Jackson Estuarian Research Lab
Reactive Phosphate Barrier Research Iformation

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For Information about the research contact Bradley Crannell at:

603-862-0538

 

Reactive Phosphate Barrier
Research Center

Contaminated sediments and dredged material pose a significant problem to the restoration of historically-contaminated estuaries and the continued commercial utilization of harbors and waterways. Heavy metals are one of the more prevalent contaminants in these sediments and innovations are needed to help manage these wastes. Technologies that work for multiple metals and which are also compatible with organic contaminant remediation technologies are needed. This project will examine the use of orthophosphate as a multi-metals chemical stabilization technology for treating contaminated sediments. Chemical stabilization treatability studies will be used to identify phosphate sources, doses, optimum reaction conditions, and stabilization mechanisms for a model sediment and for three contaminated sediments from NERRS watersheds or coastal zones. The research will be conducted by an interdisciplinary team from the University of New Hampshire and Louisiana State University with extensive experience in phosphate-based chemical stabilization studies. A project advisory board consisting of coastal decision makers, National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS) research coordinators, and the private sector will provide practical experience and advice while assisting in technology transfer, dissemination and technology demonstration in the

 

storically-contaminated estuaries and the continued commercial utilization of harbors and waterways. Heavy metals are one of the more prevalent contaminants in these sediments and innovations are needed to help manage these wastes. Technologies that work for multiple metals and which are also compatible with organic contaminant remediation technologies are needed. This project will examine the use of orthophosphate as a multi-metals chemical stabilization technology for treating contaminated sediments. Chemical stabilization treatability studies will be used to identify phosphate sources, doses, optimum reaction conditions, and stabilization mechanisms for a model sediment and for three contaminated sediments from NERRS watersheds or coastal zones. The research will be conducted by an interdisciplinary team from the University of New Hampshire and Louisiana State University with extensive experience in phosphate-based chemical stabilization