History  

HIST 800 - Advanced Explorations
Credits: 1.00 to 4.00
See department listings for semester topic. Barring duplication of subject, may be repeated for credit up to 12 credits.

HIST 801 - Seminar in Historical Explorations
Credits: 4.00
A seminar for advanced undergraduates and graduate students on a selected topic. Topics will vary by semester. This course will be discussion-based and meet once a week. There are no prerequisites for this course, but students should expect to be assigned substantial reading and writing.

HIST 802 - Holocaust: The War on Europe's Jews
Credits: 4.00
The attempted destruction of European Jewry during the Third Reich is one of the pivotal events in the history of modern Western Civilization. This course explores the circumstances and behavior of the Jews (as victims, resistors, survivors), the perpetrators (German and non-German), bystanders (German, European, and American), and rescuers (German and non-German). Attention is also given to such post-1945 matters as justice, compensation, and memory.

HIST 803 - European Conquest of North America
Credits: 4.00
A study of the social consequences of colonization, migration, and war in America, 1500-1775. Emphasis on the interaction of British colonists with competing European cultures (French, Dutch, Portuguese, and Spanish), with Native Americans, and with African and Afro-American slaves.

HIST 804 - History of Medicine in the United States
Credits: 4.00
Have you been a patient, a nurse, or a holder of insurance? Almost everyone in the United States has a role in health care. We study the growth and development of the field of American medicine from colonial times to the present, examining the changing relationships between patients, health care professionals, technology, government, and others. The focus will be shifts in responsibility and authority over time from patients, to doctors, and even to businesses.

HIST 805 - Revolutionary America, 1750-1788
Credits: 4.00
Examines the social, political, and cultural transformation of thirteen British colonies into the United States, up to the adoption of the Constitution.

HIST 806 - History of the Early Republic
Credits: 4.00
Explorations in the histories of people and institutions that transformed the new United States from a coastal republic of largely independent freeholders to a transcontinental democracy increasingly driven by class. Topics include slavery, the family, reform movements, and the formulations of national identity.

HIST 809 - United States Legal History Special Topics
Credits: 4.00
In-depth thematic exploration of the role of law in American life. Topics include Race and Equality in American Law; Community, Pluralism, and American Law; Property, Liberty, and Law; Gender and Law. May be repeated for credit with instructor's permission. Consult department listing for topics.

HIST 811 - Civil War Era
Credits: 4.00
A survey of the period from the presidency of Andrew Jackson to the end of the Reconstruction, focusing on the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include slavery in the Old South, antebellum reform movements, creation and breakdown of the Second Party System, social and economic (as well as military) events during the war, and major developments during Reconstruction after the war.

HIST 812 - Emergence of Industrial America
Credits: 4.00
Investigates the economic transformation of 19th-century America from a rural, agricultural to an urban, industrial society. Explores the sweeping economic changes, focusing on such topics as changes in work and leisure, westward expansion and its effects on native Americans, shifts in gender roles, growth of a consumer culture, rise of labor unions and populism, immigration, movements for reform and regulation, growth of American imperialism, and intellectual developments.

HIST 813 - American Ways of War
Credits: 4.00
"Is there an American way of war?" This commonly asked question will be the focal point of the course. To answer that we will study the interactions of both war and society in the United States from the Civil War onwards, addressing such issues as the causes, courses, diplomacy, homefront, legacy, and the art of the great and small wars.

HIST 815 - United States Progressivism to the New Deal
Credits: 4.00
United States from 1900 to 1941; cultural, political, and social factors causing major changes in American life.

HIST 816 - United States Since World War II
Credits: 4.00
United States since 1941; cultural, political, and social factors causing major changes in American life.

HIST 817 - Vietnam War
Credits: 4.00
An advanced interdisciplinary study of the American experience in Vietnam which uses fiction, film, music, and historical analysis to examine such matters as how and why the United States became involved in Vietnam, went to war there, and failed to win, as well as the consequences and legacies of that fateful conflict. It is strongly suggested that students first complete courses in modern American history.

HIST 818 - American Environmental History
Credits: 4.00
This course examines how nature has been a factor in American history and how Americans have wrestled with the concepts of nature and culture. Topics include industrialization, evolution, conservationism, environmentalism, and environmental diplomacy.

HIST 819 - Foreign Relations of the United States
Credits: 4.00
The history of American diplomacy from the colonial era to the present, with the dividing point at 1900. The focus will be on both the foreign and domestic influences that shaped American diplomacy.

HIST 820 - Foreign Relations of the United States
Credits: 4.00
The history of American diplomacy from the colonial era to the present, with the dividing point at 1900. The focus will be on both the foreign and domestic influences that shaped American diplomacy.

HIST 821 - History of American Thought
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study in the history of American thought. Significant American thinkers considered in their social context. 1600-1860.

HIST 822 - History of American Thought
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study in the history of American thought. Significant American thinkers considered in their social context. 1860-present.

HIST 823 - Early American Social and Cultural History
Credits: 4.00
This course is designed to give students the opportunity to explore some of the recent findings of scholars who have studied Early American social and cultural history. It focuses on the experiences of Anglo-American and on the experiences of many of the other people with whom Anglo-Americans were frequently in contact, and who also shaped Early America. The course will include consideration of the pan-Atlantic context of Early America, cross-cultural contacts, family and gender, labor systems, religious observations, crime, and other themes explored in recent social and cultural theory.

HIST 824 - Topics in Modern United States Social History
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study of topics in U.S. social history since the Age of Jackson. Topics will vary; and may include such examples as slavery and the antebellum South; reform movements in U.S. history; family history; labor history; the impact of war on American society; race in recent U.S. history. May be repeated as topics change.

HIST 825 - Southern History and Literature since the Civil War
Credits: 4.00
Equal focus on the history and literature of the South since the Civil War. Topics include reconstruction, the age of segregation, and the Civil Rights Movement. Literary focus is on the period since 1920, including the "Southern Renaissance"; authors include William Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, Flannery O'Connor, and Zora Neale Hurston.

HIST 832 - Topics in Latin American History
Credits: 4.00
Topics vary (see department listing for current semester). Seminar involves reading, discussion, and research on literature and documents related to the selected topic. It provides students with the opportunity to do research under close direction.

HIST 833 - Medieval England 800-1300
Credits: 4.00
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of the history of medieval England from the beginning of the period of consolidation under the Wessex dynasty in the ninth-century through the end of the thirteenth century. In addition to obtaining a large corpus of information through the reading of significant monographs dealing with England during this period, students will be challenged to develop the critical analytical skills necessary for the thorough understanding and practice of historical methodologies, with a particular focus on the practice of historical method in writing medieval history. Finally, students will be given the opportunity to improve their communication skills through extensive class discussions dealing with the scholarly works read for this course, and in writing assignments.

HIST 834 - Medieval Empires
Credits: 4.00
This course will explore the intellectual and political foundations of imperial rule in the Middle Ages with a particular focus on the Carolingian, German, and Byzantine empires of the early and high Middles Ages. The course will begin with the development of the idea of empire under Alexander the Great and then during the Roman empire. The course will then turn to an examination of how the rulers of the three great empires of the western Middle Ages adapted the classical ideas and practices of empire for their purposes. The course focuses on sources. Background material will be provided in short lectures.

HIST 840 - Holy War in the Holy Land: The Medieval Crusades
Credits: 4.00
Survey of medieval military expeditions organized by Christians to secure the Holy Land during the 12th and 13th centuries. Topics considered include the formulation of a "just war" theory, political, intellectual, religious, and military interactions between Christians, Jews, and Muslims; the Crusader State of Jerusalem; and the histories of individual crusades.

HIST 841 - Europe After the Black Death
Credits: 4.00
Explores the dramatic changes that characterized Western Europe as it rebounded in the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries from the ravages of the Black Death of 1348. Examines the social, political, and artistic developments in late medieval and Renaissance Italy before "crossing the Alps" to trace the expansion of Renaissance culture in Northern Europe. Topics covered in the course include the humanist movement, new patterns of social organization, the revival of classical antiquity in the arts, architecture, religion and political theory, the effects on European society of the encounter with the "New World," shifting roles for men and women in early modern European societies, and religious war and conflict.

HIST 842 - Saints, Sinners, and Heretics: Europe in the Age of Religious Reform
Credits: 4.00
Examines the history of Western Christendom from roughly 1400 to 1600, a period od tumultuous religious change throughout Europe. We begin in the Middle Ages where the seeds of religious division were sown. We then tackle Martin Luther's challenge to the Catholic church, trace the diffusion of his message throughout Europe, and address the Catholic response to the evangelizing movements that he inspired. Finally we investigate some of the regional varieties of Protestantism that developed in the latter half of the sixteenth century with a particular focus on Switzerland, Germany, England, Scotland, France, and the Netherlands.

HIST 844 - Victorian Britain
Credits: 4.00
The Victorian Era was a time of contrasts. Upon the throne sat Queen Victoria, a monarch known for her moral uprightness, sexual probity and rigid sense of decorum. The streets of London, however, teemed with prostitutes, pickpockets and impoverished Irish immigrants whose lives seemed untouched by either the prosperity or moral stringency that characterized the age. In this class we will explore the varieties of Victorian experience both at home and in the global empire Britain had amassed during the nineteenth century. Examining sources such as the novels of Charles Dickens, the decorative arts of William Morris, and the scientific writings of Charles Darwin, we will attempt to uncover the many-faceted culture, society and political life of Victorian Britain. The instructor will place a strong emphasis on reading, class participation and writing.

HIST #845 - 19th Century European Great Powers - Diplomacy and International Law
Credits: 4.00
In this lecture and discussion class, we will study Europe during the apogee of that region's strength, emphasizing events such as the creation of Italy, the Scramble for Africa, and the Hague Convention efforts to limit war. To do so, we will focus on those who wielded power, including deal-makers, deal-breakers, manipulators, and idealists like Napoleon, Bismark, and Gladstone. Examining the interactions of these people and events illuminates international law as well as traditional diplomacy.

HIST 847 - Early Modern France
Credits: 4.00
An exploration of the culture and politics of early modern French society. Popular culture, religion, gender relations, the family, state-building, political theory, and revolution will be emphasized. Primary documents in translation will be read and discussion encouraged.

HIST 848 - Modern France
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study of French society from Napoleon to Mitterand, including the Revolution of 1848 and the Paris Commune; world wars and the Vichy regime; existentialism, DeGaulle, and the revolt of May-June 1968.

HIST 849 - Comparative Topics in the History of Early Modern Europe
Credits: 4.00
Topics will vary, but may include enlightenment and revolution; the peasantry; gender and the family; crime and deviance; science and society. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

HIST 851 - Topics in European Intellectual History
Credits: 4.00
Explores major developments such as the Enlightenment, Russian intellectual history, ancient world views and cosmologies, and the relationship between gender and intellectual history. Includes topics up to the Scientific Revolution. Because topics may vary, students should check the department newsletter or office for course theme in any given term. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

HIST 852 - Topics in European Intellectual History
Credits: 4.00
Explores major developments such as the Enlightenment, Russian intellectual history, ancient world views and cosmologies, and the relationship between gender and intellectual history. Includes topics since the Renaissance. Because topics vary, students should check the department newsletter or office for course themes in any given term. May be repeated for credit as topics change.

HIST 854 - Topics in History of Science
Credits: 4.00
Study of a selected topic in the history of European science since the Renaissance.

HIST 856 - 20th Century Europe
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study of 20th-century Europe. World War I, European totalitarianism, World War II, the loss of European primacy, and the search for a new Europe.

HIST 862 - England in the Tudor and Stuart Periods
Credits: 4.00
Advanced study of England during the Tudor and Stuart periods. Political, religious, socioeconomic, and intellectual forces for change at work in England from the accession of Henry VII to the revolution of 1688-89.

HIST 864 - Russia: Modernization through Soviet Empire
Credits: 4.00
The challenges of modernization; experience and legacy of Leninist and Stalinist revolutions; Soviet consolidation and decline through the Gorbachev era.

HIST 865 - Themes in Women's History
Credits: 4.00
In-depth examination of a selected topic in women's history, such as women and health, women in modern European political theory, comparative history of women and revolution. See "Time and Room Schedule" or department for specific topic. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

HIST 866 - Environmental History of Northwest Atlantic Commercial Fisheries
Credits: 4.00
After centuries of ground-fishing humans have radically transformed the northwest Atlantic marine ecosystem, creating a tragedy for both fish and fisherman. This marine environmental history course considers the changing technology, ecology, and sociology of the commercial fishery off New England and the Canadian maritime from 1500 to the present.

HIST 869 - Germany from 1918 to Present
Credits: 4.00
Begins with the revolution of 1918 and then explores the political, social, and intellectual character of the Weimar Republic, the rise and nature of Nazism, the Holocaust, the foundation of both the German Democratic Republic and Federal Republic and their evolution in the shadow of the Cold War, and concludes with the unification of Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

HIST 871 - Museum Studies
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to theory, methods, and practice of museum studies. Examination of various museum functions, as well as historical controversies. Prereq: graduate students only.

HIST 872 - Studies in Regional Material Culture
Credits: 4.00
An introduction to the theory and methodology of material culture, that is, the study of history through the analysis of buildings, human-created landscapes, and artifacts made and used in the United States, particularly in New England. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the graduate director.

HIST 873 - Early History of Ancient Greece
Credits: 4.00
Greek history from the Minoan and Mycenaean eras through the Persian Wars of the early fifth century. Emphasis on original sources including the Homeric epics, Plutarch, Sappho, and Herodotus. Examination of the distinctive developments of political systems in Sparta, Athens, as well as issues of colonization, diplomacy, religion and culture. Through discussion of types of available evidence and their integration into historical understanding.

HIST 874 - Historiography
Credits: 4.00
Analysis of ancient and modern historians. (Not offered every year.)

HIST 875 - Historical Methods
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to contemporary historical methods. Required of all entering Ph.D. candidates; open to undergraduates with permission.

HIST 876 - Classical and Hellenistic Greek Worlds
Credits: 4.00
Greek History from the Persian Wars of the early fifth century through the life of Alexander the Great and the creation of the Hellenistic world. Emphasis on original sources including Herodotus, Thucydides, the Athenian playwrights, and Plato. Examination of the transformation from city-state political organization to large Hellenistic kingdoms, as well as discussion of Greek historiography, intellectual life, and social theory. Thorough discussion of types of available evidence and their integration into historical understanding.

HIST 877 - Roman Republic
Credits: 4.00
Covers pre-Roman Italy, the Etruscans, and the foundation of the Republic. Rome's expansion through the Punic Wars, and relations with the Hellenistic kingdoms. Disintegration and final collapse of the Republic. Includes discussion of Roman art, engineering, and political theory. Emphasis on Latin sources in philosophy, history, and literature.

HIST 878 - Roman Empire
Credits: 4.00
Collapse of the Roman Republic and creation of the Augustan principate through the division of the empire, with discussion of the fall of Rome in the west, and the eastern empire through Justinian. Discussion of Roman art, literature, philosophy, religious developments such as the proliferation of mystery religions and the rise of Christianity.

HIST 879 - Workshop in History and Historical Methods
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Workshop for teachers in History. Intensive work designed to introduce teachers to advanced current work in history. Topics vary. May be repeated with permission of the instructor or the graduate director in the history department.

HIST 880 - Special Topics in Museum Studies/Material Culture
Credits: 4.00
Study of a selected topic related to museum studies or material culture. May be repeated for course credit with permission of the graduate director.

HIST 881 - Topics History of Modern China
Credits: 4.00
Problems in modern Chinese history from 1800 to the present. Topics may vary. Students will read translated primary sources, analyze literary works, and write critical essays and a research paper.

HIST 884 - History of Southern Africa since 1652
Credits: 4.00
Struggle for political and economic control in the only region of Africa where European groups remain in power. Impact of European imperialism, European nationalism, racial conflict, economic competition and industrialization, apartheid, and assimilation with special attention to the development of European hegemony.

HIST 888 - African Religions
Credits: 4.00
Introduction to the basic principles of African religions. Exploration of historical and recent developments in the study of religion in Africa. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course focuses on the place of religion in African societies. The interrelatedness of religion with issues such as myth, ritual, gender, economics, social process, illness and healing the kingship and power, will be examined. Particular attention will be paid to the experience and expressions of African religions in the Americas, as well as the history and impact of Islam and Christianity in Africa. The course is aimed at helping students to understand what is typical about religion, and special about African religion, while appreciating the role of religion in non-Western societies. Slides, films, maps and other visual aids will be used to supplement the readings and provoke further discussion.

HIST 892 - Seminar in the History of Science
Credits: 4.00
In-depth examination of a selected topic in the history of science. Subjects vary. No special background in science required.

HIST 897 - Colloquium
Credits: 4.00
Selected topics in American, European, and non-Western history. Required of history majors. Students must elect section in the department office at the time of registration. Prereq: Intro to Historical Thinking.

HIST 898 - Internship in Museum Studies
Credits: 4.00
Supervised position with a museum, historical society, archive, or other history related site. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits. Prereq: permission. Credit/Fail.

HIST 899 - Master's Thesis
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. Cr/F.

HIST 939 - Readings in Early American History
Credits: 3.00
Introduces the chief themes and issues in the secondary literature of early American history from European settlement through the Early Republic. Students write a series of short analytical papers. Expected of all graduate students preparing a field in Early America.

HIST 940 - Readings in Modern American History
Credits: 3.00
An introduction to major historians and historiographical issues in the history of the U.S. since 1820. Intended to serve as a foundation for research in the field and as preparation for graduate examinations.

HIST 949 - Colloquium in United States History
Credits: 3.00
Topics include 1) Early American Society; 2) Early American Culture; 3) Revolutionary Period; 4) 19th Century; 5) 20th Century. Focuses on existing historical literature on a given topic, such as American slavery. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically.

HIST 951 - Colloquium in European History
Credits: 3.00
Topics include 1) Medieval; 2) Early Modern; and 3) Modern. The course focuses on the existing historical literature on a given topic, such as the French Revolution. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically. May be repeated if a different topic is selected.

HIST 952 - Colloquium in Comparative History
Credits: 3.00
Intensive reading in comparative studies of U.S. history. Compares the experience of the United States and that of some other area or nation. For example, comparing legal history of Britain and the U.S.; the impact of colonization on native peoples in North and South America; the nature of slavery in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Brazil; or the experience of women in Europe and America. Topics vary and may be repeated with permission.

HIST 953 - Colloquium in African, Asian, Latin American History
Credits: 3.00
Topics include 1) African; 2) Asian; 3) Latin American; 4) Middle Eastern. Focuses on the existing scholarly historical literature on a given topic, such as nationalism or slavery. Students normally read extensively, discuss major issues and the literature in class meetings, and write essays that examine the literature critically.

HIST 970 - Graduate Seminar in Teaching History
Credits: 1.00
Introduction of fundamental issues in the teaching of history at the college level. Topics include basic pedagogical issues, such as leading effective discussions, evaluating students' work, and lesson planning, and also concerns related to history teaching, e.g., developing students' historical consciousness, use of media, and so forth. Required of all entering Ph.D. students and applicable to the Cognate in College Teaching. Course to be taken in the Fall and then repeated in Spring for a total of two credits. (Also offered as GRAD 981.) Cr/F.

HIST 989 - Research Seminar in American History
Credits: 3.00
1) Early American Society; 2) Early American Culture; 3) Revolutionary Period; 4) 19th Century; 5) 20th Century. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 990 - Research Seminar in American History
Credits: 3.00
1) Early American Society; 2) Early American Culture; 3) Revolutionary Period; 4) 19th Century; 5) 20th Century. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 991 - Research Seminar in European History
Credits: 3.00
1) Medieval; 2) Early Modern; 3) Modern. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 992 - Research Seminar in Comparative History
Credits: 3.00
Comparative studies of U.S. history, emphasizing primary research. Colloquium compares the experience of the United States and that of some other area or nation. For example, comparing the legal histories of Britain and the U.S.; the impact of colonization on native peoples in North and South America; the nature of slavery in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Brazil, or the experiences of women in Europe and America. Topics vary, and the course may be repeated for credit.

HIST 993 - Research Seminar in African, Asian, Latin American History
Credits: 3.00
1) African; 2) Asian; 3) Latin American; 4) Middle East. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 994 - Research Seminar in African, Asian, Latin American History
Credits: 3.00
1) African; 2) Asian; 3) Latin American; 4) Middle East. Focuses on original research on a given topic using primary materials supplemented by secondary works. The objective is to produce a major research paper that might serve as the basis for a publishable article. May be repeated with a different topic.

HIST 995 - Tutorial Reading and Research
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
A) Early American History; B) American National History; C) Canada; D) Latin America; E) Medieval History; F) Early Modern Europe; G) Modern European History; H) Ancient History; I) Far East and India; J) Near East and Africa; K) European Historiography; L) American Historiography; M) Russia; N) World History; O) English History; P) New Hampshire History; Q) Historical Methodology; R) Irish History; S) History of Science; T) Maritime; U) Museum Studies. May be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prereq: permission.

HIST 997 - Directed Readings in Early American History
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Directed readings in Early American History. Supervised readings for students preparing for the Ph.D. examinations in Early American History.

HIST 998 - Directed Readings in Modern United States History
Credits: 1.00 to 6.00
Supervised readings for students preparing for Ph.D. examinations in Modern U.S. History.

HIST 999 - Doctoral Research
Credits:
Cr/F.