented toward developing the skills required by the research psychologist who intends to become a college or university teacher.

Areas in which the student may specialize are brain, behavior, and cognition; developmental psychology; or social psychology/personality. The department does not offer training in clinical or counseling psychology.


Distinctive Features of the Program

All psychology graduate students in the Ph.D. program receive a stipend and a full tuition waiver for up to five years. A low graduate student/faculty ratio provides opportunities to work closely with one or more faculty mentors. Graduates typically acquire tenure-track academic or postdoctoral positions at colleges and universities across the U.S.

The Department of Psychology is a national model for preparing future faculty. All graduate students teach Introduction to Psychology while taking a year-long seminar in the teaching of psychology, as well as one or two undergraduate survey courses in statistics and/or the student's area of specialization. 

There are active research laboratories in all areas represented in the graduate program. The department has strong partnerships with such nationally recognized programs as UNH's Child Study and Development Center and the Family Research Laboratory. UNH also has a Center for Teaching Excellence to help graduate students and faculty improve the quality of their teaching.


Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the requirements for admission to the Graduate School, applicants must intend to be full-time students working toward the doctoral degree (not just the master's degree), and they must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test scores, along with other standard application forms. The subject test in psychology is recommended. Scores must be current, within five years.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Required courses include first-year seminar (PSYC 904), three semesters of research methods and statistics (PSYC 905, 906, and 907 or 908), six advanced graduate seminars, and two semesters of the practicum and seminar in the teaching of psychology (PSYC 991-992). First-year students also participate in a noncredit graduate proseminar (PSYC 901-902), which introduces students to the research programs of the faculty. Depth in a particular area is obtained through participation in advanced seminars and by independent reading and research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.

Prior to the doctoral dissertation, the student carries out original research that culminates in either a master's thesis or a paper of publishable quality. A master's degree is awarded upon the successful completion of a program approved by the department and dean of the Graduate School. This typically takes place by the end of the second year.

The third year of the program is dedicated to the practicum and seminar in the teaching of psychology in conjunction with the teaching of introductory psychology.

Advancement to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree depends on receiving the master's degree, passing a specialist examination in one of the department's areas of specialization, and identifying a topic for doctoral research. Advancement to candidacy is usually accomplished by the end of a student's fourth year in the program. During the fourth year, students typically begin dissertation research and teach an introductory course in their specialty area. Most students complete the Ph.D. degree in the fifth year.



Public Administration (POLT)

» http://www.unh.edu/political-science/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham and in Manchester through GSMC.

 

Degrees Offered: M.P.A.

 


About the Department of Political Science Graduate Programs

The Department of Political Science at UNH offers two graduate degrees: the master of arts in political science and the master of public administration. Both provide advanced study in political science, public policy, and public administration for students interested in professions in the fields of government, public service, nonprofit management, electoral politics, education and research, or as preparation for Ph.D. programs. These degree programs give students the flexibility to tailor their coursework to individual interests within a curriculum that ensures a strong foundation in research methodology, management, and other needed skills in the professions. Faculty engage in teaching and research activities encompassing the fields of American politics, political thought, comparative/international politics, and public administration.

Both programs are offered to full- and part-time students. The M.A. program is offered in Durham. The M.P.A. program offers evening courses for working professionals at Durham and Manchester.

Additionally, a graduate certificate in sustainability politics and policy is offered.  Please see the Political Science entry for more information about the M.A. and certificate program.


Admission Requirements

Applicants are expected to have majored in political science or a related field, or have worked in government or the nonprofit sector, and must possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution. Where undergraduate preparation has been insufficient, applicants may be admitted provided that they follow a program of study approved by the graduate committee. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test is required for the M.A. program. M.P.A. applicants are strongly encouraged to include GRE test results with their application, but it is required only for those M.P.A. applicants requesting consideration for graduate assistant or tuition assistance awards. M.P.A. applicants may be asked to interview either in person or by conference call with the director of the M.P.A. program and the graduate program coordinator.


Degree Requirements

 


M.P.A. Degree Requirements

Master of public administration students must complete a minimum of 36 or 39 credits for the degree. 

Required courses include:

The capstone internship or project is the culmination of the student’s graduate work, applying academic knowledge with practical experience. Students without prior public or nonprofit sector professional experience are required to complete the internship component of the capstone.



Public Health (PHP)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/hmp/master-public-health-mph

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Manchester through GSMC.

 

Degree Offered: M.P.H.

 


Certificate Offered: Public Health

 


The College of Health and Human Services offers an interdisciplinary curriculum leading to the master of public health (M.P.H.). The program is designed to provide students with an integrated, generalist M.P.H. degree. The M.P.H. program is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).

The Public Health Certificate Program provides a vehicle for individuals working in public or community health positions, with no formal academic background in public health, the opportunity to earn a graduate program in public health. To enter the certificate program, an applicant must have a baccalaureate degree. Students completing the certificate program can apply to enter the M.P.H. program. If accepted, certificate credits can be applied to the M.P.H. degree program.

The master of public health and public health certificate seek to enhance the capacity of working public health professionals to perform the 10 Essential Services of Public Health. The program is only offered at the University of New Hampshire Graduate School Manchester Campus (GSMC). Academic classes are offered in semester units and each course is eight weeks in length and offered one evening per week for four hours. Working professionals can complete the M.P.H. program on a part-time basis over two years but have up to six years to complete the degree requirements.


Admission Requirements

(Please note that since these are part-time programs they do not meet the full-time study requirements for international applicants with F-1 or J-1 visas.)

Applications are accepted for  fall, spring, and summer semesters. The program encourages applications from persons who hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. The admission committee uses previous academic records, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, current public health experience, responses to five essay questions regarding your interest in pursuing graduate education in public health, and recommendations from three individuals as indicators of success.  Interviews with the program coordinator are encouraged.

To apply for the M.P.H. degree, applicants must submit:

  1. A completed UNH Graduate School application form
  2. Responses to five essay questions regarding their public health interests, goals, and beliefs (in lieu of a personal essay. See "Admissions Requirements" on the Graduate School's website)
  3. Official transcripts from previous undergraduate and graduate education
  4. Current résumé
  5. Three letters of recommendation
  6. GRE required. Applicants may request to have the GRE requirement waived if they have a previous master’s degree already awarded (any field). See the Test Score Waiver Process to request a waiver. If required, request official test scores to be sent directly to the Graduate School by the testing service. Test scores more than five years old may not be acceptable. Student copies and photo copies of scores are not considered official. Our CEEB code is 3918. View Test Score Information.


Degree Requirements


M.P.H. Degree Requirements

The M.P.H. program is a 48-credit curriculum. In addition to the five core courses found in every public health program: public health care systems (PHP 900), epidemiology (PHP 901), environmental health (PHP 902), biostatistics (PHP 903), and social and behavioral health (PHP 904), the program requires that all students complete four additional courses: administration (PHP 905), economics (PHP 922), policy (PHP 907), and ethics (PHP 908). Students must also complete five elective courses. The M.P.H. curriculum includes a field experience in which the student is expected to apply the theory and practice of public health to a particular area of student interest in a professional setting. The final course in the curriculum is an integrating seminar in which students work in teams, bringing both their individual and joint perspectives and expertise to address a particular public health problem for a New Hampshire-based public health entity.

Grades below the “B-” level in a graded course are considered failing grades for the purposes of determining academic standing. Repeating a course does not remove the original failing grade from the record. Students receiving failing grades in 6 or more credits either in two courses or in one course taken twice will be recommended by the M.P.H. program director to the Graduate School for dismissal from the M.P.H. or the Public Health Certificate Program. Students must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 (B-), or higher, in order to graduate. Students admitted on a conditional or provisional basis must meet the conditions or provisions as stated in the letter of admission in order to remain in the Graduate School.


Public Health Certificate

As part of the Master of Public Health Program's continuing education program, a public health certificate (PHC) is offered.  

Applying 
Applications are accepted for both fall and spring semesters. Certificate program applicants must possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. Students are expected to have experience in public health.

To apply for the certificate of public health, applicants must submit:

  1. A completed UNH graduate certificate program application
  2. Responses to five essay questions regarding their public health interests, goals, and beliefs
  3. Official transcripts from previous undergraduate and graduate education
  4. Current résumé
  5. Two letters of recommendation

Please visit the Graduate School website for detailed instructions about applying to the graduate certificate program.

Certificate Requirements
The public health certificate is a 12-credit program that can be completed on a part-time basis over one calendar year. All courses (with the exception of workshops taken as part of PHP 996) must be taken at UNH. Students completing the Public Health Certificate Program can apply to enter the M.P.H. program. If accepted, certificate credits can be applied to the M.P.H. program. To earn the public health certificate, a student must successfully complete the following 12-credit curriculum consisting of following three required courses and one elective course.

PHP 900, Public Health Care Systems, 3 cr.
PHP 901, Epidemiology, 3 cr. 
PHP 996, Applied Topics in the Essentials of Public Health, 3 cr. (This course has a unique structure that allows students to tailor their learning experience about the Ten Essential Services of Public Health to their professional goals and interests. To learn more about this course design, please consult the Public Health Certificate Section of the M.P.H. Student Handbook.)
One elective, 3 cr. (Students can take any M.P.H. course as long as any prerequisites have been met. For a complete listing of M.P.H. courses offered, see the M.P.H. Student Handbook.)



Recreation Management and Policy (RMP)

» http://www.chhs.unh.edu/rmp/index

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The Department of Recreation Management and Policy offers the master of science degree in recreation management and policy with options in recreation administration or therapeutic recreation administration. The Department of Recreation Management and Policy is accredited by the National Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions. An atmosphere of collegiality and collaboration fosters interactions between faculty and students. Faculty and students are actively engaged in applied research.


Recreation Administration Option

The recreation administration option prepares professionals with advanced knowledge and skills to plan and administer recreation services. Examples of postgraduate opportunities include directors of town and municipal recreation departments, YMCAs, resort programs, camps, campus/intramural sports, fitness centers, youth services agencies, and sports and recreation facilities, as well as outdoor recreation planners for the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and state park systems.


Therapeutic Recreation Administration Option

The therapeutic recreation administration option prepares advanced personnel for administrative responsibilities in clinical-based practice and administrative leadership in community-based recreation services that meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. Graduate education serves therapeutic recreation specialists who wish to move into administrative positions such as recreation therapy supervisor/manager/director, senior therapist, treatment coordinator, assisted-living manager, and senior center supervisor.

Students without an academic or clinical background in therapeutic recreation may use the M.S. program to satisfy the academic requirements for the national credentialing examination used by the National Council on Therapeutic Recreation Certification (NCTRC) and for New Hampshire state licensure. While the graduate program does not require prerequisite courses to qualify for admission, the credentialing examination does require coursework outside the M.S. curriculum requirements and the department may require leveling coursework upon acceptance to the M.S. program.


Admission Requirements

Admission is based on a personal history that demonstrates academic achievement and/or exemplary work experience, as well as the applicant's ability to articulate in the personal statement his or her potential and desire for graduate study in recreation administration or therapeutic recreation administration. Generally, students must have earned a minimum grade-point average of 3.00 to be considered for admission. Applicants are required to submit copies of prior academic records, current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), three references, a written personal statement, and a complete Graduate School application. A baccalaureate degree must be conferred prior to beginning the program. Interviews are encouraged but not required for all applicants. Students who wish to apply for a graduate assistantship should contact the department's graduate coordinator for an application. Admission to the program is selective and limited. It is in the applicant's best interest to apply early.


Degree Requirements

Individuals seeking a career change to recreation or therapeutic recreation administration with an undergraduate degree in a related field may be admitted to the Graduate School as a provisional student, with the expectation that they complete any required prerequisites prior to, or concurrent with, graduate courses. A specially designed curriculum is available to provisionally admitted students.

The degree program consists of required and elective coursework. In consultation with a faculty adviser, students will select either a thesis or non-thesis track. Students in both options are required to complete 30 credits as detailed in the following program outline.

Required courses. There are four core courses (12 credits) that all M.S. students in recreation management and policy are required to take regardless of option area.

Elective courses. Students who take the non-thesis track complete five courses (15 credits) from a list of RMP courses and courses outside the department. Students in the thesis track take four elective courses (12 credits).

Capstone experience. All students take a capstone experience. This experience will be either RMP 899, Master’s Thesis (6 credits) or RMP 995, Colloquium Seminar (3 credits).

It is expected that the M.S. in recreation management and policy will take full-time students two years to progress through all degree requirements. If a student takes leveling courses, they may need to complete more than two years. Most TR Administration students who level, complete two years of academic work and one semester of an internship. Part-time students should be able to complete the program in three years. Courses are generally offered once a week in three-hour blocks in the afternoon and evenings.

Required Core Competencies (4 courses = 12 credits)

1.    RMP 800, Concepts of Recreation and Leisure

2.    RMP 805, Management and Policy in Therapeutic Recreation
        or
       
RMP 806, Recreation Administration and Organizational Behavior

3.    Research methods course from the following options:

EDUC 981, Methods and Techniques of Educational Research
FS 994, Research Seminar
KIN 901, Analysis of Professional Literature
OT 903, Research Methods for Occupational Therapists
SW 860, Research Methods in Social Work  
RMP 998, Special Topics, Research Methods

4.    Graduate-level statistics from the following options:

KIN 900, Applied Statistics
OT 902, Statistics for Occupational Therapists
SW 962, Research II, Statistics

Elective courses (4 courses/12 credits thesis option and 5 courses/15 credits non-thesis option with at least one elective from RMP)

RMP 811, Recreation Resource Management
RMP 830, Camp Administration and Leadership
RMP 860, Community Sport Organizations: Administration and Development
RMP 868, Theories and Philosophies of Youth Development
RMP 870, Management and Design of Recreation & Park Facilities
RMP 872, Law and Public Policy in Recreation Services
RMP 910, Conceptual Issues and Trends in Therapeutic Recreation
RMP 912, Non-Profit Administration and Leadership
RMP 924, Grantwriting and Fund Development
RMP 964, Graduate Internship
RMP 970, Teaching Practicum
RMP 980, Independent Study

Example of electives outside of the department:

SOC 970, Social Stress and Health
SOC 988, Medical Sociology: Health, Healing and Society
SOC 880, Social Conflict
SW 840, Implications of Race, Culture and Oppression for Social Work Practice
SW 814, Introduction to Addiction: Assessment and Intervention
SW 897, Special Topics: Adventure Therapy: Facilitating and Processing the Experience
ADMN 851, Advertising and Promotion
ADMN 855, Marketing of Services
NURS 945, Clinical Decision Making in Health Care
RAM 805, Ecotourism: Managing for the Environment
RAM 867, Social Impact Assessment
KIN 841, Social Issues in Contemporary Sports
KIN 843, Sport Marketing
KIN 881, Inclusion in Physical Education
KIN 890, Social and Health Issues in Sport Psychology
RAM 877, Fundamentals and Practice of Community Planning
PHP 920, Social Marketing
PHP 922, Public Health Economics

Capstone Course

RMP 899, Master’s Thesis (6 credits)
or
RMP 995, Colloquium Seminar, non-thesis track (3 credits)



Resource Administration and Management (RAM)

» http://envecon.unh.edu/graduate

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.S.

The Department of Natural Resources and the Environment coordinates the interdisciplinary master of science degree program in resource administration and management. Students may specialize in management of publicly and privately owned natural resources or in administration of natural resource laws and policies.


Admission Requirements

Applicants are expected to have completed either an undergraduate degree in the field in which they plan to specialize or show adequate preparation in the basic support courses of the field. A minimum of one course in each of the areas of ecology or natural resources, intermediate microeconomics, and introductory statistics is required. Persons having professional experience in resource administration, management, or related areas receive priority for admittance to the program. An applicant is required to submit an essay of up to 2,000 words describing his or her background and goals.

Applicants with good undergraduate records who lack a background in a particular field may be admitted to a program, provided they are prepared to correct the deficiencies. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).


M.S. Degree Requirements

The master of science degree in resource administration and management is conferred upon successful completion of a program amounting to not less than 34 credits, including the following course requirements or equivalent: 

NR 903, Approach to Research
Quantitative methods or analytical techniques
RAM 911, Natural and Environmental Resource Management
An advanced course in environmental policy
RAM 898, Directed Research, 4-6 cr. or 
     RAM 899, Thesis, 6-10 cr.
Final oral and/or written examination

 



Social Work (SW)

» http://chhs.unh.edu/sw/index

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham and in Manchester through GSMC.

Associate Professor: Mary Banach, Linda Rene Bergeron, Cynthia Anne Broussard, Vernon Brooks Carter, Sharon B. Murphy, Patrick Shannon, Anita Tucker, Melissa Wells
Clinical Associate Professor: Susan A. Lord
Clinical Assistant Professor: Gretchen Bean, Trish Haneman Cox, Kim Kelsey, Brian Miller, Lee P. Rush

 

Degree Offered: M.S.W.

 


Certificates Offered: Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Substance Use Disorders

 


The Department of Social Work offers a master of social work (M.S.W.) degree. This program develops advanced professional knowledge and skills for persons interested in pursuing careers in the field of social work. The M.S.W. program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). It requires two years of full-time study or three-to-four years of extended-time study. The full-time program is available in Durham only; the extended-time program is available in Durham or Manchester. The Manchester academic classes are delivered in a weekend model with admission every other year. The department also offers an M.S.W Online Program.  Both programs require classroom work and two year-long field internships. Field internship hours are typically completed during normal business hours. 

The program offers all students access to both micro (direct) practice and macro (community and administrative) practice content and skills. All students complete a foundation-year course of study, and then complete a second concentration year in advanced generalist social work practice. 

Please note that beginning in the fall of 2013, the MSW program will no longer have second-year concentrations in either in direct/clinical practice or community/administrative practice. Students will still be able to complete field internships with either a direct practice (micro) or community and administrative (macro) focus. However, all students will receive instruction and training reflecting content and skills from both perspectives. 

The program features an advanced generalist concentration, which is the most common concentration in social work. It is very well suited for practice in rural, suburban, and urban settings and is viable for career positions where a CSWE-accredited degree is required. MSW students will now be able to select four electives in one or more fields of practice: (1) Health and mental health; (2) Addictions and substance abuse; (3) Children, youth, and families, (4) Disabilities; or a self-designed field of practice.   

In addition, the Department of Social Work offers two dual degrees.  The social work and kinesiology dual-degree program consists of a master in social work (M.S.W.), as well as a master of science (M.S.) in kinesiology with a concentration in outdoor education. For additional information regarding the social work/kinesiology dual degree, contact Anita Tucker at Anita.Tucker@unh.edu.  The Department of Social Work and the School of Law at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) also offer a dual degree resulting in the JD/M.S.W.  In four years, students will be able to complete two graduate degrees, a master in social work (M.S.W.) and a Juris Doctor to prepare them for a career in law and social work. For additional information regarding the social work/law dual degree, contact Sharon Murphy at Sharon.Murphy@unh.edu.

Additionally, the department offers graduate certificates in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Substance Use Disorders.  For training programs, the Title IV-E Child Welfare Training Program and a University Partnerships child welfare program are available for eligible M.S.W. students interested in a career in child protective services.


Admission Requirements

The department encourages applications from those who hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university; have attained an overall grade-point average of "B" or better in undergraduate coursework; and have completed courses in a broad range of liberal arts and science disciplines. Applicants should include a resume of two pages or less, which lists educational, work, and volunteer experiences, as well as any special skills or attributes. Applicants must submit professional recommendations from three individuals, one of whom could be a member of an academic faculty. Professional letters of reference should describe the applicant’s volunteer or work duties, skills and values relevant to social work practice with diverse populations, ability to collaborate with others, and overall strengths and challenges relevant to graduate study. Applicants should complete a personal statement of interest in pursuing graduate education in the field. Significant volunteer and/or work experience in the field is strongly recommended. Application expectations include graduation from an accredited undergraduate institution with a broad liberal arts background including a research methods course. Applicants who do not meet these requirements may fulfill them after admissions but before their second year of study. All applicants are encouraged to contact departments directly to discuss program specific application questions. Standardized graduate examinations are not required, but results of such tests may be submitted to supplement other admission materials. 

Students applying to the Online M.S.W. Program must meet the application requirements shown above.  The Online M.S.W. Program provides the same quality education that the campus-based programs offer. Students can complete their coursework and field practicum work at home and in their own community. No campus visits are required at any time. 

Students applying for advanced standing must hold a B.A. from an accredited S.W./B.S.W. program with a minimum overall grade-point average of 3.2 (4.0 point scale). This coursework must have been completed within five years of the date of M.S.W. matriculation. Advanced-standing applicants must also submit a reference from a B.S.W. faculty member and the undergraduate field supervisor or field coordinator. Students applying to the extended-time program at UNH Manchester are advised that the Manchester program admits students every other year.

Students applying to the dual-degree programs must meet the application requirements for both the Departments of Social Work and Kinesiology or the UNH School of Law. See Kinesiology and the UNH School of Law for their admission requirements.

The M.S.W. program concentrates on strengths and empowerment models that encourage individuals and families, and communities and organizations to realize their full potential. The department supplies students with a social and community systems context and promotes practice skills that are responsive to diversity issues. The program is housed in Pettee Hall with access to interview observation rooms and state-of-the-art classrooms and computer labs.

Financial aid opportunities in the department include grants for students interested in the child welfare field or in work with children with developmental disabilities and their families. The department also offers graduate research assistantships to a few second-year students. Graduates of the program are employed in a wide variety of social and human service agencies as direct practitioners and in managerial roles. Please be aware that as a condition of being placed in some agency settings, graduate social work students may be required to complete a criminal record check with both state and law enforcement agencies.


Degree Requirements

 


M.S.W. Degree Requirements

An M.S.W. candidate must complete 62 credit hours of 800- or 900-level courses including two, two-semester field internships, comprising a total of 1,240 hours in the field. Grades below the B- level in a graded course or a "fail" in a credit/fail course are considered failing grades for the purposes of determining academic standing. Repeating a course does not remove the original failing grade from the record. Graduate students receiving failing grades in 9 or more credits, received either in three courses or in any combination of courses taken twice, will be dismissed from the M.S.W. program.

Although a significant portion of the curriculum is required, students will be able to complete four elective courses. At least one of these must be taken from among Department of Social Work course offerings. 

Core MSW Program Advanced Generalist Courses, minimum 62 credits
SW 820, Social Welfare Policy I
SW 830,  Advanced Generalist Social Work Practice I
SW 840, Race, Culture & Oppression
SW 850, Human Behavior & the Social Environment I (HBSE I)
SW 880, Field Internship I (seminar and concurrent two-day/week internship/academic year)
SW 831, Advanced Generalist Social Work Practice II
SW 851, Human Behavior & the Social Environment II (HBSE II)
SW 926, Social Welfare Policy II
SW 881, Field Internship II (seminar and two-day/week internship continued from SW 880)
SW 930, Advanced Generalist Practice III
SW 952, HBSE III
SW 962, Statistics and Data Analysis
SW 982, Field Internship III (seminar and concurrent three-day/week internship/academic year)
SW 931, Advanced Generalist Practice IV
SW 965, Program & Practice Evaluation
SW 983, Field Internship IV (seminar and three-day/week internship continued from SW 982)
Electives, four 3-credit elective courses from social work (other graduate programs with permission)

Advanced Standing Program
The M.S.W. program at the Durham campus considers advanced standing for exceptional students with undergraduate degrees from accredited baccalaureate social work programs. Applicants must have graduated from the B.S.W. program within five years of matriculation into the M.S.W. program. Advanced standing students complete a minimum of 35 credits for graduation. This includes a 10-week summer practicum and seminar, which students must take prior to their advanced practice and field placement. Additional information may be obtained by contacting the coordinator of graduate admissions in the department office.

MSW Program Advanced Standing (post B.S.W./B.S.S.W.) Courses, minimum 35 credits (applies only to fall 2013 admission)
SW 900, Advanced Standing Seminar
SW 840, Race, Culture & Oppression
SW 930, Advanced Generalist Practice III 
SW 952, HBSE III
SW 962, Statistics and Analysis
SW 982, Field Internship III (seminar and concurrent internship)
SW 926, Social Welfare Policy II (unless completed in B.S.W./B.S.S.W., then an elective)
SW 931 Advanced Generalist Practice IV                
SW 965, Program & Practice Evaluation
SW 983, Field Internship IV (Seminar & Concurrent Internship)
Elective, one 3-credit course

Dual Degree Programs
Social Work and Kinesiology:
Dual-degree social work and kinesiology students take classes simultaneously over the course of two-and-a-half years in both social work and kinesiology: outdoor education and complete a minimum of 77 credits for graduation. This includes two internships, one during their first year of study, and a second specialized block placement internship over the summer following the second year of study, which concentrates on the utilization and application of adventure therapy in an agency setting. This block placement internship may occur in New England or in other appropriate settings across the U.S.  Students are required to also complete either a master thesis or an advanced studies project during their last year of study, which is supervised by faculty in kinesiology: outdoor education. For additional information regarding the Social Work/KIN dual degree course requirements, contact Anita Tucker at Anita.Tucker@unh.edu.

Social Work and UNH School of Law:  The Department of Social Work and the School of Law at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) also offer a dual degree resulting in the JD/M.S.W. In four years, students will be able to complete two graduate degrees, a master in social work (M.S.W.) and a Juris Doctor to prepare them for a career in law and social work. For additional information regarding the social work/law dual degree course requirements, contact Sharon Murphy at Sharon.Murphy@unh.edu.


Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Substance Use Disorders

The M.S.W. program offers two certificate programs.

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Certificate

About the Program
The College of Health and Human Services, Department of Social Work at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) and the New Hampshire Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (NH-LEND) training program at the Institute on Disability co-sponsor the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Graduate Certificate program. The needs of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities extend beyond the boundaries of any one discipline. Therefore, this program emphasizes an interdisciplinary, collaborative approach to providing holistic, family-centered services to children and families. This 12-credit-hour interdisciplinary program is designed to focus on the development of advocacy and practice skills for professional work with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families.

Students enrolled in the graduate certificate program will benefit from collaboration and interaction with faculty and students from many departments within the university. Additionally, students will benefit from working with staff and faculty associated with the Institute on Disability. A unique feature of this program is its collaborative relationship with the NH-LEND program. The NH-LEND program focuses on developing educational excellence related to: a) the most current knowledge regarding neurodevelopmental disabilities, b) the process of interdisciplinary collaboration and partnership, and c) strategies for continuous improvement of effective leadership. Students in the Leadership in Children's Health and Disability program will participate in a two semester Special Topics Seminar series on Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities with MCH-LEND trainees and faculty representing the disciplines of health management and policy, nursing, nutrition, occupational therapy, pediatrics, physical therapy, psychology, social work, speech language pathology, and special education.

Who Should Apply

Requirements
There are two separate tracks for this program. Track 1 is for students enrolled in the New Hampshire-Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (NH-LEND) training program. Track 2 is for all other students. The program of study consists of two required courses (6 credit hours), and two (2) electives (6 credit hours) or one (1) elective and one (1) three(3)-credit hour  independent study. Below is a detailed description of each track.

Track 1 (NH-LEND Trainees)

Course Requirements – 12 credits total

Required Courses:

 

Electives

Track 2 (All Other Students)

Required Courses:

 

Electives

All coursework for the certificate must be completed within three years. Students who successfully complete the program will receive an official student certificate from the University of New Hampshire Graduate School.

Courses completed during the certificate program may be applied toward degree requirements upon the approval of the appropriate graduate program coordinator and the Graduate School. Tuition is equal to the rates for resident graduate degree students. Tuition for non-resident students will be 10 percent above the resident rate.

Contact Information
Individuals holding a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution are eligible to apply. Applicants much submit: 1) an application form, 2) official transcripts, and 3) a $25 processing fee (this fee is waived for graduate students who are currently enrolled ). Applications are available by contacting the program coordinator. Applications will be accepted anytime, and admissions decisions are made promptly. For more information about the program and the application process, contact:

Patrick Shannon, Associate Professor
Project Coordinator
Department of Social Work and NH-LEND Program
University of New Hampshire
55 College Road, 311 Pettee Hall
Durham, NH 03824
(603) 862-5016
Patrick.shannon@unh.edu

Links & Additional Resources

The New Hampshire Maternal and Child Health Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (MCH-LEND) Program

Department of Social Work

UNH College of Health and Human Services

 

Substance Use Disorders Certificate

Certificate Requirements
The Substance Use Disorders Graduate Certificate consists of 12 credit hours acquired through a series of four required courses covering etiology of addictions, addiction policy analysis, addiction research and best practices, and system theory and strengths perspective.  

Students are required to complete the following social work courses in no particular order:  (1) Addiction: Myth and Science, (2) Assessment for Addictions, (3) Treatment of Addictions, and (4) Addiction Recovery.

Courses are offered at the UNH Manchester campus during evenings and weekends. 

ApplyingPlease contact Brian Miller at Brian.Miller@unh.edu or (603) 862-1013  for details about applying for the certificate. 



Sociology (SOC)

» http://www.unh.edu/sociology/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

Assistant Professor: Nicole S. Fox

 

Degrees Offered: M.A., Ph.D.

The Department of Sociology offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology. The master's degree program emphasizes theory and methodology. Students in the doctoral program are expected to select one major area for intensive study and examination. There are five major substantive areas for possible specialization: crime and conflict, family, social stratification, health and illness, and community and environment. Students may pursue specialties within or across the major areas of specialization or propose to the graduate committee other major areas of specialization that fall within the faculty's competence.


Admission Requirements

In addition to meeting the general Graduate School requirements, applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). All international applicants must take the TOEFL or IELTS exam.

Undergraduate majors in other fields may be admitted. However, if the student's undergraduate work has not included introductory courses in sociological theory, research methods, and statistics, these courses must be taken, or equivalent knowledge demonstrated, in addition to the requirements outlined above.

All students entering the program must complete the M.A. before admission to the Ph.D. program. The department welcomes applicants who plan to continue for the Ph.D. as well as students planning for the M.A. only.


Degree Requirements

 


M.A. Degree Requirements

Students must complete at least 26 credit hours (seven courses) of graduate-level coursework in sociology, including the Proseminar in Sociology (900, 2 cr.), Sociological Methods I (901), Sociological Methods II (902), Sociological Theory I (911), three elective graduate seminars, and 6-10 credits of Master's Thesis work (899). Successful completion of the thesis constitutes the capstone experience for the M.A. degree.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of three years in residence and take a minimum of sixteen courses in sociology (at least eight as seminars) other than thesis or dissertation research, including the Proseminar in Sociology (900, 2 cr.), Sociological Theory I and II (911 and 912), Sociological Methods I, II, III, and IV (901, 902, 903, and 904), four courses in a major area, and five elective courses. Students must pass written examinations in the major area of sociological specialization and in advanced theory and methodology, and write and defend the doctoral dissertation.



Spanish (SPAN)

» http://cola.unh.edu/llc/program/spanish-ma

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: M.A.

The program in Spanish in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures offers a master of arts degree of Spanish with courses in the following areas: Topics in Second Language Acquisition, Pedagogy and Methodology; Topics in Hispanic Literature and Cultural Studies; and Topics in Hispanic Linguistics and Cultural Studies. The program also supports work in interdisciplinary Hispanic studies.


Admission Requirements

Applicants shall have received a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with an undergraduate major in Spanish or its equivalent. The personal statement for the graduate application should be written in Spanish. Two of the three letters of recommendation should come from current or former professors. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required.


Degree Requirements

To obtain the degree, the candidate must complete a minimum of 30 credits. To satisfy the course requirements, the candidate must successfully complete ten graduate courses, eight of which should be from the offerings of the Spanish program. Two of the ten courses can be taken in allied fields approved by the department. All candidates must take Spanish 901, a 3-credit course dealing with bibliography and methods of research. Preparation of a bibliographical essay in this course is the final requirement for graduation. Graduate assistants teaching in the department must take Spanish 903, a 3-credit course in applied linguistics. Both 901 and 903 count toward the ten courses required to complete the degree.



Systems Design (ENGR)

» http://www.unh.edu/mechanical-engineering/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degree Offered: Ph.D

 


Ph.D. Systems Design

The systems design doctoral degree is an interdepartmental program that addresses contemporary engineering and scientific technical problems that can be solved only through the cooperation of a variety of disciplines. Students in systems design can elect either one of two professional directions. The first develops professionals with the technical expertise of a Ph.D. and with the ability to work with and direct groups of people working on large-scale technical projects. The second direction develops engineers with capabilities in the theory and analysis of large-scale complex systems. Concentration in an area of specific individual interest is combined with participation in a larger interdisciplinary project.

The area coordinator is Professor Barry K. Fussell.


Admission Requirements

Qualified students with bachelor's or master's degrees in engineering, mathematics, or the physical sciences are eligible for admission to the program. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). To be admitted, students must present evidence that they have sufficient background in the area in which they propose to specialize. They must also find a College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (CEPS) faculty member to serve as their adviser.


Degree Requirements

Following entrance into the program, a guidance committee is appointed for the student by the dean of the Graduate School upon recommendation of the student's area coordinator. This committee assists the student in outlining a program and may specify individual coursework requirements in addition to those required by the area of specialization. The committee also conducts an annual in-depth review of each student's progress and, following substantial completion of a student's coursework, administers the qualifying examination. This committee is also responsible for administering the language examination and/or research-tool proficiency requirements. Coursework and language requirements should normally be completed by the end of the second year of full-time graduate study and must be completed before the student can be advanced to candidacy.

Upon the successful completion of the qualifying examination and other proficiency requirements, the student is advanced to candidacy and, upon the recommendation of the student's area coordinator, a doctoral committee is appointed by the dean of the Graduate School. The doctoral committee conducts an annual review of the student's progress, supervises, and approves the doctoral dissertation, and administers the final dissertation defense.

To obtain a Ph.D. degree, a student must meet all of the general requirements as stated under academic regulations and degree requirements of the Graduate School. Students are normally expected to take coursework equivalent to two full-time academic years beyond the baccalaureate and to complete a dissertation on original technical research that will require at least one additional year of full-time study.



Zoology (ZOOL)

» http://zoology.unh.edu/

» Click to view course offerings

This program is offered in Durham.

 

Degrees Offered: M.S., Ph.D.

The Department of Biological Sciences offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in zoology.


Admission Requirements

Applicants ordinarily must have completed an undergraduate major in biology or zoology. A basic array of courses including general biology, development, general ecology, genetics, morphology, and physiology is normally required. Additionally, organic chemistry and a semester each of calculus and physics are necessary. Applicants who are deficient in any of these requirements may be admitted to graduate status but may be required to remedy their deficiencies by taking courses that do not give graduate credit. Applicants must submit current scores (within five years) from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).


Degree Requirements

 


M.S. Degree Requirements

Students plan a program of study (minimum of 30 credits) in conjunction with a faculty advisory committee. Students complete a thesis of 6 to 10 credits that is acceptable to the thesis-examining committee. Prior to the receipt of the master's degree, all candidates must pass a thesis defense, which will include questions covering general knowledge in zoology in addition to specific questions relevant to the student's research at UNH.


Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Students plan a program of study in conjunction with a faculty guidance committee. The student will present to the committee a research proposal in which the soundness, originality, and feasibility of the investigative ideas are clearly revealed, and which, when approved, will serve as the basis of the doctoral dissertation. After the approval of the proposal, students who wish to be admitted to doctoral candidacy must demonstrate, in a qualifying examination, a broad basic knowledge of their major and minor fields and their ability to carry out basic research in zoology. All doctoral candidates are required to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language. All students must complete an original dissertation project, present the results at a public seminar, and pass an oral defense consisting of questions put forth by members of the dissertation committee.


Teaching Experience

All graduate students are encouraged to obtain appropriate teaching experience, preferably as a teaching assistant.


Research and Facilities

The zoology graduate program is enhanced by courses and research in other biological science departments and institutes at the University. These include the School for Marine Science and Ocean Engineering and its associated programs:  N.H. Sea Grant Program; Center for Collaborative Science; the Center of Excellence in Coastal Ocean Observation and Analysis (COOA); the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS); UNH Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM); the Joint Hydrographic Center; and the Ocean Processes Analysis Laboratory (OPAL). There are five marine laboratories: Jackson Estuarine Lab, Judd Gregg Marine Research Complex, Anadromous Fish and Aquatic Invertebrate Research Lab (AFAIR), the Aquaculture Research Center (ARC), and Shoals Marine Lab (SML).

In addition, the Center for Freshwater Biology (CFB) jointly administers (with the UNH Cooperative Extension) the Lakes Lay Monitoring Program, which is dedicated to the preservation and sound management of lakes through citizen-based monitoring and research. The Hubbard Center for Genomic Studies provides training and research in comparative and environmental genomics, with a special emphasis on novel model species. It provides expertise in constructing DNA libraries, DNA sequencing, fragment analysis, and the analysis of gene expression.